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Top 10 Foods Highest in Magnesium


Magnesium is an essential mineral required by the body for maintaining normal muscle and nerve function, keeping a healthy immune system, maintaining heart rhythm, and building strong bones. Magnesium is also involved in at least 300 biochemical reactions in the body. A deficiency in magnesium can lead to muscle spasms, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, anxiety disorders, migraines, osteoporosis, and cerebral infarction. Conversely, consuming too much magnesium typically causes diarrhea as the body attempts to excrete the excess. The current DV for magnesium is 400mg. Below is a list of high magnesium foods, for more, see the lists of high magnesium foods by nutrient density, magnesium rich foods, vegetables high in magnesium, and fruits high in magnesium.

#1: Dark Leafy Greens (Raw Spinach)
Magnesium in 100g1 Cup Raw (30g)1 Cup Cooked (180g)
79mg (20% DV)24mg (6% DV)157mg (39% DV)
Other Greens High in Magnesium (%DV per cup cooked): Swiss Chard (38%), and Kale (19%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#2: Nuts and Seeds (Squash and Pumpkin Seeds)
Magnesium in 100g1/2 Cup (113g)1 Ounce (28g)
534mg (134% DV)606mg (152% DV)150mg (37% DV)
Other Nuts and Seeds High in Magnesium (%DV per 1/2 cup): Sesame Seeds (63%), Brazil Nuts (63%), Almonds (48%), Cashews (44% DV), Pine nuts (43%), Mixed Nuts (39%), and Peanuts (31%), Pecans (17%), Walnuts (16%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#3: Fish (Mackerel)
Magnesium in 100gPer 3oz Fillet (85g)
97mg (24% DV)82mg (21% DV)
Other Fish High in Magnesium (%DV per 3oz fillet (85g)): Pollock (18% DV), Turbot (14% DV), Tuna (14% DV), and most other fish at an average of 8% DV. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#4: Beans and Lentils (Soy Beans)
Magnesium in 100g1 Cup Cooked (172g)
86mg (22% DV)148mg (37% DV)
Other Beans and Lentils High in Magnesium (%DV per cup cooked): White Beans (28%), French Beans (25%), Black-eyed Peas (23%), Kidney Beans (21%), Chickpeas (Garbanzo) (20%), Lentils (18%), Pinto Beans (16%), . Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#5: Whole Grains (Brown Rice)
Magnesium in 100g1 Cup Cooked (195g)
44mg (11% DV)86mg (21% DV)
Other Whole Grains High in Magnesium (%DV per cup cooked): Quinoa (30%), Millet (19%), Bulgur (15%), Buckwheat (13%), Wild Rice (13%), Whole Wheat Pasta (11%), Barley (9%), Oats (7%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#6: Avocados
Magnesium in 100g1 Avocado (201g)1/2 Cup Pureed (115g)
29mg (7% DV)58mg (15% DV)33mg (9% DV)
An average avocado provides 322 calories, half a cup pureed contains 184 calories. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#7: Low-Fat Dairy (Plain Non Fat Yogurt)
Magnesium in 100g1 Cup (245g)
19mg (5% DV)47mg (12% DV)
Other Dairy Foods High in Magnesium (%DV per 100g): Goat Cheese (Hard) (14% DV), Nonfat Chocolate Yogurt (10% DV) and Nonfat Mozzarella (8%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#8: Bananas
Magnesium in 100g1 Medium (63g)1 Cup Slices (150g)
27mg (7% DV)32mg (8% DV)41mg (10% DV)
Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#9: Dried Fruit (Figs)
Magnesium in 100g1/2 Cup (75g)1 Fig (8g)
68mg (17% DV)51mg (13% DV)5mg (1% DV)
Other Dried Fruit High in Magnesium (%DV per 1/2 cup): Prunes (11%), Apricots (10%), Dates (8%), and Raisins (7%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#10: Dark Chocolate
Magnesium in 100g1 Square (29g)1 Cup Grated (132g)
327mg (82% DV)95mg (24% DV)432mg (108% DV)
1 square of dark chocolate provides 145 calories. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


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The Top 10 High Magnesium Foods by Nutrient Density (Magnesium per Gram)

#1: Rice Bran 781mg (195% DV) per 100 grams922mg (230% DV) per cup (118 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Rice Bran
#2: Dried Herbs and Spices (Coriander, Dill, Sage Basil) 694mg (174% DV) per 100 grams14mg (3% DV) per tablespoon (2 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Herbs
#3: Pumpkin & Squash Seeds 535mg (134% DV) per 100 grams738mg (185% DV) per cup (138 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pumpkin & Squash Seeds
#4: Cocoa Powder 499mg (125% DV) per 100 grams25mg (6% DV) per tablespoon (5 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cocoa Powder
#5: Flaxseeds 392mg (98% DV) per 100 grams39mg (10% DV) per tbsp (10 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Flaxseeds
#6: Brazil Nuts 376mg (94% DV) per 100 grams500mg (125% DV) per cup (133 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Brazil Nuts
#7: Tahini (Sesame Seed Paste) 353mg (88% DV) per 100 grams49mg (12% DV) per tablespoon (14 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Tahini
#8: Sunflower Seeds 346mg (87% DV) per 100 grams14mg (3% DV) per tablespoon (4 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sunflower Seeds
#9: Wheat Germ 313mg (78% DV) per 100 grams360mg (90% DV) per cup (115 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Wheat Germ
#10: Molasses 242mg (61% DV) per 100 grams48mg (12% DV) per tablespoon (20 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Molasses

Other Magnesium Rich Foods

Peanut Butter154mg (39% DV) per 100 gram serving397mg (99% DV) per cup (258 grams)49mg (12% DV) in two tablespoons (32 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Smooth Peanut Butter
Espresso80mg (20% DV) per 100 gram serving96mg (24% DV) in half a cup (4fl/oz ~120 grams)24mg (6% DV) in a fluid ounce (fl/oz) (56 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Espresso
Coffee (Caffeinated or Decaf)3mg (1% DV) per 100 gram serving7mg (2% DV) in one cup (8fl/oz, 237 grams)1mg (0% DV) in a fluid ounce (fl/oz) (30 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Coffee
Whole Wheat Bread82mg (21% DV) per 100 gram serving23mg (6% DV) per slice (28 grams)46mg (12% DV) in two slices (56 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Whole Wheat Bread
Whole Milk10mg (3% DV) per 100 gram serving98mg (24% DV) per quart (976 grams)24mg (6% DV) per cup (244 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Whole Milk
Seaweed (Spirulina)195mg (49% DV) per 100 gram serving218mg (55% DV) per cup (112 grams)14mg (3% DV) per tablespoon (7 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Seaweed (Spirulina)
Vegetarian Baked Beans27mg (7% DV) per 100 gram serving69mg (17% DV) per cup (254 grams)34mg (9% DV) in half a cup (127 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Vegetarian Baked Beans
Corn Meal (White or Yellow)127mg (32% DV) per 100 gram serving211mg (53% DV) per cup (166 grams)106mg (26% DV) per half cup (83 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Corn


Vegetables High in Magnesium

Scotch (Curly) Kale 88mg (22% DV) per 100 gram serving59mg (15% DV) per cup chopped (67 grams)29mg (7.5% DV) per (1/2) cup chopped (33.5 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Scotch Kale
Beet Greens70mg (18% DV) per 100 gram serving27mg (7% DV) per cup (38 grams)22mg (6% DV) per leaf (32 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Beet Greens
Globe Artichoke60mg (15% DV) per 100 gram serving77mg (19% DV) per medium artichoke (128 grams)97mg (24% DV) per large artichoke (162 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Artichokes
Okra57mg (14% DV) per 100 gram serving28mg (7% DV) per (1/2) cup (50 grams)54mg (14% DV) per 8 pods (95 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Okra
Arugula (Rocket)47mg (12% DV) per 100 gram serving9mg (2% DV) per cup (20 grams)1mg (0% DV) per leaf (2 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Arugula
Sweet Corn37mg (9% DV) per 100 gram serving57mg (14% DV) per cup (154 grams)33mg (8% DV) per medium ear (90 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sweet Corn
Butternut Squash34mg (9% DV) per 100 gram serving48mg (12% DV) per cup cubed (140 grams)24mg (6% DV) per (1/2) cup cubed (70 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Butternut Squash
Savoy Cabbage28mg (7% DV) per 100 gram serving20mg (5% DV) per cup shredded (70 grams)10mg (2.5% DV) per (1/2) cup shredded (35 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Savoy Cabbage
Peas24mg (6% DV) per 100 gram serving15mg (4% DV) per cup whole peas (63 grams)8mg (2% DV) per 10 pea pods (34 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Peas
Cucumber (With Peel)13mg (3% DV) per 100 gram serving14mg (4% DV) per cup sliced (104 grams)39mg (10% DV) per cucumber (301 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cucumber
Baked Potato (With Skin)30mg (8% DV) per 100 gram serving90mg (22% DV) in a large potato (299 grams)52mg (13% DV) per medium sized potato (173 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Russet Potatoes


Fruits High in Magnesium

Blackberries20mg (5% DV) per 100 gram serving29mg (7% DV) per cup (144 grams)24mg (3.5% DV) per (1/2) cup (72 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Blackberries
Raspberries22mg (6% DV) per 100 gram serving27mg (7% DV) per cup (123 grams)4mg (1% DV) per 10 raspberries (19 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raspberries
Strawberries13mg (3% DV) per 100 gram serving19mg (5% DV) per cup whole (144 grams)9mg (2% DV) per 6 medium strawberries (72 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Strawberries
Jackfruit37mg (9% DV) per 100 gram serving61mg (15% DV) per cup sliced (165 grams)30mg (7.5% DV) per (1/2) cup sliced (82.5 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Jackfruit
Watermelon10mg (3% DV) per 100 gram serving15mg (4% DV) per cup diced (152 grams)29mg (7% DV) per wedge (approx 1/16 melon, 286 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Watermelon
Guava22mg (6% DV) per 100 gram serving36mg (9% DV) per cup (165 grams)12mg (3% DV) per fruit without waste (55 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Guava
Plantain37mg (9% DV) per 100 gram serving55mg (14% DV) per cup sliced (148 grams)66mg (17% DV) per medium fruit (179 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Plantain
Kiwi Fruit17mg (4% DV) per 100 gram serving30mg (8% DV) per cup (177 grams)13mg (3% DV) per medium fruit without skin (76 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Kiwi Fruit
Passion Fruit29mg (7% DV) per 100 gram serving68mg (17% DV) per cup (236 grams)5mg (1% DV) per fruit without waste (18 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Passion Fruit
Grapefruit (Pink/Red/White)8mg (2% DV) per 100 gram serving18mg (5% DV) per cup sections with juice (230 grams)10mg (3% DV) per (1/2) medium fruit (128 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Grapefruit


Health Benefits of Magnesium

  • Regulation of Blood Pressure - Diets high in fruits and vegetables provide both magnesium and potassium which are consistently associated with reduced blood pressure.3-5
  • Reduced Risk of Type II Diabetes - Magnesium is involved in carbohydrate metabolism and the bodies use of insulin.6 Studies show that individuals with type II diabetes have low levels of magnesium in their blood.7 Correcting this lack of magnesium may help increase sensitivity to insulin and prevent type II diabetes.8
  • Reduced Risk of Heart Attack and other Cardiovascular Diseases - Because magnesium is associated with regulation of blood pressure and lower risk of diabetes, it follows that it also reduces risk of cardiovascular disease.9 Elevated levels of magnesium in the blood has been associated with reduced risk of heart attack and stroke.10-12
  • Reduced Risk of Osteoporosis - Magnesium plays a role in calcium metabolism and hormones which regulate calcium and may help to protect against osteoporosis.7,13 Several studies support that increased magnesium intake increases bone health.7,14
  • Reduced Frequency of Migraine Headaches (*Controversial) - Studies show that individuals who have frequent migraine headaches have lower levels of magnesium than other individuals.15 There is conflicting evidence as to whether increased intake of magnesium will reduce the frequency of migraines.15-18
  • Alleviation of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) - Studies suggest that consuming higher amounts of magnesium, perhaps in conjunction with vitamin B6, helps to alleviate bloating, insomnia, leg swelling, weight gain, breast tenderness, and other symptoms associated with PMS.19

Factors which Affect Magnesium Absorption

  • Fermentable carbohydrates like those found in grains, dairy, and fruit enhance the absorption of mangesium.37
  • Foods with protein enhance the absorption of magnesium and calcium.38
  • Eating foods high in insoluble fiber, or taking supplemental dietary fiber, is likely to hinder magnesium absorption.37
  • Phytates, found in vegetables, grains, seeds, and nuts may slightly hinder magnesium absorption, however, the soluble fiber, and fermentable carbohydrates found in these foods likely counteracts this effect, making most plant foods a great source of magnesium.37
  • Foods high in oxalates, such as spinach, leafy greens, nuts, tea, coffee and cacao also reduce magnesium absorption. Cooking reduces oxalic acid, so cooking spinach and other greens is better than eating them raw (in terms of magnesium absorption).35
  • High Risk Groups for a Magnesium Deficiency

    • Long distance athletes - People who exercise over long distances lose electrolytes via sweat and need to replenish their sodium, potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus levels.
    • Dehydration - People who consume excess alcohol, or suffer diarrhea, or can be otherwise dehydrated need to replenish their sodium, potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus levels.
    • People with Gastrointestinal Disorders - Most magnesium is absorbed through the colon so people with gastrointestinal disorders like Crohn's disease are at high risk for a magnesium deficiency.19,20
    • People with Poor Functioning Kidneys - The kidneys should be able to regulate magnesium in the blood, excreting less when stores are low, however, excessive loss of magnesium through urine can occur to people on specific medications, poorly managed diabetes, and alcoholics.21-29
    • The Elderly - As we age the amount of magnesium we absorb decreases as the amount we excrete increases.7
    • People Consuming high amounts of Fiber - Eating large amounts of fiber has been shown to interfere with the bodies ability to use magnesium. However, more research needs to be done to confirm how much fiber affects magnesium.30,31
    • People on a low protein diet (*Controversial) - Eating less than 30 grams of protein a day may adversely affect magnesium utilization. 32
    • People taking Certain Medications23,25,33,34,36
      • Proton Pump Inhibitors: Prescription PPIs include Nexium (esomeprazole magnesium), Dexilant (dexlansoprazole), Prilosec (omeprazole), Zegerid (omeprazole and sodium bicarbonate), Prevacid (lansoprazole), Protonix (pantoprazole sodium), AcipHex (rabeprazole sodium), Vimovo, Prilosec OTC (omeprazole), Zegerid OTC (omeprazole and sodium bicarbonate), and Prevacid 24HR (lansoprazole)36
      • Diuretics: Lasix, Bumex, Edecrin, and hydrochlorothiazide
      • Antibiotics: Gentamicin, and Amphotericin
      • Anti-neoplastic (Cancer) medication: Cisplatin
      • Zinc Supplements

    Recipes High in Magnesium

    Buckwheat (How to Cook Buckwheat)
    Oatmeal (How to Cook Oatmeal)
    Brown Rice (How to Cook Brown Rice)
    Wine Steamed Kale
    Blackberry Salad
    Low Sugar Chocolate Banana Pudding
    Burghul A Banadoura
    Vegetarian Kibbeh (Kibet Adas)
    Spicey Lentil Cabbage

    Warnings

    • Nuts, seeds, dark chocolate, and molasses are high calorie foods and should be eaten in moderate amounts by people with a high body mass index.
    • Dark chocolate, spinach, and almonds are high in oxalates which may inhibit some magnesium absorption.35 These foods however, are still good sources of magnesium.
    • Brazil nuts are very high in selenium. Excess selenium can lead to diarrhea, bad breath, and even hair loss.

    Buy High Magnesium Foods from Amazon.com

    Rice Bran, Wheat Bran, Oat Bran, Dried Chives, Pumpkin Seeds, Dark Chocolate, Flax Seeds, Brazil Nuts, Sunflower Seeds, Almonds, Molasses, Roasted Soybeans (Edamame)




    Comments.
    Name:V. Renfro
    Location:Dallas, TX
    Subject:Muscle Cramps
    This is a great article and answered my question of why I'm having severe, painful, muscle cramps.
    Posted on 2011-07-21 01:35:31
    Name:Tim
    Location:LA
    Subject:Thanks
    Thank you! Was looking to change my diet. Very helpful list.
    Posted on 2011-10-30 03:42:07
    Name:Dave
    Location:Inman, SC
    Subject:Thank you
    Very good article, exactly what I was looking for.
    Posted on 2011-11-13 19:43:10
    Name:Carrie
    Location:Ohio
    Subject:Help with Levaquin Side Effects
    I have heard magnesium helps to reverse side effects of the antibiotic, levaquin, which are: tendinitis, rotary cuff problem with numbness in the hand, and elbow pain. Is this true hopefully??
    Posted on 2012-01-06 10:34:10
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Help with Levaquin Side Effects
    Hi Carrie, thanks for your question. Consuming aluminum, magnesium, calcium, iron, or zinc while taking Levaquin interferes with its absorption. Thus magnesium may help alleviate the side effects, but only at the cost of hampering the effectiveness of the medicine itself. If you have finished the taking Levaquin you can try consume more magnesium to see if your condition improves.
    Posted on 2012-01-06 11:37:24
    Name:Annie
    Location:Colorado
    Subject:Levaquin is very dangerous!
    I feel you are being negligent in not mentioning the devastating possible side effects of Levaquin and similar drugs. They now have a black box warning, and in my opinion and that of many medical professionals, they should not be taken unless ALL other measures have failed. Many groups have been formed dealing with the side effects, often permanent, suffered by unsuspecting people (I am one). Just trying to educate the public about what dangerous drugs fluoroquinolones are. Thank you for your article.
    Posted on 2012-01-09 12:11:17
    Name:Alex Pithie
    Location:United Kingdom
    Subject:Magnesium
    Thank you for a very thorough and massively useful page of key data...lazy me wonders if there is any one-hit food that combines calcium and magnesium as I treat my adrenal gland production deficiency...but thanks again!
    Posted on 2012-01-27 23:31:46
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium
    Hi Alex, thanks for your question. Foods which are high in calcium and magnesium include almonds, brazil nuts, and dried herbs. Add dried hers to salads, sandwiches, and other food items you eat. Hope that helps!
    Posted on 2012-01-28 03:53:57
    Name:Dr. Sam Kabbani
    Location:Kuwait
    Subject:Magnesium
    80% of the world's population have Magnesium deficiency. Bones are composed of Calcium, Phosphorus and Magnesium, and eating Cheese only provides calcium so we will have 80% of all diseases starting with muscle cramps, Osteoporosis, Hypothyroidism, Bradycardia, MS, Migraine, constipation, Breast cancer, Prostate, Colitis, Gallstone, Calculus, Fatigue, Hypoglycemia, Neck pain, Dry skin, Depression, losing potassium and sodium, if we have any of this we must have food rich in Magnesium and Potassium and Sodium. Start to eat figs, then (magnesium) then salad or a baked potato with salt (Magnesium, Potassium and Sodium and Phosphorus and rich in carbs that can give you enough energy).
    Posted on 2012-02-17 17:43:25
    Name:Worried Mom
    Location:Ohio
    Subject:Magnesium and Tourett's Syndrome
    Can intake of foods rich in Magnesium help in reducing vocal tics like those in Tourett's syndrome?
    Posted on 2012-02-20 19:14:43
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium and Tourett's Syndrome
    Thanks for your question, unfortunately, it is impossible to say if magnesium rich foods would be any help or not. While there is a suspected connection between magnesium deficiency and Tourett's, as well as the possibility of magnesium alleviating some symptoms, there have not been any formal studies to confirm this theory.
    Posted on 2012-02-20 19:56:46
    Name:Meadowsweet
    Location:England
    Subject:Magnesium Analysis
    I'd be interested in knowing whether the magnesium content of foods posted on this site have been verified through laboratory analysis, please? I'm asking this question because so many websites give contradictory amounts. Another site for example says that almonds contain more magnesium than brazil nuts; and that the amount of magnesium in black strap molasses is is 45mg per tablespoon approx, whereas this site says it's 84mg a tablespoon.
    Posted on 2012-02-23 18:56:17
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium Analysis
    Hi Meadowsweet, thanks for your comment. These results are confirmed by laboratory analysis, and like most nutrition facts on the internet, are sourced from U.S. Agricultural Research Service Nutrition Database. This website currently uses release 20. The other sites you are talking about are perhaps using different releases, but the numbers should not vary too much. At least this website confirms that Brazil nuts have more magnesium than almonds. As for molasses, it was actually a typo and the amount should be 48mg per tablespoon and not 84mg. Thanks for pointing that out and please feel free to send more comments!
    Posted on 2012-02-23 19:05:21
    Name:Christian
    Location:UK
    Subject:Tablets
    How about taking magnesium supplement tablets instead of focussing on magnesium rich foods?
    Posted on 2012-03-01 08:39:38
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Tablets
    Hi Christian, thanks for your comment. In general, mangesium and other nutrients are better regulated from natural sources, and it is easier to get toxic levels of a nutrients from supplements. However, if you are not eating most of these high magnesium foods, you can certainly take a magnesium supplement, just be careful to follow the recommended dosage, or maybe even take half a tablet. Symptoms of magnesium toxicity include diarrhea and abdominal cramping.
    Posted on 2012-03-01 09:43:38
    Name:Nancy Shapcott
    Location:St. Sauveur, Quebec, Canada
    Subject:Low Magnesium
    I take 4 x 100 mg each morning. I thought I was eating the right food, including lots of veggies. So why is it low?
    Posted on 2012-03-01 10:17:49
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Low Magnesium
    Hi Nancy, thanks for your question. Did you check the section of this article for groups at high risk of deficiency? This includes people who have gastrointestinal problems, kidney problems, eat a high fiber diet, are elderly, or are on certain medications. If this is so, then try to focus on eating more of the magnesium foods listed here, or consult your health care provider for better treatment. Further, symptoms of magnesium toxicity like nausea, diarrhea, appetite loss, muscle weakness, and heartbeat irregularilty are similar to that of magnesium deficiency. Get your magnesium levels tested to be sure you don't have too much magnesium! Further, different supplements have different bioavailablility. You might be wise to try change your supplement. Otherwise, just focus on try to eat more high magneisum foods, and maybe try restrict your intake of certain high fiber foods. Hope that helps.
    Posted on 2012-03-01 16:53:49
    Name:V. S. Bhardwaj
    Location:India
    Subject:Low Magnesium...
    This list and details on Magnesium rich foods is great. Recently I came to know about my chest pain due to negligence of these nutritional foods in my eating habits. Now as I know all these foods I will change my eating habits which will lead me to good health benefits for life...VSB. Thanks Again...
    Posted on 2012-03-18 14:46:40
    Name:John
    Location:Missouri
    Subject:Help with Bipolar/Depression
    Any response from people suffering from bipolar and depression when taking additional Magnesium?
    Thanks
    John
    Posted on 2012-03-20 09:10:49
    Name:JS
    Subject:Low Magnesium Level
    I appreciate this information on what foods I can eat that are good for magnesium. I was scheduled for surgery yesterday and at the last minute when my labs came back, it had to be cancelled. My magnesium level was way too low. It would of been a risk to have surgery. When I heard all the things that were at risk, I was shocked. I am glad to know that along with the excessive amt. of magnesium I have to take in as far as pills go, I can eat these foods and hopefully increase my level to where it needs to be soon so we can proceed with my surgery. Your information has been very helpful. TY.
    Posted on 2012-03-25 16:27:54
    Name:NS
    Location:Malaysia
    Subject:Magnesium Deficient Soils
    Hi, I was just wondering with this long list of magnesium rich foods- how much do foods differ in mineral content depending on whether they are organic or GMO? I presume that most high-yield crops and vegs/foods that we get these days come from soils that are depleted of a lot of its nutrients. So how sure can we be?? Thanks!
    Posted on 2012-04-12 04:43:05
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium Deficient Soils
    Hi NS, thanks for bringing up an important question. Basically the magnesium content of these foods is found by sampling the food many times and taking the average. Any of these foods at any given time will not contain exactly the amount of magnesium quoted. However, they generally will contain more magnesium than other foods, and it can be concluded that these foods are better at obtaining and retaining magnesium than other foods. In regards to your question about Organic vs GMO vs wild foods, it is quite tricky. A formal study would have to be done for almost everyfood. The nutrtiion facts database does have an entry for wild blackberries which can be compared to farmed blackberries. Interestingly, the farmed blackberries have 4 times the magnesium of the wild variety. 20mg to 4mg of magnesium per 100 grams. This would suggest that farming can actually benefit the nutrient content of food, and even though it would not always be the case, this list can still be used as a guide to obtain foods with the most magnesium.
    Posted on 2012-04-13 10:30:01
    Name:NS
    Location:Malaysia
    Subject:RE: Magnesium Deficient Soils
    Thanks for the prompt response! Very interesting to know about the wild berries/farmed nutrition content. Would not have expected such a result!
    Posted on 2012-04-13 21:37:12
    Name:Susan
    Location:California
    Subject:GI Medications and Magnesium
    Regarding PPIs, what would be an approximate length of time and dosage that could contribute to magnesium deficiency? Also regarding muscle cramps associated with low magnesium, would that include cramps/spasms of the colon muscles? I need advice on foods to eat that won't add to existing GI problems.
    Posted on 2012-04-14 10:40:50
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: GI Medications and Magnesium
    Hi Susan, thanks for your quesiton. According to this article magnesium deficiency can occur within 2 weeks of using a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). The exact dosage over the 2 week period was not given, but the patient had previously been taking 20 mg, twice daily, of omeprazole. Hope that helps. Please refer to your primary health care provider about the GI problems as that will require more specific information to make recommendations.
    Posted on 2012-04-16 22:44:11
    Name:Suha
    Location:Lebanon
    Subject:Sciatic nerve / magnesium supplements
    My husband has been suffering severe pain caused by his sciatic nerve and has been given magnesium tablets as a part of his treatment. Instead of relying on these supplements I prefer that he takes the magnesium naturally. What do you think?
    Posted on 2012-04-18 15:13:12
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Sciatic nerve / magnesium supplements
    Hi Suha, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your husband's discomfort. Typically, obtaining magnesium from natural foods is best for people who are healthy, however, given your husband's condition you are best to stay with the magnesium supplement and follow your doctor's prescription.
    Posted on 2012-04-18 22:16:13
    Name:JLS
    Location:Portugal
    Subject:Irregular heartbeat
    Upon my complaint of a periodical heartbeat irregularity, my doctor suggested that we start with a daily dose of Magnesium-OK (145 mg) but did not make any reference to possible dietary changes, namely to foods listed and described in this very interesting website. This prescription is to continue for three months and then I'm supposed to see the doctor again. I started taking these pills about two weeks ago and did not experience a noticeable change with the problem. Of course, this is a little tricky, because it is not a continuous thing. These irregularities come and go for apparent no reason and they last for varying times, from 1 or 2 minutes to sometimes 10 or even fifteen minutes. The reason of my posting is should I start trying some of these foods rich in magnesium on top of the pill prescribed by my doctor or should I refrain from doing so at least until I check back with her again? Thank you for this wonderful website.
    Posted on 2012-04-22 23:31:48
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Irregular heartbeat
    Hi JLS, thanks for your kind comments and question. It sound like you may have heart palpitations, or arrhythmia. Did your doctor do a blood test and was your magnesium level low? Either way, you are likely OK trying to raise your magnesium by eating the foods in this list. If your body gets too much magnesium than you will get diarrhea as your body attempts to excrete the excess, and you will know to consume less magnesium. To be sure, you can also call your doctor to confirm. To help prevent your irregular heartbeat you can also try reducing caffeine (tea, coffee), alcohol, and getting more sleep. Hope that helps and that you feel better soon.
    Posted on 2012-04-22 23:42:46
    Name:Michelle
    Location:SOcal
    Subject:Supplements vs. Food
    Hi, Great article and I just wanted to add my two cents to the page if you don't mind. For those seeking to find some answers for the supplements..I have been taking magnesium citrate for almost two months now and it has helped me a great deal. You should definitely stay away from magnesium oxide and shoot for either citrate or taurate. My favorite is the taurate one but it gets a litle expensive. My main complaints were: irregular heart beats, anxiety, headaches, muscle aches, and constipation. Each person should really test for their right dosage when on the supplements because I sometimes ended up with the runs and it was not fun. However, after finding my right one, I was regular, free of pain, slept like a baby, and it's effective! I could have taken 5 different medications for my problems but magnesium with some exercise (and dietary changes) really improved my life.

    For those of you hesitant or do not want to eat a bunch of different food everyday (who has the time really?) I really recommend you find a reputable brand that includes calcium + magnesium + vit d. as a part of your supplement regimen. Best of health to you all!

    Posted on 2012-05-11 03:53:34
    Name:Gineke
    Location:Australia
    Subject:Magnesium Deficiency
    I was pleased to read your articles and resulting comments. It has confirmed a number of things for me: At around 53 I started going to a gym but got cramps when doing yoga. The trainer recommended that I take magnesium. This has turned out to be great advice. Taking magnesium improved my muscle tone and the cramps disappeared (it took a number of weeks as I must have been quite deficient). Taking magnesium has alleviated other issues I started having: I had started suffering more and more from migraines. They are very rare now (it is also important to drink plenty of water); I had started getting tingling and occasionally numbness in my finger tips and toes...this has totally disappeared! I am gluten and lactose intolerant, which I was not aware of until I was 40 (after having years and years of gastro problems). This may have been the cause of my deficiency. This is now under control through diet. I personally believe that a good diet is the basis of a healthy life, but to alleviate deficiencies taking supplements may be necessary (especially when getting older). Treating the deficiencies is a much better solution than to take medication to treat (read 'mask') symptoms caused by the deficiencies.
    Posted on 2012-05-21 03:07:13
    Name:Mary
    Location:GA
    Subject:Side effects of magnesium supplement
    I have been prescribed Magnesium Oxide, 400 mg. to be taken twice daily. I have also been prescribed many other medications due to heart problems, hypertension, mild COPD. I am suffering severe nausea since beginning the magnesuim. No vomiting, and diarhea, which I believe are side effects of the magnesium. Is there any other type magnesium supplement I might take that would lessen, or eliminate these side effects??
    Posted on 2012-06-04 14:09:50
    Name:Linda
    Location:Florida
    Subject:Magnesium Oxide or Citrate, which is best?
    I just recently bought Magnesium Oxide, which was recommended by the pharmacist, said Citrate was a laxative, but see some of the posts I am confused. I suffer from severe muscle cramps and constant muscle twitching in my calves. I also have muscle weakness, heart palpitations, constant headaches and other things going on. A friend told me it sounds like I am low on magnesium. Any advice would be a great help.
    Posted on 2012-06-25 15:27:31
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium Oxide or Citrate, which is best?
    Hi Linda and Mary, thanks for your questions about Magnesium supplements. If you get too much magnesium then you will have diarhea, and possibly other symptoms. As Michelle from SOcal commented earlier in this article, finding which magnesium supplement is best for you may require experiementation. In other words, try taking one form one month, and another form the next month, and see how you feel. Other forms of magnesium supplements include: magnesium hydroxide, carbonate, citrate, lactate, chloride, sulfate, and taurate.
    Posted on 2012-06-25 21:50:43
    Name:Liz
    Subject:Hormone imbalance
    I've been told that low progesterone levels which leads to infertility could be associated with low magnesium intake. How true? Please verify!
    Posted on 2012-06-28 08:46:12
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Hormone imbalance
    Hi Liz, thanks for your comment. Progesterone and mangesium are indeed related, however, it is uncertain whether low magnesium can lead to low progesterone. Rather, progesterone works by regulating and changing magnesium levels. As this study suggests, when progesterone levels increase, magnesium decreases. Whether being deficient in mangesium hurts the functionality of progesterone is uncertain, but it wouldn't hurt to be sure you are getting enough magnesium. Those who have plently of magnesium can alleviate premenstrual syndromes (PMS) as well.
    Posted on 2012-06-28 11:38:30
    Name:Stephanie
    Location:Florida
    Subject:Magnesium & pregnancy
    I had been taking magnesium supplements for anxiety & irregular heartbeat (I have mitral valve prolapse). I stopped after I found out I was pregnant. My OB recommended I stay off the supplements, at least for the first trimester. My anxiety & irregular heartbeat have returned. Do you know any supplemental level to be safe during pregnancy?
    Posted on 2012-07-03 08:56:51
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium & Pregnancy
    Hi Stephanie, thanks for your question. Early pregnancy is a very delicate thing. You can try eat more foods high in magnesium, otherwise, you are best to follow the advice of your OB and stay off the magnesium supplements.
    Posted on 2012-07-04 01:42:09
    Name:Manon
    Location:Florida
    Subject:Answers to so many questions
    I found this site to be so informative. I have been reading all the posts. I am definitely magnesium deficient. From cramps (ankles & toes), numbness in finger tips, RLS, and surprising to me, my severe anxiety disorder. I am 51, 2 years in my menopause, is magnesium even more important for my bones as well. I will incorporate all the magnesium foods into my diet. Thank you so much!!!!
    Posted on 2012-07-08 02:06:30
    Name:Charlie
    Location:Tenn
    Subject:Magnesium orotate
    What can you tell me about Magnesium Orotate, it supposedly has superior absorption. Also, do you know whether magnesium deficiency can cause tendonitis? Thank you.
    Posted on 2012-07-09 23:48:01
    Name:Laurie
    Location:New Jersey
    Subject:Epsom Salt Baths
    I heard that an effective way to absorb Magnesium is to soak in Epsom Salts, but haven't read any posts on it here. Can you tell me your thoughts on this alternative (and cheap) way to get Magnesium into our body? Thanks for all the great information!
    Posted on 2012-07-31 05:58:08
    Name:Gertrude "Trudy"
    Location:Maine
    Subject:Magnesium oxide
    I may be several months too late for anyone to actually read this, but it needs to be said. Magnesium oxide, while high in magnesium, around 40%, has a very low absorption rate, down around 4%. Its absorption was considered negligible and for this reason was not included in a Russian study of various compounds of magnesium. The study found that there is a trade-off of benefits among the compounds--so it may be sensible to switch types from time to time. From other sources, I also learned that magnesium gluconate is preferable for heart patients, while magnesium citrate is better for gout and kidney patients.
    Posted on 2012-08-08 01:39:50
    Name:Layla
    Location:FL
    Subject:Magnesium food
    Is the list above all of the foods or are there more? Oh and thank you.
    Posted on 2012-09-03 15:17:07
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium food
    Hi Layla, thanks for your question. This article is just for the foods highest in magnesium, there are many more foods which contain magnesium. You can use this nutrient ranking tool to rank over 7000 foods. You can also rank them by food group. Here is a list of 3000 foods high in magnesium.
    Posted on 2012-09-03 17:05:38
    Name:Michelle
    Location:West Reading, PA
    Subject:Smoothie?
    Is there a way to make a smoothie that tastes good but has foods high in magnesium and potassium? My mother is getting ready to undergo chemo and these are the two things that seem to be low in her blood. I believe it is due to meds she is on (albuterol,nexuim). She gets nauseous frequently and doesn't eat as much as she should...
    Posted on 2012-09-10 08:15:49
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE :Smoothie
    Hi Michelle, sorry to hear that your Mom will be undergoing chemo soon, that in itself can make anyone lose their appetite. Something as simple as chocolate milk, or chocolate soy milk, would be nutritious and high in potassium and magnesium. You can try to use milk or soy milk as a base, and add chocolate, bananas, and flax seed. Hope that idea helps.
    Posted on 2012-09-10 09:11:28
    Name:Diane
    Location:Lakeville, CT
    Subject:Magnesium for Lupus
    Does it help to relieve inflamation and, if so, would it be better absorbed in foods or supplement. THANK YOU!
    Posted on 2012-09-29 20:07:11
    Name:Rebecca
    Location:Massachusetts
    Subject:Magnesium in pumpkin/squash seeds
    The site indicates the amount of magnesium in these seeds. Is this raw? Does roasting or toasting make the magnesium more or less accessible to the body?
    Posted on 2012-10-28 10:46:06
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium in pumpkin/squash seeds
    Hi Rebecca, thanks for your question. The seeds referred to in the article should be either dried or roasted.
    Nutrition Facts for Dried and Roasted Squash and Pumpkin Seeds.
    Posted on 2012-10-28 21:46:08
    Name:Char Taylor
    Location:Arkansas
    Subject:Magnesium deficent after cancer
    I had cervical cancer and was treated with radiation and cisplatin, then had to have colostomy, and damaged part of colon removed from radiation damage. How long does the cisplatin affect the magnesium levels, and could my colon problems still be affecting absorbtion? I have been having cramps in all parts of my body, insomnia, depression, tiredness. Decided to start taking a supplement and will be uping the magnesium rich foods, are there any other things that could be depleting it? Was curious about diet soft drinks as well. Thank you so much, great site!!!
    Posted on 2012-11-14 01:29:51
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium deficent after cancer
    Hi Char, thanks for your questions. It is not well understood how long cisplatin will affect your magnesium levels, however, most of the studies suggest that supplementing with magnesium can start to restore your levels almost immediately. Your case is likely more complicated due to your colostomy. Your doctors may have been giving you magnesium during your treatments, if not, they should have tested your levels. Get your magnesium level tested and talk to your doctors about the best strategy for supplementation. Eating the foods here will help of course, but given your colostomy and recovery, supplementation will likely be necessary. Other factors which can put you at risk of a deficiency include not eating enough protein, eating too much fiber, having kidney problems, or taking proton pump inhibitors, diuretics, zinc supplements, and other antibiotics. See the section of this article titled "High Risk Groups for a Magnesium Deficiency" for more information.
    Posted on 2012-11-15 02:08:57
    Name:Tricia
    Location:Australia
    Subject:Normal Magnesium Levels
    Just wondering if 0-85 level of magnesium would be classed as on the low side? Can you tell me what is normal and what would be deficient? My results came back all within normal range but I do get symptoms associated with a lack of magnesium. I also wondered as magnesium helps to regulate blood sugar levels could dizziness be another related symptom? Thanks!
    Posted on 2012-11-15 21:54:45
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Normal Magnesium Levels
    Hi Tricia, thanks for your question. Normal serum (blood) magnesium levels range between 1.7-2.2 mg/dL. Dizziness is not a common symptom of magneisum deficiency, but it is possible.
    Posted on 2012-11-16 03:02:13
    Name:Acc Cess
    Location:DN
    Subject:Brazil Nuts
    Recommending Brazil Nuts for Magnesium is dangerous! People can Selenium overdose quickly on very small amounts of Brazil nuts long before they get anywhere close to that nice dose of magnesium...Please update your site with warnings, or remove from top 10 best sources...it is not accurate if measuring a safe eating amount of brazil nuts.
    Posted on 2012-12-02 16:24:05
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Brazil Nuts
    Hi Acc, thanks for your comment and warning. The article now has warnings about the selenium content of brazil nuts. They would be a good solution for someone looking to get more selenium and magnesium. As suggested, a new list is being created to reflect more commonly eaten foods. Thanks again for your suggestion!
    Posted on 2012-12-02 22:43:08
    Name:Jessica
    Location:MD, USA
    Subject:Thanks!
    Great article very informative! Over the last couple months I've read many articles pertaining to low magnesium this is by far the most informative in regards to food and also contains other helpful information. I have been taking supplements of magnesium etc per my neurologist. I wish he had mentioned the different types and low absorbtion rate of the most common type used for tablets (magnesium oxide). I've had to figure these types of things out on my own (thank goodness for the internet). Even with supplementation I continue to have symptoms associated with low magnesium etc so hoping paying more attention to my diet will help. Thanks!
    Posted on 2013-02-01 13:47:46
    Name:Pamela Bloom
    Location:Ohio
    Subject:Epsom Salt Bath for Magnesium
    A nice soak in an Epsom salt bath for 15 minutes twice a week is a great way to restore magnesium levels. Epsom salts are magnesium sulfate and the body can and does absorb it through the skin. It is also very soothing. 2 cups of Epsom salts per bath.
    Posted on 2013-02-12 19:30:31
    Name:Jennifer
    Location:Scottsdale, AZ
    Subject:Chelated Magnesium
    I was told to take chelated magnesium which I haven't seen written about in this article. I was told that it had the best absorption. What is chelated magnesium?
    Posted on 2013-03-10 11:17:46
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Chelated Magnesium
    Hi Jennifer, thanks for your question. Chelated magnesium is a form of magnesium where amino acids have been used to try boost the absorption of magnesium. It is not known whether this form of magnesium is the best for absorption, but you can try it and see if it works for you.
    Posted on 2013-03-10 23:34:55
    Name:Scott
    Location:Dallas
    Subject:Dried Vs. Fresh Magnesium Foods
    I'm curious as to why DRIED herbs and seeds are specified. If one consumed freshly picked basil or raw pumpkin seeds, would they get magnesium and would the levels be increased or decreased from the dried version? Thanks for this helpful article.
    Posted on 2013-03-11 22:45:31
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Dried Vs. Fresh Magnesium Foods
    Hi Scott, thanks for your question. The fresh foods would contain magnesium, however, this list is made by ranking the about of magnesium per gram. Since dried foods do not contain water, they are much lighter, and therefore, have a high density of magnesium, gram per gram. Looking at the nutrition facts comparison for dried vs. fresh basil, you can see that 1 tblsp of dried basil provides 8mg (2% DV) of magnesium, while 2 tblsp of fresh basil provides 3mg (1% DV). This list will soon be revised to list high magnesium foods by common portion size.
    Posted on 2013-03-12 00:26:56
    Name:Alison
    Location:London UK
    Subject:MS and Magnesium Flakes Footbath
    Thanks for this info and have to say I've started using Magnesium Flakes in a foot spa every day and its helping the circulation and replacing minerals... the above info is so very needed and informative....In gratitude, Alison
    Posted on 2013-03-12 23:46:58
    Name:Rohana Miller
    Location:United States
    Subject:My cancer survival story and why I think Magnesium Gluconate is best...
    I received very aggressive high doses of cisplatin in 1981 for stage 3 ovarian cancer. They don't give such high doses of cisplatin now as they did back then in the first few yrs of its usage. The chemo failed to cure my cancer and I went on to radiation as a last resort. I also followed Linus Pauling's Cancer and Vitamin C regimen and his megavitamin therapy. I was 35 at that time and am now 67. Most of the women who had ovarian cancer at the advanced stage I had it either died of the cancer or of the kidney damage caused by the cisplatin. I received maximum radiation dosage to entire torso and docs were astonished that my skin showed no radiation burns. I believe it was the 40 grams of C plus other vitamins and supplements I took daily. Docs were unwilling to perform 3rd look surgery since there was nothing left to treat me with if they found the cancer was not erradicated. So, I waited and lived my life and survived far beyond my 30% chance to live 5 more years to age 40. I was able to raise my 8 and 10 yr old son and daughter and am now a grandma. In 2007 I learned I had stage 4 kidney disease resulting from the cisplatin damage. I had also suffered from chronic diarrhea for 30 yrs. My veins were ruined by the chemo so long term dialysis was not an option. I was able to keep my kidneys stable for 6 yrs by putting myself on a strict renal diet and taking probiotics. The renal damage caused me to have a stroke, a-fib, osteoporosis. Jan 16th, 2013, I received a kidney transplant. My 40 yr old son was my living donor and my 42 yr old daughter was my 24/7 caretaker nurse as I recovered. It has now been two months and I am gaining strength daily, thanks to the love and devotion of my kids and a great medical team. I have been low on magnesium since my cisplatin treatment, but until I was diagnosed with kidney disease, no docs ever mentioned it to me, though I suffered with all the symptoms! Now, the anti-rejection meds and all the pills I have to take to counteract the side-effects of those meds (30+ pills daily) also reduce my magnesium levels further. Magnesium gluconate is the best form to take if you suffer from diarrhea. Amazon sells bottles of it for less than $4 for 90 pills. However, the bottle says 500mg on it, but only about 25mg of each tab is actually magnesium, the rest is gluconate. Increasing your dietary intake of high magnesium foods is by far much more effective in keeping your mag levels up and it's easy. Snacking on nuts and seeds, eating plenty of good veggies and beans, etc. will make a huge difference and you will feel the strength return to your limbs in a matter of a day or two once you start focusing on how you are eating. So, in answer to those who mentioned cisplatin - the effect on your magnesium levels can last forever because cisplatin is so damaging to your kidneys. Being highly pro-active in your own health and educating yourself can save or prolong your life. I am living proof of that. I have found my medical teams very respectful of my efforts because they see the results I have achieved, which seem miraculous to many. I firmly believe that you MUST build you strength and body to withstand cancer treatment and also to live your best life possible with other diseases you might be dealing with. This website is excellent!
    Posted on 2013-03-20 20:41:35
    Name:S Avery
    Location:Tennessee
    Subject:Does magnesium cause kidney damage?
    I was taking 800mgs of magnesium with chelated zinc for restless legs and it worked. Then someone told me it was bad for my kidneys. Is this true? It sure did help a lot and has come back since I quit taking it. Thanks for your website and hope you can answer this and it is a no!!!
    Posted on 2013-03-29 17:13:18
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Does magnesium cause kidney damage?
    Hi S Avery, thanks for your question. The amount of magnesium in your body is regulated by your kidneys. As long as your kidneys are healthy, they should have no problem regulating 800mgs plus whatever dietary magnesium you get. So the answer is while your kidneys may have to work harder, it should be fine to take the supplement. If you are worried about it, see if 400mgs a day works for you. Buy a pill cutter and cut the pill in half if need be. This can also save you money in the long run if you find it effective. Hope that helps.
    Posted on 2013-03-29 23:55:00
    Name:Jerry
    Location:Michigan
    Subject:Lower back muscle pain after spinal fusion
    I had a spinal fusion which worked but the lower muscles in my back are sore and walking has not helped. A therapist has said I need to take Epson salt bath. Is she right?
    Posted on 2013-04-07 17:13:18
    Name:D Banks
    Location:United States
    Subject:Muscle Cramps When Working Out
    I just started taking magnesium supplements when I had been told that is what I need to take to help with muscle cramps a long time ago. Oh how I wish I had just tried it way back when (as I take a lot of other health food items) because let me tell you it works. I feel calmer and my muscles don't cramp like before. Thank God.
    Posted on 2013-04-15 00:18:18
    Name:Kevin
    Location:Australia
    Subject:PMR (Polymyalgia Rheumatica)
    Can magnesium help with PMR? I've had it for about 18 months. It's not as severe as it was, but I've had enough! It has now moved to my ribs and chest area. Thank you.
    Posted on 2013-04-30 13:38:08
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: PMR (Polymyalgia Rheumatica)
    Hi Kevin, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your condition. There is no evidence to suggest that magnesium helps with PMR. You can find more information on PMR here.
    Posted on 2013-05-01 02:56:09
    Name:Louis
    Location:Australia
    Subject:Is rice bran crude a practical source?
    If rice bran crude is so high in magnesium, and dv or daily intake in mg is 400mg, does it have an adverse reaction? You wouldn't eat a cup of rice bran. You would just sprinkle s teaspoon on your oatmeal. Or have I got it wrong?
    Posted on 2013-05-08 09:04:23
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Is rice bran crude a practical source?
    Hi Louis, Thanks for your questions and comment. It is true that most people would not consume a whole cup of bran, and it would not be the best thing for them. However, this list ranks the foods highest in magnesium by nutrient density. Thus bran takes the number 1 spot. The lists on this site are currently being revised to take serving size into account. Till then, the extended list of magnesium rich foods can give you some good practical suggestions to boost your magnesium content.
    Posted on 2013-05-08 09:33:02
    Name:Joanne
    Location:Northern Ireland
    Subject:Fibromyalgia and Magnesium
    I've heard magnesium can help with a pain of fibromyalgia is this true?
    Posted on 2013-05-14 20:05:53
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Fibromyalgia and Magnesium
    Hi Joanne, thanks for your question. This study suggests found that taking 1200–2400 mg of malate and 300–600 mg of magnesium per day, over 8 weeks, significantly reduced the pain of fibromyalgia. You can get a magnesium malate supplement here if you want to try it. For further reading regarding fibromyalgia and magneisum check this article by an MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) researcher.
    Posted on 2013-05-14 21:01:26
    Name:PM
    Location:Canada
    Subject:Magnesium Bisglycinate
    What about magnesium bisglycinate? What is the difference with this and all the others you mention? My naturopathic doctor recommended this for muscle cramps.
    Posted on 2013-05-15 11:57:17
    Name:Robin
    Location:USA
    Subject:Tinnitus
    Do you think there is a correlation between tinnitus and magnesium, and if so how much magnesium do you suggest on a daily basis?
    Posted on 2013-05-15 20:01:55
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Tinnitus and Magnesium
    Hi Robin, thanks for your question. Some studies do suggest that taking magnesium (~500mg) per day can help reduce the severity of tinnitus. You can try a chelated magnesium supplement, taking doses throughout the day to reach around 500mg. Hope that helps.
    Posted on 2013-05-16 02:41:33
    Name:Rebecca
    Location:Tennessee
    Subject:Bhrt and Magnesium
    At menopause I began having migraines and already had osteopenia because of thyroid disease, so I began taking bioidentical estrogen and progesterone. The migraines are now rare, however, soon after beginning the hormones I began to ache really badly. Already having fibromyalgia, I asked my pharmacist, who recommended increasing my magnesium supplement from 400 to 800 mg. It worked! If anyone else has had this problem, maybe it will help you. I eat healthy foods and get magnesium that way also. Thank you for the information and help you are providing.
    Posted on 2013-06-15 22:06:52
    Name:Karen
    Location:Indiana
    Subject:Calcium & Magnesium
    I have HPTH (hypoparathyroidism). I was told by my doctor to take 400mg of magnesium oxide; however, it seems to upset my stomach. I was wondering if anyone else had these problems esp. HPTH patients.
    Posted on 2013-10-06 21:42:13
    Name:Debra J.M. Smith
    Location:Upstate New York
    Subject:TMJ (Jaw issues from teeth clinching)
    Recently I learned that magnesium could help with my jaw problems that are caused by clinching my teeth in my sleep, that the calming effect of magnesium might help me relax in my sleep and not clinch. Your article is very appreciated, as are all of your responses in the comments section. --Have you ever heard of stress depleting magnesium, and then such causing a circular effect because a magnesium deficiency causes a person to have more stress? --Two more things: When my youngest daughter was a child, she was almost too happy and just could not sit still for long (she was a happy-hyper child.) For a month I gave her low amounts of magnesium supplements, and it calmed her down. Also, I took acid reducers for many years and quit them roughly two years ago. Thanks for your info on those too.
    Posted on 2013-10-17 19:34:33
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: TMJ (Jaw issues from teeth clinching)
    Hi Debra, thanks for all your comments and questions. Taking magnesium can definitely help with TMJ, especially if you are deficient in magnesium. This study confirms your other comments that stress can deplete magnesium, and also that a deficiency in magnesium can cause hyperactive behavior. The antacids should not have had an effect on your magnesium level, unless they contained magnesium, in which case, they may have helped increase your magnesium level. Hope that helps.
    Posted on 2013-10-18 06:38:25
    Name:Dagun
    Location:Iceland
    Subject:Do I have enough?
    Hi, my blood test showed that I have 0,76 mmol/l of magnesium in my blood, is that ok or would you recommend that I take something extra? Thank you!
    Posted on 2013-10-23 19:28:21
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Do I have enough?
    Hi Dagun, thanks for your question. 0.76mmol/L is toward the low end of "normal" magnesium levels, however you should be fine. Try to consume more high magnesium foods like those in this article, and see if your level improves by your next test. If not, you could consider supplements. Hope that helps.
    Posted on 2013-10-24 16:53:48
    Name:Mary
    Location:Gerrards Cross, England
    Subject:Magnesium Supplement Dose Amount?
    Hi - I have suffered with toe cramps at night for a long time but it has started to get worse and occasionally I am woken by a cramp in the calf muscle which is unbearable as leaves my calf tender and sore for a couple of days. I went to my health food shop and started on a magnesium supplement which is 1 x 500mg a day. I have only been taking for the last 4 days and have had no cramps!!! I have had no side effects as yet. Is 500mg a day too much? Should I take every day or perhaps only a couple of times a week? Should I go to my doctor and get my level tested? I do not eat enough of the foods high in magnesium but intend to improve this. This article was extremely helpful and I look forward to your reply.
    Posted on 2013-10-28 06:50:38
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium Supplement Dose Amount?
    Hi Mary, thanks for your question and sharing your experience. Taking 500mg of supplemental magnesium a day should be fine. However, The Office of Dietary Supplements cautions taking too much magnesium from supplements as it can cause diarrhea or stomach cramps. They do set the limit of supplemental magnesium at 350mg a day. However, if you are not experiencing diarrhea or stomach cramps you are fine. If you do experience those symptoms cut back to 500mg every 2 days. Do get your magnesium level checked at your next doctors visit to be sure that is the problem. Also, be aware that magnesium can interfere with other medications including bisphosphonates, antibiotics, diuretics, and proton pump inhibitors. If you are not taking these medications then you probably do not need to worry, but check with your health care provider if you are taking any other medications. Hope that helps.
    Posted on 2013-10-29 05:34:43
    Name:JBC
    Location:NC
    Subject:Where's the potato?
    So why are potatoes not on this list? One medium sized potato contains about 50 mg of magnesium, beating the banana and avocado. One potato also contains an abundance of Vit. C and Vit. B-6. I know potatoes are becoming the latest demon-food, but they do have some really great nutritional benefits!
    Posted on 2013-11-12 06:46:11
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Where's the potato?
    Hi JBC, thanks for your comment. Baked potatoes with skin has now been added to the extended list of magnesium rich vegetables. Eating the skin is advisable to get all the nutritional benefits.
    Posted on 2013-11-13 05:09:01
    Name:Cheryl
    Location:Colorado
    Subject:For Psoriasis and Asthma?
    I had heard that people with a patch of psoriasis on the scalp that is very persistent in spite of using dandruff shampoo with zinc should take some zinc supplements. Then, I found the Calcium, Magnesium, and Zinc supplement. Within a month the psoriasis was gone and my asthma-type condition was greatly improved. Now, I still do fight the re-occurrence of both; but, they are better controlled, anyway. And, thank you for such a wonderful website!
    Posted on 2014-01-04 16:51:29
    Name:Avan
    Location:IL
    Subject:Medications and magnesium absorption
    Just wanted to add that Tacrolimus (an immunosuppressant commonly prescribed to prevent organ transplant rejection) will lower magnesium levels.

    These patients battle with the drug causing their bodies to "dump" mag. Thanks for the info. on helping mag. be more absorb-able. Any more suggestions would be very appreciated!

    Posted on 2014-01-16 10:35:10
    Name:Intuiteone
    Location:Pacific NW
    Subject:Eczema and magnesium
    Has anyone been incorporating supplementing magnesium to helping their excema symptoms like itching? Thanks
    Posted on 2014-01-26 12:30:19
    Name:M S Grewal
    Location:Ludhiana Punjab India
    Subject:Cramps in diabetic legs/feet.
    I was having cramps in my legs/feet for a few months. In the last week it became unbearable, I had excess urination (every hour)at night causing insomnia(7 nights).Fortunately I had a capsule Ravital (magnesium 3 mg). After half an hour in the afternoon I was fast asleep. I fail to understand your magnesium daily dose recommendation.
    Posted on 2014-02-09 04:47:44
    Name:PJ
    Location:Sydney
    Subject:Magnesium for relaxation
    I am getting amazing results using magnesium to improve my sleep. Unfortunately where I live I can't get access to some of the better forms of magnesium so I am using citrate and oxide.

    I recently read a great book on Magnesium by James Lee which appeared to be saying that magnesium helps you sleep because it promotes muscle relaxation throughout the body (something to do with calcium promoting muscle contraction and magnesium promoting subsequent relaxation) but also increases levels of serotonin.

    I don't really care *how*, I just care that my sleep has dramatically improved since I started taking it.

    What have been people's experiences in terms of the best form of magnesium (or brands even)?

    Posted on 2014-03-22 00:03:18
    Name:Maple
    Location:Ohio
    Subject:Magnesium for Migraine
    I have been suffering from Migraines for 30 years. I have seen a Neurologist for the past 17 years. The Neurologist moved so I had to find a new doctor (what a blessing!). My bouts with the migraines had increased dramatically in the last year both in frequency and duration. When I was not having a migraine I was carrying around the ghost of one. Two weeks ago I went to my new Neurologist, he suggested I take 500 mg of Magnesium a day and warned me of the side affects. I started taking 500mg right away and was affected right away with the bliss of no ghost or migraine. (what heaven) I did have a couple days of diarrhea but stoped the Magnesium for a couple of days and then started with half a dose(250mg). I have my life back and I want to tell everyone about this who suffers. I know I may still have migraine at some point but Magnesium has released me from my prison of pain. Thank you so very much for the information I have gleaned from your site.
    Posted on 2014-03-29 09:40:54
    Name:Kathy
    Location:Montana
    Subject:Epsom salt baths
    I have seen at least three posts (one was a question of effectiveness) that were about epsom salt baths and/or foot soaks increasing the absorption of magnesium by our bodies, and I have not seen a reply from Health-alicious-ness about this. I am particularly interested in the validity of this claim as I am sure would be anyone else trying to get their levels up. Perhaps it is because it is not a dietary source; but could you comment anyway or refer us to another source to verify this information.
    Posted on 2014-04-06 16:49:16
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Epsom salt baths
    Hi Kathy, thanks for your question. It is a difficult question to answer because there have not been many scientific studies on the matter, and so it is not possible to say if it is helpful or not. This page has a good discussion on the topic, though perhaps has an interest in disproving the use of epsom salts. This study, by the Epsom Salt Council suggests that epsom salt baths do increase magnesium levels, but does not suggest why. It could simply be that salt baths lower the concentration of water in your body and make it appear that your magnesium is higher. In the end, if salt baths make you feel better, you could take them and see if your magnesium level improves long term. However, salt baths should not be relied upon as the only way to boost your magnesium, and should be used in conjunction with high magnesium foods or supplements. Hope that helps.
    Posted on 2014-04-11 01:41:16

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    Comments.
    Name:V. Renfro
    Location:Dallas, TX
    Subject:Muscle Cramps
    This is a great article and answered my question of why I'm having severe, painful, muscle cramps.
    Posted on 2011-07-21 01:35:31
    Name:Tim
    Location:LA
    Subject:Thanks
    Thank you! Was looking to change my diet. Very helpful list.
    Posted on 2011-10-30 03:42:07
    Name:Dave
    Location:Inman, SC
    Subject:Thank you
    Very good article, exactly what I was looking for.
    Posted on 2011-11-13 19:43:10
    Name:Carrie
    Location:Ohio
    Subject:Help with Levaquin Side Effects
    I have heard magnesium helps to reverse side effects of the antibiotic, levaquin, which are: tendinitis, rotary cuff problem with numbness in the hand, and elbow pain. Is this true hopefully??
    Posted on 2012-01-06 10:34:10
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Help with Levaquin Side Effects
    Hi Carrie, thanks for your question. Consuming aluminum, magnesium, calcium, iron, or zinc while taking Levaquin interferes with its absorption. Thus magnesium may help alleviate the side effects, but only at the cost of hampering the effectiveness of the medicine itself. If you have finished the taking Levaquin you can try consume more magnesium to see if your condition improves.
    Posted on 2012-01-06 11:37:24
    Name:Annie
    Location:Colorado
    Subject:Levaquin is very dangerous!
    I feel you are being negligent in not mentioning the devastating possible side effects of Levaquin and similar drugs. They now have a black box warning, and in my opinion and that of many medical professionals, they should not be taken unless ALL other measures have failed. Many groups have been formed dealing with the side effects, often permanent, suffered by unsuspecting people (I am one). Just trying to educate the public about what dangerous drugs fluoroquinolones are. Thank you for your article.
    Posted on 2012-01-09 12:11:17
    Name:Alex Pithie
    Location:United Kingdom
    Subject:Magnesium
    Thank you for a very thorough and massively useful page of key data...lazy me wonders if there is any one-hit food that combines calcium and magnesium as I treat my adrenal gland production deficiency...but thanks again!
    Posted on 2012-01-27 23:31:46
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium
    Hi Alex, thanks for your question. Foods which are high in calcium and magnesium include almonds, brazil nuts, and dried herbs. Add dried hers to salads, sandwiches, and other food items you eat. Hope that helps!
    Posted on 2012-01-28 03:53:57
    Name:Dr. Sam Kabbani
    Location:Kuwait
    Subject:Magnesium
    80% of the world's population have Magnesium deficiency. Bones are composed of Calcium, Phosphorus and Magnesium, and eating Cheese only provides calcium so we will have 80% of all diseases starting with muscle cramps, Osteoporosis, Hypothyroidism, Bradycardia, MS, Migraine, constipation, Breast cancer, Prostate, Colitis, Gallstone, Calculus, Fatigue, Hypoglycemia, Neck pain, Dry skin, Depression, losing potassium and sodium, if we have any of this we must have food rich in Magnesium and Potassium and Sodium. Start to eat figs, then (magnesium) then salad or a baked potato with salt (Magnesium, Potassium and Sodium and Phosphorus and rich in carbs that can give you enough energy).
    Posted on 2012-02-17 17:43:25
    Name:Worried Mom
    Location:Ohio
    Subject:Magnesium and Tourett's Syndrome
    Can intake of foods rich in Magnesium help in reducing vocal tics like those in Tourett's syndrome?
    Posted on 2012-02-20 19:14:43
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium and Tourett's Syndrome
    Thanks for your question, unfortunately, it is impossible to say if magnesium rich foods would be any help or not. While there is a suspected connection between magnesium deficiency and Tourett's, as well as the possibility of magnesium alleviating some symptoms, there have not been any formal studies to confirm this theory.
    Posted on 2012-02-20 19:56:46
    Name:Meadowsweet
    Location:England
    Subject:Magnesium Analysis
    I'd be interested in knowing whether the magnesium content of foods posted on this site have been verified through laboratory analysis, please? I'm asking this question because so many websites give contradictory amounts. Another site for example says that almonds contain more magnesium than brazil nuts; and that the amount of magnesium in black strap molasses is is 45mg per tablespoon approx, whereas this site says it's 84mg a tablespoon.
    Posted on 2012-02-23 18:56:17
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium Analysis
    Hi Meadowsweet, thanks for your comment. These results are confirmed by laboratory analysis, and like most nutrition facts on the internet, are sourced from U.S. Agricultural Research Service Nutrition Database. This website currently uses release 20. The other sites you are talking about are perhaps using different releases, but the numbers should not vary too much. At least this website confirms that Brazil nuts have more magnesium than almonds. As for molasses, it was actually a typo and the amount should be 48mg per tablespoon and not 84mg. Thanks for pointing that out and please feel free to send more comments!
    Posted on 2012-02-23 19:05:21
    Name:Christian
    Location:UK
    Subject:Tablets
    How about taking magnesium supplement tablets instead of focussing on magnesium rich foods?
    Posted on 2012-03-01 08:39:38
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Tablets
    Hi Christian, thanks for your comment. In general, mangesium and other nutrients are better regulated from natural sources, and it is easier to get toxic levels of a nutrients from supplements. However, if you are not eating most of these high magnesium foods, you can certainly take a magnesium supplement, just be careful to follow the recommended dosage, or maybe even take half a tablet. Symptoms of magnesium toxicity include diarrhea and abdominal cramping.
    Posted on 2012-03-01 09:43:38
    Name:Nancy Shapcott
    Location:St. Sauveur, Quebec, Canada
    Subject:Low Magnesium
    I take 4 x 100 mg each morning. I thought I was eating the right food, including lots of veggies. So why is it low?
    Posted on 2012-03-01 10:17:49
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Low Magnesium
    Hi Nancy, thanks for your question. Did you check the section of this article for groups at high risk of deficiency? This includes people who have gastrointestinal problems, kidney problems, eat a high fiber diet, are elderly, or are on certain medications. If this is so, then try to focus on eating more of the magnesium foods listed here, or consult your health care provider for better treatment. Further, symptoms of magnesium toxicity like nausea, diarrhea, appetite loss, muscle weakness, and heartbeat irregularilty are similar to that of magnesium deficiency. Get your magnesium levels tested to be sure you don't have too much magnesium! Further, different supplements have different bioavailablility. You might be wise to try change your supplement. Otherwise, just focus on try to eat more high magneisum foods, and maybe try restrict your intake of certain high fiber foods. Hope that helps.
    Posted on 2012-03-01 16:53:49
    Name:V. S. Bhardwaj
    Location:India
    Subject:Low Magnesium...
    This list and details on Magnesium rich foods is great. Recently I came to know about my chest pain due to negligence of these nutritional foods in my eating habits. Now as I know all these foods I will change my eating habits which will lead me to good health benefits for life...VSB. Thanks Again...
    Posted on 2012-03-18 14:46:40
    Name:John
    Location:Missouri
    Subject:Help with Bipolar/Depression
    Any response from people suffering from bipolar and depression when taking additional Magnesium?
    Thanks
    John
    Posted on 2012-03-20 09:10:49
    Name:JS
    Subject:Low Magnesium Level
    I appreciate this information on what foods I can eat that are good for magnesium. I was scheduled for surgery yesterday and at the last minute when my labs came back, it had to be cancelled. My magnesium level was way too low. It would of been a risk to have surgery. When I heard all the things that were at risk, I was shocked. I am glad to know that along with the excessive amt. of magnesium I have to take in as far as pills go, I can eat these foods and hopefully increase my level to where it needs to be soon so we can proceed with my surgery. Your information has been very helpful. TY.
    Posted on 2012-03-25 16:27:54
    Name:NS
    Location:Malaysia
    Subject:Magnesium Deficient Soils
    Hi, I was just wondering with this long list of magnesium rich foods- how much do foods differ in mineral content depending on whether they are organic or GMO? I presume that most high-yield crops and vegs/foods that we get these days come from soils that are depleted of a lot of its nutrients. So how sure can we be?? Thanks!
    Posted on 2012-04-12 04:43:05
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium Deficient Soils
    Hi NS, thanks for bringing up an important question. Basically the magnesium content of these foods is found by sampling the food many times and taking the average. Any of these foods at any given time will not contain exactly the amount of magnesium quoted. However, they generally will contain more magnesium than other foods, and it can be concluded that these foods are better at obtaining and retaining magnesium than other foods. In regards to your question about Organic vs GMO vs wild foods, it is quite tricky. A formal study would have to be done for almost everyfood. The nutrtiion facts database does have an entry for wild blackberries which can be compared to farmed blackberries. Interestingly, the farmed blackberries have 4 times the magnesium of the wild variety. 20mg to 4mg of magnesium per 100 grams. This would suggest that farming can actually benefit the nutrient content of food, and even though it would not always be the case, this list can still be used as a guide to obtain foods with the most magnesium.
    Posted on 2012-04-13 10:30:01
    Name:NS
    Location:Malaysia
    Subject:RE: Magnesium Deficient Soils
    Thanks for the prompt response! Very interesting to know about the wild berries/farmed nutrition content. Would not have expected such a result!
    Posted on 2012-04-13 21:37:12
    Name:Susan
    Location:California
    Subject:GI Medications and Magnesium
    Regarding PPIs, what would be an approximate length of time and dosage that could contribute to magnesium deficiency? Also regarding muscle cramps associated with low magnesium, would that include cramps/spasms of the colon muscles? I need advice on foods to eat that won't add to existing GI problems.
    Posted on 2012-04-14 10:40:50
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: GI Medications and Magnesium
    Hi Susan, thanks for your quesiton. According to this article magnesium deficiency can occur within 2 weeks of using a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). The exact dosage over the 2 week period was not given, but the patient had previously been taking 20 mg, twice daily, of omeprazole. Hope that helps. Please refer to your primary health care provider about the GI problems as that will require more specific information to make recommendations.
    Posted on 2012-04-16 22:44:11
    Name:Suha
    Location:Lebanon
    Subject:Sciatic nerve / magnesium supplements
    My husband has been suffering severe pain caused by his sciatic nerve and has been given magnesium tablets as a part of his treatment. Instead of relying on these supplements I prefer that he takes the magnesium naturally. What do you think?
    Posted on 2012-04-18 15:13:12
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Sciatic nerve / magnesium supplements
    Hi Suha, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your husband's discomfort. Typically, obtaining magnesium from natural foods is best for people who are healthy, however, given your husband's condition you are best to stay with the magnesium supplement and follow your doctor's prescription.
    Posted on 2012-04-18 22:16:13
    Name:JLS
    Location:Portugal
    Subject:Irregular heartbeat
    Upon my complaint of a periodical heartbeat irregularity, my doctor suggested that we start with a daily dose of Magnesium-OK (145 mg) but did not make any reference to possible dietary changes, namely to foods listed and described in this very interesting website. This prescription is to continue for three months and then I'm supposed to see the doctor again. I started taking these pills about two weeks ago and did not experience a noticeable change with the problem. Of course, this is a little tricky, because it is not a continuous thing. These irregularities come and go for apparent no reason and they last for varying times, from 1 or 2 minutes to sometimes 10 or even fifteen minutes. The reason of my posting is should I start trying some of these foods rich in magnesium on top of the pill prescribed by my doctor or should I refrain from doing so at least until I check back with her again? Thank you for this wonderful website.
    Posted on 2012-04-22 23:31:48
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Irregular heartbeat
    Hi JLS, thanks for your kind comments and question. It sound like you may have heart palpitations, or arrhythmia. Did your doctor do a blood test and was your magnesium level low? Either way, you are likely OK trying to raise your magnesium by eating the foods in this list. If your body gets too much magnesium than you will get diarrhea as your body attempts to excrete the excess, and you will know to consume less magnesium. To be sure, you can also call your doctor to confirm. To help prevent your irregular heartbeat you can also try reducing caffeine (tea, coffee), alcohol, and getting more sleep. Hope that helps and that you feel better soon.
    Posted on 2012-04-22 23:42:46
    Name:Michelle
    Location:SOcal
    Subject:Supplements vs. Food
    Hi, Great article and I just wanted to add my two cents to the page if you don't mind. For those seeking to find some answers for the supplements..I have been taking magnesium citrate for almost two months now and it has helped me a great deal. You should definitely stay away from magnesium oxide and shoot for either citrate or taurate. My favorite is the taurate one but it gets a litle expensive. My main complaints were: irregular heart beats, anxiety, headaches, muscle aches, and constipation. Each person should really test for their right dosage when on the supplements because I sometimes ended up with the runs and it was not fun. However, after finding my right one, I was regular, free of pain, slept like a baby, and it's effective! I could have taken 5 different medications for my problems but magnesium with some exercise (and dietary changes) really improved my life.

    For those of you hesitant or do not want to eat a bunch of different food everyday (who has the time really?) I really recommend you find a reputable brand that includes calcium + magnesium + vit d. as a part of your supplement regimen. Best of health to you all!

    Posted on 2012-05-11 03:53:34
    Name:Gineke
    Location:Australia
    Subject:Magnesium Deficiency
    I was pleased to read your articles and resulting comments. It has confirmed a number of things for me: At around 53 I started going to a gym but got cramps when doing yoga. The trainer recommended that I take magnesium. This has turned out to be great advice. Taking magnesium improved my muscle tone and the cramps disappeared (it took a number of weeks as I must have been quite deficient). Taking magnesium has alleviated other issues I started having: I had started suffering more and more from migraines. They are very rare now (it is also important to drink plenty of water); I had started getting tingling and occasionally numbness in my finger tips and toes...this has totally disappeared! I am gluten and lactose intolerant, which I was not aware of until I was 40 (after having years and years of gastro problems). This may have been the cause of my deficiency. This is now under control through diet. I personally believe that a good diet is the basis of a healthy life, but to alleviate deficiencies taking supplements may be necessary (especially when getting older). Treating the deficiencies is a much better solution than to take medication to treat (read 'mask') symptoms caused by the deficiencies.
    Posted on 2012-05-21 03:07:13
    Name:Mary
    Location:GA
    Subject:Side effects of magnesium supplement
    I have been prescribed Magnesium Oxide, 400 mg. to be taken twice daily. I have also been prescribed many other medications due to heart problems, hypertension, mild COPD. I am suffering severe nausea since beginning the magnesuim. No vomiting, and diarhea, which I believe are side effects of the magnesium. Is there any other type magnesium supplement I might take that would lessen, or eliminate these side effects??
    Posted on 2012-06-04 14:09:50
    Name:Linda
    Location:Florida
    Subject:Magnesium Oxide or Citrate, which is best?
    I just recently bought Magnesium Oxide, which was recommended by the pharmacist, said Citrate was a laxative, but see some of the posts I am confused. I suffer from severe muscle cramps and constant muscle twitching in my calves. I also have muscle weakness, heart palpitations, constant headaches and other things going on. A friend told me it sounds like I am low on magnesium. Any advice would be a great help.
    Posted on 2012-06-25 15:27:31
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium Oxide or Citrate, which is best?
    Hi Linda and Mary, thanks for your questions about Magnesium supplements. If you get too much magnesium then you will have diarhea, and possibly other symptoms. As Michelle from SOcal commented earlier in this article, finding which magnesium supplement is best for you may require experiementation. In other words, try taking one form one month, and another form the next month, and see how you feel. Other forms of magnesium supplements include: magnesium hydroxide, carbonate, citrate, lactate, chloride, sulfate, and taurate.
    Posted on 2012-06-25 21:50:43
    Name:Liz
    Subject:Hormone imbalance
    I've been told that low progesterone levels which leads to infertility could be associated with low magnesium intake. How true? Please verify!
    Posted on 2012-06-28 08:46:12
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Hormone imbalance
    Hi Liz, thanks for your comment. Progesterone and mangesium are indeed related, however, it is uncertain whether low magnesium can lead to low progesterone. Rather, progesterone works by regulating and changing magnesium levels. As this study suggests, when progesterone levels increase, magnesium decreases. Whether being deficient in mangesium hurts the functionality of progesterone is uncertain, but it wouldn't hurt to be sure you are getting enough magnesium. Those who have plently of magnesium can alleviate premenstrual syndromes (PMS) as well.
    Posted on 2012-06-28 11:38:30
    Name:Stephanie
    Location:Florida
    Subject:Magnesium & pregnancy
    I had been taking magnesium supplements for anxiety & irregular heartbeat (I have mitral valve prolapse). I stopped after I found out I was pregnant. My OB recommended I stay off the supplements, at least for the first trimester. My anxiety & irregular heartbeat have returned. Do you know any supplemental level to be safe during pregnancy?
    Posted on 2012-07-03 08:56:51
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium & Pregnancy
    Hi Stephanie, thanks for your question. Early pregnancy is a very delicate thing. You can try eat more foods high in magnesium, otherwise, you are best to follow the advice of your OB and stay off the magnesium supplements.
    Posted on 2012-07-04 01:42:09
    Name:Manon
    Location:Florida
    Subject:Answers to so many questions
    I found this site to be so informative. I have been reading all the posts. I am definitely magnesium deficient. From cramps (ankles & toes), numbness in finger tips, RLS, and surprising to me, my severe anxiety disorder. I am 51, 2 years in my menopause, is magnesium even more important for my bones as well. I will incorporate all the magnesium foods into my diet. Thank you so much!!!!
    Posted on 2012-07-08 02:06:30
    Name:Charlie
    Location:Tenn
    Subject:Magnesium orotate
    What can you tell me about Magnesium Orotate, it supposedly has superior absorption. Also, do you know whether magnesium deficiency can cause tendonitis? Thank you.
    Posted on 2012-07-09 23:48:01
    Name:Laurie
    Location:New Jersey
    Subject:Epsom Salt Baths
    I heard that an effective way to absorb Magnesium is to soak in Epsom Salts, but haven't read any posts on it here. Can you tell me your thoughts on this alternative (and cheap) way to get Magnesium into our body? Thanks for all the great information!
    Posted on 2012-07-31 05:58:08
    Name:Gertrude "Trudy"
    Location:Maine
    Subject:Magnesium oxide
    I may be several months too late for anyone to actually read this, but it needs to be said. Magnesium oxide, while high in magnesium, around 40%, has a very low absorption rate, down around 4%. Its absorption was considered negligible and for this reason was not included in a Russian study of various compounds of magnesium. The study found that there is a trade-off of benefits among the compounds--so it may be sensible to switch types from time to time. From other sources, I also learned that magnesium gluconate is preferable for heart patients, while magnesium citrate is better for gout and kidney patients.
    Posted on 2012-08-08 01:39:50
    Name:Layla
    Location:FL
    Subject:Magnesium food
    Is the list above all of the foods or are there more? Oh and thank you.
    Posted on 2012-09-03 15:17:07
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium food
    Hi Layla, thanks for your question. This article is just for the foods highest in magnesium, there are many more foods which contain magnesium. You can use this nutrient ranking tool to rank over 7000 foods. You can also rank them by food group. Here is a list of 3000 foods high in magnesium.
    Posted on 2012-09-03 17:05:38
    Name:Michelle
    Location:West Reading, PA
    Subject:Smoothie?
    Is there a way to make a smoothie that tastes good but has foods high in magnesium and potassium? My mother is getting ready to undergo chemo and these are the two things that seem to be low in her blood. I believe it is due to meds she is on (albuterol,nexuim). She gets nauseous frequently and doesn't eat as much as she should...
    Posted on 2012-09-10 08:15:49
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE :Smoothie
    Hi Michelle, sorry to hear that your Mom will be undergoing chemo soon, that in itself can make anyone lose their appetite. Something as simple as chocolate milk, or chocolate soy milk, would be nutritious and high in potassium and magnesium. You can try to use milk or soy milk as a base, and add chocolate, bananas, and flax seed. Hope that idea helps.
    Posted on 2012-09-10 09:11:28
    Name:Diane
    Location:Lakeville, CT
    Subject:Magnesium for Lupus
    Does it help to relieve inflamation and, if so, would it be better absorbed in foods or supplement. THANK YOU!
    Posted on 2012-09-29 20:07:11
    Name:Rebecca
    Location:Massachusetts
    Subject:Magnesium in pumpkin/squash seeds
    The site indicates the amount of magnesium in these seeds. Is this raw? Does roasting or toasting make the magnesium more or less accessible to the body?
    Posted on 2012-10-28 10:46:06
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium in pumpkin/squash seeds
    Hi Rebecca, thanks for your question. The seeds referred to in the article should be either dried or roasted.
    Nutrition Facts for Dried and Roasted Squash and Pumpkin Seeds.
    Posted on 2012-10-28 21:46:08
    Name:Char Taylor
    Location:Arkansas
    Subject:Magnesium deficent after cancer
    I had cervical cancer and was treated with radiation and cisplatin, then had to have colostomy, and damaged part of colon removed from radiation damage. How long does the cisplatin affect the magnesium levels, and could my colon problems still be affecting absorbtion? I have been having cramps in all parts of my body, insomnia, depression, tiredness. Decided to start taking a supplement and will be uping the magnesium rich foods, are there any other things that could be depleting it? Was curious about diet soft drinks as well. Thank you so much, great site!!!
    Posted on 2012-11-14 01:29:51
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium deficent after cancer
    Hi Char, thanks for your questions. It is not well understood how long cisplatin will affect your magnesium levels, however, most of the studies suggest that supplementing with magnesium can start to restore your levels almost immediately. Your case is likely more complicated due to your colostomy. Your doctors may have been giving you magnesium during your treatments, if not, they should have tested your levels. Get your magnesium level tested and talk to your doctors about the best strategy for supplementation. Eating the foods here will help of course, but given your colostomy and recovery, supplementation will likely be necessary. Other factors which can put you at risk of a deficiency include not eating enough protein, eating too much fiber, having kidney problems, or taking proton pump inhibitors, diuretics, zinc supplements, and other antibiotics. See the section of this article titled "High Risk Groups for a Magnesium Deficiency" for more information.
    Posted on 2012-11-15 02:08:57
    Name:Tricia
    Location:Australia
    Subject:Normal Magnesium Levels
    Just wondering if 0-85 level of magnesium would be classed as on the low side? Can you tell me what is normal and what would be deficient? My results came back all within normal range but I do get symptoms associated with a lack of magnesium. I also wondered as magnesium helps to regulate blood sugar levels could dizziness be another related symptom? Thanks!
    Posted on 2012-11-15 21:54:45
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Normal Magnesium Levels
    Hi Tricia, thanks for your question. Normal serum (blood) magnesium levels range between 1.7-2.2 mg/dL. Dizziness is not a common symptom of magneisum deficiency, but it is possible.
    Posted on 2012-11-16 03:02:13
    Name:Acc Cess
    Location:DN
    Subject:Brazil Nuts
    Recommending Brazil Nuts for Magnesium is dangerous! People can Selenium overdose quickly on very small amounts of Brazil nuts long before they get anywhere close to that nice dose of magnesium...Please update your site with warnings, or remove from top 10 best sources...it is not accurate if measuring a safe eating amount of brazil nuts.
    Posted on 2012-12-02 16:24:05
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Brazil Nuts
    Hi Acc, thanks for your comment and warning. The article now has warnings about the selenium content of brazil nuts. They would be a good solution for someone looking to get more selenium and magnesium. As suggested, a new list is being created to reflect more commonly eaten foods. Thanks again for your suggestion!
    Posted on 2012-12-02 22:43:08
    Name:Jessica
    Location:MD, USA
    Subject:Thanks!
    Great article very informative! Over the last couple months I've read many articles pertaining to low magnesium this is by far the most informative in regards to food and also contains other helpful information. I have been taking supplements of magnesium etc per my neurologist. I wish he had mentioned the different types and low absorbtion rate of the most common type used for tablets (magnesium oxide). I've had to figure these types of things out on my own (thank goodness for the internet). Even with supplementation I continue to have symptoms associated with low magnesium etc so hoping paying more attention to my diet will help. Thanks!
    Posted on 2013-02-01 13:47:46
    Name:Pamela Bloom
    Location:Ohio
    Subject:Epsom Salt Bath for Magnesium
    A nice soak in an Epsom salt bath for 15 minutes twice a week is a great way to restore magnesium levels. Epsom salts are magnesium sulfate and the body can and does absorb it through the skin. It is also very soothing. 2 cups of Epsom salts per bath.
    Posted on 2013-02-12 19:30:31
    Name:Jennifer
    Location:Scottsdale, AZ
    Subject:Chelated Magnesium
    I was told to take chelated magnesium which I haven't seen written about in this article. I was told that it had the best absorption. What is chelated magnesium?
    Posted on 2013-03-10 11:17:46
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Chelated Magnesium
    Hi Jennifer, thanks for your question. Chelated magnesium is a form of magnesium where amino acids have been used to try boost the absorption of magnesium. It is not known whether this form of magnesium is the best for absorption, but you can try it and see if it works for you.
    Posted on 2013-03-10 23:34:55
    Name:Scott
    Location:Dallas
    Subject:Dried Vs. Fresh Magnesium Foods
    I'm curious as to why DRIED herbs and seeds are specified. If one consumed freshly picked basil or raw pumpkin seeds, would they get magnesium and would the levels be increased or decreased from the dried version? Thanks for this helpful article.
    Posted on 2013-03-11 22:45:31
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Dried Vs. Fresh Magnesium Foods
    Hi Scott, thanks for your question. The fresh foods would contain magnesium, however, this list is made by ranking the about of magnesium per gram. Since dried foods do not contain water, they are much lighter, and therefore, have a high density of magnesium, gram per gram. Looking at the nutrition facts comparison for dried vs. fresh basil, you can see that 1 tblsp of dried basil provides 8mg (2% DV) of magnesium, while 2 tblsp of fresh basil provides 3mg (1% DV). This list will soon be revised to list high magnesium foods by common portion size.
    Posted on 2013-03-12 00:26:56
    Name:Alison
    Location:London UK
    Subject:MS and Magnesium Flakes Footbath
    Thanks for this info and have to say I've started using Magnesium Flakes in a foot spa every day and its helping the circulation and replacing minerals... the above info is so very needed and informative....In gratitude, Alison
    Posted on 2013-03-12 23:46:58
    Name:Rohana Miller
    Location:United States
    Subject:My cancer survival story and why I think Magnesium Gluconate is best...
    I received very aggressive high doses of cisplatin in 1981 for stage 3 ovarian cancer. They don't give such high doses of cisplatin now as they did back then in the first few yrs of its usage. The chemo failed to cure my cancer and I went on to radiation as a last resort. I also followed Linus Pauling's Cancer and Vitamin C regimen and his megavitamin therapy. I was 35 at that time and am now 67. Most of the women who had ovarian cancer at the advanced stage I had it either died of the cancer or of the kidney damage caused by the cisplatin. I received maximum radiation dosage to entire torso and docs were astonished that my skin showed no radiation burns. I believe it was the 40 grams of C plus other vitamins and supplements I took daily. Docs were unwilling to perform 3rd look surgery since there was nothing left to treat me with if they found the cancer was not erradicated. So, I waited and lived my life and survived far beyond my 30% chance to live 5 more years to age 40. I was able to raise my 8 and 10 yr old son and daughter and am now a grandma. In 2007 I learned I had stage 4 kidney disease resulting from the cisplatin damage. I had also suffered from chronic diarrhea for 30 yrs. My veins were ruined by the chemo so long term dialysis was not an option. I was able to keep my kidneys stable for 6 yrs by putting myself on a strict renal diet and taking probiotics. The renal damage caused me to have a stroke, a-fib, osteoporosis. Jan 16th, 2013, I received a kidney transplant. My 40 yr old son was my living donor and my 42 yr old daughter was my 24/7 caretaker nurse as I recovered. It has now been two months and I am gaining strength daily, thanks to the love and devotion of my kids and a great medical team. I have been low on magnesium since my cisplatin treatment, but until I was diagnosed with kidney disease, no docs ever mentioned it to me, though I suffered with all the symptoms! Now, the anti-rejection meds and all the pills I have to take to counteract the side-effects of those meds (30+ pills daily) also reduce my magnesium levels further. Magnesium gluconate is the best form to take if you suffer from diarrhea. Amazon sells bottles of it for less than $4 for 90 pills. However, the bottle says 500mg on it, but only about 25mg of each tab is actually magnesium, the rest is gluconate. Increasing your dietary intake of high magnesium foods is by far much more effective in keeping your mag levels up and it's easy. Snacking on nuts and seeds, eating plenty of good veggies and beans, etc. will make a huge difference and you will feel the strength return to your limbs in a matter of a day or two once you start focusing on how you are eating. So, in answer to those who mentioned cisplatin - the effect on your magnesium levels can last forever because cisplatin is so damaging to your kidneys. Being highly pro-active in your own health and educating yourself can save or prolong your life. I am living proof of that. I have found my medical teams very respectful of my efforts because they see the results I have achieved, which seem miraculous to many. I firmly believe that you MUST build you strength and body to withstand cancer treatment and also to live your best life possible with other diseases you might be dealing with. This website is excellent!
    Posted on 2013-03-20 20:41:35
    Name:S Avery
    Location:Tennessee
    Subject:Does magnesium cause kidney damage?
    I was taking 800mgs of magnesium with chelated zinc for restless legs and it worked. Then someone told me it was bad for my kidneys. Is this true? It sure did help a lot and has come back since I quit taking it. Thanks for your website and hope you can answer this and it is a no!!!
    Posted on 2013-03-29 17:13:18
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Does magnesium cause kidney damage?
    Hi S Avery, thanks for your question. The amount of magnesium in your body is regulated by your kidneys. As long as your kidneys are healthy, they should have no problem regulating 800mgs plus whatever dietary magnesium you get. So the answer is while your kidneys may have to work harder, it should be fine to take the supplement. If you are worried about it, see if 400mgs a day works for you. Buy a pill cutter and cut the pill in half if need be. This can also save you money in the long run if you find it effective. Hope that helps.
    Posted on 2013-03-29 23:55:00
    Name:Jerry
    Location:Michigan
    Subject:Lower back muscle pain after spinal fusion
    I had a spinal fusion which worked but the lower muscles in my back are sore and walking has not helped. A therapist has said I need to take Epson salt bath. Is she right?
    Posted on 2013-04-07 17:13:18
    Name:D Banks
    Location:United States
    Subject:Muscle Cramps When Working Out
    I just started taking magnesium supplements when I had been told that is what I need to take to help with muscle cramps a long time ago. Oh how I wish I had just tried it way back when (as I take a lot of other health food items) because let me tell you it works. I feel calmer and my muscles don't cramp like before. Thank God.
    Posted on 2013-04-15 00:18:18
    Name:Kevin
    Location:Australia
    Subject:PMR (Polymyalgia Rheumatica)
    Can magnesium help with PMR? I've had it for about 18 months. It's not as severe as it was, but I've had enough! It has now moved to my ribs and chest area. Thank you.
    Posted on 2013-04-30 13:38:08
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: PMR (Polymyalgia Rheumatica)
    Hi Kevin, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your condition. There is no evidence to suggest that magnesium helps with PMR. You can find more information on PMR here.
    Posted on 2013-05-01 02:56:09
    Name:Louis
    Location:Australia
    Subject:Is rice bran crude a practical source?
    If rice bran crude is so high in magnesium, and dv or daily intake in mg is 400mg, does it have an adverse reaction? You wouldn't eat a cup of rice bran. You would just sprinkle s teaspoon on your oatmeal. Or have I got it wrong?
    Posted on 2013-05-08 09:04:23
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Is rice bran crude a practical source?
    Hi Louis, Thanks for your questions and comment. It is true that most people would not consume a whole cup of bran, and it would not be the best thing for them. However, this list ranks the foods highest in magnesium by nutrient density. Thus bran takes the number 1 spot. The lists on this site are currently being revised to take serving size into account. Till then, the extended list of magnesium rich foods can give you some good practical suggestions to boost your magnesium content.
    Posted on 2013-05-08 09:33:02
    Name:Joanne
    Location:Northern Ireland
    Subject:Fibromyalgia and Magnesium
    I've heard magnesium can help with a pain of fibromyalgia is this true?
    Posted on 2013-05-14 20:05:53
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Fibromyalgia and Magnesium
    Hi Joanne, thanks for your question. This study suggests found that taking 1200–2400 mg of malate and 300–600 mg of magnesium per day, over 8 weeks, significantly reduced the pain of fibromyalgia. You can get a magnesium malate supplement here if you want to try it. For further reading regarding fibromyalgia and magneisum check this article by an MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) researcher.
    Posted on 2013-05-14 21:01:26
    Name:PM
    Location:Canada
    Subject:Magnesium Bisglycinate
    What about magnesium bisglycinate? What is the difference with this and all the others you mention? My naturopathic doctor recommended this for muscle cramps.
    Posted on 2013-05-15 11:57:17
    Name:Robin
    Location:USA
    Subject:Tinnitus
    Do you think there is a correlation between tinnitus and magnesium, and if so how much magnesium do you suggest on a daily basis?
    Posted on 2013-05-15 20:01:55
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Tinnitus and Magnesium
    Hi Robin, thanks for your question. Some studies do suggest that taking magnesium (~500mg) per day can help reduce the severity of tinnitus. You can try a chelated magnesium supplement, taking doses throughout the day to reach around 500mg. Hope that helps.
    Posted on 2013-05-16 02:41:33
    Name:Rebecca
    Location:Tennessee
    Subject:Bhrt and Magnesium
    At menopause I began having migraines and already had osteopenia because of thyroid disease, so I began taking bioidentical estrogen and progesterone. The migraines are now rare, however, soon after beginning the hormones I began to ache really badly. Already having fibromyalgia, I asked my pharmacist, who recommended increasing my magnesium supplement from 400 to 800 mg. It worked! If anyone else has had this problem, maybe it will help you. I eat healthy foods and get magnesium that way also. Thank you for the information and help you are providing.
    Posted on 2013-06-15 22:06:52
    Name:Karen
    Location:Indiana
    Subject:Calcium & Magnesium
    I have HPTH (hypoparathyroidism). I was told by my doctor to take 400mg of magnesium oxide; however, it seems to upset my stomach. I was wondering if anyone else had these problems esp. HPTH patients.
    Posted on 2013-10-06 21:42:13
    Name:Debra J.M. Smith
    Location:Upstate New York
    Subject:TMJ (Jaw issues from teeth clinching)
    Recently I learned that magnesium could help with my jaw problems that are caused by clinching my teeth in my sleep, that the calming effect of magnesium might help me relax in my sleep and not clinch. Your article is very appreciated, as are all of your responses in the comments section. --Have you ever heard of stress depleting magnesium, and then such causing a circular effect because a magnesium deficiency causes a person to have more stress? --Two more things: When my youngest daughter was a child, she was almost too happy and just could not sit still for long (she was a happy-hyper child.) For a month I gave her low amounts of magnesium supplements, and it calmed her down. Also, I took acid reducers for many years and quit them roughly two years ago. Thanks for your info on those too.
    Posted on 2013-10-17 19:34:33
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: TMJ (Jaw issues from teeth clinching)
    Hi Debra, thanks for all your comments and questions. Taking magnesium can definitely help with TMJ, especially if you are deficient in magnesium. This study confirms your other comments that stress can deplete magnesium, and also that a deficiency in magnesium can cause hyperactive behavior. The antacids should not have had an effect on your magnesium level, unless they contained magnesium, in which case, they may have helped increase your magnesium level. Hope that helps.
    Posted on 2013-10-18 06:38:25
    Name:Dagun
    Location:Iceland
    Subject:Do I have enough?
    Hi, my blood test showed that I have 0,76 mmol/l of magnesium in my blood, is that ok or would you recommend that I take something extra? Thank you!
    Posted on 2013-10-23 19:28:21
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Do I have enough?
    Hi Dagun, thanks for your question. 0.76mmol/L is toward the low end of "normal" magnesium levels, however you should be fine. Try to consume more high magnesium foods like those in this article, and see if your level improves by your next test. If not, you could consider supplements. Hope that helps.
    Posted on 2013-10-24 16:53:48
    Name:Mary
    Location:Gerrards Cross, England
    Subject:Magnesium Supplement Dose Amount?
    Hi - I have suffered with toe cramps at night for a long time but it has started to get worse and occasionally I am woken by a cramp in the calf muscle which is unbearable as leaves my calf tender and sore for a couple of days. I went to my health food shop and started on a magnesium supplement which is 1 x 500mg a day. I have only been taking for the last 4 days and have had no cramps!!! I have had no side effects as yet. Is 500mg a day too much? Should I take every day or perhaps only a couple of times a week? Should I go to my doctor and get my level tested? I do not eat enough of the foods high in magnesium but intend to improve this. This article was extremely helpful and I look forward to your reply.
    Posted on 2013-10-28 06:50:38
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Magnesium Supplement Dose Amount?
    Hi Mary, thanks for your question and sharing your experience. Taking 500mg of supplemental magnesium a day should be fine. However, The Office of Dietary Supplements cautions taking too much magnesium from supplements as it can cause diarrhea or stomach cramps. They do set the limit of supplemental magnesium at 350mg a day. However, if you are not experiencing diarrhea or stomach cramps you are fine. If you do experience those symptoms cut back to 500mg every 2 days. Do get your magnesium level checked at your next doctors visit to be sure that is the problem. Also, be aware that magnesium can interfere with other medications including bisphosphonates, antibiotics, diuretics, and proton pump inhibitors. If you are not taking these medications then you probably do not need to worry, but check with your health care provider if you are taking any other medications. Hope that helps.
    Posted on 2013-10-29 05:34:43
    Name:JBC
    Location:NC
    Subject:Where's the potato?
    So why are potatoes not on this list? One medium sized potato contains about 50 mg of magnesium, beating the banana and avocado. One potato also contains an abundance of Vit. C and Vit. B-6. I know potatoes are becoming the latest demon-food, but they do have some really great nutritional benefits!
    Posted on 2013-11-12 06:46:11
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Where's the potato?
    Hi JBC, thanks for your comment. Baked potatoes with skin has now been added to the extended list of magnesium rich vegetables. Eating the skin is advisable to get all the nutritional benefits.
    Posted on 2013-11-13 05:09:01
    Name:Cheryl
    Location:Colorado
    Subject:For Psoriasis and Asthma?
    I had heard that people with a patch of psoriasis on the scalp that is very persistent in spite of using dandruff shampoo with zinc should take some zinc supplements. Then, I found the Calcium, Magnesium, and Zinc supplement. Within a month the psoriasis was gone and my asthma-type condition was greatly improved. Now, I still do fight the re-occurrence of both; but, they are better controlled, anyway. And, thank you for such a wonderful website!
    Posted on 2014-01-04 16:51:29
    Name:Avan
    Location:IL
    Subject:Medications and magnesium absorption
    Just wanted to add that Tacrolimus (an immunosuppressant commonly prescribed to prevent organ transplant rejection) will lower magnesium levels.

    These patients battle with the drug causing their bodies to "dump" mag. Thanks for the info. on helping mag. be more absorb-able. Any more suggestions would be very appreciated!

    Posted on 2014-01-16 10:35:10
    Name:Intuiteone
    Location:Pacific NW
    Subject:Eczema and magnesium
    Has anyone been incorporating supplementing magnesium to helping their excema symptoms like itching? Thanks
    Posted on 2014-01-26 12:30:19
    Name:M S Grewal
    Location:Ludhiana Punjab India
    Subject:Cramps in diabetic legs/feet.
    I was having cramps in my legs/feet for a few months. In the last week it became unbearable, I had excess urination (every hour)at night causing insomnia(7 nights).Fortunately I had a capsule Ravital (magnesium 3 mg). After half an hour in the afternoon I was fast asleep. I fail to understand your magnesium daily dose recommendation.
    Posted on 2014-02-09 04:47:44
    Name:PJ
    Location:Sydney
    Subject:Magnesium for relaxation
    I am getting amazing results using magnesium to improve my sleep. Unfortunately where I live I can't get access to some of the better forms of magnesium so I am using citrate and oxide.

    I recently read a great book on Magnesium by James Lee which appeared to be saying that magnesium helps you sleep because it promotes muscle relaxation throughout the body (something to do with calcium promoting muscle contraction and magnesium promoting subsequent relaxation) but also increases levels of serotonin.

    I don't really care *how*, I just care that my sleep has dramatically improved since I started taking it.

    What have been people's experiences in terms of the best form of magnesium (or brands even)?

    Posted on 2014-03-22 00:03:18
    Name:Maple
    Location:Ohio
    Subject:Magnesium for Migraine
    I have been suffering from Migraines for 30 years. I have seen a Neurologist for the past 17 years. The Neurologist moved so I had to find a new doctor (what a blessing!). My bouts with the migraines had increased dramatically in the last year both in frequency and duration. When I was not having a migraine I was carrying around the ghost of one. Two weeks ago I went to my new Neurologist, he suggested I take 500 mg of Magnesium a day and warned me of the side affects. I started taking 500mg right away and was affected right away with the bliss of no ghost or migraine. (what heaven) I did have a couple days of diarrhea but stoped the Magnesium for a couple of days and then started with half a dose(250mg). I have my life back and I want to tell everyone about this who suffers. I know I may still have migraine at some point but Magnesium has released me from my prison of pain. Thank you so very much for the information I have gleaned from your site.
    Posted on 2014-03-29 09:40:54
    Name:Kathy
    Location:Montana
    Subject:Epsom salt baths
    I have seen at least three posts (one was a question of effectiveness) that were about epsom salt baths and/or foot soaks increasing the absorption of magnesium by our bodies, and I have not seen a reply from Health-alicious-ness about this. I am particularly interested in the validity of this claim as I am sure would be anyone else trying to get their levels up. Perhaps it is because it is not a dietary source; but could you comment anyway or refer us to another source to verify this information.
    Posted on 2014-04-06 16:49:16
    Name:HealthAliciousNess
    Subject:RE: Epsom salt baths
    Hi Kathy, thanks for your question. It is a difficult question to answer because there have not been many scientific studies on the matter, and so it is not possible to say if it is helpful or not. This page has a good discussion on the topic, though perhaps has an interest in disproving the use of epsom salts. This study, by the Epsom Salt Council suggests that epsom salt baths do increase magnesium levels, but does not suggest why. It could simply be that salt baths lower the concentration of water in your body and make it appear that your magnesium is higher. In the end, if salt baths make you feel better, you could take them and see if your magnesium level improves long term. However, salt baths should not be relied upon as the only way to boost your magnesium, and should be used in conjunction with high magnesium foods or supplements. Hope that helps.
    Posted on 2014-04-11 01:41:16

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