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Top 10 Cholesterol Lowering Foods


Cholesterol is a steroid lipid (fat) found in the blood and is necessary for proper functioning of cell membranes. Our bodies already manufacture all the cholesterol we need, so it is not necessary to consume more. High levels of cholesterol have been shown to increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. Cholesterol lowering foods should be incorporated into everyone's diet for optimal health. The percentages by which these foods lower cholesterol reflect people who have high levels of cholesterol greater than 200 mg/dL, and have been diagnosed with hypercholesterolemia. Different diets, lifestyles, and foods will work differenlty for different people. It is recommended that you buy a Cholesterol Test Kit, so you can monitor your cholesterol levels at home and see which diet and lifestyle works best for you. Below is a list of foods which lowers the "bad" LDL cholesterol, while leaving the good HDL cholesterol largely unaffected.

#1: Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated Fats (Olive Oil, Canola Oil, Peanut Oil, Peanuts, Olives, Avocados)
Cholesterol Reduction:18%1,2,37
Substituting saturated animal fats and other high cholesterol foods with healthier fats like olive oil, canola oil, peanut oil, and avocados is the most powerful thing you can do to achieve a drastic reduction in your LDL cholesterol. Specifically a diet high in olive and sunflower oil, that contains 12.9% saturated fat, 15.1% monounsaturated fat, and 7.9% polyunsaturated fat can achieve an 18% reduction in LDL cholesterol vs people on a diet higher in saturated fat.1

#2: Bran (Oat, Rice)
Cholesterol Reduction:7-14%3-5
Bran, particularly oat bran, has been proven effective in lowering LDL cholesterol levels. Add bran to hot cereals and bread. Also, eating whole oatmeal every morning, or switching to whole products like brown rice, can help you get more bran in your diet and lower your cholesterol numbers. Click to see complete nutrition facts for Bran.

#3: Flax Seeds
Cholesterol Reduction:8-14%6,7
Up to 50 grams of flax seeds a day has been shown to reduce LDL cholesterol in healthy young adults by up to 8%,6 and 38 grams of flax seeds per day reduced LDL cholesterol by 14% in people with high cholesterol (hypercholesterolemia).7 In both studies the flax seeds where consumed in a muffin or other bread product. Flax seeds are easily incorporated in baked goods, as well as added to hot cereals like oatmeal.
Click to see complete nutrition facts for Flax Seeds

#4: Garlic
Cholesterol Reduction:9-12%8,9
Studies have shown that less than half a clove (900mg) of raw garlic a day can lower cholesterol by 9-12%.8,9 Raw garlic is best and can be added to olive oil salad dressings, or as a garnish on soups and sandwiches. Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Garlic.

#5: Almonds
Cholesterol Reduction:7-10%10-12
Several studes report that eating up to half a cup of almonds can reduce cholesterol levels by up to 10%. In a dose response study it was found that a quarter cup of almonds reduces cholesterol by 5% and half a cup causes the full 10% reduction.11 As almonds are a high calorie food, it is not recommended that you eat more than half a cup. Almonds are great as a snack, or as an addition to breakfast cereals like oatmeal.
Click to see complete nutrition facts for Almonds.

#6: Lycopene Foods
Cholesterol Reduction:0-17%13,14
Lycopene is a carotenoid pigment responsible for giving fruits and vegetables their red color and is found in tomatoes, watermelon, and various other high lycopene foods. Studies are conflicting as to whether lycopene reduces LDL cholesterol or not. Some studies report a 10-17% reduction13,14 while other studies find no difference.15,16 Despite this difference, lycopene is thought to generally promote heart health whether it lowers LDL cholesterol or not.

#7: Walnuts and Pistachios
Cholesterol Reduction:10%17-21
Numerous studies report a reduction in cholesterol with consumption of walnuts or pistachios. This is esepcially true when the fats from the nuts replace consumption of other high cholesterol fats. Consuming around 30 grams of walnuts, or having the nuts be about 20-30% of total caloric intake is necessary to achieve the cholesterol lowering benefits.19
Click to see complete nutrition facts for Walnuts and Pistachios.

#8: Whole Barley
Cholesterol Reduction:7-10%22,23
Like the bran from oats and rice, barley reduces cholesterol, particularly when it is used as a substitute for wheat products.22 Barley can easily substitute for wheat in the form of barley noodles, barley flour, or whole pearl barley. Click to see complete nutrition facts for Barley.

#9: Dark Chocolate and Plant Sterols
Cholesterol Reduction:2-5%24,25
The plant sterols and cocoa flavanols in dark non-milk chocolate have been shown to reduce cholesterol by 2-5%. Further, plant sterols (phytosterols), found in all plants, and particularly plant oils like corn oil and soybean oil have been shown to lower LDL cholesterol by up to 16%.25 However, this reduction is largley due to inhibiting absorption of cholesterol, and would not have a large effect if you consumed little or no cholesterol.
Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dark Chocolate.

#10: Green Tea
Cholesterol Reduction:2-5%26
Green tea has long been a staple in East Asia where it is believed to wash oil (fat) out of the body. Studies suggest this may be true as. green tea can lower cholesterol by 2-5%.26 Green tea without sugar also has few calories (typically less than 10) and can make a great substitute for a variety of beverages. Click to see complete nutrition facts for Green Tea


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More Lifestyle Choices to Lower Cholesterol

  • Take Niacin (Vitamin B3) Supplements - Niacin has been shown to lower LDL (bad) cholesterol and raise the level of HDL (good) cholesterol.27,28 The degree to which it lowers LDL cholesterol has not been measured, but one study reports a 20% increase in HDL (good) cholesterol29. There are no studies on the effect of high niacin foods as compared to the supplement. However, it is commonly construed that eating high niacin foods will help lower bad LDL levels while raising good HDL levels.
  • Exercise - Studies suggest that regular endurance aerobic exercises (walking, swimming, running) can increase levels of good (HDL) cholesterol which has protective effects on your cardiovascular system. This is especially true for people with low levels of HDL cholesterol.30,31 Further, exercise can enhance the effect of a low cholesterol diet, further lowering levels of bad (LDL) cholesterol.32
  • Become Vegan - Being vegan involves eating only plant foods and avoiding all animal foods such as dairy, meats, seafoods, etc...Veganism has been shown to lower cholesterol numbers as well as triglyceride levels.33 This is especially true for vegan diets that do not contain refined sugars, processed foods, or trans-fats, and consist mostly of high fiber foods like nuts, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables.
  • Reduce Stress - Studies show that mental, emotional, or physchological stress can increase cholesterol levels by 10%.34,35,36 One study in particular found that college students have high cholesterol levels before tests than other times in the semester.35 Another study found that performing a stressful mental activity, like math, increases cholesterol levels.36 To reduce stress in your life try drinking hot tea, yoga, or spending time with friends. Try new things till you find something that works for you.

Recipes to Lower Cholesterol

Add bran or flax to any of these recipes to increase their cholesterol lowering potential

Buy Cholesterol Test Kits from Amazon.com

You do not have to wait for your next doctors appointment to get your cholesterol numbers. You can buy a Cholesterol Test Kit to use at home. This saves both time and money, and also gives you faster feedback to know how your lifestyle choices are affecting your cholesterol levels. When you find a diet that works well for you, come back and comment to share your findings with other readers.



Comments.
Name:Gary
Location:Los Angeles
Subject:Thanks for helpful subject matter!!!!
Thank you for a helpful interesting article!!!!
Posted on 2011-10-30 08:11:07
Name:Maria
Location:Australia
Subject:Thanks for helpful information!!!
Posted on 2012-01-30 10:00:51
Name:Jesus
Location:Weston, Fl.
Subject:Olives only work as a substitute
Although a good strategy for lowering cholesterol could be to substitute animal fats for fats consisting of olives, canola, etc...it can also be misleading (at least it was for me for many years) to think that olives and olive oil alone can reduce cholesterol. Actually, even olives contain some saturated fat! So on net, olives only lower cholesterol when used as a substitute and in my view oat bran should have the first spot in your ranking!
Posted on 2012-02-10 11:15:23
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Olives only work as a substitute
Hi Jesus, thanks for your comment and making the important distinction that monosaturated fats, like olive oil, will not lower cholesterol alone, and can only work when used as a substitute for saturated animal fats or other unhealthy fats.
Posted on 2012-02-10 11:22:28
Name:Tamoor
Location:Rawalpindi Pakistan
Subject:Truely useful info
Hi, I like this info and I am doing the same practice for my regular diet. Thanks for sharing such useful information.
Posted on 2012-03-15 14:08:57
Name:Tyrel
Location:Indiana
Subject:Something not listed
Something that I didn't see listed was cinnamon. This is actually prescribed by some doctors. I have switched to using olive oil in almost all of my cooking, since it is so healthy. The only thing is, because it's an oil, it still increases the HDL cholesterol. I also take fish oil and krill oil supplements daily (I HATE seafood). I help a high HDL by taking 1 cinnamon pill shortly after eating. My doctor says that all of my blood work now looks fantastic and to keep doing what I'm doing.
Posted on 2012-05-04 22:41:35
Name:Annette
Location:Scotland
Subject:Olive oil
Despite having a healthy diet my cholsterol levels are always high. I have avoided taking statins because of the side effects. My partner suffered badly with the side effects of statins and his cardiologist recommened that he stopped taking them. I was always a user of Olive Oil that was until I read about how it can become toxic when heated to a high temperature. I have since reverted to cooking with rapseed oil (in small doses). Is this okay? What alternatives are there to taking STATINS please? Thanks Annette!
Posted on 2012-05-17 15:51:42
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Olive oil and Canola Oil
Hi Annette, thanks for your question. Canola (aka:Rapeseed) oil is a good substitute for olive oil and has been shown to lower cholesterol. Further, canola oil has a higher smoke point than olive oil, meaning that it can better tolerate high heat before becoming toxic. Another tip is to add water to the oil before cooking, this can help prevent the oil from degrading. In terms of lowering cholesterol and staying off of statins, some people are genetically predisposed to high cholesterol and it can be difficult to lower it. Perhaps try a vegan diet that is high in vegetables and whole grains, while being low in fats and sugars. This combined with 20 minutes of exercise a day might be effective. Good luck.
Posted on 2012-05-18 00:21:33
Name:Kandregula S. Satyanarayana
Location:Visakhapatnam India
Subject:Reduction of Cholesterol
I am regularly taking almond oil in food items as per your good advise. I am also taking green tea everyday. Your article is very useful. Thank you!
Posted on 2012-06-22 04:54:26
Name:Josie
Location:Pembroke Pines, Florida
Subject:Alternative to Statins
This is in response to Annette asking for an alternative to statins. I was on Lipitor and I also suffered some side effects. I stopped that right away and started on natural supplements such as Red Yeast Rice and odorless garlic pills. If you do the same, You should have no more trouble with cholesterol. You can find them at your local health food store.
Posted on 2012-07-30 22:52:35
Name:Matilda
Location:Mississippi
Subject:Niacin and Red Yeast Rice
Annette - Both Niacin and Red Yeast Rice have history of lowering cholesterol - the Red Yeast Rice can usually be found in a health food store and has been used in Oriental history - I personally have found it to be VERY effective.
Posted on 2012-07-30 23:37:17
Name:Melissa
Subject:Nutrition Labels - What to look for?
Hi, my husband has high cholesterol, and he is only 28. Since then, I have been browsing the net to find out what's good and what's bad. My question is, when buying something with a nutrition label, besides looking at the cholesterol, what else should I look at, and what should the percentage be?
Posted on 2012-09-07 07:19:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Nutrition Labels - What to look for?
Hi Melissa, thanks for your question. You want to find foods that have no cholesterol in them (0% DV). If they are animal based foods, you also want them to have as little saturated fat as possible. Further look for foods low in sugar and sodium, as both these nutrients increase the risk of heart disease. Try instead to find foods high in fiber and potassium. By low, look for less than 20% DV, and by high, look for more than 50% DV. Also, try to make more vegan or vegetarian meals, since plant based foods have no cholesterol. Numerous people have gone on vegan diets and found tremendous results with lowering cholesterol.
Posted on 2012-09-07 07:25:36
Name:Iqbal Moosa
Location:South Africa
Subject:Cholesterol lowering fruits/foods
Pomegranate is very effective in lowering ldl. Gogi berries (also rated as one of the best foods for damaged cancer cell replacement). Black grapes with the seeds. Green apples (granny smith). Citrus fruits(I have found that by eating citrus fruits after my evening meal also helps with bowel movement early every morning). Onion juice with honey. Popcorn lightly salted. Tumeric powder added to your foods also helps to lower ldl, it is also good as an anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal aid that reduces risk of cancer.
Posted on 2012-10-28 19:00:39
Name:Joe
Location:VA
Subject:Oatmeal and Muesli Breakfast
Thank you for your work and information. Your format is simple to understand. Keep doing it for so many of us you help. #2 on your Cholesterol Lowering Foods is Oat Bran so I put 1/4 cup dry Oatmeal and 1/4 cup Muesli in a saucepan when it comes to a boil and let it simmer a few minutes. I add 3 walnut halves, a dash of cinnamon and a little unsweetened almond milk, eat this breakfast with a cup of coffee and go off to the Y to work out. Previous medical report cholesterol was 352. Current cholesterol is 188. 123 point reduction 38% improvement. Your list and exercise really work. I will be 71 next month. Thank you. Can you do a list on anti-inflammatory best top ten foods?
Posted on 2013-03-03 10:30:15
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Oatmeal and Muesli Breakfast
Hi Joe, thanks for sharing your experience and congratulations on your success lowering your numbers! Keep up the good work, persistence over the long term counts the most. Thanks for the article suggestion also, will work on an article of anti-inflammatory foods.
Posted on 2013-03-03 15:46:02
Name:Nazrul
Location:Japan
Subject:Low Cholesterol (Hypocholesterolemia)
About 5 months ago my LDL Cholesterol count was just 105. Now its 51. Whereas the normal cholesterol range is 70-140. Higher LDL is risky for health. Is a lower LDL, like around 50, also a risk factor for health? Maybe I know the reason for my decreasing LDL level. Recently, I found the page for cholesterol lowering foods. Surprisingly, I found I eat almost 95-100% of these foods every day. This might be the cause I think. I would be happy to know:
Is there any other health reason that might be responsible for such drastic change of this count? Is and LDL count less than 50 unhealthy?
(A) If yes, How much risk is there?
(B) If the present situation is risky then what should I do for it?
(C) Should I eat less of some of the top 10 foods listed above?
Thank you
Posted on 2013-03-08 23:11:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low Cholesterol (Hypocholesterolemia)
Hi Nazul, thanks for your question. The effects of low cholesterol have not been studied well, and there is no "lower limit" for cholesterol. So it is not possible to tell if a LDL level of 50 is unhealthy. However, given how quickly your LDL cholesterol has dropped, you could have some underlying health problem, particularly with your liver.
Did you start eating a lot of these cholesterol lowering foods just 6 months ago? Or for most of your life? If it is just recently, the foods might have an effect, otherwise, it is unlikely that they do, and you do not need to change your diet.
Low cholesterol (Hypocholesterolemia) can lead to anxiety, depression, and even cancer. If you want to boost your cholesterol levels, try eating more high cholesterol foods. Also, consider seeing a doctor about your low cholesterol levels, particularly if they do not improve in 2-3 months.
Posted on 2013-03-09 22:57:46
Name:Robert Conroy CNC
Location:San Diego
Subject:Lowering LDL Cholesterol - Health Risks
Large studies have shown the lower your LDL below 108, the higher the risk for cancer. Amount of LDL does not effect cardiovascular risk, it's the particle size that matters and also the oxidation of cholesterol. Saturated fat makes particles large and fluffy that can do no harm. Eating high glycemic carbohydrates causes the LDL particle sizes to become the very small VLDL particles that are atherogenic (cause atherosclerosis). A good book on this is: The Great Cholesterol Myth by Dr Sinatra (a heart surgeon) and Jonny Bowden PhD nutritionist. So pretty much everything we've been told about cholesterol is simply not true. Good way to raise your particle size? Cheesecake for desert. A whole piece only has a glycemic load of around 10.
Posted on 2013-04-27 03:11:10
Name:Robert Conroy
Location:San Diego
Subject:People should not be vegan
Vegans get no omega-3 of the important kind (DHA and EPA). Plant omega-3, like from flax seeds, is called ALA. When consumed, less that .2-5% is converted to EPA and practically none is converted to DHA. Your brain is about 60% DHA. Think about that. This is why I'm treating many vegans for depression right now. Telling people to become a vegan is the worst advice you can give a person about nutrition. Over 95% of Americans are omega-3 deficient. 20% have no detectable omega-3 in their blood, at all. This would include most all vegans. 1 out of 10 Americans are now on at least 1 antidepressant. Good books about this:
The Missing Wellness Factors - EPA and DHA The Most Important Nutrients Since Vitamins? by Jorn Dyerberg M.D.
The Omega RX Zone by Barry Sears
The Omega Diet by Artemis Simopoulos M.D.
Inflammation Nation by Floyd H. Chilton PhD
Posted on 2013-04-27 03:19:08
Name:Michael
Location:New Jersey
Subject:Vegan diet

I commend the recommendation of a vegan diet. Concerns raised about the mix of fats typically found in vegan diets are misplaced. There is no known link between depression and vegan diets or even depression and circulating omega-3 levels. And there is plenty of evidence that veganism is helpful.

Also, statin drugs can sometimes cause adverse effects but on the whole are enormously beneficial. Less than 3% of patients taking statins have myalgias (muscle pain) or elevated transaminases (liver tests). Red yeast rice, touted as a "natural" substance, has an active metabolite identical to the drug lovastatin.

Posted on 2013-06-09 11:19:27
Name:Jocelyn
Location:Louisiana
Subject:Red yeast rice IS a statin.
Beware the side effects of red yeast rice. From wikipedia: In the late 1970s, researchers in the United States and Japan were isolating lovastatin from Aspergillus and monacolins from Monascus, respectively, the latter being the same fungus used to make red yeast rice but cultured under carefully controlled conditions. Chemical analysis soon showed that lovastatin and monacolin K are identical. The article "The origin of statins" summarizes how the two isolations, documentations and patent applications were just months apart.[5] Lovastatin became the patented, prescription drug Mevacor for Merck & Co. Red yeast rice went on to become a contentious non-prescription dietary supplement in the United States and other countries. Lovastatin and other prescription "statin" drugs inhibit cholesterol synthesis by blocking action of the enzyme HMG-CoA reductase. As a consequence, circulating total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol are lowered. In a meta-analysis of 91 randomized clinical trial of 12 weeks duration, totaling 68,485 participants, LDL-cholesterol was lowered by 24-49% depending on the statin.[6] Different strains of Monascus fungus will produce different amounts of monacolins. The 'Went' strain of Monascus purpureus (purpureus = dark red in Latin), when properly fermented and processed, will yield a dried red yeast rice powder that is approximately 0.4% monacolins, of which roughly half will be monacolin K (identical to lovastatin). Monacolin content of a red yeast rice product is described in a 2008 clinical trial report.[7]
Posted on 2013-07-09 09:13:59
Name:David
Location:Canada
Subject:Lowering cholesterol, sugar and stress by Yoga and Acupuncture
Lowering cholesterol, sugar and stress by Yoga and Acupuncture ---by Paramjit S Tappia and Yan Jun Xu, Winnipeg, Canada. CV network, 2013

Elevations in LDL-cholesterol, obesity and stress are major cardiovascular disease risk factors (1). Due to the side effects of a number of pharmacological agents, the potential of Yoga and acupuncture on cholesterol levels as alternative therapies has been explored, particularly in the Western world. Yoga is an ancient type of mental and physical exercise originating in India, and has been reported to reduce oxidative stress, body weight and blood cholesterol. Acupuncture has been used in China to treat a variety of diseases since about two thousands years ago. In ancient times, people used a sharp stone to pressure some points for pain relief. Subsequently, acupuncture has been found to be effective in the reversal of coma and stroke as well as for the treatment of chest pain, irregular heart beat, hypertension and other conditions including asthma and insomnia.

Recently it has been found that acupuncture is also effective for the control of blood lipids, glucose and oxidative stress. A literature review of 220 publications conducted by Peplow and Bater (2) has revealed that acupuncture with electrical stimulation (electro-acupuncture) can control elevations in blood sugar in obese women. In animal studies, electrical stimulation (15Hz) for 30-60 minutes is required for positive results. From the literature available on Traditional Chinese Medicine books, Zhongwan, Zusanli, Yishu and Geshu acupuncture points appear to be most frequently used for diabetic patients. Liang and Koya (3) reviewed acupuncture literature between 1979 and 2009; it was evidenced that acupuncture can reduce insulin resistance, hypertension, metabolic disorder, obesity and improve blood lipid profile. Furthermore, frequently used acupuncture points were Zusanli, Fenglong, Tianshu, Neiting, Sanyinjiao, Quchi, Qihai, Zhongwan, Guanyuan, Yinlingquan and Pishu.

Siu et al (4) have reported that electro-acupuncture is able to lower oxidative stress by stimulation of the Zusanli point. It appears that electrical stimulation at low frequency (2 Hertz), 30 min/day for 4 weeks yields beneficial effects. It is pointed out that different frequencies of stimulation can exert different effects. The underlying mechanism of acupuncture is that stimulation of different points release different neuropeptides and hormones. In addition, it has also been suggested that resistance of nerve fibres and electrical signals are altered in different disease that can be re-balanced by acupuncture. Acupuncture and yoga promote well-being and health and have the potential to be used as a complimentary therapeutic regimen to improve blood lipid and glucose profiles as well as attenuate oxidative stress.

References
1. Adameova A, Xu YJ, Duhamel TA, Tappia PS, Shan L and Dhalla NS. Anti-atherosclerotic molecules targeting oxidative stress and inflammation. 2009; 15: 3094-3107.
2. Peplow PV and Baxter GD. Electro-acupuncture for control of blood glucose in diabetes: Literature revies. J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2012; 5:1-10.
3. Liang F and Koya D. Acupuncture: is it effective for the treatment of insulin resistance? Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism. 2010; 12:555-569.
4. Siu FKW, Lo SCL, and Leung MCP. Effectiveness of multiple pre-ischemia electro-acupuncture on attenuating lipid peroxidation induced by cerebral ischemia in adults rats. Life Sciences. 2004; 75:1323-1332. Note: More clinical studies are needed to confirm the beneficial effects.

Posted on 2013-07-22 11:59:01
Name:Kitt
Location:Australia
Subject:Dark Chocolate Lowers My Cholesterol
Hi, I find dark chocolate with 75% Cocao, or more, helps me...1 cube a day every day.
Posted on 2013-07-27 13:41:56
Name:Chris
Location:South Africa
Subject:Cholesterol, Heart Disease, and My Theories
Most vegetable oils are low in omega 3 fats and high in omega 6's causing us all to get far too much omega 6 and become omega 3 depleted. Excess omega 6 oils cause chronic low level inflammation leading to heart disease, cancer and more. I'm talking sunflower oils, grains, breads, pastries, doughnuts, cakes, etc. Animal omega 3's are also far better than plant omega 3's (see a comment above this one).

Grass fed beef is MUCH MUCH higher is omega 3 fatty acids than regular beef - it has the same type found in fish, which is so good for our hearts and brains and joints. In addition to that the saturated fats (cholesterol) that animals contain will never be used by the body to repair (and thus block) arteries, if we get enough vitamin C (only some fruits and veg are high in vit C). We don't get nearly enough, which means that our bodies cannot produce enough collagen which is used to repair damaged arteries. It therefore relies on cholesterol which is not the ideal artery repair "material". Most animals (unlike humans) have an enzyme in their livers that allows them to produce massive amounts of vitamin C, without needing it from their diets.

These animals (except guinea pigs & humans) DON'T get heart disease. Vit C is also an anti-oxidant which prevents free radical damage to almost all parts of the body. So get plenty vitamin C and you won't have to worry about cholesterol in meats, which for the most part is actually good for us (the outer walls of the heart itself is covered with it I believe).

I would not recommend pork, very large fish or shellfish however. Shellfish are the filter feeder cleaners of the oceans, pork the same but for the land and very big fish have mercury.

Pork has caused as much, or more liver cirrhosis than alcohol - clinical trials have proven this. Search for these studies on the PubMED website (National Institute of Health). The more pork you eat the higher your chances. Pigs are habitually dirty scavengers, not matter how "clean" they are "raised". Ideal hosts for a mutating flu virus too (link between humans and dirty ducks allowing easier jump of species gap).

Germany has a high rate of alcohol consumption AND of pork consumption and thus a very high rate (at least historically) of liver cirrhosis.

Stick to organic, grass fed "clean" meats - eg. Beef, mutton/lamb, etc.

Sugars and grains are bad yes, but remember with fruits - when eaten in unprocessed totally raw form, they contain enough water to dilute the sugar (fructose) and enough fiber to slow the spikes in blood sugar. With grains, they are high in carbs, which quickly gets converted by body to sugar too, but fiber with the wholegrains when unrefined also slows down blood sugar spikes as does fiber in fruit. Gluten in grains a different story, there is a lot of debate as to how good gluten is for you. At the least it's not good for those who are gluten intolerant (although some argue we all are, just some much more than others).

Due to people not eating enough wholegrains and/or green vegetables, magnesium deficiency is becoming a big problem in the west. Magnesium (and Vitamin D) drives calcium into the bones and teeth where it belongs. With a lack of magnesium, calcium starts building up in all the soft organs and tissues of the body (calcification of kidneys, heart, arteries and even brain - alzheimers). Plaque that blocks arteries (causing heart attacks and strokes) is composed of one or more of the following and is not just cholesterol:

Plaque = Cholesterol (saturated fat), calcium, oxidized cholesterol, trans fat (heat damaged vegetable oil in all fried foods), proteins attached to cholesterol molecules, etc, etc.

Whoever is scared of red meat due to it "clogging their arteries" - has swallowed the BS fed to them by the USDA hook, line and sinker! Not only does red meat not CAUSE CHD/CVD, it may very well help to PREVENT it!

Do you know WHY saturated fat and cholesterol get the blame for CHD? Because Pfizer LIED! They'd already invented the statin now known as Lipitor, but needed to prove the correlation between high cholesterol and CHD. So they fed it to rabbits, which promptly dropped dead!

The fact it killed the bunnies shouldn't come as any surprise to anyone who knows the primary role of cholesterol (in fact, it's essential for just about everything - as essential, in fact, as blood, water and oxygen), but the word is derived from the Greek for 'solid bile'. Now, as you're no doubt aware, bile is necessary for the proper digestion of fat; bunnies, being herbivores, have no use for it so, it should be no wonder that they keeled over - you would too if you ate something toxic!

So, after killing the bunnies, Pfizer then doctored the report to make it look like the trial had been conducted on HUMANS, and presented it to the USDA.

So, for the past 40+ years, we've been fed a LIE; Pfizer - and the rest of Big Pharma, has been getting rich from POISONING the Western world with a drug that has ZERO purpose, and a list of side-effects, many of them potentially fatal, that goes on for MILES! Some of the major ones include: -

Obesity CHD (I kid you not - cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol in particular, is ESSENTIAL for coronary health) Diabetes (types 2 & 3. Never heard of type 3...? You have, except you probably call it 'dementia'. It's termed 'type 3 diabetes' because it's caused in the same way as type 2: - eating a low-fat/high-carb diet containing copious amounts of grains, starches and sugars) Liver failure (this is hardly surprising as statins interfere with the liver's own cholesterol regulation (it produces up to 1.5g every single day. If cholesterol was that deadly, why would our bodies produce it...?!) Stroke Joint disorders (such as OA and RA) There may also be a causal link between statins, a LFHC diet and diseases such as MS, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

The one of most nutritious foods is one of the most demonized: - LARD, rendered fat from grass-fed pigs. 60 years or so ago, it was the number 1 cooking fat, and hardly anyone was overweight. Then, when Pfizer cooked up the non-existent link between saturated fat, cholesterol and CHD, and the USDA told everyone to start using Crisco, suddenly everyone started ballooning.

Something else happened too - children began presenting with rickets, and adults with osteomalacia. Why...? Because lard, with its high HDL cholesterol content is the best food source of vitamin D! So, suddenly over 80% of Americans were vitamin D deficient - and the USDA never twigged why (it STILL hasn't - and neither has the NHS/DoH over here, either!). The body CANNOT synthesize D without adequate supplies of cholesterol, and they'd prohibited and outlawed the best source! It's been downhill faster than a skier on speed ever since.

In short, if you value your health, and your GP insists you take 'em, RESIST IN THE STRONGEST POSSIBLE TERMS! If you're on them already, chuck 'em and switch to eating a LCHF diet - your body WILL thank you!

Nearly EVERYTHING the NHS/BDA in the UK, and the USDA/ADA/AHA has been telling you about diet is WRONG - VERY WRONG!

If you want to know what should constitute a healthy diet, do the EXACT OPPOSITE of what you're told (aside from avoiding sugars, and eating veggies, obviously.

Reducing cholesterol too much can be deadly - especially for those who are skinny and/or very elderly. Even if most don't experience side effects from statins at fist - that will only be temporary - long term they are extremely dangerous - especially higher doses. Don't get pulled in by the commercialized propaganda. Money making racket. Even margarine manufacturers are finally admitting that their cheaper, harder margarine are high in heart attack causing trans fats cause by high temperature hydrogenation of vegetable oils. So why do they still sell them then!

Posted on 2013-09-28 08:24:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cholesterol, Heart Disease, and My Theories
Hi Chris, thanks for sharing your thoughts. Grass fed free roaming animals are likely a healthier food source than farmed grain fed animals, but more studies need to be done to confirm how heart healthy grass fed meat is. Would also recommend you check The China Study which concluded that a plant based diet is best for heart health and cancer prevention.
Posted on 2013-09-28 09:47:10
Name:John
Location:SL
Subject:Carnivorous animals
If cholesterol was so bad, then why aren't carnivorous animals dying by the millions from heart disease???!!!! It's heat damaged, vegetable oil, trans fats that are killing us - not cholesterol!
Posted on 2013-09-28 10:39:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Carnivorous animals
Hi John, thanks for your question. Heart disease is a progressive, long term (chronic), disease that often occurs in old age. Most carnivorous animals do not live to old age in the wild, and therefore, do not die of heart disease for the same reason they don't die of cancer. Further, carnivorous animals often go days without eating, which is a sharp contrast from the 3-5 meals a day most people consume. Lastly heart disease and cholesterol levels are prone to genetic differences. In theory, carnivores would be better adapted to consuming high levels of cholesterol than people who are omnivores. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2013-09-28 23:51:30
Name:John
Location:SL
Subject:RE: Carnivorous animals
Firstly, what is you definition of old age? 40? 50? 60? What about omnivores like monkeys? Don't forget that even carnivores eat vegetation in the stomachs of their prey and so are not 100% carnivorous from that point of view.

Why aren't monkeys dying from heart attacks? Chimpanzees reach puberty at an age of between eight and 10 years, and rarely live past age 40 in the wild, but have been known to live more than 60 years in captivity. (without heart attacks)

Trans fats, smoking and vitamin C deficiencies are giving people heart disease - NOT cholesterol!!! Additionally most VEGETABLE oils we eat (which are also highly processed and often include trans fats) are high in inflamation causing omega 6 oils and low in anti-inflammatory omega 3 oils, only found in some plants. Inflation in the body increases risk of heart disease, cancer, and many other chronic diseases and even aging. These are known medical facts commonly ignored by those with an agenda. Most of the biggest medical journals allow paid advertising in their journals.

It's the TYPE of plants and the TYPE of meats that we eat that are important. That also explains why these studies can be so easily misinterpreted, or even fabricated/distorted to push a certain industry agenda. This has happened with the tobacco industry for decades, and now with the margarine and GMO industries pushing the same anti-cholesterol agenda.

Posted on 2013-09-29 05:35:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Carnivorous animals
Hi John, thanks for your reply. In regards to animals and their cause of death, no one is really collecting data on wild animals, their diets, and their causes of death. If anyone is, please share these results. Further, even if this is the case with animals, it probably would not prove anything for the case with humans, cholesterol, and heart disease. Epidemiology and health studies do not work that way. Animals studies in the lab work hard to isolate one dietary factor, and have a control group beside the test group, to help account for any other factors. This is the proper format for a scientific study. Looking at isolated examples is prone to be erroneous, take for instance the fact that there are many long term smokers in their 80s who have not yet died of smoking. The comedian George Burns smoked cigars, but lived to be 100 and died from natural causes. Despite these examples, no one would say that smoking is not harmful to your health.

In the same way, you could not look at carnivorous animals, or even people, who eat high cholesterol diets and live to die of natural causes, and then jump to the conclusion that cholesterol is not harmful to health. It may be tempting to make a point that way, but it just not accurate. Health studies look at people's diet in the long term, and try to account for other factors like exercise, socializing, stress, genetics, etc...which can all have an effect. Also, many other independent studies need to be done. So it is best to look at an analyze the scientific literature, and try to not grab on to how wild animals live, etc...

That said, you are correct to say that trans fats, and smoking also contribute to heart disease. It is not cholesterol alone. However, even though smoking and trans fats are factors, it does not mean we can ignore cholesterol, and state that cholesterol is not a risk factor. If you feel that scientific studies are biased by industry, you may be right, there certainly are some. Yet their methodologies give us clues, and it is up to each person to decide what is best for them.

In regards to the type of meat and type of vegetables. You are right, they do matter. The question is: Which ones matter? And further, to what kind of person? While the type of vegetable and meat does matter, it is hasty to jump to the conclusion that with the right type of vegetable and meat, cholesterol is no longer an issue. Till some data comes out, it is difficult to tell.

It is true that the link between cholesterol and heart disease is controversial, but the general consensus is that the link exists and a lower cholesterol level leads to increased protection from heart disease. For anyone interested in reading more, wikipedia has a good article on the lipid hypothesis and the various controversies regarding theory.

Posted on 2013-10-01 04:52:26
Name:Steve
Location:Texas
Subject:Cause of heart disease
But cholesterol is not the primary cause of heart disease anyway. The problem is vitamin C deficiency, causing a collagen deficiency, causing the body to rely on cholesterol instead of collagen to "repair" arteries - and that's just one cause.

Others include trans fats, omega 3 deficiencies, calcification of arteries with plaque (cholesterol & calcium deposits). Calcification due to magnesium and/or vitamin D deficiency (both of which are needed to send calcium into BONES where it belongs, leading to much high bone mineral densities). I hope you will be brave enough to publish this.

Margarine and vegetable oil manufacturers have a vested interest in demonizing cholesterol and statin makers and cardiologists to an extent have the same vested interests, so the meat industries vested interests are tiny in comparison. We all know who's winning the propaganda war.

Posted on 2013-10-01 06:02:35
Name:DianneP
Location:Toronto
Subject:Let us be clear on lipids
I have had elevated cholesterol problems for 27 years. However, I refuse to take a statin drug after all the research I have done. My doc says it is not that it is to high but I am pre-diabetic (type 2)and that is her main concern. I have studied and studied lipids online since I knew I had to start there. Firstly, make sure you use NON FAKE olive oils. A test is to place it in a fridge and it should go solid if it is true olive oil. Put it this way, Italy cannot stop the criminals dealing in fake olive olive oil distribution. The fakes are everywhere, so I buy mine from a trusted health food store. Olive oil ought not to be used in cooking, unless it is very low. It goes rancid and once rancid, any health benefit is gone. I use virgin coconut oil (nutiva) for all heated foods and olive, avocados for non heated foods. My doc went ballistic over the coconut oil, but I am careful not to use more than 2 tbsp a day. I refuse to use cheaply made oils such as soy, corn, canola as these are mostly genetically modified. By the way, these oils are what is mixed into the fake blends of olive oils found in grocery stores as well as other cheap vegetable oils. It has been 4 years since I started my new ways of eating healthy. My HDL and Trigs are within normal range although my LDL is not within range, but many professionals believe too much reliance on LDL as the bad marker leads to doctors prescribing statins. Statins shut down production of more than just cholesterol which is dangerous in other ways and does not really address the problems of what we eat and how we exercise. I do use niacin (flush), red yeast rice and ubiquinol and take a baby aspirin. I eat a lot of veggies, fruits, raw nuts, seeds, legumes and beans, fish. My dessert is dark chocolate with almonds or dried figs, dates etc. I believe eating fiber foods and avoiding processed foods is the most important way to health. I use herbs and spices for taste and health benefits. Recently, the head doc read over my chart, and proclaimed that I do not have diabetes anymore.... music to my ears!
Posted on 2013-10-22 09:10:28
Name:Liz
Location:A
Just eat whatever you eat in moderation.
The body has a funny way of telling what it needs.
Above is called craving...body correcting imbalance
listen to it.
Pills are bad....it causes other complications.
Exercise is good..the body was made for moving.
Doctors are not always right.If something makes you niggly find a new better doctor. Don't let them play supreme being over YOUR body.
Foods nowadays are genetically engineered. Grow your own so you know what goes in your mouth.
Keep a few chicks for eggs, If you can keep a cow/lamb...MILK.
MAKE YOUR OWN!
Today everything are enhanced to make MONEY!.
Cheers.
Posted on 2013-10-28 23:22:47
Name:Penelope
Location:Wimbledon UK
Subject:UK vs US measurements of cholesterol?
Hi, I've just found this site and it's brilliant. My question is: here in the UK our ok cholesterol level would be about 4 (I think). For ie when 1st tested it was 8.3, extremely high on an already very healthy diet so doc says it's hereditary. Over 4 years it's down to 6.3 after adding daily plant sterol tablet, 2 tbsps oatbran & now 40mg of statins daily. Still high. What is your equivilent measurement compared to ours for I cannot work it out? Thank you for all your wonderful information.
Posted on 2013-12-18 14:14:38
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: UK vs US measurements of cholesterol?
Hi Penelope, thanks for your question. The UK measures cholesterol in mmol / L (millimoles per liter) while the US measures in mg / dL (milligrams per deciliter). To convert the UK numbers to US you need to multiply them by 38.66. For your convenience, this website has a converter. You current level of 6.3 would translate to a US equivalent of 243mg/dL which is still high.

The general guidelines for total cholesterol are as follows:

  • Desirable: less than 200 mg/dL (< 5.18 mmol/L)
  • Borderline high: 200 - 239 mg/dL (5.18 - 6.19 mmol/L)
  • High: 240 mg/dL and above (> 6.19 mmol/L)
Hope that helps and keep up the good dieting lowering your numbers even further!
Posted on 2013-12-19 17:36:57
Name:VK
Location:Mumbai
Subject:Flax seeds also reduces cholesterol
I was not aware of flax seeds benefits. I was surprise to see that it is available in India but people are not aware of health benefits of it . Flax seeds(Alasi in hindi) are also good source of Omega 3 acid and help to reduce cholesterol. I tried flax seeds, aloe vera juice, and 20-30 minutes of brisk walking to reduce cholesterol, and it worked brilliantly for me. The taste of aloe vera juice was not great, but roasted flaxseeds were very tasty and tempting .
Posted on 2014-04-08 10:45:03

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Comments.
Name:Gary
Location:Los Angeles
Subject:Thanks for helpful subject matter!!!!
Thank you for a helpful interesting article!!!!
Posted on 2011-10-30 08:11:07
Name:Maria
Location:Australia
Subject:Thanks for helpful information!!!
Posted on 2012-01-30 10:00:51
Name:Jesus
Location:Weston, Fl.
Subject:Olives only work as a substitute
Although a good strategy for lowering cholesterol could be to substitute animal fats for fats consisting of olives, canola, etc...it can also be misleading (at least it was for me for many years) to think that olives and olive oil alone can reduce cholesterol. Actually, even olives contain some saturated fat! So on net, olives only lower cholesterol when used as a substitute and in my view oat bran should have the first spot in your ranking!
Posted on 2012-02-10 11:15:23
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Olives only work as a substitute
Hi Jesus, thanks for your comment and making the important distinction that monosaturated fats, like olive oil, will not lower cholesterol alone, and can only work when used as a substitute for saturated animal fats or other unhealthy fats.
Posted on 2012-02-10 11:22:28
Name:Tamoor
Location:Rawalpindi Pakistan
Subject:Truely useful info
Hi, I like this info and I am doing the same practice for my regular diet. Thanks for sharing such useful information.
Posted on 2012-03-15 14:08:57
Name:Tyrel
Location:Indiana
Subject:Something not listed
Something that I didn't see listed was cinnamon. This is actually prescribed by some doctors. I have switched to using olive oil in almost all of my cooking, since it is so healthy. The only thing is, because it's an oil, it still increases the HDL cholesterol. I also take fish oil and krill oil supplements daily (I HATE seafood). I help a high HDL by taking 1 cinnamon pill shortly after eating. My doctor says that all of my blood work now looks fantastic and to keep doing what I'm doing.
Posted on 2012-05-04 22:41:35
Name:Annette
Location:Scotland
Subject:Olive oil
Despite having a healthy diet my cholsterol levels are always high. I have avoided taking statins because of the side effects. My partner suffered badly with the side effects of statins and his cardiologist recommened that he stopped taking them. I was always a user of Olive Oil that was until I read about how it can become toxic when heated to a high temperature. I have since reverted to cooking with rapseed oil (in small doses). Is this okay? What alternatives are there to taking STATINS please? Thanks Annette!
Posted on 2012-05-17 15:51:42
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Olive oil and Canola Oil
Hi Annette, thanks for your question. Canola (aka:Rapeseed) oil is a good substitute for olive oil and has been shown to lower cholesterol. Further, canola oil has a higher smoke point than olive oil, meaning that it can better tolerate high heat before becoming toxic. Another tip is to add water to the oil before cooking, this can help prevent the oil from degrading. In terms of lowering cholesterol and staying off of statins, some people are genetically predisposed to high cholesterol and it can be difficult to lower it. Perhaps try a vegan diet that is high in vegetables and whole grains, while being low in fats and sugars. This combined with 20 minutes of exercise a day might be effective. Good luck.
Posted on 2012-05-18 00:21:33
Name:Kandregula S. Satyanarayana
Location:Visakhapatnam India
Subject:Reduction of Cholesterol
I am regularly taking almond oil in food items as per your good advise. I am also taking green tea everyday. Your article is very useful. Thank you!
Posted on 2012-06-22 04:54:26
Name:Josie
Location:Pembroke Pines, Florida
Subject:Alternative to Statins
This is in response to Annette asking for an alternative to statins. I was on Lipitor and I also suffered some side effects. I stopped that right away and started on natural supplements such as Red Yeast Rice and odorless garlic pills. If you do the same, You should have no more trouble with cholesterol. You can find them at your local health food store.
Posted on 2012-07-30 22:52:35
Name:Matilda
Location:Mississippi
Subject:Niacin and Red Yeast Rice
Annette - Both Niacin and Red Yeast Rice have history of lowering cholesterol - the Red Yeast Rice can usually be found in a health food store and has been used in Oriental history - I personally have found it to be VERY effective.
Posted on 2012-07-30 23:37:17
Name:Melissa
Subject:Nutrition Labels - What to look for?
Hi, my husband has high cholesterol, and he is only 28. Since then, I have been browsing the net to find out what's good and what's bad. My question is, when buying something with a nutrition label, besides looking at the cholesterol, what else should I look at, and what should the percentage be?
Posted on 2012-09-07 07:19:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Nutrition Labels - What to look for?
Hi Melissa, thanks for your question. You want to find foods that have no cholesterol in them (0% DV). If they are animal based foods, you also want them to have as little saturated fat as possible. Further look for foods low in sugar and sodium, as both these nutrients increase the risk of heart disease. Try instead to find foods high in fiber and potassium. By low, look for less than 20% DV, and by high, look for more than 50% DV. Also, try to make more vegan or vegetarian meals, since plant based foods have no cholesterol. Numerous people have gone on vegan diets and found tremendous results with lowering cholesterol.
Posted on 2012-09-07 07:25:36
Name:Iqbal Moosa
Location:South Africa
Subject:Cholesterol lowering fruits/foods
Pomegranate is very effective in lowering ldl. Gogi berries (also rated as one of the best foods for damaged cancer cell replacement). Black grapes with the seeds. Green apples (granny smith). Citrus fruits(I have found that by eating citrus fruits after my evening meal also helps with bowel movement early every morning). Onion juice with honey. Popcorn lightly salted. Tumeric powder added to your foods also helps to lower ldl, it is also good as an anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal aid that reduces risk of cancer.
Posted on 2012-10-28 19:00:39
Name:Joe
Location:VA
Subject:Oatmeal and Muesli Breakfast
Thank you for your work and information. Your format is simple to understand. Keep doing it for so many of us you help. #2 on your Cholesterol Lowering Foods is Oat Bran so I put 1/4 cup dry Oatmeal and 1/4 cup Muesli in a saucepan when it comes to a boil and let it simmer a few minutes. I add 3 walnut halves, a dash of cinnamon and a little unsweetened almond milk, eat this breakfast with a cup of coffee and go off to the Y to work out. Previous medical report cholesterol was 352. Current cholesterol is 188. 123 point reduction 38% improvement. Your list and exercise really work. I will be 71 next month. Thank you. Can you do a list on anti-inflammatory best top ten foods?
Posted on 2013-03-03 10:30:15
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Oatmeal and Muesli Breakfast
Hi Joe, thanks for sharing your experience and congratulations on your success lowering your numbers! Keep up the good work, persistence over the long term counts the most. Thanks for the article suggestion also, will work on an article of anti-inflammatory foods.
Posted on 2013-03-03 15:46:02
Name:Nazrul
Location:Japan
Subject:Low Cholesterol (Hypocholesterolemia)
About 5 months ago my LDL Cholesterol count was just 105. Now its 51. Whereas the normal cholesterol range is 70-140. Higher LDL is risky for health. Is a lower LDL, like around 50, also a risk factor for health? Maybe I know the reason for my decreasing LDL level. Recently, I found the page for cholesterol lowering foods. Surprisingly, I found I eat almost 95-100% of these foods every day. This might be the cause I think. I would be happy to know:
Is there any other health reason that might be responsible for such drastic change of this count? Is and LDL count less than 50 unhealthy?
(A) If yes, How much risk is there?
(B) If the present situation is risky then what should I do for it?
(C) Should I eat less of some of the top 10 foods listed above?
Thank you
Posted on 2013-03-08 23:11:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low Cholesterol (Hypocholesterolemia)
Hi Nazul, thanks for your question. The effects of low cholesterol have not been studied well, and there is no "lower limit" for cholesterol. So it is not possible to tell if a LDL level of 50 is unhealthy. However, given how quickly your LDL cholesterol has dropped, you could have some underlying health problem, particularly with your liver.
Did you start eating a lot of these cholesterol lowering foods just 6 months ago? Or for most of your life? If it is just recently, the foods might have an effect, otherwise, it is unlikely that they do, and you do not need to change your diet.
Low cholesterol (Hypocholesterolemia) can lead to anxiety, depression, and even cancer. If you want to boost your cholesterol levels, try eating more high cholesterol foods. Also, consider seeing a doctor about your low cholesterol levels, particularly if they do not improve in 2-3 months.
Posted on 2013-03-09 22:57:46
Name:Robert Conroy CNC
Location:San Diego
Subject:Lowering LDL Cholesterol - Health Risks
Large studies have shown the lower your LDL below 108, the higher the risk for cancer. Amount of LDL does not effect cardiovascular risk, it's the particle size that matters and also the oxidation of cholesterol. Saturated fat makes particles large and fluffy that can do no harm. Eating high glycemic carbohydrates causes the LDL particle sizes to become the very small VLDL particles that are atherogenic (cause atherosclerosis). A good book on this is: The Great Cholesterol Myth by Dr Sinatra (a heart surgeon) and Jonny Bowden PhD nutritionist. So pretty much everything we've been told about cholesterol is simply not true. Good way to raise your particle size? Cheesecake for desert. A whole piece only has a glycemic load of around 10.
Posted on 2013-04-27 03:11:10
Name:Robert Conroy
Location:San Diego
Subject:People should not be vegan
Vegans get no omega-3 of the important kind (DHA and EPA). Plant omega-3, like from flax seeds, is called ALA. When consumed, less that .2-5% is converted to EPA and practically none is converted to DHA. Your brain is about 60% DHA. Think about that. This is why I'm treating many vegans for depression right now. Telling people to become a vegan is the worst advice you can give a person about nutrition. Over 95% of Americans are omega-3 deficient. 20% have no detectable omega-3 in their blood, at all. This would include most all vegans. 1 out of 10 Americans are now on at least 1 antidepressant. Good books about this:
The Missing Wellness Factors - EPA and DHA The Most Important Nutrients Since Vitamins? by Jorn Dyerberg M.D.
The Omega RX Zone by Barry Sears
The Omega Diet by Artemis Simopoulos M.D.
Inflammation Nation by Floyd H. Chilton PhD
Posted on 2013-04-27 03:19:08
Name:Michael
Location:New Jersey
Subject:Vegan diet

I commend the recommendation of a vegan diet. Concerns raised about the mix of fats typically found in vegan diets are misplaced. There is no known link between depression and vegan diets or even depression and circulating omega-3 levels. And there is plenty of evidence that veganism is helpful.

Also, statin drugs can sometimes cause adverse effects but on the whole are enormously beneficial. Less than 3% of patients taking statins have myalgias (muscle pain) or elevated transaminases (liver tests). Red yeast rice, touted as a "natural" substance, has an active metabolite identical to the drug lovastatin.

Posted on 2013-06-09 11:19:27
Name:Jocelyn
Location:Louisiana
Subject:Red yeast rice IS a statin.
Beware the side effects of red yeast rice. From wikipedia: In the late 1970s, researchers in the United States and Japan were isolating lovastatin from Aspergillus and monacolins from Monascus, respectively, the latter being the same fungus used to make red yeast rice but cultured under carefully controlled conditions. Chemical analysis soon showed that lovastatin and monacolin K are identical. The article "The origin of statins" summarizes how the two isolations, documentations and patent applications were just months apart.[5] Lovastatin became the patented, prescription drug Mevacor for Merck & Co. Red yeast rice went on to become a contentious non-prescription dietary supplement in the United States and other countries. Lovastatin and other prescription "statin" drugs inhibit cholesterol synthesis by blocking action of the enzyme HMG-CoA reductase. As a consequence, circulating total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol are lowered. In a meta-analysis of 91 randomized clinical trial of 12 weeks duration, totaling 68,485 participants, LDL-cholesterol was lowered by 24-49% depending on the statin.[6] Different strains of Monascus fungus will produce different amounts of monacolins. The 'Went' strain of Monascus purpureus (purpureus = dark red in Latin), when properly fermented and processed, will yield a dried red yeast rice powder that is approximately 0.4% monacolins, of which roughly half will be monacolin K (identical to lovastatin). Monacolin content of a red yeast rice product is described in a 2008 clinical trial report.[7]
Posted on 2013-07-09 09:13:59
Name:David
Location:Canada
Subject:Lowering cholesterol, sugar and stress by Yoga and Acupuncture
Lowering cholesterol, sugar and stress by Yoga and Acupuncture ---by Paramjit S Tappia and Yan Jun Xu, Winnipeg, Canada. CV network, 2013

Elevations in LDL-cholesterol, obesity and stress are major cardiovascular disease risk factors (1). Due to the side effects of a number of pharmacological agents, the potential of Yoga and acupuncture on cholesterol levels as alternative therapies has been explored, particularly in the Western world. Yoga is an ancient type of mental and physical exercise originating in India, and has been reported to reduce oxidative stress, body weight and blood cholesterol. Acupuncture has been used in China to treat a variety of diseases since about two thousands years ago. In ancient times, people used a sharp stone to pressure some points for pain relief. Subsequently, acupuncture has been found to be effective in the reversal of coma and stroke as well as for the treatment of chest pain, irregular heart beat, hypertension and other conditions including asthma and insomnia.

Recently it has been found that acupuncture is also effective for the control of blood lipids, glucose and oxidative stress. A literature review of 220 publications conducted by Peplow and Bater (2) has revealed that acupuncture with electrical stimulation (electro-acupuncture) can control elevations in blood sugar in obese women. In animal studies, electrical stimulation (15Hz) for 30-60 minutes is required for positive results. From the literature available on Traditional Chinese Medicine books, Zhongwan, Zusanli, Yishu and Geshu acupuncture points appear to be most frequently used for diabetic patients. Liang and Koya (3) reviewed acupuncture literature between 1979 and 2009; it was evidenced that acupuncture can reduce insulin resistance, hypertension, metabolic disorder, obesity and improve blood lipid profile. Furthermore, frequently used acupuncture points were Zusanli, Fenglong, Tianshu, Neiting, Sanyinjiao, Quchi, Qihai, Zhongwan, Guanyuan, Yinlingquan and Pishu.

Siu et al (4) have reported that electro-acupuncture is able to lower oxidative stress by stimulation of the Zusanli point. It appears that electrical stimulation at low frequency (2 Hertz), 30 min/day for 4 weeks yields beneficial effects. It is pointed out that different frequencies of stimulation can exert different effects. The underlying mechanism of acupuncture is that stimulation of different points release different neuropeptides and hormones. In addition, it has also been suggested that resistance of nerve fibres and electrical signals are altered in different disease that can be re-balanced by acupuncture. Acupuncture and yoga promote well-being and health and have the potential to be used as a complimentary therapeutic regimen to improve blood lipid and glucose profiles as well as attenuate oxidative stress.

References
1. Adameova A, Xu YJ, Duhamel TA, Tappia PS, Shan L and Dhalla NS. Anti-atherosclerotic molecules targeting oxidative stress and inflammation. 2009; 15: 3094-3107.
2. Peplow PV and Baxter GD. Electro-acupuncture for control of blood glucose in diabetes: Literature revies. J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2012; 5:1-10.
3. Liang F and Koya D. Acupuncture: is it effective for the treatment of insulin resistance? Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism. 2010; 12:555-569.
4. Siu FKW, Lo SCL, and Leung MCP. Effectiveness of multiple pre-ischemia electro-acupuncture on attenuating lipid peroxidation induced by cerebral ischemia in adults rats. Life Sciences. 2004; 75:1323-1332. Note: More clinical studies are needed to confirm the beneficial effects.

Posted on 2013-07-22 11:59:01
Name:Kitt
Location:Australia
Subject:Dark Chocolate Lowers My Cholesterol
Hi, I find dark chocolate with 75% Cocao, or more, helps me...1 cube a day every day.
Posted on 2013-07-27 13:41:56
Name:Chris
Location:South Africa
Subject:Cholesterol, Heart Disease, and My Theories
Most vegetable oils are low in omega 3 fats and high in omega 6's causing us all to get far too much omega 6 and become omega 3 depleted. Excess omega 6 oils cause chronic low level inflammation leading to heart disease, cancer and more. I'm talking sunflower oils, grains, breads, pastries, doughnuts, cakes, etc. Animal omega 3's are also far better than plant omega 3's (see a comment above this one).

Grass fed beef is MUCH MUCH higher is omega 3 fatty acids than regular beef - it has the same type found in fish, which is so good for our hearts and brains and joints. In addition to that the saturated fats (cholesterol) that animals contain will never be used by the body to repair (and thus block) arteries, if we get enough vitamin C (only some fruits and veg are high in vit C). We don't get nearly enough, which means that our bodies cannot produce enough collagen which is used to repair damaged arteries. It therefore relies on cholesterol which is not the ideal artery repair "material". Most animals (unlike humans) have an enzyme in their livers that allows them to produce massive amounts of vitamin C, without needing it from their diets.

These animals (except guinea pigs & humans) DON'T get heart disease. Vit C is also an anti-oxidant which prevents free radical damage to almost all parts of the body. So get plenty vitamin C and you won't have to worry about cholesterol in meats, which for the most part is actually good for us (the outer walls of the heart itself is covered with it I believe).

I would not recommend pork, very large fish or shellfish however. Shellfish are the filter feeder cleaners of the oceans, pork the same but for the land and very big fish have mercury.

Pork has caused as much, or more liver cirrhosis than alcohol - clinical trials have proven this. Search for these studies on the PubMED website (National Institute of Health). The more pork you eat the higher your chances. Pigs are habitually dirty scavengers, not matter how "clean" they are "raised". Ideal hosts for a mutating flu virus too (link between humans and dirty ducks allowing easier jump of species gap).

Germany has a high rate of alcohol consumption AND of pork consumption and thus a very high rate (at least historically) of liver cirrhosis.

Stick to organic, grass fed "clean" meats - eg. Beef, mutton/lamb, etc.

Sugars and grains are bad yes, but remember with fruits - when eaten in unprocessed totally raw form, they contain enough water to dilute the sugar (fructose) and enough fiber to slow the spikes in blood sugar. With grains, they are high in carbs, which quickly gets converted by body to sugar too, but fiber with the wholegrains when unrefined also slows down blood sugar spikes as does fiber in fruit. Gluten in grains a different story, there is a lot of debate as to how good gluten is for you. At the least it's not good for those who are gluten intolerant (although some argue we all are, just some much more than others).

Due to people not eating enough wholegrains and/or green vegetables, magnesium deficiency is becoming a big problem in the west. Magnesium (and Vitamin D) drives calcium into the bones and teeth where it belongs. With a lack of magnesium, calcium starts building up in all the soft organs and tissues of the body (calcification of kidneys, heart, arteries and even brain - alzheimers). Plaque that blocks arteries (causing heart attacks and strokes) is composed of one or more of the following and is not just cholesterol:

Plaque = Cholesterol (saturated fat), calcium, oxidized cholesterol, trans fat (heat damaged vegetable oil in all fried foods), proteins attached to cholesterol molecules, etc, etc.

Whoever is scared of red meat due to it "clogging their arteries" - has swallowed the BS fed to them by the USDA hook, line and sinker! Not only does red meat not CAUSE CHD/CVD, it may very well help to PREVENT it!

Do you know WHY saturated fat and cholesterol get the blame for CHD? Because Pfizer LIED! They'd already invented the statin now known as Lipitor, but needed to prove the correlation between high cholesterol and CHD. So they fed it to rabbits, which promptly dropped dead!

The fact it killed the bunnies shouldn't come as any surprise to anyone who knows the primary role of cholesterol (in fact, it's essential for just about everything - as essential, in fact, as blood, water and oxygen), but the word is derived from the Greek for 'solid bile'. Now, as you're no doubt aware, bile is necessary for the proper digestion of fat; bunnies, being herbivores, have no use for it so, it should be no wonder that they keeled over - you would too if you ate something toxic!

So, after killing the bunnies, Pfizer then doctored the report to make it look like the trial had been conducted on HUMANS, and presented it to the USDA.

So, for the past 40+ years, we've been fed a LIE; Pfizer - and the rest of Big Pharma, has been getting rich from POISONING the Western world with a drug that has ZERO purpose, and a list of side-effects, many of them potentially fatal, that goes on for MILES! Some of the major ones include: -

Obesity CHD (I kid you not - cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol in particular, is ESSENTIAL for coronary health) Diabetes (types 2 & 3. Never heard of type 3...? You have, except you probably call it 'dementia'. It's termed 'type 3 diabetes' because it's caused in the same way as type 2: - eating a low-fat/high-carb diet containing copious amounts of grains, starches and sugars) Liver failure (this is hardly surprising as statins interfere with the liver's own cholesterol regulation (it produces up to 1.5g every single day. If cholesterol was that deadly, why would our bodies produce it...?!) Stroke Joint disorders (such as OA and RA) There may also be a causal link between statins, a LFHC diet and diseases such as MS, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

The one of most nutritious foods is one of the most demonized: - LARD, rendered fat from grass-fed pigs. 60 years or so ago, it was the number 1 cooking fat, and hardly anyone was overweight. Then, when Pfizer cooked up the non-existent link between saturated fat, cholesterol and CHD, and the USDA told everyone to start using Crisco, suddenly everyone started ballooning.

Something else happened too - children began presenting with rickets, and adults with osteomalacia. Why...? Because lard, with its high HDL cholesterol content is the best food source of vitamin D! So, suddenly over 80% of Americans were vitamin D deficient - and the USDA never twigged why (it STILL hasn't - and neither has the NHS/DoH over here, either!). The body CANNOT synthesize D without adequate supplies of cholesterol, and they'd prohibited and outlawed the best source! It's been downhill faster than a skier on speed ever since.

In short, if you value your health, and your GP insists you take 'em, RESIST IN THE STRONGEST POSSIBLE TERMS! If you're on them already, chuck 'em and switch to eating a LCHF diet - your body WILL thank you!

Nearly EVERYTHING the NHS/BDA in the UK, and the USDA/ADA/AHA has been telling you about diet is WRONG - VERY WRONG!

If you want to know what should constitute a healthy diet, do the EXACT OPPOSITE of what you're told (aside from avoiding sugars, and eating veggies, obviously.

Reducing cholesterol too much can be deadly - especially for those who are skinny and/or very elderly. Even if most don't experience side effects from statins at fist - that will only be temporary - long term they are extremely dangerous - especially higher doses. Don't get pulled in by the commercialized propaganda. Money making racket. Even margarine manufacturers are finally admitting that their cheaper, harder margarine are high in heart attack causing trans fats cause by high temperature hydrogenation of vegetable oils. So why do they still sell them then!

Posted on 2013-09-28 08:24:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cholesterol, Heart Disease, and My Theories
Hi Chris, thanks for sharing your thoughts. Grass fed free roaming animals are likely a healthier food source than farmed grain fed animals, but more studies need to be done to confirm how heart healthy grass fed meat is. Would also recommend you check The China Study which concluded that a plant based diet is best for heart health and cancer prevention.
Posted on 2013-09-28 09:47:10
Name:John
Location:SL
Subject:Carnivorous animals
If cholesterol was so bad, then why aren't carnivorous animals dying by the millions from heart disease???!!!! It's heat damaged, vegetable oil, trans fats that are killing us - not cholesterol!
Posted on 2013-09-28 10:39:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Carnivorous animals
Hi John, thanks for your question. Heart disease is a progressive, long term (chronic), disease that often occurs in old age. Most carnivorous animals do not live to old age in the wild, and therefore, do not die of heart disease for the same reason they don't die of cancer. Further, carnivorous animals often go days without eating, which is a sharp contrast from the 3-5 meals a day most people consume. Lastly heart disease and cholesterol levels are prone to genetic differences. In theory, carnivores would be better adapted to consuming high levels of cholesterol than people who are omnivores. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2013-09-28 23:51:30
Name:John
Location:SL
Subject:RE: Carnivorous animals
Firstly, what is you definition of old age? 40? 50? 60? What about omnivores like monkeys? Don't forget that even carnivores eat vegetation in the stomachs of their prey and so are not 100% carnivorous from that point of view.

Why aren't monkeys dying from heart attacks? Chimpanzees reach puberty at an age of between eight and 10 years, and rarely live past age 40 in the wild, but have been known to live more than 60 years in captivity. (without heart attacks)

Trans fats, smoking and vitamin C deficiencies are giving people heart disease - NOT cholesterol!!! Additionally most VEGETABLE oils we eat (which are also highly processed and often include trans fats) are high in inflamation causing omega 6 oils and low in anti-inflammatory omega 3 oils, only found in some plants. Inflation in the body increases risk of heart disease, cancer, and many other chronic diseases and even aging. These are known medical facts commonly ignored by those with an agenda. Most of the biggest medical journals allow paid advertising in their journals.

It's the TYPE of plants and the TYPE of meats that we eat that are important. That also explains why these studies can be so easily misinterpreted, or even fabricated/distorted to push a certain industry agenda. This has happened with the tobacco industry for decades, and now with the margarine and GMO industries pushing the same anti-cholesterol agenda.

Posted on 2013-09-29 05:35:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Carnivorous animals
Hi John, thanks for your reply. In regards to animals and their cause of death, no one is really collecting data on wild animals, their diets, and their causes of death. If anyone is, please share these results. Further, even if this is the case with animals, it probably would not prove anything for the case with humans, cholesterol, and heart disease. Epidemiology and health studies do not work that way. Animals studies in the lab work hard to isolate one dietary factor, and have a control group beside the test group, to help account for any other factors. This is the proper format for a scientific study. Looking at isolated examples is prone to be erroneous, take for instance the fact that there are many long term smokers in their 80s who have not yet died of smoking. The comedian George Burns smoked cigars, but lived to be 100 and died from natural causes. Despite these examples, no one would say that smoking is not harmful to your health.

In the same way, you could not look at carnivorous animals, or even people, who eat high cholesterol diets and live to die of natural causes, and then jump to the conclusion that cholesterol is not harmful to health. It may be tempting to make a point that way, but it just not accurate. Health studies look at people's diet in the long term, and try to account for other factors like exercise, socializing, stress, genetics, etc...which can all have an effect. Also, many other independent studies need to be done. So it is best to look at an analyze the scientific literature, and try to not grab on to how wild animals live, etc...

That said, you are correct to say that trans fats, and smoking also contribute to heart disease. It is not cholesterol alone. However, even though smoking and trans fats are factors, it does not mean we can ignore cholesterol, and state that cholesterol is not a risk factor. If you feel that scientific studies are biased by industry, you may be right, there certainly are some. Yet their methodologies give us clues, and it is up to each person to decide what is best for them.

In regards to the type of meat and type of vegetables. You are right, they do matter. The question is: Which ones matter? And further, to what kind of person? While the type of vegetable and meat does matter, it is hasty to jump to the conclusion that with the right type of vegetable and meat, cholesterol is no longer an issue. Till some data comes out, it is difficult to tell.

It is true that the link between cholesterol and heart disease is controversial, but the general consensus is that the link exists and a lower cholesterol level leads to increased protection from heart disease. For anyone interested in reading more, wikipedia has a good article on the lipid hypothesis and the various controversies regarding theory.

Posted on 2013-10-01 04:52:26
Name:Steve
Location:Texas
Subject:Cause of heart disease
But cholesterol is not the primary cause of heart disease anyway. The problem is vitamin C deficiency, causing a collagen deficiency, causing the body to rely on cholesterol instead of collagen to "repair" arteries - and that's just one cause.

Others include trans fats, omega 3 deficiencies, calcification of arteries with plaque (cholesterol & calcium deposits). Calcification due to magnesium and/or vitamin D deficiency (both of which are needed to send calcium into BONES where it belongs, leading to much high bone mineral densities). I hope you will be brave enough to publish this.

Margarine and vegetable oil manufacturers have a vested interest in demonizing cholesterol and statin makers and cardiologists to an extent have the same vested interests, so the meat industries vested interests are tiny in comparison. We all know who's winning the propaganda war.

Posted on 2013-10-01 06:02:35
Name:DianneP
Location:Toronto
Subject:Let us be clear on lipids
I have had elevated cholesterol problems for 27 years. However, I refuse to take a statin drug after all the research I have done. My doc says it is not that it is to high but I am pre-diabetic (type 2)and that is her main concern. I have studied and studied lipids online since I knew I had to start there. Firstly, make sure you use NON FAKE olive oils. A test is to place it in a fridge and it should go solid if it is true olive oil. Put it this way, Italy cannot stop the criminals dealing in fake olive olive oil distribution. The fakes are everywhere, so I buy mine from a trusted health food store. Olive oil ought not to be used in cooking, unless it is very low. It goes rancid and once rancid, any health benefit is gone. I use virgin coconut oil (nutiva) for all heated foods and olive, avocados for non heated foods. My doc went ballistic over the coconut oil, but I am careful not to use more than 2 tbsp a day. I refuse to use cheaply made oils such as soy, corn, canola as these are mostly genetically modified. By the way, these oils are what is mixed into the fake blends of olive oils found in grocery stores as well as other cheap vegetable oils. It has been 4 years since I started my new ways of eating healthy. My HDL and Trigs are within normal range although my LDL is not within range, but many professionals believe too much reliance on LDL as the bad marker leads to doctors prescribing statins. Statins shut down production of more than just cholesterol which is dangerous in other ways and does not really address the problems of what we eat and how we exercise. I do use niacin (flush), red yeast rice and ubiquinol and take a baby aspirin. I eat a lot of veggies, fruits, raw nuts, seeds, legumes and beans, fish. My dessert is dark chocolate with almonds or dried figs, dates etc. I believe eating fiber foods and avoiding processed foods is the most important way to health. I use herbs and spices for taste and health benefits. Recently, the head doc read over my chart, and proclaimed that I do not have diabetes anymore.... music to my ears!
Posted on 2013-10-22 09:10:28
Name:Liz
Location:A
Just eat whatever you eat in moderation.
The body has a funny way of telling what it needs.
Above is called craving...body correcting imbalance
listen to it.
Pills are bad....it causes other complications.
Exercise is good..the body was made for moving.
Doctors are not always right.If something makes you niggly find a new better doctor. Don't let them play supreme being over YOUR body.
Foods nowadays are genetically engineered. Grow your own so you know what goes in your mouth.
Keep a few chicks for eggs, If you can keep a cow/lamb...MILK.
MAKE YOUR OWN!
Today everything are enhanced to make MONEY!.
Cheers.
Posted on 2013-10-28 23:22:47
Name:Penelope
Location:Wimbledon UK
Subject:UK vs US measurements of cholesterol?
Hi, I've just found this site and it's brilliant. My question is: here in the UK our ok cholesterol level would be about 4 (I think). For ie when 1st tested it was 8.3, extremely high on an already very healthy diet so doc says it's hereditary. Over 4 years it's down to 6.3 after adding daily plant sterol tablet, 2 tbsps oatbran & now 40mg of statins daily. Still high. What is your equivilent measurement compared to ours for I cannot work it out? Thank you for all your wonderful information.
Posted on 2013-12-18 14:14:38
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: UK vs US measurements of cholesterol?
Hi Penelope, thanks for your question. The UK measures cholesterol in mmol / L (millimoles per liter) while the US measures in mg / dL (milligrams per deciliter). To convert the UK numbers to US you need to multiply them by 38.66. For your convenience, this website has a converter. You current level of 6.3 would translate to a US equivalent of 243mg/dL which is still high.

The general guidelines for total cholesterol are as follows:

  • Desirable: less than 200 mg/dL (< 5.18 mmol/L)
  • Borderline high: 200 - 239 mg/dL (5.18 - 6.19 mmol/L)
  • High: 240 mg/dL and above (> 6.19 mmol/L)
Hope that helps and keep up the good dieting lowering your numbers even further!
Posted on 2013-12-19 17:36:57
Name:VK
Location:Mumbai
Subject:Flax seeds also reduces cholesterol
I was not aware of flax seeds benefits. I was surprise to see that it is available in India but people are not aware of health benefits of it . Flax seeds(Alasi in hindi) are also good source of Omega 3 acid and help to reduce cholesterol. I tried flax seeds, aloe vera juice, and 20-30 minutes of brisk walking to reduce cholesterol, and it worked brilliantly for me. The taste of aloe vera juice was not great, but roasted flaxseeds were very tasty and tempting .
Posted on 2014-04-08 10:45:03

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