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Top 10 Fruits Highest in Calcium


Calcium is necessary for the growth and maintenance of strong teeth and bones, nerve signaling, muscle contraction, and secretion of certain hormones and enzymes. A deficiency in calcium can lead to numbness in fingers and toes, muscle cramps, convulsions, lethargy, loss of appetite, and abnormal heart rhythm. Finding calcium in fruits and vegetables is a concern for vegans, or those on a raw food diet. The DV (percent daily value) for calcium is 1000mg, below is a list of calcium rich fruits.

#1: Dried Figs
Calcium per 100g servingCalcium in 1 cupCalcium in 1 Fig
162mg241mg13mg
16% DV24% DV1% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Figs

#2: Rhubarb (Cooked)
Calcium per 100g servingCalcium in 1 cup
145mg348mg
15% DV35% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Rhubarb

#3: Dates (Medjool)
Calcium per 100g servingCalcium in 1 Date
64mg15.36mg
6% DV2% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Dates

#4: Kumquats
Calcium per 100g servingCalcium in 1 Kumquat
62mg12mg
6% DV1% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts

#5: Prickly Pears
Calcium per 100g servingCalcium in 1 cupCalcium in 1 Prickly Pear
56mg83mg58mg
6% DV8% DV6% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Prickly Pears

#6: Dried Apricots
Calcium per 100g servingCalcium in 1 cup
55mg71.5mg
6% DV7% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Apricots

#7: Oranges and Tangerines
Calcium per 100g servingCalcium in 1 cupCalcium in 1 Orange
43mg71mg60mg
4% DV7% DV6% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Oranges

#8: Prunes (Dried Plums)
Calcium per 100g servingCalcium in 1 cup
43mg75mg
4% DV7% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Plums

#9: Mulberries
Calcium per 100g servingCalcium in 1 cup
39mg55mg
4% DV5% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts

#10: Kiwi (Chinese Gooseberries)
Calcium per 100g servingCalcium in 1 cupCalcium in 1 Kiwi
34mg60mg26mg
3% DV6% DV3% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Kiwis




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Comments.
Name:Eleanor
Location:New Zealand
Subject:Rhubarb and Oxalic Acid
Rhubarb is not a good source of calcium as it is high in oxalic acid which binds the calcium and stops the body absorbing it.
Posted on 2013-06-21 04:39:20
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Rhubarb and Oxalic Acid
Hi Elanor, thanks for your comment. The U.S. Office of Dietary Supplements states that "...components in food: phytic acid and oxalic acid, found naturally in some plants, bind to calcium and can inhibit its absorption...For people who eat a variety of foods, these interactions probably have little or no nutritional consequence and, furthermore, are accounted for in the overall calcium DRIs, which factor in differences in absorption of calcium in mixed diets." Therefore, even though rhubarb contains oxalate, it is still a good source of calcium.
Posted on 2013-06-25 10:26:59
Name:Stone
Location:NC
Subject:Huh?
I think Eleanor's point is still valid... Whether it's a good source of calcium or not is irrelevant if it has another component that inhibits absorption, no? That's like saying I can clean the kitchen because I have hands, but it's always a mess because I can't walk to it since my feet won't let me.
Posted on 2013-08-10 16:19:33
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Huh?
Hi Stone, thanks for your comment. Digestion is very complicated, involving a wide array of factors. It would not be correct to assume oxalic acid completely inhibits calcium absorption. Rather, oxalic acid inhibits a percentage of calcium absorption, and with a varied diet, perhaps does not inhibit any absorption. Keep in mind that when scientists do studies, they have to isolate factors, leading to unnatural diets in the first place. Going to you analogy it is like saying you have hands to clean the kitchen, but sometimes you are too busy to clean it all, unless you get help from your friends, or just take a little extra time (eat extra fruit, even though it has oxalic acid). All the fruits listed here have a percent daily value (%DV) they provide for calcium. Any inhibition from oxalic acid is already factored into this %DV. The effect of oxalic acid should be understood, but not overstated.
Posted on 2013-08-11 01:11:07
Name:Mike
Location:Ontario, Canada
Subject:Calcium
In addition to concerning ones self with calcium intake we also have to make sure we do not over do the Phosphorous. In order to achieve the recommended amounts (calcium 1000 to 1500 mgs and Phosphorous NO MORE than 700 mgs.) We have to track and balance the diet vary carefully. In other words we have to add up the total amounts of calcium and phosphorous taken in each day until we get a feel for what adds up. Very few people achieve this balance (mostly too much Phosphorous and too little calcium). I submit a friendly challenge to any one to suggest a daily diet of natural (whole) foods that will meet the amounts as recommended by the National Institute of Health and others. Remember you can't exceed the phosphorous amounts as this will negate the effects of the calcium intake.
Posted on 2014-04-13 23:45:10

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Comments.
Name:Eleanor
Location:New Zealand
Subject:Rhubarb and Oxalic Acid
Rhubarb is not a good source of calcium as it is high in oxalic acid which binds the calcium and stops the body absorbing it.
Posted on 2013-06-21 04:39:20
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Rhubarb and Oxalic Acid
Hi Elanor, thanks for your comment. The U.S. Office of Dietary Supplements states that "...components in food: phytic acid and oxalic acid, found naturally in some plants, bind to calcium and can inhibit its absorption...For people who eat a variety of foods, these interactions probably have little or no nutritional consequence and, furthermore, are accounted for in the overall calcium DRIs, which factor in differences in absorption of calcium in mixed diets." Therefore, even though rhubarb contains oxalate, it is still a good source of calcium.
Posted on 2013-06-25 10:26:59
Name:Stone
Location:NC
Subject:Huh?
I think Eleanor's point is still valid... Whether it's a good source of calcium or not is irrelevant if it has another component that inhibits absorption, no? That's like saying I can clean the kitchen because I have hands, but it's always a mess because I can't walk to it since my feet won't let me.
Posted on 2013-08-10 16:19:33
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Huh?
Hi Stone, thanks for your comment. Digestion is very complicated, involving a wide array of factors. It would not be correct to assume oxalic acid completely inhibits calcium absorption. Rather, oxalic acid inhibits a percentage of calcium absorption, and with a varied diet, perhaps does not inhibit any absorption. Keep in mind that when scientists do studies, they have to isolate factors, leading to unnatural diets in the first place. Going to you analogy it is like saying you have hands to clean the kitchen, but sometimes you are too busy to clean it all, unless you get help from your friends, or just take a little extra time (eat extra fruit, even though it has oxalic acid). All the fruits listed here have a percent daily value (%DV) they provide for calcium. Any inhibition from oxalic acid is already factored into this %DV. The effect of oxalic acid should be understood, but not overstated.
Posted on 2013-08-11 01:11:07
Name:Mike
Location:Ontario, Canada
Subject:Calcium
In addition to concerning ones self with calcium intake we also have to make sure we do not over do the Phosphorous. In order to achieve the recommended amounts (calcium 1000 to 1500 mgs and Phosphorous NO MORE than 700 mgs.) We have to track and balance the diet vary carefully. In other words we have to add up the total amounts of calcium and phosphorous taken in each day until we get a feel for what adds up. Very few people achieve this balance (mostly too much Phosphorous and too little calcium). I submit a friendly challenge to any one to suggest a daily diet of natural (whole) foods that will meet the amounts as recommended by the National Institute of Health and others. Remember you can't exceed the phosphorous amounts as this will negate the effects of the calcium intake.
Posted on 2014-04-13 23:45:10

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Location:       
Email:(Optional)
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References

    • USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.