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Top 10 Vegetables Highest in Potassium


Potassium is an essential nutrient used to maintain fluid and electrolyte balance in the body. A deficiency in potassium causes fatigue, irritability, and hypertension (increased blood pressure). Overdose of potassium from natural sources is nearly impossible, however, it is possible to consume too much potassium via potassium salts which can lead to nausea, vomiting, and even cardiac arrest. Potassium from natural food sources, like the ones listed below, are considered safe and healthy. The current percent daily value for potassium is a 3.5 grams. Below is a list of vegetables high in potassium, for more, see the articles on high potassium foods, and high potassium fruits.

#1: Sun-Dried Tomatoes
Potassium 100gPotassium in 1 cup (54g)
3.4g1.1g
98% DV53% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts

#2: Spinach
Potassium 100g (Raw)1 Cup (Raw - 30g)1 Cup (Cooked - 180g)
558mg167mg839mg
16% DV5% DV24% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Spinach

#3: Swiss Chard (Cooked)
Potassium 100gPotassium in 1 Cup Chopped (175g)
549mg961mg
16% DV27% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Swiss Chard

#4: Mushrooms
Potassium 100gPotassium in 1 Cup Diced (86g)
484mg416mg
14% DV12% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts

#5: Sweet Potato (With Skin)
Potassium 100gPotassium in 1 Cup (200g)Average Potato (114g)
475mg950mg542mg
14% DV27% DV15% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Sweet Potatoes

#6: Kale (Raw)
Potassium 100gPotassium in 1 Cup (67g)
447mg299mg
13% DV9% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Kale

#7: Brussels Sprouts
Potassium 100gPotassium in 1 Cup (88g)Potassium in 1 Sprout (19g)
389mg342mg74mg
11% DV10% DV2% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Brussels Sprouts

#8: Zucchini With Skin
Potassium 100gPotassium in 1 Cup (180g)
253mg455mg
7% DV13% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Zucchini

#9: Green (Snap) Beans
Potassium 100gPotassium in 1 Cup (110g)
209mg230mg
6% DV7% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Green Beans

#10: Asparagus
Potassium 100gPotassium in 1 Cup (134g)
202mg271mg
6% DV8% DV
Click to see complete nutrition facts || More about Asparagus




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Even More Potassium Rich Vegetables

Yams670mg (19% DV) per 100 gram serving911mg (26% DV) per cup cubed (136 grams)456mg (13% DV) in half a cup cubed (68 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cooked Yams
Garden Cress606mg (17% DV) per 100 gram serving303mg (9% DV) per cup (50 grams)6mg (0% DV) in a single sprig (1 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Garden Cress
Wasabi Root568mg (16% DV) per 100 gram serving738mg (21% DV) per cup sliced (130 grams)960mg (27% DV) in a root (169 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Wasabi Root
Lotus Root556mg (16% DV) per 100 gram serving450mg (13% DV) in 10 slices (81 grams)639mg (18% DV) in a root (115 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Lotus Root
Baked Potato (With Skin)535mg (15% DV) per 100 gram serving1.6g (46% DV) in a large potato (299 grams)926mg (26% DV) in a medium sized potato (173 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Baked Potato with Skin
Bamboo Shoots533mg (15% DV) per 100 gram serving805mg (23% DV) in 1 cup sliced (151 grams)405mg (12% DV) in half a cup (76 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Bamboo Shoots
Taro Root484mg (14% DV) per 100 gram serving639mg (18% DV) in 1 cup sliced (132 grams)320mg (9% DV) in half a cup (66 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cooked Taro Root
Acorn Squash437mg (12% DV) per 100 gram serving896mg (26% DV) in 1 cup cubed (205 grams)448mg (13% DV) in half a cup cubed (103 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Baked Acorn Squash
Broccoli Rabe (Rapini)196mg (6% DV) per 100 gram serving78mg (2% DV) in 1 cup chopped (40 grams)37mg (1% DV) in one stalk (19 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Broccoli Rabe (Raab)
Palm Hearts177mg (5% DV) per 100 gram serving258mg (26% DV) per cup (146 grams)58mg (2% DV) per piece (33 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Canned Palm Hearts



Comments.
Name:Todd
Location:Ohio
Subject:Potatoes
Why are potatoes not listed as the number 1 vegetable for potassium? 926 gms/ serving. who eats a whole wasabi root?
Posted on 2011-03-30 06:16:16
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Potatoes
Hi Todd, You have a good question, and the reason why potatoes are not listed as the number 1 food is because they have a really high glycemic index, greatly increasing the risk of type II diabetes. In other words, potatoes spike your blood sugar, causing you to feel more hunger, and increasing your tolerance to insulin. While lots of people eat potatoes, they are simply not a healthy food compared to the alternatives, and therefore, do not get the #1 spot. Try eating baked sweet potatoes instead, which in fact, are a completely different root from common white potatoes, and help regulate your blood sugar, decreasing risk of type II diabetes! In regards to wasabi, while it is true no one eats a whole wasabi root, it is still notable that wasabi provides a high amount of potassium gram per gram, and so people should certainly try to eat more of it!
Posted on 2011-03-30 09:19:32
Name:Anita
Location:NY
Subject:Why Bananas?
So why are bananas recommended for heavy exercisers? Wouldn't spinach, winter squash, or a carrot do as well for potassium?
Posted on 2011-08-11 20:55:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Why Bananas?
Hi Anita, thanks for your question. Your are right that a carrot, winter squash, or spinach would do as well for exercisers. Bananas are often recommended since they are cheap, ubiquitous, easy to carry, and also contain complex carbohydrates that take time to digest, thus providing energy over a long period. That said, carrots, spinach, or winter squash can work as well if they fit your exercise routine, they are also more likely to help promote weight loss.
Posted on 2011-08-11 20:59:43
Name:Steve
Subject:Tomatoes?
Sorry to disappoint you guys, but tomatoes, having seeds, are fruits. You guys might want to rearrange this or something.
Posted on 2011-09-07 15:55:55
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Tomatoes
Hi Steve, thanks for your comment. You are right that tomatoes are technically fruits, however, they are listed here under vegetables since they are often thought of as vegetables for cooking and most other culinary uses.
Posted on 2011-09-07 16:08:12
Name:Hubert
Location:Calgary AB
Subject:Potassium
My kidneys have a hard time with potassium, apparently I have too much. I try to eat foods low in potassium. All my favorite foods are high in potassium. HELP.
Posted on 2011-10-18 18:23:52
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Potassium and Kidney Disease
Hi Hubert, thanks for your comment and sorry to hear of your condition. As mentioned in the comments of the article on high potassium foods, it is true that almost all foods have potassium and there are no known foods, other than water, which will lower the concentration of potassium in your body. One thing you can do is try to leach, or remove, the potassium from fruits and vegetables. You can do this by soaking the vegetables in water, and then boiling them in water. The National Kidney Foundation will have more resources that can help you, including an article on potassium.
Posted on 2011-10-18 18:41:53
Name:Debra
Location:Florida
Subject:White sweet potatoes
I recently ate my first organic white sweet potato. WOW! What a wonderful flavor! Does it have the same nutritional value as an orange sweet potato--especially when it comes to the potassium content? And what about its glycemic index factor?--is it similar to a white potato?
Posted on 2012-02-26 19:43:10
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: White sweet potatoes
Hi Debra, thanks for your comment. Currently there are no nutrition facts for white sweet potatoes, but it is likely they have a similar potassium content to regular sweet potatoes. Sweet potatoes are related to regular potatoes only by name and are actually quite a different vegetable, almost closer to carrots than potatoes! As such, white sweet potatoes would likely have a similar glycemic index as any other sweet potato.
Posted on 2012-02-26 20:20:36
Name:Linda Frederick
Location:Okmulgee, Oklahoma
Subject:Foods that won't raise my potassium
I have high potassium, I need a list of foods I can eat that will not raise my potassium levels.
Posted on 2012-03-08 01:51:05
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Foods that won't raise my potassium
Hi Linda, thanks for your question. Avoiding potassium can be very difficult, and there really is not any food that doesn't have potassium except water. You can use the nutrient ranking tool to find foods low in potassium accross various food groups. The National Kidney Foundation will also have resources that can help you, including an article on a low potassium diet, which provides a list of vegetables they deem to be low in potassium, and instructions for how to leach potassium out of vegetables.
Posted on 2012-03-08 03:44:14
Name:Michael
Location:Chicago
Subject:Potassium, Magnesium, and Calcium
If you are suffering from leg cramps you need a combination of potassium, magnesium, and calcium. It is this balance that helps prevent the cramps. Potassium alone won't do it. You need a balance of the three long with sodium... but most of us are getting more than enough sodium in our diets.
Posted on 2012-05-06 01:22:25
Name:Renee
Location:Minnesota
Subject:RE: Potassium, Magnesium, and Calcium
Hi Michael. Any chance you know of one source for all of those or have an example of a good food combination that will do the trick?
Posted on 2012-07-08 18:30:30
Name:Michael
Location:Chicago
Subject:RE: Potassium, Magnesium, and Calcium
Hi Renee,

There are a zillion websites with this info... just google, "Food high in..." for each mineral.

That said, I also take a magnesium CITRATE supplement everyday (NOT magnesium oxide as it cannot be absorbed easily by the body).

Also, I always have some Formula 303 with me in case I start to cramp and I chew a couple of these which helps. I don't take these regulary but just when I feel my muscles tightening up.

Hope that helps!

Posted on 2012-07-09 20:17:08
Name:Mikie Logsdon
Location:Evansville, IN
Subject:Thank You
Thank you all for all or your comments and suggestions. My wife has polysistic kidneys, and I came here to see what I could avoid. All of you have been a world of help. We are checking to see if I can donate one to her. Again, thank you all. Mikie The Viking
Posted on 2012-08-05 20:14:33
Name:Jen N
Location:Antigua, Guatemala
Subject:Potassium, magnesium, and sodium
It is true that if you have a potassium deficiency, you need all three. Potassium, sodium, and magnesium are the electrolytes our body needs. However, it is not true that we get enough sodium from our diet. To rebalance your electrolytes you need NATURAL sodium which is different even from sea salt. Salt sodium or the sodium in processed foods leaches electrolytes from our bodies. To rebalance your electrolytes try making an electrolyte broth using herbs, potatoes, celery, carrots and leafy greens. Do not add salt!
Posted on 2012-10-27 15:51:51
Name:Nadeem
Location:Pakistan
Subject:Loss of Potassium
I do regular run and exercise and sweat a lot. At times, I suffer sever body aches esp in legs and headache. Doctors here say its because of low potassium. This bad condition stays for few days. What to do? Thanks.
Posted on 2012-12-12 08:11:53
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Loss of Potassium
Hi Nadeem, thanks for your question. When you sweat you do lose electrolytes from your body like sodium, magnesium, phosphorus, calcium, and potassium. Loss of these electrolytes will lead to cramping. When you run, try to mix fruit and/or vegetable juice in your water to restore electrolytes. Orange juice should be fine. You can also buy commercial sport drink products. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-12-12 11:14:02
Name:Annette
Location:SC
Subject:Danger of high potassium levels?
I'm a vegetarian and have been for 20 plus years and have no reason why, but my potassium is high. Can that be dangerous? If so I'm open for any suggestion. And I do exercise. I eat healthy and still something can be wrong...
Posted on 2013-03-13 18:57:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Danger of high potassium levels?
Hi Annette, thanks for your comment. How do you know that your potassium levels are high? Is it from a blood test? Potassium levels are well regulated by the body, and a long term high level of potassium can signal kidney failure, or some other factor not related to diet and exercise. However, your high potassium levels may simply be due to your vegetarian diet, and not be harmful at all. Consult your doctor or health care provider if your potassium levels are very high on your blood test results, or if you feel ill.
Posted on 2013-03-13 21:26:46
Name:TT
Location:Kuwait
Subject:Heart Palpitations from Low Potassium
For 4 years I have been suffering from a rapid palpitation problem. My doctor thinks I have low potassium. Please help!
Posted on 2013-04-30 08:18:51
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Heart Palpitations from Low Potassium
Hi TT, thanks for your question. Eating the high potassium vegetables listed in this article, and other high potassium foods can help boost your potassium level. Further, heart palpitations have many causes, including stress and caffeine. You can find more information on heart palpitations here.
Posted on 2013-05-01 02:37:11
Name:Marge
Location:Los Angeles
Subject:Portion size and low vs high potassium
You folks might want to cross-reference your list with the National Kidney Foundation. Apparently green beans are a low potassium food whereas on your list it's considered high. Unfortunately, they don't provide any info on the amount of potassium in any of the foods on their list, so your mileage may vary. Still, it would be nice if there was a basic agreement about what is high potassium and what isn't. Thanks :)
Posted on 2013-06-13 17:10:24
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Portion size and low vs high potassium
Hi Marge, thanks for your question. It seems the Kidney Foundation is trying to provide a list of "low potassium foods" mainly for people who have to avoid potassium, namely, people with kidney disease. Since this is their goal, they chose a 1/2 cup portion size and called green beans a "low potassium food" at that portion size. Please note however, that they say "Eating more than 1 portion can make a lower potassium food into a higher potassium food." This warning is the key difference, as 1 cup of green beans, as listed here, is a high potassium food. Beyond that, it would be nice if they included numbers and a link to the referred green beans, as there is a wide variety of green beans out there. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-06-14 00:46:53
Name:Leslie
Location:Leslieeva@gmail.com
Subject:Why Bananas? Why not Avocados?
Why do bananas get all the credit for packing potassium when in reality there are so many more potassium-rich foods? I understand they are convenient as a pre or post-workout snack but the idea that they are high in potassium and will relive cramping is seeming more and more like a myth. I read somewhere that avocados had 35% more potassium than bananas yet they still don't have enough to make your list. I DO love sun dried tomatoes and spinach though. Why sun- dried and not vine ripened tomatoes? So many questions!
Posted on 2013-09-03 11:46:15
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Why Bananas? Why not Avocados?
Hi Leslie, thanks for your question. You are right that avocados have more potassium than bananas, and if you check the lists of top 10 foods highest in potassium, and high potassium fruits, you will see that avocados are ranked higher. Avocados and bananas are both fruits, which is why they are not ranked on this article of high potassium vegetables. In regards to sun dried tomatoes, they have more potassium per gram because they are dried, and so there is no water weight. You can compare the nutrition facts of 1 piece of sun dried tomatoes, to 1 red ripe raw tomato. Pay attention to the gram weight and calories, as well as the potassium level. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2013-09-03 22:04:25
Name:Catherene
Location:WV
Subject:Too high potassium
What about problems having extremely high potassium levels along with kidney disease and high blood pressure, what foods are left to eat when your doctor says no potassium in your diet? My boyfriend is going through this now.
Posted on 2013-10-04 00:17:55
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Too high potassium
Hi Catherine, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your boyfriend's condition. You can try use the nutrient ranking tool to find foods low in potassium. You can also try soaking vegetables in water, to try get some of the potassium out. The National Kidney Foundation has a page on Kidney Disease Friendly Cooking which may help. Amazon also has some recipe books related to the condition. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-04 03:55:50
Name:William
Location:Northeast Ohio
Subject:Heart palpitations, potassium and bananas
I had been having some severe heart palpitations. I was put on 24 hour monitor and nothing was found. A nurse saw my potassium was low at a 3 when it should be 3.5 to 6 and she recommended eating 1 banana a day. That did the trick. The palpitations have all but stopped.
Posted on 2013-11-09 14:11:03

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Comments.
Name:Todd
Location:Ohio
Subject:Potatoes
Why are potatoes not listed as the number 1 vegetable for potassium? 926 gms/ serving. who eats a whole wasabi root?
Posted on 2011-03-30 06:16:16
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Potatoes
Hi Todd, You have a good question, and the reason why potatoes are not listed as the number 1 food is because they have a really high glycemic index, greatly increasing the risk of type II diabetes. In other words, potatoes spike your blood sugar, causing you to feel more hunger, and increasing your tolerance to insulin. While lots of people eat potatoes, they are simply not a healthy food compared to the alternatives, and therefore, do not get the #1 spot. Try eating baked sweet potatoes instead, which in fact, are a completely different root from common white potatoes, and help regulate your blood sugar, decreasing risk of type II diabetes! In regards to wasabi, while it is true no one eats a whole wasabi root, it is still notable that wasabi provides a high amount of potassium gram per gram, and so people should certainly try to eat more of it!
Posted on 2011-03-30 09:19:32
Name:Anita
Location:NY
Subject:Why Bananas?
So why are bananas recommended for heavy exercisers? Wouldn't spinach, winter squash, or a carrot do as well for potassium?
Posted on 2011-08-11 20:55:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Why Bananas?
Hi Anita, thanks for your question. Your are right that a carrot, winter squash, or spinach would do as well for exercisers. Bananas are often recommended since they are cheap, ubiquitous, easy to carry, and also contain complex carbohydrates that take time to digest, thus providing energy over a long period. That said, carrots, spinach, or winter squash can work as well if they fit your exercise routine, they are also more likely to help promote weight loss.
Posted on 2011-08-11 20:59:43
Name:Steve
Subject:Tomatoes?
Sorry to disappoint you guys, but tomatoes, having seeds, are fruits. You guys might want to rearrange this or something.
Posted on 2011-09-07 15:55:55
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Tomatoes
Hi Steve, thanks for your comment. You are right that tomatoes are technically fruits, however, they are listed here under vegetables since they are often thought of as vegetables for cooking and most other culinary uses.
Posted on 2011-09-07 16:08:12
Name:Hubert
Location:Calgary AB
Subject:Potassium
My kidneys have a hard time with potassium, apparently I have too much. I try to eat foods low in potassium. All my favorite foods are high in potassium. HELP.
Posted on 2011-10-18 18:23:52
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Potassium and Kidney Disease
Hi Hubert, thanks for your comment and sorry to hear of your condition. As mentioned in the comments of the article on high potassium foods, it is true that almost all foods have potassium and there are no known foods, other than water, which will lower the concentration of potassium in your body. One thing you can do is try to leach, or remove, the potassium from fruits and vegetables. You can do this by soaking the vegetables in water, and then boiling them in water. The National Kidney Foundation will have more resources that can help you, including an article on potassium.
Posted on 2011-10-18 18:41:53
Name:Debra
Location:Florida
Subject:White sweet potatoes
I recently ate my first organic white sweet potato. WOW! What a wonderful flavor! Does it have the same nutritional value as an orange sweet potato--especially when it comes to the potassium content? And what about its glycemic index factor?--is it similar to a white potato?
Posted on 2012-02-26 19:43:10
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: White sweet potatoes
Hi Debra, thanks for your comment. Currently there are no nutrition facts for white sweet potatoes, but it is likely they have a similar potassium content to regular sweet potatoes. Sweet potatoes are related to regular potatoes only by name and are actually quite a different vegetable, almost closer to carrots than potatoes! As such, white sweet potatoes would likely have a similar glycemic index as any other sweet potato.
Posted on 2012-02-26 20:20:36
Name:Linda Frederick
Location:Okmulgee, Oklahoma
Subject:Foods that won't raise my potassium
I have high potassium, I need a list of foods I can eat that will not raise my potassium levels.
Posted on 2012-03-08 01:51:05
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Foods that won't raise my potassium
Hi Linda, thanks for your question. Avoiding potassium can be very difficult, and there really is not any food that doesn't have potassium except water. You can use the nutrient ranking tool to find foods low in potassium accross various food groups. The National Kidney Foundation will also have resources that can help you, including an article on a low potassium diet, which provides a list of vegetables they deem to be low in potassium, and instructions for how to leach potassium out of vegetables.
Posted on 2012-03-08 03:44:14
Name:Michael
Location:Chicago
Subject:Potassium, Magnesium, and Calcium
If you are suffering from leg cramps you need a combination of potassium, magnesium, and calcium. It is this balance that helps prevent the cramps. Potassium alone won't do it. You need a balance of the three long with sodium... but most of us are getting more than enough sodium in our diets.
Posted on 2012-05-06 01:22:25
Name:Renee
Location:Minnesota
Subject:RE: Potassium, Magnesium, and Calcium
Hi Michael. Any chance you know of one source for all of those or have an example of a good food combination that will do the trick?
Posted on 2012-07-08 18:30:30
Name:Michael
Location:Chicago
Subject:RE: Potassium, Magnesium, and Calcium
Hi Renee,

There are a zillion websites with this info... just google, "Food high in..." for each mineral.

That said, I also take a magnesium CITRATE supplement everyday (NOT magnesium oxide as it cannot be absorbed easily by the body).

Also, I always have some Formula 303 with me in case I start to cramp and I chew a couple of these which helps. I don't take these regulary but just when I feel my muscles tightening up.

Hope that helps!

Posted on 2012-07-09 20:17:08
Name:Mikie Logsdon
Location:Evansville, IN
Subject:Thank You
Thank you all for all or your comments and suggestions. My wife has polysistic kidneys, and I came here to see what I could avoid. All of you have been a world of help. We are checking to see if I can donate one to her. Again, thank you all. Mikie The Viking
Posted on 2012-08-05 20:14:33
Name:Jen N
Location:Antigua, Guatemala
Subject:Potassium, magnesium, and sodium
It is true that if you have a potassium deficiency, you need all three. Potassium, sodium, and magnesium are the electrolytes our body needs. However, it is not true that we get enough sodium from our diet. To rebalance your electrolytes you need NATURAL sodium which is different even from sea salt. Salt sodium or the sodium in processed foods leaches electrolytes from our bodies. To rebalance your electrolytes try making an electrolyte broth using herbs, potatoes, celery, carrots and leafy greens. Do not add salt!
Posted on 2012-10-27 15:51:51
Name:Nadeem
Location:Pakistan
Subject:Loss of Potassium
I do regular run and exercise and sweat a lot. At times, I suffer sever body aches esp in legs and headache. Doctors here say its because of low potassium. This bad condition stays for few days. What to do? Thanks.
Posted on 2012-12-12 08:11:53
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Loss of Potassium
Hi Nadeem, thanks for your question. When you sweat you do lose electrolytes from your body like sodium, magnesium, phosphorus, calcium, and potassium. Loss of these electrolytes will lead to cramping. When you run, try to mix fruit and/or vegetable juice in your water to restore electrolytes. Orange juice should be fine. You can also buy commercial sport drink products. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-12-12 11:14:02
Name:Annette
Location:SC
Subject:Danger of high potassium levels?
I'm a vegetarian and have been for 20 plus years and have no reason why, but my potassium is high. Can that be dangerous? If so I'm open for any suggestion. And I do exercise. I eat healthy and still something can be wrong...
Posted on 2013-03-13 18:57:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Danger of high potassium levels?
Hi Annette, thanks for your comment. How do you know that your potassium levels are high? Is it from a blood test? Potassium levels are well regulated by the body, and a long term high level of potassium can signal kidney failure, or some other factor not related to diet and exercise. However, your high potassium levels may simply be due to your vegetarian diet, and not be harmful at all. Consult your doctor or health care provider if your potassium levels are very high on your blood test results, or if you feel ill.
Posted on 2013-03-13 21:26:46
Name:TT
Location:Kuwait
Subject:Heart Palpitations from Low Potassium
For 4 years I have been suffering from a rapid palpitation problem. My doctor thinks I have low potassium. Please help!
Posted on 2013-04-30 08:18:51
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Heart Palpitations from Low Potassium
Hi TT, thanks for your question. Eating the high potassium vegetables listed in this article, and other high potassium foods can help boost your potassium level. Further, heart palpitations have many causes, including stress and caffeine. You can find more information on heart palpitations here.
Posted on 2013-05-01 02:37:11
Name:Marge
Location:Los Angeles
Subject:Portion size and low vs high potassium
You folks might want to cross-reference your list with the National Kidney Foundation. Apparently green beans are a low potassium food whereas on your list it's considered high. Unfortunately, they don't provide any info on the amount of potassium in any of the foods on their list, so your mileage may vary. Still, it would be nice if there was a basic agreement about what is high potassium and what isn't. Thanks :)
Posted on 2013-06-13 17:10:24
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Portion size and low vs high potassium
Hi Marge, thanks for your question. It seems the Kidney Foundation is trying to provide a list of "low potassium foods" mainly for people who have to avoid potassium, namely, people with kidney disease. Since this is their goal, they chose a 1/2 cup portion size and called green beans a "low potassium food" at that portion size. Please note however, that they say "Eating more than 1 portion can make a lower potassium food into a higher potassium food." This warning is the key difference, as 1 cup of green beans, as listed here, is a high potassium food. Beyond that, it would be nice if they included numbers and a link to the referred green beans, as there is a wide variety of green beans out there. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-06-14 00:46:53
Name:Leslie
Location:Leslieeva@gmail.com
Subject:Why Bananas? Why not Avocados?
Why do bananas get all the credit for packing potassium when in reality there are so many more potassium-rich foods? I understand they are convenient as a pre or post-workout snack but the idea that they are high in potassium and will relive cramping is seeming more and more like a myth. I read somewhere that avocados had 35% more potassium than bananas yet they still don't have enough to make your list. I DO love sun dried tomatoes and spinach though. Why sun- dried and not vine ripened tomatoes? So many questions!
Posted on 2013-09-03 11:46:15
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Why Bananas? Why not Avocados?
Hi Leslie, thanks for your question. You are right that avocados have more potassium than bananas, and if you check the lists of top 10 foods highest in potassium, and high potassium fruits, you will see that avocados are ranked higher. Avocados and bananas are both fruits, which is why they are not ranked on this article of high potassium vegetables. In regards to sun dried tomatoes, they have more potassium per gram because they are dried, and so there is no water weight. You can compare the nutrition facts of 1 piece of sun dried tomatoes, to 1 red ripe raw tomato. Pay attention to the gram weight and calories, as well as the potassium level. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2013-09-03 22:04:25
Name:Catherene
Location:WV
Subject:Too high potassium
What about problems having extremely high potassium levels along with kidney disease and high blood pressure, what foods are left to eat when your doctor says no potassium in your diet? My boyfriend is going through this now.
Posted on 2013-10-04 00:17:55
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Too high potassium
Hi Catherine, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your boyfriend's condition. You can try use the nutrient ranking tool to find foods low in potassium. You can also try soaking vegetables in water, to try get some of the potassium out. The National Kidney Foundation has a page on Kidney Disease Friendly Cooking which may help. Amazon also has some recipe books related to the condition. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-04 03:55:50
Name:William
Location:Northeast Ohio
Subject:Heart palpitations, potassium and bananas
I had been having some severe heart palpitations. I was put on 24 hour monitor and nothing was found. A nurse saw my potassium was low at a 3 when it should be 3.5 to 6 and she recommended eating 1 banana a day. That did the trick. The palpitations have all but stopped.
Posted on 2013-11-09 14:11:03

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References

    • USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.