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Top 10 Foods Highest in Cholesterol


Cholesterol is a steroid lipid (fat) found in the blood of all animals and is necessary for proper functioning of our cell membranes and production of hormones. While there can be negative health benefits associated with low cholesterol, cholesterol deficiency is rare. Our bodies already manufacture all the cholesterol we need, so it is not necessary to consume more. Excessive consumption of cholesterol has been shown to increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. Cholesterol is only found in animal food products, and thus, vegans are likely to have lower cholesterol than non-vegans. It is recommended that you buy a Cholesterol Test Kit, so you can monitor your cholesterol levels at home and see which diet works best for you. The current percent daily value (DV) for cholesterol is 300mg. Below is a list of high cholesterol foods, click here for an extended list of cholesterol rich foods. To lower your cholesterol, read the article on cholesterol lowering foods.

#1: Egg Yolk
The yolks of eggs have the most cholesterol of any food with 1234mg per 100 gram serving or 411% of the DV. A single egg yolk will provide 210mg (70% DV) of cholesterol, while a whole egg provides slightly more with 212mg (71% DV). Thus all the cholesterol in eggs is found in their yolks.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#2: Caviar (Fish Roe)
A common spread for breads in Northern and Eastern Europe, caviar is packed with cholesterol. 100 grams provides 588mg (196% DV), that is 94mg (31% DV) per tablespoon.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#3: Liver, Pate, Foie Gras
Cholesterol is manufactured by the liver, and therefore liver in cuisine contains a lot of cholesterol. The liver from most any meat will contain 564mg of cholesterol per 100 grams or 188% of the DV. Foie Gras (and most pâtés) contain 255mg (85% DV) per 100g serving,or 20mg (7% DV) per tablespoon.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#4: Butter
Common in cakes, cookies, on bread, and vegetables, butter is everywhere. 100 grams of butter packs 215mg (72% DV) of cholesterol, one stick has more with 243mg (81% DV), and one tablespoon contains 30mg (10% DV).
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#5: Shrimp (Prawns, Camarones)
100 grams of shrimp will contain 195mg (65% DV) of cholesterol. A single large shrimp contains 11mg (4% DV), and an ounce of shrimp will provide around 55mg (18% DV).
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#6: Fast Foods (Breakfasts)
Fast foods, the breakfasts in particular, are packed with cholesterol. A ham, egg, and cheese biscuit will provide 172mg (57% DV) per 100g serving, or 246mg (82% DV) of cholesterol per biscuit. An egg and sausage biscuit has even more with 261mg (87% DV).
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#7: Oil Packed Fish
Although thought to be good for your heart, the oil of fish, and oil packed fish, does contain quite a bit of cholesterol. Oil packed Atlantic Sardines carry 142mg (47% DV) of cholesterol per 100g. That is 131mg (44% DV) per can, and 17mg (6% DV) in a single sardine.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#8: Cheese
A vegetarian source of protein, and also a good source of calcium, cheese is a tasty addition to most any dish. Port de Salut contains the most cholesterol with 123mg (41% DV) per 100 gram serving. That is 21mg (7% DV) per one inch cube. Other cheeses high in cholesterol include: Fontina (39% DV), Gouda (38%), Cream Cheese (37% DV), Gruyere (37%), and Cheddar (35% DV).
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#9: Processed Meats (Sausage, Lamb, Duck)
The amount of cholesterol in any processed meat depends on the cut used, and the amount of fat added during processing. Liver sausage and bratwurst will contain around 158mg (50% DV) of cholesterol per 100 gram serving. That is 63mg (21% DV) per link. In terms of meats, lamb and duck will contain the most cholesterol all things being equal.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#10: Shellfish (Oysters, Clams, and Mussels)
Shellfish can be eaten raw, baked, steamed, fried, or made into chowder. Wild Eastern Oysters contain the most cholesterol with 105mg (35% DV) per 100g serving. That is 30mg (10% DV) per ounce, or 7mg (3% DV) per oyster.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.



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Other Cholesterol Rich Foods (Which should be avoided by people with high blood cholesterol)

Squid (Calamari)260mg (87% DV) per 100 gram serving1179mg (395% DV) per pound (453 grams)221mg (74% DV) in a 3oz serving (85 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Squid (Calamari)
Fast Food Biscuits, Burgers, and Sandwiches*235mg (78% DV) per 100 gram serving353mg (118% DV) per item (150 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fast Food Egg and Bacon Biscuit
Cream Puffs (Eclair)196mg (65% DV) per 100 gram serving129mg (43% DV) per cream puff (66 grams)94mg (31% DV) in an eclair (48 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cream Puffs and Eclairs
Liver Sausage (Liverwurst)*158mg (53% DV) per 100 gram serving28mg (9% DV) per slice (18 grams)44mg (15% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Liver Sausage (Liverwurst)
Crab Cakes*150mg (50% DV) per 100 gram serving180mg (60% DV) in two crab cakes (120 grams)90mg (30% DV) per crab cake (60 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Crab Cakes (Blue Crab)
Chocolate Mousse*140mg (47% DV) per 100 gram serving566mg (188% DV) per cup (404 grams)283mg (94% DV) in a half-cup (202 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Chocolate Mousse
Heavy Whipping Cream137mg (46% DV) per 100 gram serving326mg (109% DV) per cup cream (~2 cups whipped) (238 grams)164mg (55% DV) per cup whipped (120 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Heavy Whipping Cream
Snack and Candy Bars*136mg (45% DV) per 100 gram serving38mg (13% DV) in a 1 ounce bar (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Snack and Candy Bars
Crayfish133mg (44% DV) per 100 gram serving113mg (38% DV) in a 3 ounce serving (85 grams)38mg (13% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Wild Caught Crayfish
Beef Stick Snacks*133mg (44% DV) per 100 gram serving27mg (9% DV) per stick (20 grams)37mg (12% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Smoked Beef Stick Snacks
Whelk130mg (43% DV) per 100 gram serving111mg (37% DV) in a 3 ounce serving (85 grams)37mg (12% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Whelk
Blood Sausage120mg (40% DV) per 100 gram serving30mg (10% DV) per slice (25 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Blood Sausage
Pork Ribs**118mg (39% DV) per 100 gram serving258mg (86% DV) per pound (219 grams)100mg (33% DV) in a 3 ounce serving (85 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Roasted Pork Back-ribs
Souffle118mg (39% DV) per 100 gram serving320mg (106% DV) in two cups (272 grams)160mg (53% DV) per cup (136 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Spinach Souffle
Cookies, Cakes, Pies, and Brownies*117mg (39% DV) per 100 gram serving6mg (2% DV) per item (5 grams)33mg (11% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Butter Cookies
Veal**113mg (38% DV) per 100 gram serving292mg (97% DV) per pound (258 grams)96mg (32% DV) in a 3 ounce serving (85 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Roasted Veal Shoulder
Bacon113mg (38% DV) per 100 gram serving36mg (12% DV) in 4 slices (32 grams)9mg (3% DV) per slice (8 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pan Fried Bacon
Fried Chicken (esp. Fast Foods)**112mg (37% DV) per 100 gram serving166mg (55% DV) in two pieces (148 grams)83mg (27% DV) per piece (74 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Breaded and Fried Chicken, Dark Meat (Leg or Thigh)
Pepperoni (Beef, Pork, and Turkey)*105mg (35% DV) per 100 gram serving2mg (1% DV) per slice (2 grams)29mg (10% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pepperoni
Toffee104mg (35% DV) per 100 gram serving48mg (16% DV) in 4 pieces (48 grams)12mg (4% DV) per piece (12 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Toffee
Salami*100mg (33% DV) per 100 gram serving27mg (9% DV) in 3 slices (27 grams)28mg (9% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dry (or Hard) Salami
Octopus96mg (32% DV) per 100 gram serving82mg (27% DV) in a 3 ounce serving (85 grams)27mg (9% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Octopus
Ice Cream92mg (31% DV) per 100 gram serving196mg (66% DV) per cup (214 grams)98mg (33% DV) in a half-cup (107 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Vanilla Ice Cream
Whole Milk (3.25% Milkfat)10mg (3% DV) per 100 gram serving24mg (8% DV) per cup (244 grams)3mg (1% DV) in a fluid ounce (31 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Whole Milk
*Amount of cholesterol may vary greatly between products. Be sure to check nutrition labels for the exact amount of cholesterol in each individual product.
**Amount of cholesterol varies greatly between cuts. Ask for low-fat lean cuts which will greatly reduce the amount of cholesterol. For chicken and turkey white meat has less cholesterol and fat than dark cuts such as the leg and thigh.

High Risk Groups who need to limit or eliminate Cholesterol Consumption

  • Individuals with a family history of high cholesterol - Regulation of cholesterol blood levels are hereditary and it is advisable to find out if relatives have high cholesterol levels.
  • Older Adults - Cholesterol levels rise with age, particularly in post-menopausal women.
  • Over weight Individuals - Being over-weight increases risk of heart-disease and tends to colerate with high cholesterol levels.
  • People with Low Physical Activity Levels - Excersize is an effective way to lower bad cholesterol levels (LDLs) and raise good cholesterol levels (HDLs). People who are not physically active are at risk for high cholesterol levels.
  • Individuals with high blood pressure - High blood pressure in combination with high cholesterol levels greatly increases the risk of heart disease and heart attacks.
  • Smokers - Individuals who smoke cigarettes have a higher risk of heart disease and should avoid high cholesterol foods.

Buy Cholesterol Test Kits from Amazon.com

You do not have to wait for your next doctors appointment to get your cholesterol numbers. You can buy a Cholesterol Test Kit to use at home. This saves both time and money, and also gives you faster feedback to know how your lifestyle choices are affecting your cholesterol levels. When you find a diet that works well for you, come back and comment to share your findings with other readers.




Comments.
Name:Joanne
Subject:Hormones
Cholesterol is needed to make hormones, so not all of it is bad. It is especially needed if one has hormonal problems, which are most commonly found in women.
Posted on 2011-05-24 09:17:17
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hormones
Hi Joanne, thanks for your comment. You are right that cholesterol is not all bad. Even though our bodies typically create adequate amounts of cholesterol some people may be required to consume cholesterol. Further, consumption of some cholesterol may not be bad among people who do not have high cholesterol levels. The percent daily values (DV) are posted in this article as a guideline.
Posted on 2011-05-24 21:13:10
Name:Jonathan
Location:Washington DC
Subject:Additional Cholesterol
For the large majority of people, you should not consume cholesterol. The body produces its own cholesterol, so eating animal products (cholesterol is only found in animal products) is not a good idea.
Posted on 2011-11-09 12:58:07
Name:David Powelson
Location:Eureka, CA
Subject:Cholesterol
The connection between cholesterol levels and heart attack risk are entirely specious. What is true is that cholesterol is a precursor for estrogen and testosterone. The differential ability of our bodies to produce cholesterol is a big reason for physical difference. And I am sure cholesterol-lowering diets assist in the production of obesity, to the extent they work. If you want to make an animal fat, after all, you remove its sex organs. A lot like lowering the cholesterol in human diets. Good job of turning small problems into big ones, vegetarians.
Posted on 2011-12-03 23:26:26
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cholesterol
Interesting thoughts, however, people who have been diagnosed with the clincal condition of Hypercholesterolemia might be inclined to disagree, particularly if they are taking cholesterol lowering medications they would rather not take. While you could assert that a diet higher in sugary carbohydrates and lower in fats could increase the onset of type II diabetes, it would not be accurate to assert that a diet higher in oatmeal, oat bran, almonds, flax seeds, and other low glycemic, cholesterol lowering foods, would have the same effect. Can you cite any studies or articles that state otherwise?
Posted on 2011-12-04 07:22:59
Name:Phil
Location:Manchester
Subject:RE: Cholesterol
David, you are incorrect. The link between cholesterol levels and risk of heart attack is well established. What is not well established, however, is the link between cholesterol intake and blood cholesterol levels. Dietary cholesterol is almost entirely irrelevant when it comes to blood cholesterol levels. The vast majority of blood cholesterol is produced within our own bodies. Eating foods high in saturated and trans fats increases production of cholesterol, and thus the blood level. For example, (beef) liver is high in cholesterol but rather low in fat (1 gram of saturated fat per 100 grams of liver). Eating large amounts of liver in a low fat diet should not increase your blood cholesterol significantly, despite the high cholesterol content.
Posted on 2011-12-06 09:59:55
Name:Sam Gifford
Location:Scotland
Subject:How to Lower my Cholesterol?
So what do I need to adjust in my diet to lower my cholesterol level?
Posted on 2011-12-08 07:31:05
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How to Lower my Cholesterol?
Hi Sam, thanks for your question. There are numerous studies to suggest that changes in diet can affect your cholesterol level. See the article on Cholesterol Lowering Foods to get examples of things you can eat that have been shown to lower cholesterol levels, and by what percent they are likely to lower them. While factors like genetics, exercise, drinking, blood pressure, and smoking can all play a role in cholesterol levels, it is still best to try change your diet. The best thing you can do is to substitute animal fats, like butter, with monounsaturated and/or polyunsaturated fats like olive oil, and peanut oil. To take a detailed look at studies which followed diet and cholesterol levels see these articles: Hope that helps!
Posted on 2011-12-08 23:06:17
Name:Juliet
Location:UK
Subject:Dietary Cholesterol
The cholesterol that you eat in your diet has negligible impact upon your blood cholesterol! If you want to reduce your serum cholesterol, you should concentrate on reducing the saturated fat that you consume, rather than reducing cholesterol intake. The saturated fat intake has a far greater impact on your blood cholesterol levels. I feel this article is quite misleading as the majority of people with high cholesterol do not have high cholesterol intake in their diets! I am a medical student.
Posted on 2011-12-30 06:10:47
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Dietary Cholesterol
Hi Juliet, thanks for your comment. It is true that simply avoiding high cholesterol foods is not enough to lower blood cholesterol, since blood cholesterol also depends on factors such as genetics and refined carbohydrate consumption. However, while some studies suggest that the cholesterol we eat may not have a very big impact on blood cholesterol, there are still other recent studies (1997) which say reducing intake of dietary cholesterol can decrease blood cholesterol by as much as 10%. Further, every food high in cholesterol is also high in saturated fats! If you suggest that people should limit intake of saturated fats instead of cholesterol they still need to limit or avoid the foods listed in this article. For people who argue that we all need some cholesterol, it should be noted that it takes very little consumption to meet or exceed the 300mg percent daily value (DV). When you consume cholesterol it is absorbed by your body, which people with high cholesterol, or on cholesterol lowering medications, do not want. These foods should still be limited or avoided in order to lower blood cholesterol.
Posted on 2012-01-30 04:49:11
Name:Carl
Location:India
Subject:Acknowledgement
Thank you for the posts. I was able to defend my term paper because of some information you gave.
Posted on 2012-02-21 00:54:36
Name:Jov
Location:Philippines
Subject:Fiber Affecting Cholesterol
A diet high in fiber is probably a diet low in cholesterol. A modified balanced diet with high fiber content is effected by including more fruits, nuts, vegetables and whole grains in meal preparation. It helps reduce the amount of fats and sugar in the bloodstream. Fiber can only be taken from plants, thus meat does not produce it.
Posted on 2012-02-21 07:16:24
Name:Elizabeth
Location:usa
Subject:What other options when medication and excersise don't work?
I am on CRESTOR, and execise and dieting alone is not doing the job. I have had high cholesterol since I was a child, and now I'm 41 yrs old. Although it runs in the fam, I am sure I can be cholesterol free. Can emotional stress affect everything I'm doing?
Posted on 2012-02-24 00:51:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: What other options when medication and excersise don't work?
Hi Elizabeth, thanks for your comment. It sounds like you are battling high cholesterol from genetic causes. There are a few studies from the late 50s which support a connection to stress increasing blood cholesterol levels. Interestingly, medical students had high cholesterol before a test than other times in the semester. Another study in the 90s suggests that people doing mentally stressful activities, like math, also had high cholesterol levels than people at rest. As such, you could try yoga, or other stress relieving activities to see if it lowers your cholesterol. Also, consider trying some new cholesterol lowering foods, if you have not already.
Posted on 2012-02-24 14:06:01
Name:Anonymous
Location:Midwest
Subject:Too Low Cholesterol
Hi. Thank you for your wonderful site. I clicked to find foods to avoid, so I could eat them. My cholesterol is 161, Tri 50, HDL 84, LDL 67, non HDL 77. Do you have an opinion either way re studies that have shown too low cholesterol is a factor in depression? I read if the number goes below 160ish, it's detrimental. I'm 50, a vegetarian 34 years. Also, do you think cholesterol levels have anything to do with a body not retaining potassium, or making adequate ACTH or cortisol? It's a stretch, probably, but maybe not if our systems are all interconnected. Thank you for your time! Cheers!
Posted on 2012-03-17 15:08:05
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Too Low Cholesterol
Thanks for your comment. The studies are mixed on the relationship of low cholesterol to depression. Chances are it does not have a strong effect. A level of 161mg/dL is not very low, with a normal range being between 150-199. In regards to potassium, ACTH, and cortisol it is unlikely that cholesterol levels have a very strong effect.
Posted on 2012-03-17 15:19:19
Name:Anonymous
Location:Midwest
Subject:Vegetarians and Cholesterol
Hi - thanks for answering. Did a bit more google- this is an interesting tidbit- 161 is average for vegetarians- "'American Heart Association, “while the average cholesterol level in the U.S. is 210, the average vegetarian’s cholesterol level is 161 and the average vegan’s cholesterol level is 133. People with cholesterol levels below 150 are virtually assured of never having a heart attack, while nearly one-third of meat-eaters will die from one.”' and '"In this study ‘low cholesterol’ was defined as less than 160mg/dL (4.16 mmol/L). This level has been noted several times in the medical literature as a level below which suicide is more likely.'"

All I know is I bought eggs, googled how to boil one, ate 2 in 1 sitting, then slept a full night's sleep for the first time in- literally- years. =)

Less than 200 mg/dl - desirable
200 - 240 mg/dl - increased risk
Above 240 mg/dl - significant risk
Posted on 2012-03-20 15:51:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vegetarian Cholesterol
Thanks for your reply, it would appear that the average cholesterol for vegans came from this 1999 study of a rural Chinese population. This John Robbin's Page for his Food Revolution book gives more references. Hope things keep going well for you with the new diet.
Posted on 2012-03-20 16:14:32
Name:Serene
Location:Malaysia
Subject:Fish Egg Cholesterol
Do fish eggs contain cholesterol especially grouper or red snapper eggs (beside caviar)?
Posted on 2012-04-30 04:28:02
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fish Egg Cholesterol
Hi Serene, thanks for your quesiton. The average cholesterol found in fish eggs from a variety of species is 52mg (17% DV) per tablespoon, and it would be highly unlikely to find any fish egg or any kind of egg that does not contain cholesterol. Further, note that the average species of fish does have less than the 94mg (31% DV) per tablespoon found in cavaiar. Nutrition facts for fish eggs (roe) and caviar.
Posted on 2012-05-08 02:45:15
Name:Chris
Location:Halifax, NS Canada
Subject:Natural ways to lower cholesterol
I was diagnosed today with high cholesterol. I am 39, I workout regularly & eat pretty healthy for the most part. I'm not a big meat eater; however I do like cheese! My father died of a heart attack at 39, & several other family members have also been diagnosed over the years. My Dr wanted to prescribe Crestor or Lipitor, but I REFUSE to be on medication, especially if the side effect is liver inflammation!! I don't believe this is necessary, and I will be seeking advice from a Naturopath, which my Dr thinks is great. In the meantime I have read that Artichoke Extract is extremely useful & beneficial for lowering cholesterol. What is your take on this?
Posted on 2012-05-09 21:53:24
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Natural ways to lower cholesterol
Hi Chris, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your diagnosis. This review study found that artichoke leaf extract can help lower cholesterol, particularly if your levels are above 230mg/dL. You can also check the article on cholesterol lowering foods: olive oil, bran, almonds, etc..It is great that you want to try lower your levels naturally, many people have succeeded at this by going vegan for a period of time, which means no meat, dairy, or eggs. However, medications have their place, if you cannot lower your levels to below 180mg/dL in 6 months, you may want to consider taking a reduced level of meds in combination with your lifestyle changes. Also, due to your family history of heart attack, you may also want to avoid high sodium foods in an attempt to lower your blood pressure. This is only assuming your blood pressure is high. Hope those notes help and good luck!
Posted on 2012-05-09 22:13:36
Name:Tolu
Location:NG
Subject:Cholesterol and Animal Products
For me, I do not include any kind of fish whatsoever in my meals and this has been on for the past 25 years now. Can it be said that my health is on the verge of collapse considering the general knowledge that fish is good for the heart? Also,what can I take as an alternative to fish consumption? How should I reduce my meat intake in order to prevent a high-cholestorol and risk heart disease? Please reply promptly. Best!
Posted on 2012-06-21 04:20:03
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cholesterol and Animal Products
Hi Tolu, thanks for your question. Just because you have avoided fish, does not mean that you health is on the verge of collapse. Eating flax seeds can be a good substitute for fish since they also have omega 3 heart healthy oils. To lower you cholesterol you should also avoid meat and try eating more of these cholesterol lowering foods.
Posted on 2012-06-22 00:02:10
Name:Siddharth
Location:India
Subject:Role of Wine?
Hi, I was recently diagnosed with high blood cholesterol about 350. While I was google searching various options, I came across that red wine can lower cholesterol levels when consumed regularly in moderate quantities, the French Paradox, etc. I am a non-alcoholic. Do you advise that wine could be considered as an option?
Posted on 2012-08-28 07:14:11
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Role of Wine?
Hi Siddharth, thanks for your question. While some studies show that wine can reduce heart disease, it may not reduce cholesterol levels. You are probably better off trying other foods which lower cholesterol, like garlic. You can also buy red wine supplements which are meant to convey the benefits of red wine in a pill, leaving out the alcohol and the expense of bottles of wine. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-08-28 11:40:59
Name:Max
Subject:Fish is good for you
Do you know the different between HDL ("good") and LDL ("bad") cholesterol? Yes, fish oil "contains quite a bit of cholesterol," but it's almost entirely the good kind. What's more, it helps arteries so actually DECREASES the risk of heart disease. This post is ridiculously wrong, and borderline medical negligence.
Posted on 2012-08-28 12:23:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fish is good for you
Hi Max, thanks for your comment and bringing up an important distinction, however, this article exists to list the foods highest in cholesterol, good and bad. It also exists for informational and research purposes. Although not common, some people suffer from low cholesterol, and this article can be used by people looking to boost their cholesterol levels. Would it not also be negligent to omit fish for people looking to raise their cholesterol level? An article on cholesterol lowering foods has been written for people looking to lower their cholesterol level. Further, for someone with very high cholesterol, it would be quite advisable to avoid oil packed fish, and possibly fish altogether, in favor of a vegan diet.
Posted on 2012-08-28 12:55:39
Name:Australia 15
Location:Dubai
Subject:Drugs or not!
Hi there, I am a mother of two boys, and I'm 36. I was diagnosed with high cholesterol two days ago total 300, HDL 63.02, LDL 212.63 and Trigly 135.41. It does run in my family, my dad's side. I had aunt died at age 48 heart attack and uncle age 63 also heart attack, my dad he is 67, and he is using Vytorin. My Dr. here (in UAE) recommends CRESTOR 20 mg, I never smoked or drunk in my life. I love exercise (running), but I've been lazy the last three months. I'm 4KG over my required weight. I asked my Dr. if I could try to lose the wight and be on diet the first six months, and if it does not work then I could use the drugs if it's still high, he told me that I might lower it only to 280 or 250! Which is still high! Any advice please? I'm so worried to take any medications. I would love to have a third child in the future. (They love giving Medications over here!).
Posted on 2012-09-20 11:47:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Drugs or not!
Hi Australia, thanks for your question. There is a chance you can really lower your cholesterol with diet, but you are going to have to be strict. Do the following in order of importance:
  1. Become vagan - Cut all animal foods from your diet: Meat, Eggs, Dairy, etc...
  2. Don't eat any refined sugar, and limit sweet foods
  3. Limit intake of refined oil. If you must have any oil, make it olive oil.
Other than that, you can try eating more of these cholesterol lowering foods, and exercising for at least 20 minutes each day. Six months should be enough time to lower your total cholesterol level below 200. However, given high cholesterol runs in your family, you may have to take medication to bring the number down that low. Stay strict with the diet, and you may be able to escape the meds! Good luck.
Posted on 2012-09-20 14:53:44
Name:Antony
Location:France
Subject:For those who eat brains...
Lamb brain has 2100 mg of cholesterol per hundred grams, 4x times more than egg, same with other brains probably...
Posted on 2012-09-27 00:52:20
Name:Nicola
Location:London UK
Subject:Cholesterol is good for pregnant women
I was just reading about my needs at 16 weeks pregnant and I never knew that it was good to 'not worry too much' about high cholesterol intake during pregnancy. It's necessary for my baby's brain development and a good building block for my hormones. Now that explains why my cravings have been about eggs, shellfish, but most especially sausages (as i'm not normally keen on the latter). Mmmm... I'm going to get myself a seafood platter for dinner tonight. Great site!
Posted on 2012-11-26 09:28:58
Name:UB40
Location:Bahrain
Subject:Do ginger & vinegar lower cholesterol?
I was diagnosed 10 days ago high in all the DL's as high as Australia 15 from Dubai. I like the advise and steps you gave her to follow. I think I am going to follow those steps and hope that I will get a good result in 6 months time.
I have recently met 2 old friends of mine. One of them is consuming fresh ginger by chewing 3 big pieces of ginger 3 times a day while the other takes 10ml of Apple vinegar in glass of water 30 minutes before breakfast. Both of them say they are content with their habits.
How do you take that?
Posted on 2012-11-26 20:15:55
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Do ginger & vinegar lower cholesterol?
Hi UB40, thanks for your comment and questions. Some preliminary animal studies have shown that ginger extract can help lower cholesterol. How much whole pieces of ginger will lower cholesterol is not known, and it is doubtful there is a very large effect, but it could be part of a total plan for lowering cholesterol. Most likely, eating ginger and drinking vinegar water can help to reduce appetite, and therefore cholesterol as a result.
Posted on 2012-11-26 21:10:35
Name:Pop
Location:Florida USA
Subject:How do Blood Sugar Levels affect Cholesterol?
I am 45 and have drank almost 4 liters of regular soft drinks for a year. Some with caffeine, some without. I found out that my blood sugar level is 422. As far as I know they did not check my cholestrol, so I have no idea what that is. I usually do not eat red meat and eat alot of boiled skinless-boneless chicken tenders. I am switching to a diet of sugar free cookies for snacks, salads with no fat dressing, and salmon and flounder for my meats. Eating Heart Healthy Campbells soup and Heart Healthy cereal as well. Will add more olive oil and raw garlic to my cooking for the fish and chicken in the future. How would this style of diet effect my blood sugar AND my cholesterol?
Posted on 2012-12-03 17:39:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:How do Blood Sugar Levels affect Cholesterol?
Hi Pop, thanks for your question. A diet high in sugar is shown to lower good HDL cholesterol, and raise levels of harmful triglycerides. In short, a high sugar diet is harmful for your heart and cardiovascular health. Having "sugar free" snacks is ok, but be careful, as the health effects of artificial sweetners are unknown. Snacking on low-sugar whole fruits and vegetables might be a better choice. Low fat salad dressings can often be a high sugar food, so be careful. Here are lists for foods high in sugar, and foods high in carbs, which you should try avoid. Cereals which claim to be heart healthy are usually also high in sugar, read labels and try to find a cereal which has no added sugar. Try to prepare your own hot oatmeal each morning instead of commercial cereal. In regards to your diet, the addition of fish, garlic, olive oil, etc... all sound good. Adding regular exercise to your routine will also help. Good luck and keep watch of your numbers. Getting your cholesterol tested would also be a good idea!
Posted on 2012-12-04 03:40:20
Name:Pop
Location:Florida, USA
Subject:Putting Feet up, does it help sugar levels and cholesterol
Thanks for the advice. I have one more question that may be a little off topic but I was hoping you could help me answer. Again, I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. I am sure I have had it for a while, maybe even for years, I have just never had it checked out. I have had a almost numbness or tingling in my toes for about 1 year now which started off in one toe and now has spread to both feet with all my toes and a little bit of the foot right under them. My skin color has not changed though. I have always heard that putting your feet up helps with blood circulation but I am unsure of what incline is best.

There is a yoga pose that suggests putting your rear end up against the wall with your legs straight up on the wall and of course, your feet above them. It says you should do this for 1-10 minutes.

One website suggests that this may cause clots in the brain or other areas for people with heart disease or diabetes. Does it help blood circulation in your feet if you put them up and if so, what incline is best. I can't find anything on this, please help with advice.

Posted on 2012-12-06 00:39:27
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Putting Feet up, does it help sugar levels and cholesterol
Hi Pop, thanks for your quesiton. Not sure which angle to hold your feet is best, or if there have been any studies that raising your feet is a good treatment for circulation problems due to diabetes. Diabetic socks are available and may do a better job meeting your needs. Diabetic socks are a fairly risk free treamtent, but pay attention to any warnings that come with the products, and work with your doctor or health care provider to find a good fit. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-12-06 00:52:29
Name:Philip
Location:New Zealand
Subject:Cholesterol lifestyle changes
Hi Just been told I have 5.3 (bad cholestrol rating). How much does drinking alcohol effect this? Would you stop drinking with this rating? Dad died at 56, I am 49, don't smoke about, 10 kgs overweight, and stressed most of the time. Will I be on medication forever?
Posted on 2012-12-12 18:18:40
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cholesterol lifestyle changes
Hi Philip, thanks for your question. Drinking more than 1-2 glasses of alcohol a day will increase your blood pressure and risk of heart disease. This combined with your high cholesterol and stress is not good. Take steps to reduce or stop drinking, start exercising every day, lose weight, and eat healthy. Then over some years, your might be able to stop taking medication if you can lower your cholesterol. Make a plan, make changes, and you can get there!
Posted on 2012-12-13 14:37:56
Name:John
Location:London, England
Subject:Oily fish
Hi. I have never smoked. alcohol about 8 pints a week. Correct weight for size. Reasonably fit. Exercise about 90 mins a week. Red meat about once a month. Low fat milk, hardly any dairy. Use olive oil in cooking. No off the shelf meals. Chinese restaurant once a fortnight. Skinned chicken & veg's or vegggie soup for dinner. Breakfast mackerel or sardines in olive oil with black beans or plain oats. Rarely touch anything from #1 to #10 list above. But I've just been told I have high cholesterol ( 5.9) !! Where am I going wrong?? And just read on your site that sardines are a no no, but seen elsewhere they are on the good guys list. Breakfast mackeral or sardines in olive oil with black beans. But I've just been told i have high cholesterol ( 5.9)! Where am I going wrong?
Posted on 2013-01-10 15:12:26
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Oily fish
Hi John, Thanks for your question. Sometimes genetics is just a factor with cholesterol. You may want to consider becoming vegan.

As for fish oil, it is generally considered good for your heart, which is why it is sometimes recommended for people with high cholesterol. This site simply lists what foods have cholesterol and not necessarily what is good for your heart. So while sardines may be good for your heart, they are unlikely to lower cholesterol, and probably best avoided by someone with high cholesterol like yourself. Fish would also be a great food for someone with low cholesterol...

Posted on 2013-01-10 15:26:31
Name:Emily
Location:Texas
Subject:Smith lemli opitz syndrome
There is a lot of misinformation in these comments. My daughter is 20 mos old and was diagnosed with smith lemli opitz at two weeks old. SLOS is diagnosed by having a high level of 7dhc (the precursor to cholesterol) in the blood. The body is missing the enzyme that changes the 7dhc into cholesterol, so the body does not have enough cholesterol to support normal growth and development. The treatment is dietary cholesterol. When we upped my daughter's cholesterol intake her total cholesterol went from 62 to 98. Dietary cholesterol absolutely affects blood cholesterol. Also, cortisol is made from cholesterol, which means that if you don't have enough cholesterol, you also don't have enough cortisol. This is why individuals with SLOS get fresh frozen plasma or something else to boost their cortisol levels when they are very sick or for an operation. My daughter actually gets 2000mg of cholesterol a day through her g tube. That's a ton. :)
Posted on 2013-01-12 22:24:47
Name:James
Subject:Cholesterol Ratio
I've heard that cholesterol level is actually irrelevant unless it is over 300mg/dL. It actually is the ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL that is important. Higher levels of HDL actually make higher levels of total cholesterol completely healthy.
Posted on 2013-01-31 16:19:10
Name:Pilar
Location:Philippines
Subject:Coconut oil, Palm oil
Are these two products - coconut and palm oil rich in cholesterol? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-02-02 00:34:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coconut oil, Palm oil
Hi Pilar, thanks for your question. Cholesterol is only found in animal foods, so coconut and palm oil contain no cholesterol. However, commercially processed coconut and palm oil can be unhealthy. Avoid any oils which are labelled as partially hydrogenated, and try to always consume these oils in their natural, or "virgin" state. I.E. Virgin coconut oil.
Posted on 2013-02-02 14:07:36
Name:Yvonne
Location:SK, Canada
Subject:Reasons for Low Cholesterol
Do you know what health conditions cause low cholesterol (<121mg/dL)? What process in the body might be impaired causing low cholesterol? Tests also revealed low ApoB. Is this genetic? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-02-17 15:50:06
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Reasons for Low Cholesterol
Hi Yvonne, thanks for your question. Low cholesterol, or Hypocholesterolemia, can be caused by rare genetic diseases, liver dysfunction, and statins (cholesterol lowering medications). There is no "unhealthy lower limit" defined for cholesterol. The U.S. National Library of Medicine considers a level of 100-129mg/dL as being "near best". It even recommends a level of 70mg/dL for people with heart disease. Given that information, you do not need to worry about your current level. However, if your cholesterol level continues to fall, then consult a health care professional.
Posted on 2013-02-18 20:23:07
Name:Sonal
Location:UK
Subject:U.K. Definition of High Cholesterol
Six months ago my GP told me I have high cholesterol at 7.0. He suggested to do more exercises and review my diet as they were both proven to lower cholesterol. Six months later and my cholesterol went down to 6.9. I did not do anything different but did a little bit of stepping exercises (five minutes a day) in my kitchen when an opportunity arises. My GP would not put me on medication as my blood pressure is normal. Still working on losing weight (1/2 stone) and hopefully it will work. By the way I started taking kyolic garlic 103 and see if it works! I asked my GP what is the normal range for cholesterol, but did not get a straight answer. All I got is that my cholesterol is high...Am I in the middle range or the highest? Please tell me. Thank you.
Posted on 2013-03-03 09:03:53
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: U.K. Definition of High Cholesterol
Hi Sonal, thanks for your question. The British measure cholesterol differently than in the United States. The British use a mmol/L measure, while the U.S. uses mg/dL. The normal level for cholesterol in the U.K. is 5.5mmol/L for men, and 5.6mmol/L for women. Given this fact, your cholesterol is definitely high. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) recommends that your total cholesterol be less than 5mmol/L, and the Joint British Societies recommends less than 4mmol/L if you are at risk of heart disease. Keep trying to do more exercise and the garlic will hopefully help. Check here for more cholesterol lowering foods.
Posted on 2013-03-03 17:34:19
Name:Ruslan Khamitov
Location:San Francisco
Subject:Misleading info on caviar which is actually healthy...
Besides cholesterol caviar has tons of Omega3, potassium, vitamin A and D and is actually really good for you. The amount of cholesterol is not harmful and is actually required by the body otherwise it's going to produce its own. So don't over dramatize things by saying things like "Avoid" this food. Where is McDonald's on this list?
Posted on 2013-03-18 22:22:07
Name:Chris
Location:Scituate, MA
Subject:Fish oil lowers cholesterol
Fish oil omega 3 is almost guaranteed to lower cholesterol, as in herrings.
Posted on 2013-04-02 17:16:33
Name:Mark
Location:Tucson
Subject:Eggs and sardines don't raise cholesterol
At the end of the year I had a physical and my weight was 200, cholesterol was 211, HDL 32, Tri. 300. My height is 6 feet. I tried the paleo diet and started exercising. After 90 days.. Weight now 165, Chol. 149, HDL 60, LDL 80, and Tri. 45. I ate either 1 can of sardines or omega 3 eggs every day for the full 90 days. I also ate shrimp, red meat, including beef liver and pork. I did eat more fish, Salmon primarily. Lots of vegetables, and 3 fruits a day: apple, banana, and grapefruit. Point is whole natural foods are not what is making peoples cholesterol elevate. It is too much fast and processed foods. Too much processed sugar, bread, and grains. I am living proof! Check out the paleo diet for all things I avoided.
Posted on 2013-04-15 00:25:31
Name:Peter Borten
Location:Boulder, CO
Subject:Dietary Cholesterol is not the Cause of an Unhealthy Serum Cholesterol Profile
Moreover, without specifically measuring levels of *small, dense LDL particles* the serum cholesterol numbers you mention are close to meaningless.

Here's a study that shows that by eating LOTS of the food at the top of your list - egg yolks, three a day - people's serum lipid profiles IMPROVED.

This study states: "Dietary cholesterol content does not significantly influence plasma cholesterol values, which are regulated by different genetic and nutritional factors that influence cholesterol absorption or synthesis."

This study states: "Each 1 mmol/L increase in total cholesterol corresponded to a 15% decrease in mortality." and "In people older than 85 years, high total cholesterol concentrations are associated with longevity owing to lower mortality from cancer and infection."

Posted on 2013-04-28 04:11:03
Name:Nishy
Location:Jamaica
Subject:More detail about the type of foods
Great comments everyone. My question is, how is the level of cholesterol measured in these foods? As it naturally occurs or as a prepared meal? For instance, some people will prepare food such as shrimp, on the grill, boiled or baked rather than fried. So if it is prepared a certain way, it affects the overall cholesterol count of the item. I also see where "Fast Food" has its own category...but what type of fast food? The information isn't very clear. Looking forward to the comments. Thanks!
Posted on 2013-04-29 22:51:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: More detail about the type of foods
Hi Nishy, thanks for your questions and comments. The foods in this article are to be used as a general guide, so specific details are not listed. To find out the different cholesterol levels of foods prepared in different ways you need to use the nutrition facts comparison tool. For example, here is the nutrition facts comparison of breaded and fried shrimp, vs cooked (moist heat), and canned. Interestingly the breaded and fried shrimp has the lowest cholesterol (177mg) but the highest calories (242). The canned shrimp contains the most cholesterol with 252mg. Unfortunately the data for grilled and boil shrimp does not exist, but the general rule is that shrimp is high in cholesterol holds true. As for fast foods, we can use the nutrient ranking tool to find and rank 471 fast foods high in cholesterol. 471 being all the fast foods in the database. Hope those tools and that info helps!
Posted on 2013-04-30 02:44:29
Name:Goode
Location:Virginia
Subject:Does eating heavy cream raise blood cholesterol?
I was recently told that I have high cholesterol. I am presently trying to gain weight, because I am very thin. To increase my calorie intake I am considering adding heavy cream to my milk shakes. Will the heavy cream make my cholesterol worse? I appreciate your advice. Thanks.
Posted on 2013-05-06 21:24:06
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Does eating heavy cream raise blood cholesterol?
Hi Goode, thanks for your question. Both heavy cream and milk shakes will increase your blood cholesterol. Between the cholesterol content, saturated fat, and sugar, you have a lot of ingredients that are just not good for you. Your cholesterol level also depends on your genetics and amount you exercise each day. If you are looking to gain weight, check out this list of high calorie foods recommended for weight gain. You want to stick to trying to eat a lot of nuts, particularly almonds, which may help lower cholesterol. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2013-05-07 06:52:01
Name:Jess
Location:WA
Subject:Food for thought on dietary cholesterol and heart disease

http://advances.nutrition.org/content/3/5/711.full “In recent years, however, there have been a number of epidemiological studies that did not support a relationship between cholesterol intake and cardiovascular disease. Further, a number of recent clinical trials that looked at the effects of long-term egg consumption (as a vehicle for dietary cholesterol) reported no negative impact on various indices of cardiovascular health and disease.”

Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19751443 “For many years, both the medical community and the general public have incorrectly associated eggs with high serum cholesterol and being deleterious to health, even though cholesterol is an essential component of cells and organisms.”

Last one, promise: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11111098 “Analysis of the available epidemiological and clinical data indicates that for the general population, dietary cholesterol makes no significant contribution to atherosclerosis and risk of cardiovascular disease.”

Posted on 2013-05-27 17:54:29
Name:Stephen
Location:UK
Subject:Food for thought on cholesterol metabolism and food sources...
An interesting thread of commentary and definitely thought provoking. Maybe some small additional input to think about. There is not enough reporting, monitoring of the HDL/LDL clinically at the General Practitioner level. When food is taken in it is processed by a whole bunch of enzymes, the liver pumps out soaps to make micelles (small fat blobs) of the fats, which can be absorbed into the blood and first pass of this fat rich blood from the gut goes to the liver where a large proportion is handled by repackaging. So we don't eat HDL or LDL just fats, proteins, carbs, etc.,. The liver is responsible for the packages. The egg commentaries have been enlightening, of course they do not have high levels of carbs, but do have lots of protein (egg white), so in a 6 egg quiche there will be over 1200mg cholesterol and about 150 mg cholesterol from cheddar cheese - the egg carries little additional fat (some phospholipids), the cheese buckets of fat. In this situation is the high egg cholesterol turned into dietary available cholesterol due to the fats from the cheese, which only provides a 1/10th as much cholesterol as the eggs - importantly - when it is all transformed in the gut to fat blobs? As we say on my planet "Live long and prosper".
Posted on 2013-06-30 05:24:08
Name:Healthy Person
Location:Earth
Subject:Hormones are key
For the majority of people these 10 foods should be essential to their diet. Others who do qualify for the exception to the above, because of their medical condition, have missed the train and should switch their research to a life insurance policy instead. There is still plenty of healthy and health conscious people in the world. So, why don't we look at food from healthy people perspective and then qualify it saying that those who can't shouldn't...
Posted on 2013-06-30 10:51:42
Name:Lisa
Location:UK
Subject:Wrong! Cholesterol is actually good...
So much misinformation here! All these are great for you, your Chol levels should be 190-220 to be healthy. Now vegetable oils/carbs/sugar are the real killers, Google Michael Rothman, MD. Soy is also dangerous. You need Cholesterol!
Posted on 2013-07-01 10:35:19
Name:Stephen
Location:UK
Subject:Cholesterol what is enough?
Lisa, Lisa, Lisa - and Rothman? Really? Being generous, let's say enthusiastic amateur. Unless there are genetic reasons, we make enough cholesterol to get by and maybe there is too much focus on this - after all the human scare is epidemiological and therefore association. Fats on the other hand? You raise a valid point, but it really is when these fats oxidize in the LDL and the delivery system is tainted. How do we limit oxidation processes? - not by scavengers like vitamin E. This is a mass action argument. The lifetime of an oxygen free-radical is so short that you need to have the scavenger sitting next to the radical at the point of production. This can only be achieved by massive doses of vitamin E (or Q10). The only way forward is about limiting production of these damaging oxygen free-radicals.
Posted on 2013-07-13 18:08:29
Name:Mollie
Location:New York
Subject:Personally...
I am a 20 year old who just received information that I have high LDL cholesterol levels. I am a college athlete who is not over weight and exercises everyday, I also do not eat red meats, fish or egg products. For a while I had stayed away from whole grains because I was avoiding gluten and carbohydrates but I am realizing that these actually help to lower cholesterol levels. I now include whole grain cereals, and wheat products into my diet and replaced milk and butter with almond milk and almond butter. I unfortunately have high cholesterol due to my genetics and hope that these steps will help to lower it by my next appointment.
Posted on 2013-07-25 16:12:52
Name:Megan
Location:US
Subject:High cholesterol does lead to heart disease
It astounds me at some people's ignorance about diets. I have researched (I am also a nurse) and it is known in the medical field that cholesterol sticks to the arteries and if bad enough, it blocks those arteries. This causes heart attacks and bad circulation.
Posted on 2013-10-01 05:57:39
Name:Anon
Location:Here
Subject:Dietary Cholesterol and Eggs
Go by actual scientific research, not what dietitians (who've been getting things wrong for decades!) tell you. To quote Harvard School of Public Health: "A solid body of research shows that for most people, cholesterol in food has a much smaller effect on blood levels of total cholesterol and harmful LDL cholesterol than does the mix of fats in the diet. Recent research has shown that moderate egg consumption—up to one a day—does not increase heart disease risk in healthy individuals (1, 2) and can be part of a healthy diet."

The Japanese consume quite a lot of eggs per capita and it's not killing them that fast. But they don't eat as much of their eggs in cakes or with bacon.

See also this study. Basically if you're diabetic you may have to reduce egg consumption.

Posted on 2013-10-28 06:29:54
Name:Mrs lower Bad cholesterol for insurance
Location:California
Subject:How many days to reduce bad levels?
I need to reduce my Bad cholesterol levels. I will sign up for Obama care by end of March 2014 and require a lower level to avoid paying a higher premium. How long will it take from > 300 if I reduced to only about 10 mgs of cholesterol per day to be an acceptable level for most people?
FYI: No family history of high cholesterol.
Posted on 2014-01-19 21:24:39
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How many days to reduce bad levels?
Hi and thanks for your question. Everyone is different, but if you adopt a vegan diet and exercise you could start seeing lower cholesterol within a week, and great levels within a month to six weeks. The article on cholesterol lowering foods will likely also help.
Posted on 2014-01-20 01:47:24
Name:Terry Lynch
Location:Hawaii
Subject:Niacin/major effect on LDL Cholesterol
I have just seen a major reversal of LDL and HDL cholesterol values upon discovering niacin malabsorption and ancient Pellagra. Since the 1930's the US has been enriching all of its wheat flour products with B-Vitamins to address widespread niacin deficiencient diets that resulted ultimately in the pellagra. The disease has literally disappeared since this move to obscurity and doctors don't go there as general rule.

So I suffered or many years with skin conditions, loss of hair and dental disaster and got the usual try lipitor/zocor/zetia due to slightly elevated cholesterol levels. I was on a gluten free diet for about 5 years which really mimicked the pellagra diet and my high fructose diet and possible hypochlorhydria(concommitant with Pellagra)which contributed to low tryptophan absorption and thus overt pellagra or vitamin B-3 deficiency.

My sizable intake of supplemental B-Vitamin B-100 of Vitamin world (one in the morning with meals/one at night with meal)immediately resulted in noticeable skin healing and low AND BEHOLD MY GOOD HDL RAISED UP AND MY LDL DOVE TO 86 from about 150!!!

As many of you know higher HDL Cholesterol caused by my substantial niacinimide intake with a balanced b-complex then in turn mopped up my notorious defamed LDL which our Pharma industry has claimed in partial understanding is the primary cause of arteriosclerosis and heart disease.

There can be no doubt that if you suffer and undiagnosed, even asymptomatic Vitamin B-3 deficiency, your LDL cholesterol levels can be beneficially lowered. However, B-Vitamin supplementation needs the oversight of a trained health care professional or careful research on your part to be sure none of the meds you presently take will be effected. Excessive niacin or niacinimide daily intake is not recommended, and may be counter indicated in certain cases of liver disease.

If you are on a celiac or wheat free diet you may want to discuss and/or research B- vitamin supplementation as I did and reap the health benefits of higher HDL cholesterol.

By the way, I lean on a high protein diet which includes about four eggs a day, fish , and chicken and butter. Flour products including sugar dough balls are no part of it due to celiac disease,and this is a good and bad thing. The good thing is not eating carbos like bread cookies and cakes and having excessive iron intake from enriched flour which leads to heart attacks ; the bad is not knowing that my diet was totally lacking in certain B-Vitamins and that with other malabsorption factors resulted in deadly effects of b-vitamin malnutrition discovered by Dr. Goldberg in the 1920's.

Alogha nui, Terry Lynch

Posted on 2014-03-27 14:46:36
Name:Genelle
Location:Canada
Subject:Boosting Cholesterol Levels
I was told I have low cholesterol,and low cholesterol is related to memory loss. I am only 39 years old and forget things more often than usual and am sometimes confused; does that mean I am in the beginners stage of dementia or Alzheimers? I was told to eat lots of nuts and fish oil; is there any other food that is high in cholesterol but also safe?
Posted on 2014-03-28 13:03:57
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Boosting Cholesterol Levels
Hi Genelle, thanks for your question. Nuts, seeds, and fish oil are a good way to get heart healthy and brain healthy fats. Consider also adding dark chocolate, coconut, and avocados to the list of good fats to eat. The article on foods high in saturated fats may also give you some ideas. Further, if your cholesterol is low, you should be fine also eating some animal fats from eggs or meats. In regards to your symptoms, it is likely nothing to worry about right now, and any diagnosis is best left to your doctor or primary care provider. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2014-03-31 01:04:39

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Comments.
Name:Joanne
Subject:Hormones
Cholesterol is needed to make hormones, so not all of it is bad. It is especially needed if one has hormonal problems, which are most commonly found in women.
Posted on 2011-05-24 09:17:17
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hormones
Hi Joanne, thanks for your comment. You are right that cholesterol is not all bad. Even though our bodies typically create adequate amounts of cholesterol some people may be required to consume cholesterol. Further, consumption of some cholesterol may not be bad among people who do not have high cholesterol levels. The percent daily values (DV) are posted in this article as a guideline.
Posted on 2011-05-24 21:13:10
Name:Jonathan
Location:Washington DC
Subject:Additional Cholesterol
For the large majority of people, you should not consume cholesterol. The body produces its own cholesterol, so eating animal products (cholesterol is only found in animal products) is not a good idea.
Posted on 2011-11-09 12:58:07
Name:David Powelson
Location:Eureka, CA
Subject:Cholesterol
The connection between cholesterol levels and heart attack risk are entirely specious. What is true is that cholesterol is a precursor for estrogen and testosterone. The differential ability of our bodies to produce cholesterol is a big reason for physical difference. And I am sure cholesterol-lowering diets assist in the production of obesity, to the extent they work. If you want to make an animal fat, after all, you remove its sex organs. A lot like lowering the cholesterol in human diets. Good job of turning small problems into big ones, vegetarians.
Posted on 2011-12-03 23:26:26
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cholesterol
Interesting thoughts, however, people who have been diagnosed with the clincal condition of Hypercholesterolemia might be inclined to disagree, particularly if they are taking cholesterol lowering medications they would rather not take. While you could assert that a diet higher in sugary carbohydrates and lower in fats could increase the onset of type II diabetes, it would not be accurate to assert that a diet higher in oatmeal, oat bran, almonds, flax seeds, and other low glycemic, cholesterol lowering foods, would have the same effect. Can you cite any studies or articles that state otherwise?
Posted on 2011-12-04 07:22:59
Name:Phil
Location:Manchester
Subject:RE: Cholesterol
David, you are incorrect. The link between cholesterol levels and risk of heart attack is well established. What is not well established, however, is the link between cholesterol intake and blood cholesterol levels. Dietary cholesterol is almost entirely irrelevant when it comes to blood cholesterol levels. The vast majority of blood cholesterol is produced within our own bodies. Eating foods high in saturated and trans fats increases production of cholesterol, and thus the blood level. For example, (beef) liver is high in cholesterol but rather low in fat (1 gram of saturated fat per 100 grams of liver). Eating large amounts of liver in a low fat diet should not increase your blood cholesterol significantly, despite the high cholesterol content.
Posted on 2011-12-06 09:59:55
Name:Sam Gifford
Location:Scotland
Subject:How to Lower my Cholesterol?
So what do I need to adjust in my diet to lower my cholesterol level?
Posted on 2011-12-08 07:31:05
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How to Lower my Cholesterol?
Hi Sam, thanks for your question. There are numerous studies to suggest that changes in diet can affect your cholesterol level. See the article on Cholesterol Lowering Foods to get examples of things you can eat that have been shown to lower cholesterol levels, and by what percent they are likely to lower them. While factors like genetics, exercise, drinking, blood pressure, and smoking can all play a role in cholesterol levels, it is still best to try change your diet. The best thing you can do is to substitute animal fats, like butter, with monounsaturated and/or polyunsaturated fats like olive oil, and peanut oil. To take a detailed look at studies which followed diet and cholesterol levels see these articles: Hope that helps!
Posted on 2011-12-08 23:06:17
Name:Juliet
Location:UK
Subject:Dietary Cholesterol
The cholesterol that you eat in your diet has negligible impact upon your blood cholesterol! If you want to reduce your serum cholesterol, you should concentrate on reducing the saturated fat that you consume, rather than reducing cholesterol intake. The saturated fat intake has a far greater impact on your blood cholesterol levels. I feel this article is quite misleading as the majority of people with high cholesterol do not have high cholesterol intake in their diets! I am a medical student.
Posted on 2011-12-30 06:10:47
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Dietary Cholesterol
Hi Juliet, thanks for your comment. It is true that simply avoiding high cholesterol foods is not enough to lower blood cholesterol, since blood cholesterol also depends on factors such as genetics and refined carbohydrate consumption. However, while some studies suggest that the cholesterol we eat may not have a very big impact on blood cholesterol, there are still other recent studies (1997) which say reducing intake of dietary cholesterol can decrease blood cholesterol by as much as 10%. Further, every food high in cholesterol is also high in saturated fats! If you suggest that people should limit intake of saturated fats instead of cholesterol they still need to limit or avoid the foods listed in this article. For people who argue that we all need some cholesterol, it should be noted that it takes very little consumption to meet or exceed the 300mg percent daily value (DV). When you consume cholesterol it is absorbed by your body, which people with high cholesterol, or on cholesterol lowering medications, do not want. These foods should still be limited or avoided in order to lower blood cholesterol.
Posted on 2012-01-30 04:49:11
Name:Carl
Location:India
Subject:Acknowledgement
Thank you for the posts. I was able to defend my term paper because of some information you gave.
Posted on 2012-02-21 00:54:36
Name:Jov
Location:Philippines
Subject:Fiber Affecting Cholesterol
A diet high in fiber is probably a diet low in cholesterol. A modified balanced diet with high fiber content is effected by including more fruits, nuts, vegetables and whole grains in meal preparation. It helps reduce the amount of fats and sugar in the bloodstream. Fiber can only be taken from plants, thus meat does not produce it.
Posted on 2012-02-21 07:16:24
Name:Elizabeth
Location:usa
Subject:What other options when medication and excersise don't work?
I am on CRESTOR, and execise and dieting alone is not doing the job. I have had high cholesterol since I was a child, and now I'm 41 yrs old. Although it runs in the fam, I am sure I can be cholesterol free. Can emotional stress affect everything I'm doing?
Posted on 2012-02-24 00:51:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: What other options when medication and excersise don't work?
Hi Elizabeth, thanks for your comment. It sounds like you are battling high cholesterol from genetic causes. There are a few studies from the late 50s which support a connection to stress increasing blood cholesterol levels. Interestingly, medical students had high cholesterol before a test than other times in the semester. Another study in the 90s suggests that people doing mentally stressful activities, like math, also had high cholesterol levels than people at rest. As such, you could try yoga, or other stress relieving activities to see if it lowers your cholesterol. Also, consider trying some new cholesterol lowering foods, if you have not already.
Posted on 2012-02-24 14:06:01
Name:Anonymous
Location:Midwest
Subject:Too Low Cholesterol
Hi. Thank you for your wonderful site. I clicked to find foods to avoid, so I could eat them. My cholesterol is 161, Tri 50, HDL 84, LDL 67, non HDL 77. Do you have an opinion either way re studies that have shown too low cholesterol is a factor in depression? I read if the number goes below 160ish, it's detrimental. I'm 50, a vegetarian 34 years. Also, do you think cholesterol levels have anything to do with a body not retaining potassium, or making adequate ACTH or cortisol? It's a stretch, probably, but maybe not if our systems are all interconnected. Thank you for your time! Cheers!
Posted on 2012-03-17 15:08:05
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Too Low Cholesterol
Thanks for your comment. The studies are mixed on the relationship of low cholesterol to depression. Chances are it does not have a strong effect. A level of 161mg/dL is not very low, with a normal range being between 150-199. In regards to potassium, ACTH, and cortisol it is unlikely that cholesterol levels have a very strong effect.
Posted on 2012-03-17 15:19:19
Name:Anonymous
Location:Midwest
Subject:Vegetarians and Cholesterol
Hi - thanks for answering. Did a bit more google- this is an interesting tidbit- 161 is average for vegetarians- "'American Heart Association, “while the average cholesterol level in the U.S. is 210, the average vegetarian’s cholesterol level is 161 and the average vegan’s cholesterol level is 133. People with cholesterol levels below 150 are virtually assured of never having a heart attack, while nearly one-third of meat-eaters will die from one.”' and '"In this study ‘low cholesterol’ was defined as less than 160mg/dL (4.16 mmol/L). This level has been noted several times in the medical literature as a level below which suicide is more likely.'"

All I know is I bought eggs, googled how to boil one, ate 2 in 1 sitting, then slept a full night's sleep for the first time in- literally- years. =)

Less than 200 mg/dl - desirable
200 - 240 mg/dl - increased risk
Above 240 mg/dl - significant risk
Posted on 2012-03-20 15:51:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vegetarian Cholesterol
Thanks for your reply, it would appear that the average cholesterol for vegans came from this 1999 study of a rural Chinese population. This John Robbin's Page for his Food Revolution book gives more references. Hope things keep going well for you with the new diet.
Posted on 2012-03-20 16:14:32
Name:Serene
Location:Malaysia
Subject:Fish Egg Cholesterol
Do fish eggs contain cholesterol especially grouper or red snapper eggs (beside caviar)?
Posted on 2012-04-30 04:28:02
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fish Egg Cholesterol
Hi Serene, thanks for your quesiton. The average cholesterol found in fish eggs from a variety of species is 52mg (17% DV) per tablespoon, and it would be highly unlikely to find any fish egg or any kind of egg that does not contain cholesterol. Further, note that the average species of fish does have less than the 94mg (31% DV) per tablespoon found in cavaiar. Nutrition facts for fish eggs (roe) and caviar.
Posted on 2012-05-08 02:45:15
Name:Chris
Location:Halifax, NS Canada
Subject:Natural ways to lower cholesterol
I was diagnosed today with high cholesterol. I am 39, I workout regularly & eat pretty healthy for the most part. I'm not a big meat eater; however I do like cheese! My father died of a heart attack at 39, & several other family members have also been diagnosed over the years. My Dr wanted to prescribe Crestor or Lipitor, but I REFUSE to be on medication, especially if the side effect is liver inflammation!! I don't believe this is necessary, and I will be seeking advice from a Naturopath, which my Dr thinks is great. In the meantime I have read that Artichoke Extract is extremely useful & beneficial for lowering cholesterol. What is your take on this?
Posted on 2012-05-09 21:53:24
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Natural ways to lower cholesterol
Hi Chris, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your diagnosis. This review study found that artichoke leaf extract can help lower cholesterol, particularly if your levels are above 230mg/dL. You can also check the article on cholesterol lowering foods: olive oil, bran, almonds, etc..It is great that you want to try lower your levels naturally, many people have succeeded at this by going vegan for a period of time, which means no meat, dairy, or eggs. However, medications have their place, if you cannot lower your levels to below 180mg/dL in 6 months, you may want to consider taking a reduced level of meds in combination with your lifestyle changes. Also, due to your family history of heart attack, you may also want to avoid high sodium foods in an attempt to lower your blood pressure. This is only assuming your blood pressure is high. Hope those notes help and good luck!
Posted on 2012-05-09 22:13:36
Name:Tolu
Location:NG
Subject:Cholesterol and Animal Products
For me, I do not include any kind of fish whatsoever in my meals and this has been on for the past 25 years now. Can it be said that my health is on the verge of collapse considering the general knowledge that fish is good for the heart? Also,what can I take as an alternative to fish consumption? How should I reduce my meat intake in order to prevent a high-cholestorol and risk heart disease? Please reply promptly. Best!
Posted on 2012-06-21 04:20:03
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cholesterol and Animal Products
Hi Tolu, thanks for your question. Just because you have avoided fish, does not mean that you health is on the verge of collapse. Eating flax seeds can be a good substitute for fish since they also have omega 3 heart healthy oils. To lower you cholesterol you should also avoid meat and try eating more of these cholesterol lowering foods.
Posted on 2012-06-22 00:02:10
Name:Siddharth
Location:India
Subject:Role of Wine?
Hi, I was recently diagnosed with high blood cholesterol about 350. While I was google searching various options, I came across that red wine can lower cholesterol levels when consumed regularly in moderate quantities, the French Paradox, etc. I am a non-alcoholic. Do you advise that wine could be considered as an option?
Posted on 2012-08-28 07:14:11
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Role of Wine?
Hi Siddharth, thanks for your question. While some studies show that wine can reduce heart disease, it may not reduce cholesterol levels. You are probably better off trying other foods which lower cholesterol, like garlic. You can also buy red wine supplements which are meant to convey the benefits of red wine in a pill, leaving out the alcohol and the expense of bottles of wine. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-08-28 11:40:59
Name:Max
Subject:Fish is good for you
Do you know the different between HDL ("good") and LDL ("bad") cholesterol? Yes, fish oil "contains quite a bit of cholesterol," but it's almost entirely the good kind. What's more, it helps arteries so actually DECREASES the risk of heart disease. This post is ridiculously wrong, and borderline medical negligence.
Posted on 2012-08-28 12:23:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fish is good for you
Hi Max, thanks for your comment and bringing up an important distinction, however, this article exists to list the foods highest in cholesterol, good and bad. It also exists for informational and research purposes. Although not common, some people suffer from low cholesterol, and this article can be used by people looking to boost their cholesterol levels. Would it not also be negligent to omit fish for people looking to raise their cholesterol level? An article on cholesterol lowering foods has been written for people looking to lower their cholesterol level. Further, for someone with very high cholesterol, it would be quite advisable to avoid oil packed fish, and possibly fish altogether, in favor of a vegan diet.
Posted on 2012-08-28 12:55:39
Name:Australia 15
Location:Dubai
Subject:Drugs or not!
Hi there, I am a mother of two boys, and I'm 36. I was diagnosed with high cholesterol two days ago total 300, HDL 63.02, LDL 212.63 and Trigly 135.41. It does run in my family, my dad's side. I had aunt died at age 48 heart attack and uncle age 63 also heart attack, my dad he is 67, and he is using Vytorin. My Dr. here (in UAE) recommends CRESTOR 20 mg, I never smoked or drunk in my life. I love exercise (running), but I've been lazy the last three months. I'm 4KG over my required weight. I asked my Dr. if I could try to lose the wight and be on diet the first six months, and if it does not work then I could use the drugs if it's still high, he told me that I might lower it only to 280 or 250! Which is still high! Any advice please? I'm so worried to take any medications. I would love to have a third child in the future. (They love giving Medications over here!).
Posted on 2012-09-20 11:47:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Drugs or not!
Hi Australia, thanks for your question. There is a chance you can really lower your cholesterol with diet, but you are going to have to be strict. Do the following in order of importance:
  1. Become vagan - Cut all animal foods from your diet: Meat, Eggs, Dairy, etc...
  2. Don't eat any refined sugar, and limit sweet foods
  3. Limit intake of refined oil. If you must have any oil, make it olive oil.
Other than that, you can try eating more of these cholesterol lowering foods, and exercising for at least 20 minutes each day. Six months should be enough time to lower your total cholesterol level below 200. However, given high cholesterol runs in your family, you may have to take medication to bring the number down that low. Stay strict with the diet, and you may be able to escape the meds! Good luck.
Posted on 2012-09-20 14:53:44
Name:Antony
Location:France
Subject:For those who eat brains...
Lamb brain has 2100 mg of cholesterol per hundred grams, 4x times more than egg, same with other brains probably...
Posted on 2012-09-27 00:52:20
Name:Nicola
Location:London UK
Subject:Cholesterol is good for pregnant women
I was just reading about my needs at 16 weeks pregnant and I never knew that it was good to 'not worry too much' about high cholesterol intake during pregnancy. It's necessary for my baby's brain development and a good building block for my hormones. Now that explains why my cravings have been about eggs, shellfish, but most especially sausages (as i'm not normally keen on the latter). Mmmm... I'm going to get myself a seafood platter for dinner tonight. Great site!
Posted on 2012-11-26 09:28:58
Name:UB40
Location:Bahrain
Subject:Do ginger & vinegar lower cholesterol?
I was diagnosed 10 days ago high in all the DL's as high as Australia 15 from Dubai. I like the advise and steps you gave her to follow. I think I am going to follow those steps and hope that I will get a good result in 6 months time.
I have recently met 2 old friends of mine. One of them is consuming fresh ginger by chewing 3 big pieces of ginger 3 times a day while the other takes 10ml of Apple vinegar in glass of water 30 minutes before breakfast. Both of them say they are content with their habits.
How do you take that?
Posted on 2012-11-26 20:15:55
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Do ginger & vinegar lower cholesterol?
Hi UB40, thanks for your comment and questions. Some preliminary animal studies have shown that ginger extract can help lower cholesterol. How much whole pieces of ginger will lower cholesterol is not known, and it is doubtful there is a very large effect, but it could be part of a total plan for lowering cholesterol. Most likely, eating ginger and drinking vinegar water can help to reduce appetite, and therefore cholesterol as a result.
Posted on 2012-11-26 21:10:35
Name:Pop
Location:Florida USA
Subject:How do Blood Sugar Levels affect Cholesterol?
I am 45 and have drank almost 4 liters of regular soft drinks for a year. Some with caffeine, some without. I found out that my blood sugar level is 422. As far as I know they did not check my cholestrol, so I have no idea what that is. I usually do not eat red meat and eat alot of boiled skinless-boneless chicken tenders. I am switching to a diet of sugar free cookies for snacks, salads with no fat dressing, and salmon and flounder for my meats. Eating Heart Healthy Campbells soup and Heart Healthy cereal as well. Will add more olive oil and raw garlic to my cooking for the fish and chicken in the future. How would this style of diet effect my blood sugar AND my cholesterol?
Posted on 2012-12-03 17:39:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:How do Blood Sugar Levels affect Cholesterol?
Hi Pop, thanks for your question. A diet high in sugar is shown to lower good HDL cholesterol, and raise levels of harmful triglycerides. In short, a high sugar diet is harmful for your heart and cardiovascular health. Having "sugar free" snacks is ok, but be careful, as the health effects of artificial sweetners are unknown. Snacking on low-sugar whole fruits and vegetables might be a better choice. Low fat salad dressings can often be a high sugar food, so be careful. Here are lists for foods high in sugar, and foods high in carbs, which you should try avoid. Cereals which claim to be heart healthy are usually also high in sugar, read labels and try to find a cereal which has no added sugar. Try to prepare your own hot oatmeal each morning instead of commercial cereal. In regards to your diet, the addition of fish, garlic, olive oil, etc... all sound good. Adding regular exercise to your routine will also help. Good luck and keep watch of your numbers. Getting your cholesterol tested would also be a good idea!
Posted on 2012-12-04 03:40:20
Name:Pop
Location:Florida, USA
Subject:Putting Feet up, does it help sugar levels and cholesterol
Thanks for the advice. I have one more question that may be a little off topic but I was hoping you could help me answer. Again, I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. I am sure I have had it for a while, maybe even for years, I have just never had it checked out. I have had a almost numbness or tingling in my toes for about 1 year now which started off in one toe and now has spread to both feet with all my toes and a little bit of the foot right under them. My skin color has not changed though. I have always heard that putting your feet up helps with blood circulation but I am unsure of what incline is best.

There is a yoga pose that suggests putting your rear end up against the wall with your legs straight up on the wall and of course, your feet above them. It says you should do this for 1-10 minutes.

One website suggests that this may cause clots in the brain or other areas for people with heart disease or diabetes. Does it help blood circulation in your feet if you put them up and if so, what incline is best. I can't find anything on this, please help with advice.

Posted on 2012-12-06 00:39:27
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Putting Feet up, does it help sugar levels and cholesterol
Hi Pop, thanks for your quesiton. Not sure which angle to hold your feet is best, or if there have been any studies that raising your feet is a good treatment for circulation problems due to diabetes. Diabetic socks are available and may do a better job meeting your needs. Diabetic socks are a fairly risk free treamtent, but pay attention to any warnings that come with the products, and work with your doctor or health care provider to find a good fit. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-12-06 00:52:29
Name:Philip
Location:New Zealand
Subject:Cholesterol lifestyle changes
Hi Just been told I have 5.3 (bad cholestrol rating). How much does drinking alcohol effect this? Would you stop drinking with this rating? Dad died at 56, I am 49, don't smoke about, 10 kgs overweight, and stressed most of the time. Will I be on medication forever?
Posted on 2012-12-12 18:18:40
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cholesterol lifestyle changes
Hi Philip, thanks for your question. Drinking more than 1-2 glasses of alcohol a day will increase your blood pressure and risk of heart disease. This combined with your high cholesterol and stress is not good. Take steps to reduce or stop drinking, start exercising every day, lose weight, and eat healthy. Then over some years, your might be able to stop taking medication if you can lower your cholesterol. Make a plan, make changes, and you can get there!
Posted on 2012-12-13 14:37:56
Name:John
Location:London, England
Subject:Oily fish
Hi. I have never smoked. alcohol about 8 pints a week. Correct weight for size. Reasonably fit. Exercise about 90 mins a week. Red meat about once a month. Low fat milk, hardly any dairy. Use olive oil in cooking. No off the shelf meals. Chinese restaurant once a fortnight. Skinned chicken & veg's or vegggie soup for dinner. Breakfast mackerel or sardines in olive oil with black beans or plain oats. Rarely touch anything from #1 to #10 list above. But I've just been told I have high cholesterol ( 5.9) !! Where am I going wrong?? And just read on your site that sardines are a no no, but seen elsewhere they are on the good guys list. Breakfast mackeral or sardines in olive oil with black beans. But I've just been told i have high cholesterol ( 5.9)! Where am I going wrong?
Posted on 2013-01-10 15:12:26
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Oily fish
Hi John, Thanks for your question. Sometimes genetics is just a factor with cholesterol. You may want to consider becoming vegan.

As for fish oil, it is generally considered good for your heart, which is why it is sometimes recommended for people with high cholesterol. This site simply lists what foods have cholesterol and not necessarily what is good for your heart. So while sardines may be good for your heart, they are unlikely to lower cholesterol, and probably best avoided by someone with high cholesterol like yourself. Fish would also be a great food for someone with low cholesterol...

Posted on 2013-01-10 15:26:31
Name:Emily
Location:Texas
Subject:Smith lemli opitz syndrome
There is a lot of misinformation in these comments. My daughter is 20 mos old and was diagnosed with smith lemli opitz at two weeks old. SLOS is diagnosed by having a high level of 7dhc (the precursor to cholesterol) in the blood. The body is missing the enzyme that changes the 7dhc into cholesterol, so the body does not have enough cholesterol to support normal growth and development. The treatment is dietary cholesterol. When we upped my daughter's cholesterol intake her total cholesterol went from 62 to 98. Dietary cholesterol absolutely affects blood cholesterol. Also, cortisol is made from cholesterol, which means that if you don't have enough cholesterol, you also don't have enough cortisol. This is why individuals with SLOS get fresh frozen plasma or something else to boost their cortisol levels when they are very sick or for an operation. My daughter actually gets 2000mg of cholesterol a day through her g tube. That's a ton. :)
Posted on 2013-01-12 22:24:47
Name:James
Subject:Cholesterol Ratio
I've heard that cholesterol level is actually irrelevant unless it is over 300mg/dL. It actually is the ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL that is important. Higher levels of HDL actually make higher levels of total cholesterol completely healthy.
Posted on 2013-01-31 16:19:10
Name:Pilar
Location:Philippines
Subject:Coconut oil, Palm oil
Are these two products - coconut and palm oil rich in cholesterol? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-02-02 00:34:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coconut oil, Palm oil
Hi Pilar, thanks for your question. Cholesterol is only found in animal foods, so coconut and palm oil contain no cholesterol. However, commercially processed coconut and palm oil can be unhealthy. Avoid any oils which are labelled as partially hydrogenated, and try to always consume these oils in their natural, or "virgin" state. I.E. Virgin coconut oil.
Posted on 2013-02-02 14:07:36
Name:Yvonne
Location:SK, Canada
Subject:Reasons for Low Cholesterol
Do you know what health conditions cause low cholesterol (<121mg/dL)? What process in the body might be impaired causing low cholesterol? Tests also revealed low ApoB. Is this genetic? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-02-17 15:50:06
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Reasons for Low Cholesterol
Hi Yvonne, thanks for your question. Low cholesterol, or Hypocholesterolemia, can be caused by rare genetic diseases, liver dysfunction, and statins (cholesterol lowering medications). There is no "unhealthy lower limit" defined for cholesterol. The U.S. National Library of Medicine considers a level of 100-129mg/dL as being "near best". It even recommends a level of 70mg/dL for people with heart disease. Given that information, you do not need to worry about your current level. However, if your cholesterol level continues to fall, then consult a health care professional.
Posted on 2013-02-18 20:23:07
Name:Sonal
Location:UK
Subject:U.K. Definition of High Cholesterol
Six months ago my GP told me I have high cholesterol at 7.0. He suggested to do more exercises and review my diet as they were both proven to lower cholesterol. Six months later and my cholesterol went down to 6.9. I did not do anything different but did a little bit of stepping exercises (five minutes a day) in my kitchen when an opportunity arises. My GP would not put me on medication as my blood pressure is normal. Still working on losing weight (1/2 stone) and hopefully it will work. By the way I started taking kyolic garlic 103 and see if it works! I asked my GP what is the normal range for cholesterol, but did not get a straight answer. All I got is that my cholesterol is high...Am I in the middle range or the highest? Please tell me. Thank you.
Posted on 2013-03-03 09:03:53
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: U.K. Definition of High Cholesterol
Hi Sonal, thanks for your question. The British measure cholesterol differently than in the United States. The British use a mmol/L measure, while the U.S. uses mg/dL. The normal level for cholesterol in the U.K. is 5.5mmol/L for men, and 5.6mmol/L for women. Given this fact, your cholesterol is definitely high. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) recommends that your total cholesterol be less than 5mmol/L, and the Joint British Societies recommends less than 4mmol/L if you are at risk of heart disease. Keep trying to do more exercise and the garlic will hopefully help. Check here for more cholesterol lowering foods.
Posted on 2013-03-03 17:34:19
Name:Ruslan Khamitov
Location:San Francisco
Subject:Misleading info on caviar which is actually healthy...
Besides cholesterol caviar has tons of Omega3, potassium, vitamin A and D and is actually really good for you. The amount of cholesterol is not harmful and is actually required by the body otherwise it's going to produce its own. So don't over dramatize things by saying things like "Avoid" this food. Where is McDonald's on this list?
Posted on 2013-03-18 22:22:07
Name:Chris
Location:Scituate, MA
Subject:Fish oil lowers cholesterol
Fish oil omega 3 is almost guaranteed to lower cholesterol, as in herrings.
Posted on 2013-04-02 17:16:33
Name:Mark
Location:Tucson
Subject:Eggs and sardines don't raise cholesterol
At the end of the year I had a physical and my weight was 200, cholesterol was 211, HDL 32, Tri. 300. My height is 6 feet. I tried the paleo diet and started exercising. After 90 days.. Weight now 165, Chol. 149, HDL 60, LDL 80, and Tri. 45. I ate either 1 can of sardines or omega 3 eggs every day for the full 90 days. I also ate shrimp, red meat, including beef liver and pork. I did eat more fish, Salmon primarily. Lots of vegetables, and 3 fruits a day: apple, banana, and grapefruit. Point is whole natural foods are not what is making peoples cholesterol elevate. It is too much fast and processed foods. Too much processed sugar, bread, and grains. I am living proof! Check out the paleo diet for all things I avoided.
Posted on 2013-04-15 00:25:31
Name:Peter Borten
Location:Boulder, CO
Subject:Dietary Cholesterol is not the Cause of an Unhealthy Serum Cholesterol Profile
Moreover, without specifically measuring levels of *small, dense LDL particles* the serum cholesterol numbers you mention are close to meaningless.

Here's a study that shows that by eating LOTS of the food at the top of your list - egg yolks, three a day - people's serum lipid profiles IMPROVED.

This study states: "Dietary cholesterol content does not significantly influence plasma cholesterol values, which are regulated by different genetic and nutritional factors that influence cholesterol absorption or synthesis."

This study states: "Each 1 mmol/L increase in total cholesterol corresponded to a 15% decrease in mortality." and "In people older than 85 years, high total cholesterol concentrations are associated with longevity owing to lower mortality from cancer and infection."

Posted on 2013-04-28 04:11:03
Name:Nishy
Location:Jamaica
Subject:More detail about the type of foods
Great comments everyone. My question is, how is the level of cholesterol measured in these foods? As it naturally occurs or as a prepared meal? For instance, some people will prepare food such as shrimp, on the grill, boiled or baked rather than fried. So if it is prepared a certain way, it affects the overall cholesterol count of the item. I also see where "Fast Food" has its own category...but what type of fast food? The information isn't very clear. Looking forward to the comments. Thanks!
Posted on 2013-04-29 22:51:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: More detail about the type of foods
Hi Nishy, thanks for your questions and comments. The foods in this article are to be used as a general guide, so specific details are not listed. To find out the different cholesterol levels of foods prepared in different ways you need to use the nutrition facts comparison tool. For example, here is the nutrition facts comparison of breaded and fried shrimp, vs cooked (moist heat), and canned. Interestingly the breaded and fried shrimp has the lowest cholesterol (177mg) but the highest calories (242). The canned shrimp contains the most cholesterol with 252mg. Unfortunately the data for grilled and boil shrimp does not exist, but the general rule is that shrimp is high in cholesterol holds true. As for fast foods, we can use the nutrient ranking tool to find and rank 471 fast foods high in cholesterol. 471 being all the fast foods in the database. Hope those tools and that info helps!
Posted on 2013-04-30 02:44:29
Name:Goode
Location:Virginia
Subject:Does eating heavy cream raise blood cholesterol?
I was recently told that I have high cholesterol. I am presently trying to gain weight, because I am very thin. To increase my calorie intake I am considering adding heavy cream to my milk shakes. Will the heavy cream make my cholesterol worse? I appreciate your advice. Thanks.
Posted on 2013-05-06 21:24:06
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Does eating heavy cream raise blood cholesterol?
Hi Goode, thanks for your question. Both heavy cream and milk shakes will increase your blood cholesterol. Between the cholesterol content, saturated fat, and sugar, you have a lot of ingredients that are just not good for you. Your cholesterol level also depends on your genetics and amount you exercise each day. If you are looking to gain weight, check out this list of high calorie foods recommended for weight gain. You want to stick to trying to eat a lot of nuts, particularly almonds, which may help lower cholesterol. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2013-05-07 06:52:01
Name:Jess
Location:WA
Subject:Food for thought on dietary cholesterol and heart disease

http://advances.nutrition.org/content/3/5/711.full “In recent years, however, there have been a number of epidemiological studies that did not support a relationship between cholesterol intake and cardiovascular disease. Further, a number of recent clinical trials that looked at the effects of long-term egg consumption (as a vehicle for dietary cholesterol) reported no negative impact on various indices of cardiovascular health and disease.”

Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19751443 “For many years, both the medical community and the general public have incorrectly associated eggs with high serum cholesterol and being deleterious to health, even though cholesterol is an essential component of cells and organisms.”

Last one, promise: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11111098 “Analysis of the available epidemiological and clinical data indicates that for the general population, dietary cholesterol makes no significant contribution to atherosclerosis and risk of cardiovascular disease.”

Posted on 2013-05-27 17:54:29
Name:Stephen
Location:UK
Subject:Food for thought on cholesterol metabolism and food sources...
An interesting thread of commentary and definitely thought provoking. Maybe some small additional input to think about. There is not enough reporting, monitoring of the HDL/LDL clinically at the General Practitioner level. When food is taken in it is processed by a whole bunch of enzymes, the liver pumps out soaps to make micelles (small fat blobs) of the fats, which can be absorbed into the blood and first pass of this fat rich blood from the gut goes to the liver where a large proportion is handled by repackaging. So we don't eat HDL or LDL just fats, proteins, carbs, etc.,. The liver is responsible for the packages. The egg commentaries have been enlightening, of course they do not have high levels of carbs, but do have lots of protein (egg white), so in a 6 egg quiche there will be over 1200mg cholesterol and about 150 mg cholesterol from cheddar cheese - the egg carries little additional fat (some phospholipids), the cheese buckets of fat. In this situation is the high egg cholesterol turned into dietary available cholesterol due to the fats from the cheese, which only provides a 1/10th as much cholesterol as the eggs - importantly - when it is all transformed in the gut to fat blobs? As we say on my planet "Live long and prosper".
Posted on 2013-06-30 05:24:08
Name:Healthy Person
Location:Earth
Subject:Hormones are key
For the majority of people these 10 foods should be essential to their diet. Others who do qualify for the exception to the above, because of their medical condition, have missed the train and should switch their research to a life insurance policy instead. There is still plenty of healthy and health conscious people in the world. So, why don't we look at food from healthy people perspective and then qualify it saying that those who can't shouldn't...
Posted on 2013-06-30 10:51:42
Name:Lisa
Location:UK
Subject:Wrong! Cholesterol is actually good...
So much misinformation here! All these are great for you, your Chol levels should be 190-220 to be healthy. Now vegetable oils/carbs/sugar are the real killers, Google Michael Rothman, MD. Soy is also dangerous. You need Cholesterol!
Posted on 2013-07-01 10:35:19
Name:Stephen
Location:UK
Subject:Cholesterol what is enough?
Lisa, Lisa, Lisa - and Rothman? Really? Being generous, let's say enthusiastic amateur. Unless there are genetic reasons, we make enough cholesterol to get by and maybe there is too much focus on this - after all the human scare is epidemiological and therefore association. Fats on the other hand? You raise a valid point, but it really is when these fats oxidize in the LDL and the delivery system is tainted. How do we limit oxidation processes? - not by scavengers like vitamin E. This is a mass action argument. The lifetime of an oxygen free-radical is so short that you need to have the scavenger sitting next to the radical at the point of production. This can only be achieved by massive doses of vitamin E (or Q10). The only way forward is about limiting production of these damaging oxygen free-radicals.
Posted on 2013-07-13 18:08:29
Name:Mollie
Location:New York
Subject:Personally...
I am a 20 year old who just received information that I have high LDL cholesterol levels. I am a college athlete who is not over weight and exercises everyday, I also do not eat red meats, fish or egg products. For a while I had stayed away from whole grains because I was avoiding gluten and carbohydrates but I am realizing that these actually help to lower cholesterol levels. I now include whole grain cereals, and wheat products into my diet and replaced milk and butter with almond milk and almond butter. I unfortunately have high cholesterol due to my genetics and hope that these steps will help to lower it by my next appointment.
Posted on 2013-07-25 16:12:52
Name:Megan
Location:US
Subject:High cholesterol does lead to heart disease
It astounds me at some people's ignorance about diets. I have researched (I am also a nurse) and it is known in the medical field that cholesterol sticks to the arteries and if bad enough, it blocks those arteries. This causes heart attacks and bad circulation.
Posted on 2013-10-01 05:57:39
Name:Anon
Location:Here
Subject:Dietary Cholesterol and Eggs
Go by actual scientific research, not what dietitians (who've been getting things wrong for decades!) tell you. To quote Harvard School of Public Health: "A solid body of research shows that for most people, cholesterol in food has a much smaller effect on blood levels of total cholesterol and harmful LDL cholesterol than does the mix of fats in the diet. Recent research has shown that moderate egg consumption—up to one a day—does not increase heart disease risk in healthy individuals (1, 2) and can be part of a healthy diet."

The Japanese consume quite a lot of eggs per capita and it's not killing them that fast. But they don't eat as much of their eggs in cakes or with bacon.

See also this study. Basically if you're diabetic you may have to reduce egg consumption.

Posted on 2013-10-28 06:29:54
Name:Mrs lower Bad cholesterol for insurance
Location:California
Subject:How many days to reduce bad levels?
I need to reduce my Bad cholesterol levels. I will sign up for Obama care by end of March 2014 and require a lower level to avoid paying a higher premium. How long will it take from > 300 if I reduced to only about 10 mgs of cholesterol per day to be an acceptable level for most people?
FYI: No family history of high cholesterol.
Posted on 2014-01-19 21:24:39
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How many days to reduce bad levels?
Hi and thanks for your question. Everyone is different, but if you adopt a vegan diet and exercise you could start seeing lower cholesterol within a week, and great levels within a month to six weeks. The article on cholesterol lowering foods will likely also help.
Posted on 2014-01-20 01:47:24
Name:Terry Lynch
Location:Hawaii
Subject:Niacin/major effect on LDL Cholesterol
I have just seen a major reversal of LDL and HDL cholesterol values upon discovering niacin malabsorption and ancient Pellagra. Since the 1930's the US has been enriching all of its wheat flour products with B-Vitamins to address widespread niacin deficiencient diets that resulted ultimately in the pellagra. The disease has literally disappeared since this move to obscurity and doctors don't go there as general rule.

So I suffered or many years with skin conditions, loss of hair and dental disaster and got the usual try lipitor/zocor/zetia due to slightly elevated cholesterol levels. I was on a gluten free diet for about 5 years which really mimicked the pellagra diet and my high fructose diet and possible hypochlorhydria(concommitant with Pellagra)which contributed to low tryptophan absorption and thus overt pellagra or vitamin B-3 deficiency.

My sizable intake of supplemental B-Vitamin B-100 of Vitamin world (one in the morning with meals/one at night with meal)immediately resulted in noticeable skin healing and low AND BEHOLD MY GOOD HDL RAISED UP AND MY LDL DOVE TO 86 from about 150!!!

As many of you know higher HDL Cholesterol caused by my substantial niacinimide intake with a balanced b-complex then in turn mopped up my notorious defamed LDL which our Pharma industry has claimed in partial understanding is the primary cause of arteriosclerosis and heart disease.

There can be no doubt that if you suffer and undiagnosed, even asymptomatic Vitamin B-3 deficiency, your LDL cholesterol levels can be beneficially lowered. However, B-Vitamin supplementation needs the oversight of a trained health care professional or careful research on your part to be sure none of the meds you presently take will be effected. Excessive niacin or niacinimide daily intake is not recommended, and may be counter indicated in certain cases of liver disease.

If you are on a celiac or wheat free diet you may want to discuss and/or research B- vitamin supplementation as I did and reap the health benefits of higher HDL cholesterol.

By the way, I lean on a high protein diet which includes about four eggs a day, fish , and chicken and butter. Flour products including sugar dough balls are no part of it due to celiac disease,and this is a good and bad thing. The good thing is not eating carbos like bread cookies and cakes and having excessive iron intake from enriched flour which leads to heart attacks ; the bad is not knowing that my diet was totally lacking in certain B-Vitamins and that with other malabsorption factors resulted in deadly effects of b-vitamin malnutrition discovered by Dr. Goldberg in the 1920's.

Alogha nui, Terry Lynch

Posted on 2014-03-27 14:46:36
Name:Genelle
Location:Canada
Subject:Boosting Cholesterol Levels
I was told I have low cholesterol,and low cholesterol is related to memory loss. I am only 39 years old and forget things more often than usual and am sometimes confused; does that mean I am in the beginners stage of dementia or Alzheimers? I was told to eat lots of nuts and fish oil; is there any other food that is high in cholesterol but also safe?
Posted on 2014-03-28 13:03:57
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Boosting Cholesterol Levels
Hi Genelle, thanks for your question. Nuts, seeds, and fish oil are a good way to get heart healthy and brain healthy fats. Consider also adding dark chocolate, coconut, and avocados to the list of good fats to eat. The article on foods high in saturated fats may also give you some ideas. Further, if your cholesterol is low, you should be fine also eating some animal fats from eggs or meats. In regards to your symptoms, it is likely nothing to worry about right now, and any diagnosis is best left to your doctor or primary care provider. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2014-03-31 01:04:39

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References

  1. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.
  2. National Institutes of Health Cholesterol Education Program