Home   Top 10 Lists   Nutrition Facts   Super Foods   Fruits   Vegetables   Recipes   Blog   FAQ   

Beans and Legumes with the Most Protein


Beans and legumes are inexpensive and a common food all over the world. Typically high in fiber, calcium, and iron, beans and legumes are also a great source of protein. Combined with whole grains like buckwheat, brown rice, millet, quinoa, and teff, beans and legumes not only make a delcious meal, but often also provide the full compliment of essential amino acids needed by humans. Here is a list of beans and legumes which provide the most protein. The list is ranked in order of which bean and legume has the highest percentage of protein. In general, the more mature a bean or legume, the more rich in protein it will be.
#1 Dry Roasted Soybeans 776 calories per cup 68 grams of protein per cup Protein: 40% Carb: 33% Fat: 20% Other (water): 7% Complete Nutrition Facts for Roasted Soybeans
#2 Roasted Peanuts 773 calories per cup 35 grams of protein per cup Protein: 26% Carb: 19% Fat: 49% Other (water): 6% Complete Nutrition Facts for Roasted Peanuts
#3 Boiled Soybeans 298 calories per cup 28.6 grams of protein per cup Protein: 17% Carb: 10% Fat: 9% Other (water): 64% Complete Nutrition Facts for Boiled Soybeans
#4 Boiled Lupin Beans 198 calories per cup 25.8 grams of protein per cup Protein: 16% Carb: 10% Fat: 3% Other (water): 71% Complete Nutrition Facts for Boiled Lupin Beans
#5 Falafel 57 calories per cup 2.3 grams of protein per patty Protein: 13% Carb: 32% Fat: 18% Other (water): 37% Complete Nutrition Facts for Falafel
#6 Miso 547 calories per cup 32.1 grams of protein per cup Protein: 12% Carb: 27% Fat: 6% Other (water): 55% Complete Nutrition Facts for Miso
#7 Boiled Winged Beans 253 calories per cup 18.3 grams of protein per cup Protein: 11% Carb: 15% Fat: 6% Other (water): 68% Complete Nutrition Facts for Winged Beans
#8 Boiled White Beans 249 calories per cup 17.4 grams of protein per cup Protein: 10% Carb: 25% Fat: 0.4% Other (water): 74.6% Complete Nutrition Facts for White Beans
#9 Boiled Cranberry (Roman) Beans 241 calories per cup 16.5 grams of protein per cup Protein: 9% Carb: 24.5% Fat: 0.5% Other (water): 66% Complete Nutrition Facts for Cranberry (Roman) Beans
#10 Boiled Yellow Beans 255 calories per cup 16.2 grams of protein per cup Protein: 9% Carb: 25% Fat: 1% Other (water): 65% Complete Nutrition Facts for Yellow Beans
#11 Boiled Pink Beans 252 calories per cup 15.3 grams of protein per cup Protein: 9% Carb: 28% Fat: 0.5% Other (water): 62.5% Complete Nutrition Facts for Pink Beans
#12 Boiled Lentils 230 calories per cup 17.9 grams of protein per cup Protein: 9% Carb: 20% Fat: 0.4% Other (water): 70.6% Complete Nutrition Facts for Cooked Lentils
#13 Boiled Pinto Beans 245 calories per cup 15.4 grams of protein per cup Protein: 9% Carb: 26% Fat: 0.7% Other (water): 64.3% Complete Nutrition Facts for Pinto Beans
#14 Boiled Black Beans (Frijoles Negros) 227 calories per cup 15.2 grams of protein per cup Protein: 9% Carb: 24% Fat: 0.5% Other (water): 66.5% Complete Nutrition Facts for Black Beans (Frijoles Negros)
#15 Boiled Chickpeas (Garbanzo Beans, Bengal Gram) 269 calories per cup 14.5 grams of protein per cup Protein: 9% Carb: 27% Fat: 2.5% Other (water): 61.5% Complete Nutrition Facts for Chickpeas (Garbanzo Beans, Bengal Gram)
#16 Boiled Kidney Beans 225 calories per cup 15.3 grams of protein per cup Protein: 9% Carb: 23% Fat: 0.5% Other (water): 67.5% Complete Nutrition Facts for Kidney Beans
#17 Boiled Split Peas 231 calories per cup 16.3 grams of protein per cup Protein: 8% Carb: 21% Fat: 0.4% Other (water): 70.6% Complete Nutrition Facts for Split Peas
#18 Boiled Great Northern Beans 209 calories per cup 14.7 grams of protein per cup Protein: 8% Carb: 21% Fat: 0.5% Other (water): 70.5% Complete Nutrition Facts for Great Northern Beans
#19 Boiled Yardlong Beans 202 calories per cup 14.2 grams of protein per cup Protein: 8% Carb: 21% Fat: 0.5% Other (water): 70.5% Complete Nutrition Facts for Yardlong Beans
#20 Boiled Navy Beans 255 calories per cup 15 grams of protein per cup Protein: 8% Carb: 26% Fat: 0.6% Other (water): 65.4% Complete Nutrition Facts for Navy Beans
#21 Firm Tofu 176 calories in a quarter block (122g) 21 grams of protein per cup Protein: 8% Carb: 2% Fat: 4% Other (water): 86% Complete Nutrition Facts for Firm Tofu
#22 Boiled Hyacinth Beans 227 calories per cup 16 grams of protein per cup Protein: 8% Carb: 21% Fat: 0.6% Other (water): 70.4% Complete Nutrition Facts for Hyacinth Beans
#23 Boiled Cowpeas (Catjang) 200 calories per cup 13.9 grams of protein per cup Protein: 8% Carb: 20% Fat: 0.7% Other (water): 71.4% Complete Nutrition Facts for Cowpeas (Catjang)
#24 Boiled Lima Beans 229 calories per cup 14.6 grams of protein per cup Protein: 8% Carb: 23% Fat: 0.4% Other (water): 68.6% Complete Nutrition Facts for Lima Beans
#25 Hummus 415 calories per cup 19.8 grams of protein per cup Protein: 8% Carb: 14% Fat: 10% Other (water): 68% Complete Nutrition Facts for Hummus
#26 Boiled Moth Beans 207 calories per cup 13.8 grams of protein per cup Protein: 8% Carb: 21% Fat: 0.6% Other (water): 70.4% Complete Nutrition Facts for Moth Beans
#27 Boiled Broad Beans (Fava) 187 calories per cup 12.9 grams of protein per cup Protein: 8% Carb: 20% Fat: 0.4% Other (water): 71.6% Complete Nutrition Facts for Broad Beans (Fava)
#28 Boiled Mungo Beans 189 calories per cup 13.6 grams of protein per cup Protein: 8% Carb: 18% Fat: 0.6% Other (water): 73.4% Complete Nutrition Facts for Mungo Beans
#29 Boiled Adzuki Beans 294 calories per cup 17.3 grams of protein per cup Protein: 8% Carb: 25% Fat: 0.1% Other (water): 66.9% Complete Nutrition Facts for Adzuki Beans
#30 Boiled French Beans (Mature Seeds) 228 calories per cup 12.5 grams of protein per cup Protein: 7% Carb: 24% Fat: 0.7% Other (water): 68.3% Complete Nutrition Facts for French Beans (Mature Seeds)
#31 Boiled Mung Beans 212 calories per cup 14.2 grams of protein per cup Protein: 7% Carb: 19% Fat: 0.4% Other (water): 73.6% Complete Nutrition Facts for Mung Beans
#32 Boiled Pigeon Peas (Red Gram) 203 calories per cup 11.4 grams of protein per cup Protein: 7% Carb: 23% Fat: 0.4% Other (water): 69.6% Complete Nutrition Facts for Pigeon Peas (Red Gram)
For more suggestions try the nutrient ranking tool.




Advertisement





Comments.
Name:Nancy
Location:London ON
Subject:Need more protein - I'm vegan
Due to family health history, high cholestrol and spine damage, I had to become vegan to drop weight so far 42 lbs in one year of being vegan. But starting to hate the taste of peanuts. In a peanut free environment it is hard.
Posted on 2011-04-25 19:44:06
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Need more protein - I'm vegan
Hi Nancy, thanks for your comment and congratulations on all the weight loss! First, you should not worry too much about protein, as the need for protein is often exaggerated and protein deficiency in developing countries is extremely rare. If you are tired of eating peanuts, why not try edamame (roasted soybeans) or some other form of cooked beans? You can also try substituting with almonds which are lower in calories and great at reducing cholesterol levels. Also consider trying some new high protein grains. Quinoa is a grain that provides all the essential amino acids for your protein needs. You can also try oats, which again help to lower cholesterol and have a high protein to carb ratio. Hope that helps, and good luck with meeting your goals!
Posted on 2011-04-25 19:56:18
Name:Thomas
Location:Tokyo
Subject:Feel better
Reading your info made me feel better about my overall health situation and the difficulty of takeing care of it. Thanks.
Posted on 2012-05-29 10:43:27
Name:Kapil Gorve
Location:India
Subject:Size of Serving
Well reading your article definitely feels good,but you didn't mention the size of the serving. You mentioned it as per cup but its not clear what the cup size. Please reply soon.
Posted on 2013-02-15 00:52:16
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Size of Serving
Hi Kapil, thanks for your question. The cup is a standard U.S. measuring cup, which is 8 U.S. ounces, or around 270 grams for most cooked beans and legumes. You can click on the complete nutrition facts link by each listing to get the exact amount of grams per serving. Hope that answers your question.
Posted on 2013-02-17 14:07:31
Name:Karen
Location:NH
Subject:Thanks for all the lists and my thoughts on healthy eating...
I am a less than a Lessmeatarian. I see I eat nearly all the foods listed in the Super lists. When I learned of the horror of GE foods and all the foods filled with GMOs, I cleaned house. It has been two years. I am very happy of what I have accomplished for myself and my husband. I write to help others become aware and then allow them to make healthier food choices, but alas ~ I have not lost even so much as a pound over the two years of literally changing my food life. In many ways it is sad to me. I feel ripped off, not that I gave up all the crap and poisons..but that my body defy's any change and resists it like the plague - it seems. For me - maybe fat is who I am. That aside, thank you for all the good information. I am gratefully appreciative to constantly learn. Maybe one day my body will catch up :) Happy Spring!
Posted on 2013-03-18 22:09:24
Name:JB
Location:California
Subject:Concerned about the protein content of peas
Hello, I was wondering about the protein measurements. I saw that 1 cup of peas has approx 6g of protein, which differs much from your measurements. Thank you for clarifying. I'm trying to figure out how many cups of peas (frozen or steamed) I need for 32g of protein.
Posted on 2013-04-24 19:56:16
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Concerned about the protein content of peas
Hi JB, thanks for your question. I think the cause of confusion here is that there are many types of peas. The peas listed here with the most protein are split peas. These differ from fresh green peas in shape and sometimes color (they can be yellow or green). They are also typically sold dry and need to be boiled. For an example of what split peas look like see this recipe for split pea soup. Split peas can be found at your local grocery store or on amazon.com. While cooked split peas do provide 16.3g of protein per cup, cooked green peas only provide 8.6g per cup. This is closer to the number you saw. For more information here is a nutrition comparison of yellow split peas vs. cooked green peas. Hope it helps.
Posted on 2013-04-25 03:21:23
Name:Val
Location:France
Subject:Weight loss and Vegan Diets
Karen,

Congratulations on changing your diet! To lose weight, keep your diet at 80-10-10 like the "China StudyDiet" says to do.

Dr. John McDougall's book The Starch Solution, and Neal Barnard's books are all written to help you. Bonne Anne!

Posted on 2014-01-03 19:28:50
Name:Alex
Location:California
Subject:Concerning the protein % calculated
It seems the calculated protein percentages are oddly low. I am assuming your calculations are more in depth than multiplying the grams/cup by 4 and creating a ratio to the total calories/cup. Is this true? What method is accurate and why?
Posted on 2014-01-23 04:26:45
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Concerning the protein % calculated
Hi Alex, thanks for your question. The percentage of protein is taken directly from the 100 gram serving for each food. For example the 1st food, dry roasted soybeans, has 39.6 grams of protein per 100 grams, so it is 39.6% protein, or 40% to round up. Click to see the complete nutrition facts for each food and you will see this statistic. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2014-01-23 23:21:36

Post a comment.
Name:          
Location:       
Email:(Optional)
Subject:         

Spam Prevention *(REQUIRED):
Enter the last three letters of this sentence.
Comments.
Name:Nancy
Location:London ON
Subject:Need more protein - I'm vegan
Due to family health history, high cholestrol and spine damage, I had to become vegan to drop weight so far 42 lbs in one year of being vegan. But starting to hate the taste of peanuts. In a peanut free environment it is hard.
Posted on 2011-04-25 19:44:06
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Need more protein - I'm vegan
Hi Nancy, thanks for your comment and congratulations on all the weight loss! First, you should not worry too much about protein, as the need for protein is often exaggerated and protein deficiency in developing countries is extremely rare. If you are tired of eating peanuts, why not try edamame (roasted soybeans) or some other form of cooked beans? You can also try substituting with almonds which are lower in calories and great at reducing cholesterol levels. Also consider trying some new high protein grains. Quinoa is a grain that provides all the essential amino acids for your protein needs. You can also try oats, which again help to lower cholesterol and have a high protein to carb ratio. Hope that helps, and good luck with meeting your goals!
Posted on 2011-04-25 19:56:18
Name:Thomas
Location:Tokyo
Subject:Feel better
Reading your info made me feel better about my overall health situation and the difficulty of takeing care of it. Thanks.
Posted on 2012-05-29 10:43:27
Name:Kapil Gorve
Location:India
Subject:Size of Serving
Well reading your article definitely feels good,but you didn't mention the size of the serving. You mentioned it as per cup but its not clear what the cup size. Please reply soon.
Posted on 2013-02-15 00:52:16
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Size of Serving
Hi Kapil, thanks for your question. The cup is a standard U.S. measuring cup, which is 8 U.S. ounces, or around 270 grams for most cooked beans and legumes. You can click on the complete nutrition facts link by each listing to get the exact amount of grams per serving. Hope that answers your question.
Posted on 2013-02-17 14:07:31
Name:Karen
Location:NH
Subject:Thanks for all the lists and my thoughts on healthy eating...
I am a less than a Lessmeatarian. I see I eat nearly all the foods listed in the Super lists. When I learned of the horror of GE foods and all the foods filled with GMOs, I cleaned house. It has been two years. I am very happy of what I have accomplished for myself and my husband. I write to help others become aware and then allow them to make healthier food choices, but alas ~ I have not lost even so much as a pound over the two years of literally changing my food life. In many ways it is sad to me. I feel ripped off, not that I gave up all the crap and poisons..but that my body defy's any change and resists it like the plague - it seems. For me - maybe fat is who I am. That aside, thank you for all the good information. I am gratefully appreciative to constantly learn. Maybe one day my body will catch up :) Happy Spring!
Posted on 2013-03-18 22:09:24
Name:JB
Location:California
Subject:Concerned about the protein content of peas
Hello, I was wondering about the protein measurements. I saw that 1 cup of peas has approx 6g of protein, which differs much from your measurements. Thank you for clarifying. I'm trying to figure out how many cups of peas (frozen or steamed) I need for 32g of protein.
Posted on 2013-04-24 19:56:16
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Concerned about the protein content of peas
Hi JB, thanks for your question. I think the cause of confusion here is that there are many types of peas. The peas listed here with the most protein are split peas. These differ from fresh green peas in shape and sometimes color (they can be yellow or green). They are also typically sold dry and need to be boiled. For an example of what split peas look like see this recipe for split pea soup. Split peas can be found at your local grocery store or on amazon.com. While cooked split peas do provide 16.3g of protein per cup, cooked green peas only provide 8.6g per cup. This is closer to the number you saw. For more information here is a nutrition comparison of yellow split peas vs. cooked green peas. Hope it helps.
Posted on 2013-04-25 03:21:23
Name:Val
Location:France
Subject:Weight loss and Vegan Diets
Karen,

Congratulations on changing your diet! To lose weight, keep your diet at 80-10-10 like the "China StudyDiet" says to do.

Dr. John McDougall's book The Starch Solution, and Neal Barnard's books are all written to help you. Bonne Anne!

Posted on 2014-01-03 19:28:50
Name:Alex
Location:California
Subject:Concerning the protein % calculated
It seems the calculated protein percentages are oddly low. I am assuming your calculations are more in depth than multiplying the grams/cup by 4 and creating a ratio to the total calories/cup. Is this true? What method is accurate and why?
Posted on 2014-01-23 04:26:45
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Concerning the protein % calculated
Hi Alex, thanks for your question. The percentage of protein is taken directly from the 100 gram serving for each food. For example the 1st food, dry roasted soybeans, has 39.6 grams of protein per 100 grams, so it is 39.6% protein, or 40% to round up. Click to see the complete nutrition facts for each food and you will see this statistic. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2014-01-23 23:21:36

Post a comment.
Name:          
Location:       
Email:(Optional)
Subject:         

Spam Prevention *(REQUIRED):
Enter the last three letters of this sentence.

References

    • USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.