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Top 10 Foods Highest in Manganese


Manganese is required by the body for proper enzyme functioning, nutrient absorption, wound healing, and bone development. Manganese deficiency is rare and can been seen expressed in poor bone health, joint pain, and fertility problems. Manganese toxicity from food sources is also rare, but can adversely affect the neurological system. Health benefits of manganese includes strengthening weak bones, anti-oxidant protection, alleviating pre menstrual syndrome (PMS), anemia, arthritis, alopecia (spot baldness), and prevention of epileptic seizures. However, more research needs to be conducted to confirm these health benefits. The current DV for manganese is 2mg. Below is a list of high manganese foods, for more, see the lists of high manganese foods by nutrient density, and manganese rich foods.

#1: Seafood (Mussels, Cooked)
Manganese 100g Per 3oz (85g)Per ounce (28g)
6.8mg (340% DV)5.8mg (289% DV)1.9mg (96% DV)
Other Seafood High in Manganese (%DV per 3oz cooked): Clams (43%), and Crayfish (22%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#2: Nuts (Hazelnuts)
Manganese 100g Per 2oz (56g)Per ounce (28g)
5.6mg (278% DV)3.1mg (156% DV)1.6mg (78% DV)
Other Nuts High in Manganese (%DV per ounce): Pecans (55%), Walnuts (48%), Macadamia (43%), Almonds (32%), Cashews (23%), and Pistachio (17%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#3: Seeds (Pumpkin)
Manganese 100g Per cup (129g)Per ounce (28g)
4.5mg (227% DV)5.9mg (293% DV)1.3mg (64% DV)
Other Seeds High in Manganese (%DV per ounce): Chia Seeds (38%), Sesame and Flaxseeds (35%), and Sunflower Seeds (30%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#4: Bread (Whole-Wheat)
Manganese 100g Per slice (28g)Per 2 slices (56g)
2.1mg (107% DV)0.7mg (35% DV)1.4mg (70% DV)
Other Breads High in Manganese (%DV per piece): Whole-Wheat English Muffin (59%), Whole-Wheat Pita (56%), and Whole-Wheat Roll (32%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#5: Tofu (Firm, Raw)
Manganese 100g Per 1/2 cup (126g)Per 1/4 block (81g)
1.2mg (59% DV)1.5mg (74% DV)1.0mg (48% DV)
Tempeh is also High in Manganese (%DV per 1/2 cup): (54%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#6: Beans (Butter/Lima Beans, Cooked)
Manganese 100g Per cup (170g)Per 1/2 cup (85g)
1.3mg (63% DV)2.1mg (106% DV)1.1mg (53% DV)
Other Beans High in Manganese (%DV per cup cooked): Winged Beans (103%), Chickpeas (84%), Adzuki Beans (66%), White Beans (57%), Black-eyed Beans (47%), and Kidney Beans (42%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#7: Fish (Bass, Cooked)
Manganese 100g Per fillet (62g)Per 3oz (85g)
1.1mg (57% DV)0.7mg (35% DV)1.0mg (48% DV)
Other Fish High in Manganese (%DV per 3oz cooked): Trout (46%), Pike (44%), and Perch (38%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#8: Spinach (Cooked)
Manganese 100g Per cup (180g)Per 1/2 cup (90g)
0.9mg (47% DV)1.7mg (84% DV)0.8mg (42% DV)
Other Dark Green Leafy Vegetables High in Manganese (%DV per cup cooked): Frozen Spinach (68%), Amaranth Leaves (57%), Beet Greens (37%), Swiss Chard (29%), and Napa Cabbage (11%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#9: Kale
Manganese 100g Per cup, chopped (67g)Per 1/2 cup, chopped (34g)
0.7mg (33% DV)0.4mg (22% DV)0.2mg (11% DV)
A cup of chopped kale contains only 33 calories and 0.6g of fat. Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#10: Tea (Black, Brewed)
Manganese 100g Per cup (237g)Per fluid ounce (30g)
0.2mg (11% DV)0.5mg (26% DV)0.1mg (3% DV)
A cup of instant tea contains (47% DV). Click to see complete nutrition facts.




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Top 10 High Manganese Foods by Nutrient Density (Manganese per Gram)

#1: Dried Herbs & Spices (Ground Cloves) 60.1mg (3006% DV) per 100 grams1.2mg (60% DV) per teaspoon (2 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Herbs & Spices
#2: Bran (Rice) 14.2mg (711% DV) per 100 grams16.8mg (838% DV) per cup (118 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Bran
#3: Pine Nuts 8.8mg (440% DV) per 100 grams2.5mg (123% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pine Nuts
#4: Mussels 6.8mg (340% DV) per 100 grams5.8mg (289% DV) per 3oz (85 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Mussels
#5: Hazelnuts (Filberts) 5.6mg (278% DV) per 100 grams1.6mg (78% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Hazelnuts
#6:Pumpkin Seeds 4.5mg (227% DV) per 100 grams1.3mg (64% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pumpkin Seeds
#7: Cocoa & Chocolate (Cocoa Powder) 3.8mg (192% DV) per 100 grams0.2mg (10% DV) per tablespoon (5 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cocoa & Chocolate
#8: Dry Roasted Soybeans (Edamame) 2.2mg (108% DV) per 100 grams3.7mg (186% DV) per cup (172 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Edamame
#9: Sun Dried Tomatoes 1.9mg (92% DV) per 100 grams1.0mg (50% DV) per cup (54 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sun Dried Tomatoes
#10: Garlic 1.7mg (84% DV) per 100 grams0.2mg (8% DV) per 3 cloves (9 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Garlic


Other Manganese Rich Foods

Rye Crackers 5.4mg (268% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.8mg (38% DV) per 1/2 ounce (14 grams) 0.6mg (30% DV) per cracker (11 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Rye Crackers
Lemongrass 5.2mg (261% DV) per 100 gram serving 3.5mg (175% DV) per cup (67 grams) 0.3mg (13% DV) per tablespoon (5 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Lemongrass
Granola (Homemade) 4.1mg (203% DV) per 100 gram serving 5.0mg (247% DV) per cup (122 grams) 1.1mg (57% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Granola
Maple Syrup 2.9mg (145% DV) per 100 gram serving 9.2mg (458% DV) per cup (315 grams) 0.6mg (29% DV) per tablespoon (20 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Maple Syrup
Pretzels (Whole-Wheat) 2.7mg (133% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.5mg (76% DV) per 2oz (57 grams) 0.8mg (37% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pretzels
Wild Blueberries 2.0mg (100% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.9mg (144% DV) per 100g frozen 4.0mg (201% DV) per cup frozen (140 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Wild Blueberries
Spirulina 1.9mg (95% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.1mg (106% DV) per cup (112 grams) 0.1mg (7% DV) per tablespoon (7 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Spirulina
Molasses 1.5mg (77% DV) per 100 gram serving 5.2mg (258% DV) per cup (337 grams) 0.3mg (15% DV) per tablespoon (20 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Molasses
Sweet Potato Chips 1.4mg (67% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.5mg (23% DV) per packet (34 grams) 0.4mg (19% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sweet Potato Chips
Shiitake Mushrooms (Dried) 1.2mg (59% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.2mg (9% DV) per 4 mushrooms (15 grams) 0.05mg (2% DV) per mushroom (4 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Shiitake Mushrooms
Okra (Frozen, cooked) 0.84mg (42% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.78mg (39% DV) per 1/2 cup (92 grams) 2.2mg (108% DV) per package (255 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Okra
Teff (Cooked) 2.9mg (143% DV) per 100 gram serving 7.2mg (360% DV) per cup (252 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Teff
Desiccated Coconut 2.8mg (137% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.8mg (38% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Desiccated Coconut
Sprouted Wheat 1.9mg (93% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.0mg (100% DV) per cup (108 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sprouted Wheat
Buckwheat Groats (Roasted) 1.6mg (81% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.7mg (133% DV) per cup (164 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Buckwheat Groats
Whole-Wheat Spaghetti (Cooked) 1.4mg (69% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.9mg (97% DV) per cup (140 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Whole-Wheat Spaghetti
For more foods high in manganese use the nutrient ranking tool.

Health Benefits of Manganese

  • Antioxidant Protection - Magnanese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is the principle antioxidant used during energy production in the mitochondria (the powerhouse of our cells).2
  • Osteoporosis Protection (*Controversial) - Two recent studies have found that women with osteoporosis have lower blood manganese levels, than women without osteoporosis.3,4 This finding is a correlation, and does not suggest any specific link between manganese and osteoporosis, however, it is promising since manganese is involved in bone development. Despite this theory another study found no difference in blood magnesium levels between women with osteoporosis and women without it, creating doubts about the effects of manganese.5
  • Prevention of Epileptic Seizures - Preliminary studies in rats show that those with lower manganese levels are more prone to epileptic seizures. There is also evidence that people with lower manganese levels have a greater risk of epileptic seizures. The causes of epilepsy, however, are not well understood, and more research needs to be done before there can be a conclusive link between epilepsy and manganese.6,7
  • Prevention of Alopecia (Spot Baldness) - A study on alopecia reported that all 19 participants were deficient in manganese. Several other participants also had problems with calcium absorption and zinc metabolism. After 2-3 months of micro-nutrient therapy normal hair growth was resumed.8

Warnings

  • Mussels, Oysters, and Clams are high cholesterol foods which should be eaten in moderate amounts and avoided by people at risk of heart disease or stroke.
  • Intake of manganese from enriched infant formulas can lead to hyperactive children, or learning disabled children. Excessive levels of manganese are toxic and suppliments should be approached with care.9

Buy Manganese Foods

Cloves, saffron, pine nuts, pecans, cocoa powder, roasted squash seeds, tahini (sesame butter), flax seeds, chili powder, Roasted Soy Beans (Edamame), Sunflower Seeds.




Comments.
Name:Heather
Location:Houston, TX
Subject:Tea and Manganese
Green tea is very high in manganese. I'm prediabetic and this mineral lowers my glucose.
Posted on 2012-08-26 16:08:12
Name:Ellie Ragsdale
Location:Mtn. View, CA
Subject:Manganese Deficiency
How come manganese deficiency (I'd expect it's not enough of it) and toxicity are rare?
Posted on 2014-01-09 08:32:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Manganese Deficiency
Hi Ellie, thanks for your question. Manganese deficiency is rare because most people only need to consume 2mg a day, and manganese is found in a wide variety of foods. Further, manganese is well regulated by the body, so toxicity from foods is rare, however, it can easily be toxic if you consume too much manganese from supplements or some other source.
Posted on 2014-01-14 14:49:35

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Comments.
Name:Heather
Location:Houston, TX
Subject:Tea and Manganese
Green tea is very high in manganese. I'm prediabetic and this mineral lowers my glucose.
Posted on 2012-08-26 16:08:12
Name:Ellie Ragsdale
Location:Mtn. View, CA
Subject:Manganese Deficiency
How come manganese deficiency (I'd expect it's not enough of it) and toxicity are rare?
Posted on 2014-01-09 08:32:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Manganese Deficiency
Hi Ellie, thanks for your question. Manganese deficiency is rare because most people only need to consume 2mg a day, and manganese is found in a wide variety of foods. Further, manganese is well regulated by the body, so toxicity from foods is rare, however, it can easily be toxic if you consume too much manganese from supplements or some other source.
Posted on 2014-01-14 14:49:35

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References

  1. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 26.
  2. Leach RM, Harris ED. Manganese. In: O'Dell BL, Sunde RA, eds. Handbook of nutritionally essential minerals. New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc; 1997:335-355.
  3. Freeland-Graves J, Llanes C. Models to study manganese deficiency. In: Klimis-Tavantzis DL, ed. Manganese in health and disease. Boca Raton: CRC Press, Inc; 1994.
  4. Reginster JY, Strause LG, Saltman P, Franchimont P. Trace elements and postmenopausal osteoporosis: a preliminary study of decreased serum manganese. Med Sci Res. 1988;16:337-338.
  5. Odabasi E, Turan M, Aydin A, Akay C, Kutlu M. Magnesium, zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium levels in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Can magnesium play a key role in osteoporosis? Ann Acad Med Singapore. 2008;37(7):564-567.
  6. Keen CL, Zidenberg-Cherr S. Manganese. In: Ziegler EE, Filer LJ, eds. Present Knowledge in Nutrition. 7th ed. Washington D.C.: ILSI Press; 1996:334-343.
  7. Carl GF, Gallagher BB. Manganese and epilepsy. In: Klimis-Tavantzis DL, ed. Manganese in health and disease. Boca Raton: CRC Press, Inc; 1994:133-157.
  8. Blaurock-Busch, E. Wichtige Nahrstoffe fur Gesunde Haut und Haare, Kosmetik Internat. 3/87.
  9. Collipp, P.J., et al. Manganese in infant formulas and learning disability. Ann. Nutr. Metab. 27(6):488-494, 1983.