Home   Top 10 Lists   Nutrition Facts   Super Foods   Fruits   Vegetables   Recipes   Blog   FAQ   

Foods Low in Vitamin K for a Warfarin (Coumadin) Diet


If you are taking an anticoagulant or a blood thinner, like Warfarin (Coumadin), then it is important to keep your PT/INR (Prothrombin Time and International Normalized Ratio) levels stable. PT/INR measure factors of blood coagulation. In order to maintain stable PT/INR levels you should not eat more than 1 serving of a high vitamin K food, and no more than 3 servings of a food with moderate amounts of vitamin K. What is important is that your intake of vitamin K stays consistent. Having a "cheat" day where you eat a large amount of vitamin K, like a spinach salad, could be extremely harmful. This is a guide of what foods you can eat and in what amounts. Exact amounts depend on your dosage of Warfarin. Listed below are foods low in vitamin K presented by food group with sample serving sizes and amounts of vitamin K.

General points when taking Warfarin (Coumadin)

  • A low INR means you have increased risk of clotting
  • A high INR means you have an increased risk of bleeding
  • Warfarin increases INR, Vitamin K decreases it
  • Most doctors aim to keep INR around 2.5-3.5
  • When a doctor prescribes Warfarin, they are trying to balance it with how much vitamin K you eat
  • Regularly check your PT/INR levels
  • Take the same amount of Warfarin at the same time each day
  • Keep your intake of vitamin K consistent from day to day
  • Eat no more than 1 serving of food that contains 200%-600% DV of vitamin K
  • Eat no more than 3 servings of food that contains 60-200% DV of vitamin K
  • Eliminate alcohol if you can, or limit yourself to no more than 3 drinks a day
  • Take no more than 800IU of vitamin E supplements
  • Avoid cranberries and cranberry juice as they can raise INR and risk of bleeding
  • Limit or avoid grapefruit and grapefruit juice
  • Avoid drinking green tea as it antagonizes Warfarin and lowers INR
  • Work with your doctor when taking CoQ10 as it can hamper the effectiveness of Warfarin
  • Many natural supplements affect PT/INR levels, so it is best to avoid them unless your doctor advises otherwise. The following supplements definitely affect PT/INR levels: arnica, bilberry, butchers broom, cat's claw, dong quai, feverfew, forskolin, garlic, ginger, gingko, horse chestnut, insositol hexaphosphate, licorice, melilot(sweet clover), pau d'arco, red clover, St. John's wort, sweet woodruff, turmeric, willow bark, and wheat grass.

List of Vitamin K foods to limit to 1 serving per day (200%-660% DV)

FoodServing SizeVitamin K Content
Boiled Kale1/2 cup(660% DV)
Boiled Spinach1/2 cup(560% DV)
Boiled Turnip Greens1/2 cup(530% DV)
Boiled Collard Greens1/2 cup(520% DV)
Boiled Swiss Chard1/2 cup(360% DV)
Raw Parsley1/4 cup(300% DV)
Boiled Mustard Greens1/2 cup(260% DV)

List of Vitamin K foods to limit to 3 serving per day (60%-200% DV)

FoodServing SizeVitamin K Content
Boiled Brussels Sprouts1/2 cup(190% DV)
Raw Spinach1 cup(180% DV)
Raw Turnip Greens1 cup(170% DV)
Raw Green Leaf Lettuce1 cup(125% DV)
Raw Broccoli1 cup(110% DV)
Raw Endive1 cup(70% DV)
Raw Romain Lettuce1 cup(70% DV)



Advertisement



Foods Low in Vitamin K to eat on a Warfarin (Coumadin) Diet


Vegetables Low in Vitamin K

FoodServing SizeVitamin K Content
Turnips (Raw or Cooked)1 cup0.2μg (0% DV)
Beets (Raw or Cooked)1 cup0.3μg (0% DV)
Sweet Corn (Raw or Canned)1 cup0.5μg (1% DV)
Onions (Raw or Cooked)1 medium (331g)1μg (1% DV)
Rutabagas (Raw or Cooked)1 cup0.5μg (1% DV)
Pumpkin (Cooked)1 cup2μg (2% DV)
Winter Squash, Butternut/Spaghetti (Cooked)1 cup2μg (2% DV)
Summer Squash (Cooked)1 cup3μg (4% DV)
Potatoes (Cooked)1 cup3μg (4% DV)
Sweet Potatoes (Cooked)1 cup7μg (9% DV)
Eggplants (Cooked)1 cup3μg (4% DV)
Bamboo shoots (Raw or Canned)1 cup0μg (0% DV)
Portabella Mushrooms (Raw or Cooked)1 cup0μg (0% DV)
White Mushrooms (Raw or Cooked)1 cup0μg (0% DV)
Shiitake Mushrooms (Cooked)1 cup0μg (0% DV)
Tomatoes (Raw)1 cup14μg (18% DV)
Tomatoes (Cooked)1 cup7μg (8% DV)
Cucumbers (Raw)1 cup17μg (21% DV)
Iceberg Lettuce (Raw)1 cup shredded17.4μg (22% DV)
Artichokes1 medium17.8μg (22% DV)
For more foods please use the nutrient ranking tool, or check the nutriton facts for individual foods. Low vitamin K does not necessarily guarantee safe administration of Warfarin (Coumadin).

Fruits Low in Vitamin K

FoodServing SizeVitamin K Content
Oranges1 medium (140g)0μg (0% DV)
Watermelon1 cup diced0.2μg (0% DV)
Litchis1 cup0.8μg (1% DV)
Bananas1 medium (105g)0.6μg (1% DV)
Pineapple1 cup1.2μg (1% DV)
Apples1 medium (182g)4μg (5% DV)
Nectarines1 medium (142g)3μg (4% DV)
Strawberries 1 cup3μg (4% DV)
Peaches1 medium (150g)4μg (5% DV)
Avoid grapefruit and cranberries
For more foods please use the nutrient ranking tool, or check the nutriton facts for individual foods. Low vitamin K does not necessarily guarantee safe administration of Warfarin (Coumadin).

Grains/Starches Low in Vitamin K

All grain products are low in vitamin K. Here are some examples:
FoodServing SizeVitamin K Content
White Rice1 cup0μg (0% DV)
Brown Rice1 cup1.2μg (1% DV)
Couscous1 cup0.2μg (0% DV)
Cornmeal (White or Yellow)1 cup0.4μg (0% DV)
Bulgur1 cup0.9μg (1% DV)
Pearled Barley1 cup1.3μg (2% DV)
Pasta (Plain)1 cup0μg (0% DV)
Whole Wheat Bread1 Slice0μg (0% DV)
Buckwheat1 cup3.2μg (4% DV)
Millet1 cup0.5μg (1% DV)
Quinoa1 cup0.0μg (0% DV)
For more foods please use the nutrient ranking tool, or check the nutriton facts for individual foods. Low vitamin K does not necessarily guarantee safe administration of Warfarin (Coumadin).

Other Food Groups

All meats are low in vitamin K with the exception of some canned fish packed in oil, and abalone. All Dairy and Egg Products are low in Vitamin K. Besides soybeans, soy products, and green beans, all beans and legumes are low in vitamin K. If you are into juicing, here are some low vitamin K juice recipes.

Warnings

  • Avoid making any big changes to your diet. If you try any new food, try it in small quantities and monitor your PT/INR
  • Even though a food is low in vitamin K it does not mean that it will not interact with Warfarin (Coumadin). This article is intended as a general guide for foods low in vitamin K and is for information purposes only. As stated above, try new foods with caution and consult health care providers or literature before trying new foods.

Further Reading




Comments.
Name:Christine L. Villa
Location:California
Subject:Carrot Intake
My friend recommended my husband to take one bag of carrots (about 6 pieces) to make into carrot juice. My husband is taking WARFARIN and also Lovanox to thin his blood. I think I should not have given him that carrot juice because his INR was 1.3. I might have caused it by giving it to him. He was already low being injected and taking Coumadin and now I was asked to give him a higher dosage of Coumadin tablet for two days plus the injection. Please let me know the limit of carrots ASAP. I was told it will help him cure his cancer.
Posted on 2012-06-09 19:19:14
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Carrot Intake
Hi Christine, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your husband's condition. One large carrot contains 9.5μg (12% DV) of vitamin K. Which means 6 could have had as much as 57μg (72% DV) of vitamin K. This is not necessarily enough vitamin K to make such a change in his INR, did you make any other changes to your husband's diet, or give him any other foods high in vitamin K? If not, it seems that the carrots are the culprit, and you should not give him more than 1-2 carrots a day.

What is it about the carrots that are beneficial to his cancer? Is it the beta-carotene? If so, you can maybe try to give him pumpkin or butternut squash. Both are low in Vitamin K, but have a similar nutrient profile to carrots. They might be good substitutes! Hope that helps.

Posted on 2012-06-10 02:30:31
Name:Stuart
Location:England
Subject:Cups
What is the "cup size"...it says 1/2 cup 1/4 cup etc...but I can't see the actual size...
Posted on 2012-06-11 20:32:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cups
Hi Stuart, thanks for your question. The cup size refers to 1 standard U.S. size cup, which equates to U.S. 8 fluid ounces. To put it in perspective, 100 grams of cooked rice fills half a cup.
Posted on 2012-06-11 21:05:04
Name:Lisa Hayes
Location:Shreveport, LA
Subject:I am new
I am new to this. I started 6/11/12. This has been very scary for me. I have to give myself Lovonox injections 2x a day plus take Coumadin. I'm scared to eat. Half the time I don't know what to eat. I look at the things that are high and the things that are low in Vitamin K. Should I just eat meat and forget about all veggies which I love? They still haven't gotten my levels right. I have to go to the hospital everyday for them to check me. Please help!!!!!
Posted on 2012-06-18 13:15:55
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: I am new
Hi Lisa, thanks for your question. You can eat more than just meat, practically all grains and fruits are low in vitamin K and you can eat them! However, you do have to give up some of the vegetables you love, if you are having trouble getting your levels down, then just eat the vegetables low in vitamin K listed in this article. If you want to have green leafy vegetables, have no more than a 1/4 to 1/2 cup listed here under the vitamin K foods to limit to 1 serving per day, and have the same amount everyday. Hope that helps and feel better soon.
Posted on 2012-06-18 20:47:31
Name:Diana
Location:Ontario, Canada
Subject:Tomatoes and Coumadin
I'm currently taking coumadin and I'm a bit confused as to how much of tomatoes I can eat. Many websites say different things. Thanks!
Posted on 2012-06-20 02:05:11
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Tomatoes and Coumadin
Hi Diana, there have not been any studies which state that tomatoes are bad when taking Coumadin. Obviously, if you find that your PT/INR changes after eating tomatoes, then they are not good for you. Make changes to your diet slowly, and keep monitoring.
Posted on 2012-06-20 09:41:20
Name:Chad
Location:Tennessee
Subject:High INR
I have been on warfarin for about a month now. My levels were good for the first three weeks, but today my INR jumped tremendously. It was 3.2 last Friday and today it was greater than 10. The doctors took more blood than usual to see what was wrong. They took me off warfarin until Monday and I get checked again tomorrow. I think I may have figured out what could have caused it, but I question it. My wife went out of town and left a greenbean caserole. I ate the entire thing in four days. I have a list of foods, but some are different than others. My question is, can green beans cause your INR to jump, especially that much? I have learned my lesson and my doctors seem satisified in that being the cause. Just scared, hate this whole blood clot ordeal!
Posted on 2012-06-23 01:55:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: High INR
Hi Chad, thanks for sharing your experience and your question. Having a high INR means that you actually avoided too many foods high in vitamin K. Target INRs vary, but a range of 2.5-3.5 is common. Vitamin K will lower your INR, increasing your chance for a blood clot. Looking at the nutrition facts for green beans, they only contain about 21% DV of vitamin K in a cup. If you substituted the green beans with another food high in vitamin K, that might be the reason why your INR jumped. Consider keeping a food diary to find any future cause of INR instability.
Posted on 2012-06-23 04:23:30
Name:nhguardsman1
Location:Lowell Ma
Subject:Wine and Coumadin
I have been on coumadin for 3 yrs. While I was attending cooking school we had a wine tasting class every day we would get to sample different wines. Little did I realize what I was doing to my inr so anybody that enjoys their wine should really watch how much they drink. Thanks.
Posted on 2012-06-27 18:44:20
Name:twdancer
Location:Lakewood, CO
Subject:Coumadin and L-lysene
I just had emergency surgery to remove a very large clot in my leg. I am on Lovenox shots twice a day and warferin 2.5 mg once a day. I have a bad cold sore. I usually take L-lysene for that but am not sure that natural remedies are ok with the current blood thinners. Help!
Posted on 2012-07-04 17:36:23
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin and L-lysene
Hi twdancer, thanks for your question. There are no studies to suggest adverse affects from L-lysene and Coumadin, and it seems that they should not interact. Consult a pharmacist, even at a local pharmacy, to be sure.
Posted on 2012-07-05 08:25:16
Name:Ron F.
Location:Rochelle, IL (USA)
Subject:Vitamin K foods also low in sugars
I think your list for foods low in Vitamin K is great. However, being diabetic has an additional dimension to my needs to find those foods that are BOTH low in Vitamin K and low in carbohydrates. For instance, peas on your list would not work because of the complex carbs (starches) in them. Do you know of a tool / service that I can check out that helps sort it out minus the individual checking and cross-checking? Any assistance is greatly appreciated, and thanks!
Posted on 2012-07-29 18:08:31
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin K foods also low in sugars
Hi Ron, thanks for your question. This tool can help you to find foods low in sugar and vitamin K, though you will have to go through the list to find the foods that you commonly eat. If you make a list like that, maybe come back here and share it with others who are also in your situation. Thanks!
Posted on 2012-07-31 06:53:27
Name:Karen
Location:Edmonton, Alberta
Subject:Fruits high in vitamin K
I never knew blueberries and blackberries are high in vitamin K. Now I'm wondering about cherries as I've also been eating them the past few weeks and my PT/INR has been dropping despite taking higher doses of coumadin. What other fruit should I be aware of?
Posted on 2012-08-05 05:07:14
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fruits high in vitamin K
Hi Karen, thanks for your question. Cherries are pretty low in vitamin K, providing 2.1μg (3% DV) per 100 grams, or 2.9μg (4% DV) in a cup. For more, see this list of 1000 fruits high in vitamin K.
Posted on 2012-08-05 05:23:10
Name:Beth Gregg
Location:Asheville NC
Subject:Green Peppers
What levels do green peppers and colored (orange and yellow) contain of vitamin K? My daughter has Cerebral Venus Thrombosis and has always eaten these as a snack. Also, should cucumbers be peeled or not?
Posted on 2012-08-24 16:12:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Green Peppers
Hi Beth, thanks for your questions. Looking at the nutrition facts for peppers, a whole large green or red pepper (164 grams) does not contain more than 15% DV of vitamin K, and should be safe to eat. There is no vitamin K data for yellow peppers, but you could assume that they are low in vitamin K.

Looking at the nutrition facts comparison for peeled vs. unpeeled cucumbers you can see that unpeeled cucumbers have much less vitamin K, so yes, peel the cucumbers! Hope that helps.

Posted on 2012-08-25 06:21:37
Name:Joquetta
Location:Colorado
Subject:Miracle Whip & other condiments & coumadin
I know Mayonaise & Miracle Whip & other salad dressings that I used have loads of vitamin K. I want to know what is in them that has Vitamin K? & how much? Do peanuts have vitamin K? I HATE this coumadin thing. I am on that & plavix & aspirin.
Posted on 2012-09-20 16:05:43
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Miracle Whip & other condiments & coumadin
Hi Joquetta, thanks for your question. It is the vegetable oils in the dressings and condiments which adds the vitamin K. Soybean and canola oil are particularly high in vitmain K, so avoid products which have them. Flaxseed, coconut, peanut, corn, and sunflower oil are all low in vitamin K, so try to buy condiments which use them. Further, peanuts are low in vitamin K. For more information:

List of 50 Fats and Oils Low in Vitamin K

70 Fats and Oils High in vitamin K to avoid

You could also go for fat free condiments and dressings, which should eleminate most of the vitamin K, but check labels carefully!
Posted on 2012-09-20 22:16:33
Name:Sydney
Location:Oxnard, CA
Subject:Coumadin diet
My 13 year old Grand Daughter just had open heart surgery and will be on Coumadin for 6 months...We are proud of her love for healthy food ...now we are struggling to find the magic combo to keep her blood work in compliance. Like all kids she loves chocolate milk or candy ...can this be part of my inability to correct her numbers? As her Caregiver I need HELP.
Posted on 2012-10-05 13:09:32
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin diet
Hi Sydney, thanks for your question. Chocolate milk is low in vitamin K and should be ok for your granddaughter. Most candies and sweets are also low in vitamin K and should be fine. This includes hard candies, marshmallows, and jellybeans. Here is list of 1000 candies low in vitamin K. Hope that helps. Please note that this advice is also only regarding vitamin K. As she has just had heart surgury, you may want to consult with her doctor to be sure.
Posted on 2012-10-07 03:44:08
Name:Linda Howard
Location:Richland, Ms
Subject:Low sodium diet and taking coumadin
My husband is on coumadin 12.5 daily. We did the injections - he had bloodclots in leg and lungs. I am having a time trying to find low sodium foods to eat and watch the Vitamin K, as well. Any help, please?
Posted on 2012-10-17 15:02:50
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low sodium diet and taking coumadin
Hi Linda, thanks for your question. All the fruits and vegetables listed in this article as low in vitamin K are also low in sodium. The grains (except for some pastas) are also low in sodium, just be sure you do not add any salt to them when you are cooking. Meats (other than seafood and canned meats) are also low in sodium and vitamin K. As for legumes, just avoid soybeans and canned beans and you should be fine. So basically you can eat most fruits, veggies, meats, grains, and beans. Just don't add any salt. Here is a list of high sodium foods to avoid. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-10-17 18:40:45
Name:Sally
Location:Cairo
Subject:Coumadin and yoghurt
Hi, my husband has had 3 DVT's and now he is on Coumadin for life. He eats a lot of yoghurt , does it affect his INR? Especially that his INR Is fluctuating and not reaching 2 easily.
Posted on 2012-10-21 20:28:01
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin and yoghurt
Hi Sally, thanks for your question. Yogurt is low in vitamin K and should not be affecting your husband's INR. Is he eating any of these other high vitamin K foods?

Complete nutrition facts for yogurt.
Posted on 2012-10-21 20:31:32
Name:Mark
Location:Warner Robins
Subject:Coumadin and green peas and lima beans
My doctor said I should be careful with green peas. If eating them I should only have a 1/2 cup serving 2 to 3 times daily, however I cannot find anything about this vegetable. I also cannot find anything about lima beans anywhere. Should I limit my intake of this as well? My coumadin dose is 10mg 5 days a week and 7.5 the other two. Any help you can provide would be most helpful as I love my green peas and lima beans.
Posted on 2012-10-25 09:27:42
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin and green peas and lima beans
Hi Mark, thanks for your question. 1 cup of green peas does provide 41μg (52% DV) of vitamin K, so it does make sense to limit it, if that is what your doctor suggests. 1 cup of lima beans contains much less vitamin K with 11μg (13% DV) and should be ok to eat.

Nutrition facts for peas and lima beans.

As a previous poster stated, green peas are also high in carbohydrates and sugars, so if you are diabetic, that might also be a reason why your doctor does not want you to eat peas.

Talk to your doctor about why he does not want you to eat lima beans, and see if you can eat more lima beans in place of green peas. Hope that helps.

Posted on 2012-10-25 13:36:25
Name:Mahi
Location:Canada
Subject:Coumadin dose
My husband is on coumadin since august this year. Right now he is taking 7.5 mg for 3 days and 7 mg for 3 days. His INR was 2.3 last week and the doctor has said that now instead of going weekly for INR, he should go after 2 weeks. Is it safe to continue with the same dose? Is alternating the dose harmful?
Posted on 2012-11-11 11:31:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin dose
Hi Mahi, thanks for your question. Most patients on Coumadin aim for an INR of 2.5-3.5, in this regard, your husband's INR is likely in a good range. When prescribing coumadin, health care providers may aim for a weekly dose.Ref Thus your husband's dose of 7.5mg for 3 days, and 7mg for 3 days would add up to a 6 day total of 43.5mg. It is safe to alternate like this. Just be sure your husband keeps consuming the same amount of vitamin K foods each day.
Posted on 2012-11-12 02:23:49
Name:Brent
Location:Summersville WV
Subject:Asparagus Vitamin K Content
I'm taking Coumadin, can I eat asparagus?
Posted on 2012-11-22 01:14:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Asparagus Vitamin K Content
Hi Brent, thanks for your question. Asparagus is fairly high in vitamin K, half a cup cooked contains 57% DV. This means that you should limit asparagus to no more than 3 servings a day, and regulate your consumption of it with other vitamin K foods and your dosage of coumadin.

Complete nutrition facts for asparagus.

Posted on 2012-11-22 01:56:03
Name:Diann Hamilton
Location:The Villages, Fl
Subject:Coumadin
My husband has been on Coumadin for about 8 months. He has been watching what he eats and this week his level was 1.5. He was taking 2 whole pills a week and half a pill the other five days. They changed it now to 3 whole and half the other 4 days. They want his level between 2 and 2.5. We do not know what else to do to reach that level.
Posted on 2012-11-26 13:45:13
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin
Hi Diann, thanks for your comment. The best you can do is to keep your consumption of vitamin K constant while increasing the dosage. The increased dosage should help get his INR up to 2-2.5.
Posted on 2012-11-26 20:42:58
Name:Rick K.
Location:Oklahoma City, OK
Subject:Grapefruit and Grapefruit juice?
My Warfarin monitors said to avoid grapefruit. I was drinking lots of it because of its low glycemic index. My sugar intake is concentrated in chocolate.

(Other meds include Furosemide and Diltiaz ER - treating afib).

What is the scoop on grapefruit?

Posted on 2012-11-27 17:37:06
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Grapefruit and Grapefruit juice?
Hi Rick, thanks for your question. There are various complications between cardiovascular drugs and grapefruit juice, in this case, the Diltiazem is likely to have the greatest interaction. Studies show that there is no strong effect between Grapefruit juice and Warfarin, but you are still advised to keep grapefruit juice consumption to less than 8oz a day. Maybe try other unsweetened juices such as strawberry or peach? Hope this helps.
Posted on 2012-11-27 23:50:16
Name:Edward Dasaro
Location:Brooklyn, NY
Subject:Soy Milk
Is soy milk high in vitamin K?
Posted on 2012-11-28 12:12:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Soy Milk
Hi Edward, thanks for your question. Soybean oil, and most soy products, are high in vitamin K. A 16 ounce serving (2 cups) of soy milk would provide 18% DV for vitamin K and is probably ok to drink while on Warfarin. Substitutes like almond milk present a vitamin K free option if that works better for you.
Complete nutrition facts for soymilk.
Posted on 2012-11-28 21:49:17
Name:Raymond McCutcheon
Location:Columbus, OH
Subject:Cranberry effect on Warfarin
How do cranberries interact with warfarin?
Posted on 2012-12-04 08:23:44
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cranberry effect on Warfarin
Hi Raymond, thanks for your question. There have been some cases where cranberry juice taken while on Warfarin has increased INR and risk of bleeding in some people. If you are on Warfarin, it is advised that you avoid cranberries, and cranberry juice. For more information on the biochemical theory, see this article.
Posted on 2012-12-04 09:58:48
Name:Liza
Location:Childers, Australia
Subject:Lower dose of Warfarin
Hi, My husband is on 7mg of warfarin daily to keep his level at 2.5-3.5 What can he eat to lower his dose of warfarin but stay on 2.5 - 3.5 level?
Posted on 2012-12-07 19:21:31
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Lower dose of Warfarin
Hi Liza, thanks for your question. If your husband wants to lower his dose then he must slowly reduce his intake of high vitamin K foods. As he does this his INR should increase above 3.5 and your doctor should adjust his prescription down accordingly. Please note you want to discuss these changes with his health care providers so they know, you want to monitor his INR levels more often during this time, and you want to make these changes gradually.
Posted on 2012-12-07 19:26:41
Name:TG
Location:DC, USA
Subject:Juicing
I was an avid juicer prior to getting blood clots and landing in the hospital for 5 days. Now 75% of the fruits and veggies I was using in my daily juices are high in Vitamin K. Is there a web-site for warfarin friendly juices? I've looked everywhere. Also, I'm getting mixed signals on carrots. Some websites say they are high and others say they are low?
Posted on 2012-12-07 19:39:17
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Juicing
Hi TG, thanks for your quesiton, and for making a great suggestion to add some warfarin friendly juicing recipes! The trouble with juicing is that it tends to concentrate calories and nutrients. An average carrot (61g) provides 10% DV for vitamin K, while an 8oz cup of carrot juice (100g) provides 19% of the daily value(DV). Note that most drinking cups are at least 16oz, or 2 "cup servings", meaning that a glass of carrot juice would contain 38% DV of vitamin K. Carrots are probably best avoided! However, the amount of vitamin K you can comsume all depends on your dose of Warfarin. This might explain the mixed signals you have been getting. Monitor your INR carefully with your diet, and keep looking for fruits and vegetables with low vitamin K levels. Check back to this webpage in a couple month for low vitamin K juicing recipes. Or come back and share some you have found!

Complete nutrition facts for carrot juice and carrots.

Posted on 2012-12-07 19:41:11
Name:Aunchalee
Location:TX
Subject:Vitamin K in butter
I use butter to cook food lately, but my husband just said it contains high vitamin k. I feel so sick to cook now. There aren't many things too cook.

By the way my husband has been taking rat poison for three months! I don't want him to take it forever! I wish his inr will be higher than 1.3 next time he goes see the doctor.

Posted on 2012-12-09 12:15:54
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin K in butter.
Hi Aunchalee, thanks for your comment. Not sure where your husband got his information, but butter is low in vitamin K. One tablespoon provides 1% of the DV for vitamin K. Butter, however, is high in cholesterol, and probably best avoided by someone with cardiovascualr disease.
Posted on 2012-12-10 06:10:31
Name:Celia
Location:USA
Subject:Coumadin and coconut
My husband is recently put on coumadin. Can he have coconut? It is not on any of the food lists I have.
Posted on 2012-12-11 12:15:34
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin and coconut
Hi Celia, thanks for your question. Coconut meat, milk, and water are all low in vitamin K and should be fine on a Warfarin (Coumadin) diet.
Complete nutrition facts for coconut meat, milk, and water.
Posted on 2012-12-12 07:45:02
Name:Jim
Location:Libertyville, IL
Subject:Salmon
I eat salmon 8 times a week. Will that significantly affect my coumodin dosage?
Posted on 2012-12-19 12:14:38
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Salmon
Hi Jim, thanks for your question. Salmon, like other meats, is low in vitamin K and should not affect your coumadin dose. Be sure you do not cook it with any herbs, which are high in vitamin K. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-12-19 21:04:28
Name:S
Location:USA
Subject:Vit K content in cauliflower and celery?
Hi: Your table site doesn't tell about the Vit K content of cauliflower and celery. Also olive oil. Can you please give that information? Thanks!
Posted on 2012-12-26 15:42:11
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vit K content in cauliflower and celery?
Hi S, thanks for your question. 1 cup of raw cauliflower (100g) contains 37% of the DV for vitamin K. 1 cup of raw celery (100g) contains 20% of the DV. 2 tablespoons of olive oil provides 22% of the DV for vitamin K. Here are the complete nutrition facts for all three.
Posted on 2012-12-26 20:34:18
Name:Toniixo
Location:Norwich, UK
Subject:Low vitamin K diet and recipes
Does anyone know of any recipe websites and meal plans I could use? I have been on Warfarin for over 6 months now, and my INR is still very unstable. The only 2 things I refuse to cut out of my diet are cheese and garlic (my favorites). Thanks a lot!
Posted on 2012-12-26 20:40:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low vitamin K diet and recipes
Hi Toniixo, thanks for your question. Not sure what recommendations everyone has. The Coumdain Cookbook could be a good resource for you.
Posted on 2012-12-26 20:51:06
Name:Lisa Williams
Location:Ohio
Subject:Warfarin and CoQ10
I suffered PE in August and have, by now, fairly well regulated my warfarin / INR level. I had a full range of blood work done in November, and found that I was very low in B12 and was somewhat on the verge of high cholesterol, so my hematologist recommended I begin taking CoQ10 every day. However, I just read a warning that CoQ10 can contribute to blood clotting. Am I putting myself in danger by taking CoQ10 while I am on warfarin?
Posted on 2013-01-02 08:32:04
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin and CoQ10
Hi Lisa, thanks for your question. The University of Maryland Medical Center suggests a possible interaction between CoQ10 and blood thinning medication such as Warfarin. They suggest you work closely with your health care provider while taking both substances. Further, this study reports a case where CoQ10 appeared to reduce the effectiveness of Warfarin. The short answer is that CoQ10 with Warfarin is potentially putting you in danger and you should ask your doctor about it or seek a second opinion.
Posted on 2013-01-02 22:33:43
Name:Sofia
Location:Toronto
Subject:Coumadin and Sprouts
How do you raise the enzyme levels of a person on Coumadin who also has cancer? Specifically I would like you to comment on the use of sprouted beans and grains as a protein and enzyme source while on Coumadin. The person cannot eat any animal protein. Does it make a difference from the vit. K point if the grains/beans are sprouted or cooked? A second question: what is the vit. K content for quinoa? Thanks!
Posted on 2013-01-04 11:08:29
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin and Sprouts
Hi Sofia, thanks for your questions. Sprouting does increase the amount of vitamin K. Looking at the nutrition comparison of cooked soybeans vs sprouted soybeans we see that 1 cup of cooked beans (172g) provides 41% DV for vitamin K, while 1 cup of cooked sprouted soybeans (94g) provides 83% DV. Unfortunately the vitamin K content of raw soybean sprouts are not available, but you can assume that cooking increases the vitamin K content.

Quinoa contains little or no vitamin K. You can use the nutrition facts comparison tool to look up values of other foods, or the nutrient ranking tool to rank vitamin K values for different foods. Just be careful since values of vitamin K are not available for all foods.

Posted on 2013-01-04 14:15:23
Name:Nelda van Rooyen
Location:Tete, Mozambique
Subject:Warfarin and cayenne pepper
I have read that drinking a cup a hot water and a teaspoon of cayenne pepper twice a day can be very beneficial for so many ailments and that cayenne is a fantastic natural remedy. Is it safe to use it when on warfarin?
Posted on 2013-01-06 10:05:16
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin and cayenne pepper
Hi Nelda, thanks for your question. Cayenne pepper is fairly low in vitamin K. 1 teaspoon only provides 2% DV. However, the chemcial which gives pepper its heat, Capsaicin, increases the risk of bleeding associated with Warfarin. You are probably ok with 1 teaspoon a day, but be aware of the increased risk of bleeding, and let your health care providers know also. Further, see how your PT/INR reacts.
Posted on 2013-01-06 15:50:07
Name:Judie
Location:MA
Subject:Soybeans
I've been unable to find the vitamin K value for soy beans. I've been a vegetarian for over 40 years, and have relied on soy products for a lot of my protein needs. I have contacted several companies that make soy products, but have had no response yet. Please advise.
Posted on 2013-01-09 15:17:45
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Soybeans
Hi Judie, thanks for your question. Soybeans and soy products are generally high in vitamin K. The possible exception being tofu. Tofu provides 8% DV of vitamin K per cup, but might depend on how it is made. Soybean oil provides 32% DV per tablespoon, mature cooked soybeans contain 41% DV per cup, and 1 cup of cooked soybean sprouts provides 83% DV. Here are the nutrition facts for tofu, soybeans, and sprouts.
Posted on 2013-01-09 16:26:12
Name:Vincent
Location:VA
Subject:Consistency of Vitamin K
I read where intake of Vitamin K while on Coumadin should be consistent. However, I might eat a cup of brocolli one time this week and not again for two or more weeks. The same would be true for spinach. Does consistency mean a cup of either should be consumed each week?
Posted on 2013-01-10 17:15:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Consistency of Vitamin K
Hi Vincent, thanks for your question. You need to keep your intake of vitamin K the same from day to day. This means if you eat 1 cup of broccoli one day, you need to eat something with the same amount of vitamin K the next day. Spinach has 5 times the amount of vitamin K as broccoli, so one cup of cooked spinach = 5 cups of cooked broccoli. Be sure to check nutrition facts and find equivalent foods for each day.
Posted on 2013-01-10 23:37:41
Name:Jacquie
Location:BC
Subject:Lemons
I have been on Warfarin for the past 8 months due to a blood clot in my leg, the first thing I had to give up was my green tea. I thought I was being so healthy only drinking green tea (who knew). After 8 months of up and down INR readings I am struggling to keep my numbers between 2 & 3. I was told taking lemon would help thin down my blood, is this true?
Posted on 2013-01-11 17:51:02
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Lemons
Hi Jacquie, thanks for your question. There is no evidence to show that lemon thins blood. This 2010 study on the effect of limes and Warfarin in rodents found that lime juice actually reduces the blood thinning effect of Warfarin. Like grapefruit juice, it is probably best to limit or eliminate lemon from your diet.
Posted on 2013-01-11 18:53:20
Name:Sonia Smith
Location:Gloucester UK
Subject:Glucosamine Sulphate, garlic tablets, and fish oil
I have always taken glucosamine sulphate 1000MG tablets, but have ben told not to take them on Warfarin, could you please explain why? I need them for my joints.

I also take garlic tablets, is this ok? And fish oil tablets? Would be grateful for your help.

Posted on 2013-01-14 13:16:27
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Glucosamine Sulphate, garlic tablets, and fish oil
Hi Sonia, thanks for your questions. According to the U.S. Library of Medicine Glucosamine Sulphate increases the effect of Warfarin, which increases risk of excessive bleeding. Unfortunately, the same is likely true about fish oil tablets, and you should avoid them. Further, you should not take the garlic tablets while on Warfarin.
Posted on 2013-01-14 16:52:42
Name:Betty
Location:NV
Subject:Chilis?
I am a new receiver of Warfarin. I have always used a lot of seasonings when cooking, but now see that some of them are not good. I am curious about Ortego Chili's, I don't seen any thing about using chilies.
Posted on 2013-01-15 01:21:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Chilis
Hi Betty, thanks for your question. While chilis and bell peppers are relatively low in vitamin K, they do contain capsaicin. Capsaicin is the chemical which makes chilies spicy, and when combined with Warfarin, increases risk of bleeding. Chilis are best avoided.
Posted on 2013-01-15 01:54:22
Name:Rajneesh
Location:Jaipur India
Subject:Food with high b12 but less K
Hi, My wife is on acitrom and the doctor asked her to avoid food which contains vitamin K. She also has deficiency of Vitamin B12. Are there any vegetarian foods which are high in B12 but low in vitamin K?
Posted on 2013-01-18 09:37:27
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:Food with high b12 but less K
Hi Rajneesh, thanks for your question. Vitamin B12 can only naturally be found in animal products. Does your wife eat milk, yogurt, and eggs? If so, these would be the best sources of vitamin B12. Milk is the highest, followed by yogurt, and eggs. Here are the complete nutrition facts for all 3 foods. All 3 foods are also very low in vitamin K. However, as these foods are high in cholesterol, they may not be the best for your wife. Likely, it is best for your wife to take vitamin B12 supplements, or eat fortified foods.
Posted on 2013-01-18 17:41:06
Name:DeAnna
Location:Indiana
Subject:Started on warfarin yesterday and was not told to watch vitamin K consumption
I had a doctor place me on Warfarin yesterday at 5mg and to stay on my plavix which I have been on for years. Never said anything to me about what to eat or not to eat...just that my situation was serious and I needed to start on it immediately because of a two genetic blood clotting mutations and history of stroke. Doing more testing for other mutations but why in the world would a doc not tell their patient all of this I am reading?..I know nothing about this med and everything I am reading here is news to me. This concerns me given my doc didn't tell me about this stuff. Is it maybe he wanted to see what my normal readings will be with my normal eating habits maybe?
Posted on 2013-02-02 13:25:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Started on warfarin yesterday and was not told to watch vitamin K consumption
Hi DeAnna, thanks for your comment. It is strange you doctor did not mention anything about vitamin K. Plavix is a blood thinner which does not interact with vitamin K, but as long as you are on warfarin you should keep your vitamin K consumption constant. Even if your doctor wanted to establish your baseline level, warning you to keep your consumption constant would have been the right thing to do. Ask your doctor about it on your next visit and please come back to share what you learn for the benefit of others reading this article.
Posted on 2013-02-02 13:42:36
Name:DeAnna
Location:Indiana
Subject:Follow up
I certainly will be asking when I go back and let you all know what I find out..and I am staying close to this website and bookmarking it so I can learn things I need to know. Thank you soo much for your response and for providing a resourceful place for folks to turn to.
Posted on 2013-02-02 14:04:20
Name:S
Location:Utah
Subject:Onions
I read boiled onions are high in Vit K and then read raw and cooked onions are low in Vit K. Are onions safe to eat?
Posted on 2013-02-03 13:50:17
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Onions
Thanks for your question. Onions are low in vitamin K, and boiling them should not increase their level. Not sure why you read otherwise. Onion is related to garlic, which can interact with warfarin. As such, try to keep your level of onion consumption at an average, or below average level.
Posted on 2013-02-03 15:22:35
Name:Samantha
Location:Australia
Subject:How much vitamin K to eat at the start of Warfarin?
Hi, I'm on Warfarin and have been told to avoid ALL high in vitamin K foods altogether (all green food plus herbs/spices). In regards to other foods being high in Vitamin K, is there a maximum % of DV of Vitamin K that I would be allowed? So I have a rule of thumb of what I am allowed and I am not. Thanks!
Posted on 2013-02-04 01:15:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How much vitamin K to eat at the start of Warfarin?
Hi Samantha, thanks for your question. How much vitamin K you can eat depends a lot on your situation, your dose of warfarin, and your PT/INR. As you have been told to avoid all vitamin K, stick to the fruits and vegetables that are low in vitamin K listed in this article. That is to say, fruits and veggies with less than 10% DV (Daily Value) of vitamin K. Grains, meats, dairy products, and beans (except soy) also fit in this category. Basically aim to consume 100% or less of the daily value (DV) for vitamin K each day.
Posted on 2013-02-04 01:29:55
Name:Genesis
Subject:Can I be vegetarian while taking Coumadin?
I just left the hospital yesterday after getting a DVT in my arm. The hematologist told me to avoid Vitamin K altogether while I'm on Coumadin (which will probably be for the remainder of my life, and I'm only 22) but I'm having a hard time knowing what to eat being that I'm vegetarian/vegan. Should I re-introduce animal products into my diet, or do you think given that I find a good balance, I can be vegetarian while on anticoagulants? Spinach, Kale, Cranberries, Blueberries, Broccoli, and Green Tea were staples in my diet - I'm afraid that I'll be missing a lot of key nutrients if I cut out Vitamin K and don't re-introduce something else.
Posted on 2013-02-04 13:55:39
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Can I be vegetarian while taking Coumadin?
Hi Genesis, you can be vegetarian or vegan while on Coumdain (Warfarin). Just be sure you eat plenty of whole grains, beans (except soy beans), and the vegetables/fruits listed in this article as "low vitamin K foods". You will get all the nutrients you need, except vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 is found naturally in animal products, you can either supplement, or try to eat fortified foods. Not sure what range of grains you ate as a vegan, but quinoa is a complete protein source, providing all the essential amino acids. Beans and legumes are high in fiber, and perfect for you. As you progress in taking Coumadin you can talk to your doctor about increasing your dose as you start to eat some vitamin K foods (greens) again. Get your PT/INR tested weekly if you go in this direction. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-02-04 16:26:59
Name:Shailendra
Location:Saudi Arabia
Subject:Warfarin diet Self Monitoring
Hi, I have been on Warfarin since the 26th of Jan. As of today I am taking 6.5mg and my INR is 3.0 I understand its advisable to have at least 2 INR samples within the same range? Secondly, after reading all FAQs I must ask: How much time it takes for INR to alter once any alteration in Vitamin K intake has happened? Is it 12/24/48 hrs? All above answers end with that the bottom line is to check vitamin K intake. Practically, its very difficult for individuals to monitor it. And hence so many queries. Correct me if I am wrong. Is it the best practice to write down each day what and how much you eat in your diet? This will give a fair idea of vitamin K intake and then utilize a spread sheet to calculate daily vitamin K intake. Finally I assume, the body needs a specific amount of vitamin K which must be met everyday? What are Vitamin K deficiency effects? If some one has to stay on Warfarin for a long time, he may consciously consume less Vita-K. Finally please suggest a diet when on Warfarin + Constipation prone piles/Fissure problem. I know this is a lot of questions, but hope they address many people. Thanks in advance. Shailendra
Posted on 2013-02-06 16:13:35
Name:Pii
Location:Hawaii
Subject:Shellfish and a Coumadin Diet
I just started Coumadin and have been doing a lot of research on VK. This is so very difficult to try to balance. I had an ICD put in 9 months ago and my cardiologist highly recommended a blood thinner. He gave me a sample of Pradaxa, and after researching this med decided I did not want the risks involved. My problem is figuring out the amounts by US measurement in lieu of grams/micrograms etc. This site has really been informative with the breakdown and the problems/solutions. I did not see anything regarding seafood and VK effects. Can you give some pros/cons on shell fish (which I love) and also on red wine (how much is safe to consume. I drink 4-6 oz with dinner each day. Mahalo, Pii
Posted on 2013-02-18 18:34:39
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Shellfish and a Coumadin Diet
Hi Pii, thanks for your questions. Shellfish are low in vitamin K and should be fine to eat with Coumadin (Warfarin). The only reservation is that most shellfish is high in cholesterol, so you want to watch your cholesterol level. It is best to eliminate alcohol if you can, but 4-6oz a day is acceptable. Do not drink more than 3 glasses a day. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-02-18 20:42:54
Name:Umbers
Subject:Yogurt and Bacteria which produce Vitamin K
I saw in the comments that someone had asked about yogurt, and if it would have any effect on INR. I just wanted to point out that even though yogurt is very low in vitamin K, it does have beneficial bacteria, and bacteria in human body produces Vitamin K. So if people are having a hard time keeping their numbers within the INR zone their doctors have set, it may be because the bacteria the consume in the yogurt is adding to the Vitamin K producing bacteria already inside of them. They should try going without yogurt for a while, to see if their problems resolve.
Posted on 2013-02-26 01:04:30
Name:Beck Duncan
Location:Clayton County, Georgia
Subject:Very Informative
I have been taking coumadin for about a month now. My doctor told me not to eat leafy greens. This site has shown that, if we are consistent, we can actually eat the dreaded leafy greens. I have osteopena an am afraid of making matters worse by not getting enough vitamin k.
Posted on 2013-03-05 12:51:34
Name:Mary
Location:Indiana
Subject:Iceberg lettuce
Is iceberg lettuce ok while taking blood thinners?
Posted on 2013-03-05 19:01:02
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Iceberg lettuce
Hi Mary, thanks for your question. One cup of shredded Iceberg lettuce contains 17μg (22% DV) of vitamin K. Given this fact, it should be fine for most people on Warfarin to eat 2 cups of shredded ice-berg lettuce a day. However, it depends greatly on your dose and what other foods you are eating. Make changes to your diet slowly. So you may want to start with half a cup of iceberg lettuce for a week, then a cup for a week, then 2 cups. Hope that helps. Here are the complete nutrition facts for iceberg lettuce.
Posted on 2013-03-06 19:39:32
Name:Coco
Location:TX
Subject:Green Anti inflammatory Smoothies and Pradaxa (Dabigatran)
Hi, I have recently started to do the Green Smoothie and smoothies in general to help me with my health. I had looked at doing a smoothie for anti inflammatory, because my feet swell. I recently got diagnosed with my second superficial blood clot and I notice that the list of foods/vegs/supplements that I would need to use for this smoothie are on your high/medium K list! I am currently on PRADAXA temporarily until my blood work comes back.

Can I still do this smoothie in moderation?

Posted on 2013-04-16 16:51:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Green Anti inflammatory Smoothies and Pradaxa (Dabigatran)
Hi Coco, thanks for your question. Are you on Warfarin and Pradaxa? Or just Pradaxa? Are you planning to go on Warfarin soon? Did you doctor tell you not to eat vitamin K foods? If you answer yes to any of the previous questions, then you probably need to stop the smoothies, or just have 8 ounces a day. If you are just taking Pradaxa then you should not have to change your diet at all. Pradaxa claims to have no special diet requirements. This is because Pradaxa works in a different way from Warfarin. Hope that information helps.
Posted on 2013-04-16 18:52:11
Name:Jim C
Location:North Carolina
Subject:Warfarin/Exoxaparin
About 2 weeks ago my doctor discovered a clot in the upper groin area of my left leg. He put me on Xarelto 15 mg 2 times daily and sent me home. I was scheduled to see the doctor 1 week later for a follow up but a few hours before my appointment the clot entered my left lung and I was hospitalized for 4 days. In the hospital they placed me on warfarin and 2 injections of exoxaparin. When I left the hospital my INR was 1.5. I continued the injections for 2 days at home and also took 5mg warfarin daily. On the 3rd day my INR was still only at 1.6. I get it checked again tomorrow but I am beginning to think I will never get above 2.0. The doctor wants it between 2.0 and 3.0. I am not eating any vitamin K to my knowledge. What could be my problem.
Posted on 2013-04-16 20:17:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin/Exoxaparin
Hi Jim, sorry to hear about your condition and thanks for your questions. Not sure why your INR is not adjusting higher. Are you sure you are not eating any vitamin K? Here is a more detailed list of high vitamin K foods you can check. Further, you may need a higher dose of Warfarin. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2013-04-17 03:59:40
Name:Kathy
Location:Chicago
Subject:Keep a food diary while on Warfarin
Anyone who is on Warfarin should keep a food diary. I have done this for a year and it helps. It's too easy to think in your head you did or didn't do something. So when you write it down consistently day to day you will have a better overview of what you are doing. Most importantly, write down the portions of your fruits and veggies and milk that you have daily. Try it, it works.
Posted on 2013-05-14 03:44:48
Name:Joyce
Location:New Jersey
Subject:Ginger tea
I recently started Coumadin and Lovenox injections after a DVT and PE. I steep ginger several times a week to make tea. Is this still safe?
Posted on 2013-05-19 22:10:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Ginger tea
Hi Joyce, check the first section under "General point when taking Warfin". Ginger is listed under the herbs and/or supplements to avoid. You would be best not drinking ginger tea.
Posted on 2013-05-20 03:01:11
Name:Vicki
Location:Early Tx
Subject:Plavix, vitamin K, and Miracle Whip
My husband had a stent in after having a heart attack. He has been put on Plavix and told to avoid foods high in Vit K. He doesn't eat green leafy veggies. Mostly green beans, pintos, corn, green peas. He also uses miracle whip. (That's the only thing he will use as dressing) I didn't see these on your list. Will they be ok? Thanks.
Posted on 2013-05-22 18:15:43
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Plavix, vitamin K, and Miracle Whip
Hi Vicki, thanks for your questions. Plavix works differently from Warfarin, and it does not interact with vitamin K. As such, it should be ok to eat vitamin K foods while on Plavix. However, given the doctor said to avoid vitamin K, your husband may be on some other medication to avoid it, or it may just be a good idea given his heart condition. All the foods you mentioned are fine except for Miracle Whip. Miracle whip is high in cholesterol, saturated fat, sugar, and vitamin K. It is not a heart healthy food, and your husband should not eat it, or most oils, and a simple vinegar dressing might be best. Hope that helps, here are the complete nutrition facts for miracle whip.
Posted on 2013-05-23 02:43:38
Name:Audrey
Location:West Sussex
Subject:Cabbage, beans, swedes, parsnips, and leeks?
2 weeks ago I was taken in to hospital with PE on both lungs I love vegetables to the point that my husband & I have an allotment and grow them ourselves. I do eat a lot of green vegetables including cabbage, leeks, swede, parsnips runner beans french beans and Chinese cabbage. These are vegetables I cant find amount of K vitamin in them. Also I am dairy intolerant and so have to use soya milk. I don't use a lot unless I am making a dessert with it, could this be a problem?
Posted on 2013-05-25 15:46:11
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cabbage, beans, swedes, parsnips, and leeks?
Hi Audrey, thanks for your question. Cabbage is high in vitamin K and you should avoid it. 1 cup of raw cabbage provides 85% of the DV for vitamin K. As for Chinese (Napa) Cabbage, leeks, beans, there is no vitamin K data, but you are best to avoid them, or limit them considerably. When in doubt with green vegetables, don't eat them! The good news is that both parsnips and swedes (rutabagas) are low in vitamin K and fine to eat, just the roots, not the greens! As for soy milk, it provides 9% DV of vitamin K per cup, and should be fine. Remember, the main thing is to keep your consumption consistent and in line with your dose. You can use the nutrition facts comparison tool to find vitamin K values for more foods. Here are the nutrition facts for cabbage, parsnips, and soy milk. And here are the facts for swedes (rutabagas).
Posted on 2013-05-27 00:39:41
Name:Crystal
Location:Findlay
Subject:Raw vs Cooked
I'm confused, I am on warfarin and everything I look up refers to raw veggies only. Does the Vitamin K level break down after cooking or does it stay the same?
Posted on 2013-05-27 03:29:29
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Raw vs Cooked
Hi Crystal, thanks for your question. Vitamin K does not break down with cooking, and if anything, becomes more concentrated. For example, look at the nutrition comparison of raw spinach vs boiled spinach.
Posted on 2013-05-28 01:00:28
Name:Rita
Location:Philadelphia
Subject:Warfarin and Green Tea
Can you have green tea or a green tea extract when taking warfarin? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-05-28 22:04:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin and Green Tea
Hi Rita, thanks for your question. This single case study suggests that green tea hampers the effect of Warfarin, and lowers INR, increasing the chance for blood clots. You should avoid green tea, and green tea supplements. This study also lists green tea as something to avoid. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-05-29 03:19:58
Name:Casey
Location:Illinois
Subject:Juicing and Vitamin K
You wrote last year 'Check back to this webpage in a couple month for low vitamin K juicing recipes.'. Did you manage to find any?
Posted on 2013-06-04 19:14:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Juicing and Vitamin K
Hi Casey, thanks for bringing this issue back up. A list of low vitamin K juice recipes has now been created. You could make any juice with the list of low vitamin K fruits and veggies above, except for tomatoes, cucumbers, ice berg lettuce, artichokes, grapefruit, and cranberries. Hope you find the recipes useful.
Posted on 2013-06-05 04:08:56
Name:Tammy
Location:Ohio
Subject:Nutrition labels and avoiding black/orange pekoe tea
I'm on warfarin for the rest of my life starting 5/10/13 and have been struggling with the INR. Thank you for your site! I have been checking the packages for vitamin k, but much to my surprise olive oil and carrots don't list it on the nutrition label. I was just making carrots with olive oil as a snack, when I started reading this site, I'm not eating them now! Also, for others struggling with this, I was told to not drink so much black/orange pekoe tea, I was drinking a gallon a day and my DR believes that it was affecting my INR.
Posted on 2013-06-09 18:27:06
Name:Sue
Location:Ontario, Canada
Subject:Warfarin, Food, and my experience
I've been on Warfarin for over thirty years - take it from me "be cautious" but don't sweat the eating thing .. just make sure PT/INR is checked. My dosage is 8.5 mg per day and my INR is to be kept between 2.5 and 3.5.
Posted on 2013-06-28 23:20:06
Name:Donald
Location:Riverside, CA
Subject:Mechanical valve and eating salad
I had a mechanical valve for over a year. My levels are supposed to be between 1.8 and 2.5. I take 4mg warfarin 5 days a week and 2mg 2 days a week and a baby asperin every day. I eat hardly any high Vit k foods but would like to start having salads and veggies more now. Some sites list green leaf lettuce as medium and some list it as low. If I eat a good sized salad every day with low k veggies and I miss a day or 2 do I have to be concerned about my INR?
Posted on 2013-06-29 03:20:44
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Mechanical valve and eating salad
Hi Donald, thanks for your question. The difference in the lettuce could be by type. In general, ice-berg lettuce is lower in vitamin K, and romain is lower than green leaf. Try make your salad mostly with ice-berg lettuce, with only a little Romain mixed in.Consistency is important with INR, and it would depend on how you make your salad if missing 2 days would really be that bad. Perhaps eating some other vitamin K food to balance the salad could work, but it would be better to be consistent. Also, avoid using oil in your salad dressing, particularly soy bean oil, which is high in vitamin K. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-06-29 19:10:58
Name:Trish
Location:Georgia
Subject:Vitamin Supplements and Coumadin
My husband is on Coumadin for multiple PE's. We have been struggling to get his INR between 2 and 3. We had an Aha moment today when we realized the multivitamins he is taking contain Vitamin K! Here's hoping that stopping the vitamins will help get him in the proper range!
Posted on 2013-07-04 02:24:41
Name:Sandi
Location:Colorado
Subject:Warfarin and Weight Gain
Does warfarin cause people to gain weight because of the Vitamin K restrictions? I have gained 20 pounds since starting the med in 2011. Please help me choose the correct diet to get my weight back down.
Posted on 2013-07-08 10:14:47
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin and Weight Gain
Hi Sandi, thanks for your question. Warfarin does eliminate dark leafy greens which are a big part of salads and weight loss. However, you can still eat low calorie vegetables like mushrooms and winter squash. Most fruits, like the low vitamin K fruits listed in this article, are also available. Try to eat fewer grains and meats, and eat more fruits and vegetables. Beyond that, there is not too much else to weight loss specific to Warfarin. Increasing your level of activity and exercise should also help. Hope those thoughts are useful.
Posted on 2013-07-09 09:07:47
Name:Mike Griffin
Location:United States
Subject:Broccoli and warfarin
I am a Warfarin patient that loves vegetables. Your chart indicates (3) 1 cup servings of raw broccoli per day is ok. I prefer mine steamed or boiled. Will this change the daily limit?
Posted on 2013-07-16 15:03:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Broccoli and warfarin
Hi Mike, thanks for your question. Cooking broccoli tends to reduce its water content, therefore concentrating the vitamins in it. In short, 1/2 a cup of raw broccoli contains more water than 1/2 a cup boiled and drained, and therefore, the 1/2 a cup which has been boiled contains almost twice as much vitamin K! The way to measure this is to take 3 cups of raw broccoli and cook them. They should cook down to 1-2 cups of broccoli and will have the same amount of vitamin K as the original raw 3 cups. Hope that makes sense! Here is the nutrition facts comparison of raw vs cooked broccoli.
Posted on 2013-07-17 13:09:16
Name:Ann M.
Location:Pennsylvania
Subject:Confused and Frustrated with Warfarin
Hello, I am a 59 year old woman who comes from a family of nine in which 6 have or have had issues with clots, (father passed at the age of 57 from a clot to his heart after surgery). We have all been tested for Factor V and I am the only one who was negative. I am currently and will always be on warfarin because in the past I have had a clot in my leg and one in my lung. My INR numbers have been all over the place and just driving me crazy. Most recently, over the past couple of months and with no changes to my diet or other medications that I am taking I have had to have my blood taken two, three or sometimes four times a week because the levels are either extremely high or extremely low. As of a week ago, totally baffled with this whole coumadin/warfarin issue (which I hate), I found the Coumadin Cookbook at the local library and have been following the information as well as keeping my vitamin K intake as low as 35 to 40 mcgs daily (sometimes even lower) and journaling all information in a diary. In the beginning of the week of using the cookbook and its recipes, I started with a INR of 3.66 and three days later dropped to 2.46. I am expected for a recheck of my blood in two days and am reaching out for help. My question is... is it unhealthy or harmful if a person is taking in such a low amount of vitamin K? Will it have any adverse affects to the liver, pancreas or any other organ? I have read in several books, the average person eats an average of 60 to 80 mcgs vitamin k daily. This whole thing "SCARES" me to death and I feel like I'm hitting a wall. Your help is greatly appreciated. Thank you!!
Posted on 2013-07-19 15:19:26
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Confused and Frustrated with Warfarin
Hi Ann, thanks for your comments and sharing your experience with the Coumadin Cookbook. When on Warfarin (Coumadin) the main thing is to keep your level of vitamin K intake constant. So if you are eating 60-80mcgs of vitamin K a day, it should be ok, as long as your Warfarin dose accounts for it, and your INR is constant. The main function of vitamin K is to cause the blood to coagulate. This is why the risk of bleeding is the main risk associated with Warfarin, however, the thinning of blood is also its main benefit. Vitamin K also help metabolize some proteins, and calcium. Low vitamin K levels can increase risk of heart disease due to calcification of arteries. Other symptoms of vitamin K deficiency include bruises and other marks on the skin. The long term effects of Warfarin have not been studied well, but risk of bleeding is the greatest risk. Damage to the liver and other organs should not occur. Hope that information helps, for now, try to keep your level of vitamin K constant and take things day by day.
Posted on 2013-07-21 14:08:51
Name:Danyelle
Location:Florida
Subject:Being so young and my new lifestyle
So, I just had a mitral valve replacement (mechanical) and I'm only 20 years old. Being so young, I worry that I will not be able to drink and eat to experience the world of foods I love and alcohol.... How does alcohol play a role in my life now on warfarin (Coumadin) ? And balancing my diet, will I need to eat the same amount of vitamin k everyday? My levels have jumped to 6.4 then to 1.5 but I'm only 3.5 weeks into this new life. It's just hard to take all in and I'm confused. Please help?
Posted on 2013-07-24 08:32:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Being so young and my new lifestyle
Hi Danyelle, thanks for your questions. Alcohol does affect PT/INR and is best avoided. You do need to eat the same amount of vitamin K each day to stay healthy and keep your PT/INR constant. Try keeping a food diary, and try new foods that work for you! Hope that helps!
Posted on 2013-07-25 23:22:34
Name:Vito
Location:Italy
Subject:Coumadin and food when travelling
Hello, I had DVT and pulmonary embolism 3 weeks ago. I am taking coumadin half tablet daily. My question is this. Before this happened I booked a trip to Thailand with my GF. We should leave in two weeks. I just started coumadin so I am going every 3 days for blood test and until now everything seems ok. Do you thin k I can leave for 2 weeks (I will ask my doctor to give a 2 weeks schedule for coumadin) or I am risking too much? I look k forward to hearing from you, Best regards and compliments for the site and info you give!
Posted on 2013-07-31 13:23:38
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin and food when travelling
Hi Vito, thanks for your question. Definitely talk with your doctor about taking the trip. One thing to keep in mind is that there is a higher risk of DVT (Deep Vein Thrombosis) when you are sitting on a long flight. If you take the flight, be sure stretch often and walk about the plane cabin. Avoid all alcohol and tea which can dehydrate you, and drink plenty of water. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-07-31 14:57:07
Name:Wife
Location:Indiana
Subject:Beets juice supplements
Hello, my husband has been on Warfarin for just over a year and his INR stays between 2.5-3.5. A friend is suggesting he take beet juice supplements. Will this interfere with his Warfarin? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-09-06 12:43:42
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Beet juice supplements
Hi and thanks for your question. From the perspective of vitamin K, there should not be a problem, as beets are low in vitamin K. However, there have been no studies regarding beet juice supplements and vitamin K. What your husband could do is take some of the supplements a bit before his INR test and see if there are any noticeable changes.
Posted on 2013-09-08 23:38:16
Name:My mother
Location:Iran
Subject:Garlic as a blood thinner
My mother had mithral valve replacement operation and triscopid repair and AF ablation 1.5 months ago. She takes warfarin and aspirin, and some other tablets can't remember now.

Her INR and PT test two weeks ago shows she is stable. In an essay I read garlic is a blood thinner and can be eaten one piece a day, now in this site I read that it should be avoided until the doctor advises. Please let me know can she take garlic in a day? Thanks in advance for your reply.

Posted on 2013-09-11 10:07:27
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Garlic as a blood thinner
Hi and thanks for your question. It is true that garlic acts as a blood thinner. The thing to keep in mind is that your mother is already on blood thinners (Warfarin and Aspirin). It is ok for her to have 1-2 pieces of garlic a day, as long as it does not affect her PT/INR test too much and cause it to become unstable. Try 1 piece a day, and see what her PT/INR shows at her next test. If her PT/INR increases too much, then stop the garlic, or reduce the Warfarin dose. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-09-11 21:02:33
Name:VI Wife
Location:St Thomas
Subject:Coumadin with Juicing and Cancer
Hi, In 2011 my husband was dx with mucoepodermoid carconoma, In 2013 he was dx with pneumonia and a blood clot in his lung. He has always been on a green leafy diet for his cancer but that contradicts the treatment for the blood clot. Can you clarify what options there are for both a healthy green(ish) diet and still maintaining a healthy INR level. I'm afraid that I will do something wrong and make his situation worse.
Posted on 2013-09-16 05:17:29
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin with Juicing and Cancer
Hi and thanks for your question. Unfortunately, leafy greens are out when it comes to taking Warfarin. The best you could do is perhaps a bit of ice-berg lettuce with cucumbers, onions, and mushrooms. Winter squash is also high in vitamin A and can be a good part of an anti-cancer diet. Another option can be to ask you doctor for another blood thinning medication which does not interfere with vitamin K.
Posted on 2013-09-17 06:22:13
Name:Auribe
Location:California
Subject:Salt
Is it best to stay away from salt altogether while on coumadin? I'm having knee replacement surgery and will be on coumadin for a month. I bought some prepared food (frozen) for when I come home thinking it would be easy for meals. But now worry about salt intake after reading many of the comments.
Posted on 2013-09-18 17:29:53
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Salt
Hi Auribe, thanks for your question. Of course, you want to try keep your blood pressure low while on Warfarin, or even in general. However, if your meals have sodium around 10-20% of the daily value (DV) they should be fine. You do not have to avoid salt and sodium completely.
Posted on 2013-09-19 00:08:17
Name:Garrett Marlowe
Location:Eastern Seaboard
Subject:Be aware that Vitamin K may be an alternative to Warfarin
You may get the impression that Vitamin K is the opposite of Warfarin and that it coagulates blood instead of being an anticoagulant. Not true. Actually Vitamin K simply increases the number of anticoagulant proteins in your body. It's the weird way that warfarin works that causes the bad interaction. So my advice is, stay on the green veggies, even if you do take warfarin, and fully discuss the options with your doctor. If your condition is not critical, and your proteins are not genetically malformed, you may be able to use Vitamin K as an anticoagulant and avoid the risks of a chemical drug.

For more see:
Which anticoagulant proteins Vitamin K increases

How warfarin and Vitamin K interact

Be healthy.
Posted on 2013-09-26 09:38:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Be aware that Vitamin K may be an alternative to Warfarin
Hi Garrett, thanks for highlighting these interesting details on vitamin K and Warfarin, however, it does not seem right to claim that vitamin K is an alternative to Warfarin. Instead, you could say that vitamin K regulates blood coagulation. Is there any source that suggests vitamin K increases INR to an appropriate level? You are right that Warfarin does not officially antagonize vitamin K, "but rather antagonizes vitamin K1 recycling, depleting active vitamin K1." However, that does not mean you should eat a lot of vitamin K while on a steady dose of Warfarin. Instead, as The National Library of Medicine suggests Vitamin K intake should be kept constant while on Warfarin.
Posted on 2013-09-26 23:11:07
Name:Terri
Location:NYC
Subject:Beans
This site has been so informative and a great resource for a Coumadin diet. I am confused about beans. When you say to avoid them are you talking about string beans, green beans, or all legumes? I love cooking with cannelini, kidney, and roman beans. Are these also high in vitamin k?
Posted on 2013-09-29 16:45:29
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Beans
Hi Terri, thanks for your question, and glad the page is useful. Besides soy beans, soy products, and green beans, all other beans and legumes are fine for a low vitamin K Warfarin diet. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-01 05:03:48
Name:Linda
Location:NYC
Subject:Iced Tea, Soda, and Balsamic Vinaigrette
First, thanks for this website. I just started Coumadin at the beginning of the month. DVT in leg. I know not to drink Green tea (which I was since I gave up soda in June) but what about regular Ice Tea, say like Snapple, or Dunkin Doughnuts? I saw one comment about Black Tea, but most store bought ice teas don't specifically list what tea, they just say Tea leafs. Any help with this would be great. Also is soda ok? And also is Balsamic Vinaigrette ok to take while on Coumadin?
Posted on 2013-10-02 09:40:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Iced Tea, Soda, and Balsamic Vinaigrette
Hi Linda thanks for your comments and questions. Iced tea is typically made from "black" tea leaves unless the label on the front specifics otherwise. In any case, if the tea looks dark, it is likely black tea. Tea is ok to drink as long as the caffeine doesn't raise your blood pressure too much. The same goes for caffeine in sodas. Sodas are ok to drink on Warfarin but are not the best for your health in general. Balsamic vinaigrette is also ok, the problem with Warfarin is being able to have a decent salad...Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-03 02:19:30
Name:Donna
Location:Ontario
Subject:Warfarin Dose and Protein S Deficiency
In reading some of the responses there has been reference made to the amount of vitamin K consumed being dependent on the individual's dose of warfarin. What does this mean? I am currently taking 15mg 6x and 12.5mg 1x, or 102.5mg weekly. Does having 'Protein S deficiency' have any added issues with vitamin K or do I follow the same guidelines?
Posted on 2013-10-09 12:13:43
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin Dose and Protein S Deficiency
Hi Donna, thanks for your question. When you are on warfarin, you are trying to keep your INR in a specific range of 2.5 to 3.5. That range is such that your blood is thin enough to avoid clots but not so thin that your bleed excessively. Thus people on a high dose of Warfarin could eat more vitamin K to keep their INR in the right range. That is why dose matters. With a protein S deficiency, your chances of a blood clot are even higher, so you need to take more Warfarin to compensate, which explains why your dose is a little higher than most. You should still regulate your intake of vitamin K to keep your INR level as consistent as possible.
Posted on 2013-10-10 05:42:16
Name:Josephine
Location:Michigan
Subject:Flaxseed and My Years of Experience Taking Warfarin
I have been on warfarin for 9 yrs. My dosage has been 2 mgs daily. Once in a while an adjustment needs to be made because numbers have shifted after long travels. I am to keep my numbers between 2 and 3. I do watch my green intake and a few times had too many and like I said an adjustment to the medication was made. For the past 3 mos. I have been on 2 mg (5 days) and 1 mg(2 days).

I have had a weight problem most of my life and just recently came across a book called wheat belly by a Dr Davis. I started following it and Ii feel wonderful by totally eliminating wheat from my diet. There are some recipes that call for flaxseed in order to make certain bread recipes.for example you would use 1/4 cup flaxseed to 2 cups of almond flour or coconut flour and garbanzo flour. My question is should that amt of flaxseed affect the warfarin and blood levels.

I was told that I would have to remain on Coumadin for ever because my Afib is not reversible...

Posted on 2013-10-11 12:06:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Flaxseed and My Years of Experience Taking Warfarin
Hi Josephine, thanks for your question and sharing your experience. Flaxseed is quite low in vitamin K, 1 cup of whole flaxseed provides 7μg (9% DV) of vitamin K, and 1 cup of flaxseed oil contains 20μg (25% DV). Here are the complete nutrition facts. Please note, The National Library of Medicine states that flax seed can thin blood, and increase your risk of bruises and bleeding while on Warfarin. A quarter cup per day should be fine, but be on the watch if you start getting bruises. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-11 18:20:56
Name:Mike
Location:Chicago
Subject:Avocado
My mother is wondering if avocados are alright, she taking blood thinner and now can not have vitamin k in her diet.
Posted on 2013-10-14 13:20:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Avocado
Hi Mike, thanks for your question. An average avocado (201 grams) contains 42μg (53% DV) of vitamin K. Depending on your Mom's intake of other vitamin K foods, half an avocado a day (~27% DV) should be fine. Here are the complete nutrition facts.
Posted on 2013-10-15 05:15:43
Name:Linda
Location:NYC
Subject:Coumadin vs. XARELTO
I can't seem to get my levels above 2 and my doctor wants to switch me to XARELTO and I am not sure if I should as it is such a new med and I have read some really bad reviews. As I seem to get the best answers here, I though I would ask what your thoughts were. Thanks.
Posted on 2013-10-15 05:47:52
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin vs. XARELTO
Hi Linda, thanks for your question. Both Coumadin and Xarelto will have side effects, and so it is a tough choice. At this stage, your INR is not at a good level, so on top of side effects, you have to consider your risk of a blood clot, which is also bad. You might try Xarelto and see how it works for you. If the side effects are too bad, you could try something else. At least you would be able to regain a more normal diet. The National Library of Medicine has a Xarelto page on what foods/drugs to avoid, as well as a list of side effects to watch out for. Perhaps anyone else on Xarelto will share their experience here. This study found Xarelto more effective at preventing clots, but does state the long term effects are not well understood. Given your risk of a blood clot, you might try Xarelto and go from there. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2013-10-15 05:58:07
Name:Jeanette
Location:Australia
Subject:Diet vs Warfarin: Is there a natural way?
I'm curious as to know why we cannot eat a diet that is high/rich in blood thinning compounds instead of taking Warfarin with its side affects? We are having to decrease what is normally seen as required in a healthy diet, whilst we take a drug that is very unstable.
Posted on 2013-10-18 12:21:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Diet vs Warfarin: Is there a natural way?
Hi Jeanette, thanks for your question. While some foods are natural blood thinners, they are less stable and potent than Warfarin. Some blood thinning medications exist which operate independently of vitamin K, allowing for a more normal diet, but Warfarin is still the most popular, and considered the safest.
Posted on 2013-10-19 06:58:56
Name:Susan
Location:Modimolle RSA
Subject:Low Vit K for Warferin/Diabetic
I have my hands in my hair. Food that is good for a diabetic is NOT good for Warferin users. Please help me. What a fantastic job you are doing. Keep it up! Easy to research.
Posted on 2013-10-23 09:36:47
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low Vit K for Warferin/Diabetic
Hi Susan, thanks for your comments and suggestion. No doubt lots of people are in the same predicament, and a list of low vitamin K foods suitable for diabetes will be created.
Posted on 2013-10-24 07:00:21
Name:Dan Coman
Location:Romania
Subject:Bodybuilding and staying healthy
I have a trombophilia caused by an irreversible mutation in factor V, Leyden. I had a pulmonary infarction at the end of July and doctors gave me 2mgs of Sintrom, acenocumarol. We don't have Warfarin in Romania. My INR is usually between 2 and 3, but I have a different condition from average man, because I used to do lots of sports, particularly gym, not quite professional bodybuilding. I plan to restart going to the gym and take things gradually. But this is linked to a healthy food and this means lots of vegetables. I see most of them have high amounts of vitamin K. What's your advise, please? Should I only eat meat? What about olive oil in connection with vitamin K? Should I fear osteoporosis, due to my intention of keeping low levels of vitamin K? As a gym addict, should I lower down my training with weights because rabdomyolise can cause thrombosis?! Sorry for so many questions, but I am worried! Thanks! Dan
Posted on 2013-11-06 09:26:14
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Bodybuilding and staying healthy
Hi Dan, thanks for your questions. As long as your INR stays in a good range, working out should be fine. Weight lifting should help prevent osteoporosis, so you are ok there. 2 tablespoons of olive oil a day is also ok. A list of vegetables low in vitamin K is provided. Try to limit yourself to these. Keep a food diary, and keep track of your INR. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-11-07 04:57:12
Name:Laura Lee Reid
Location:Canada
Subject:Blood clots and I love this site.
I am so thankful for this site. I have received more information from this one site than all the others I have come across. Thank you for your 'lists'. I had a full right shoulder replacement surgery recently, and for whatever reason, I came out of it with pulmonary embolism. (my lungs). I am on Coumadin and my INR numbers are up then down, then up. It has been 44 days now and I am scared like the dickens. My shoulder is doing wonderful but my lungs.... Well, I am frightened but a little less so, knowing that I can come here and read and learn and do what I need to do to survive in this strange world of warfarin and blood clots, and all the rest of it. Thank you for your kind manner and informative messages.
Posted on 2013-11-27 15:14:12
Name:Kevin
Location:United States
Subject:Coumadin guidelines for ingredients and supplements
You're providing an incredible service. I've been taking warfarin since mitral valve replacement in 2005 and still struggle to get my PT/INR in check.

I work with a lot of clients in the health and nutrition field. It is frustrating to be so limited in what I can ingest not knowing if it will interact with coumadin. This resource is a big help.

I'd love to hear any further guidelines you have on ingredients often found in things like protein shakes. I was surprised to find that one I'd been taking had about 500% daily of vit K. Beyond K, are there any of those "sub-ingredients" you know of that need to be avoided?

Also, I've been taking a coconut concentrated MCT oil supplement. I see that coconuts are low in K, but is a C-8 MCT high enough to affect INR?

Thanks! Kevin

Posted on 2013-12-10 11:42:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin guidelines for ingredients and supplements
Hi Kevin, thanks for your kind words, suggestions, and questions. Common ingredients which may present a problem in vitamin K content include soybean oil, dried herbs, dried fruit, and pickled cucumbers.

In regards to supplements, other readers sharing comments might be the best way to find out if there is a problem with Warfarin. Unfortunately, MCT oil has not been analyzed for vitamin K content, so it is difficult to say if it is a problem or not. A good strategy might be to keep your diet constant and try a low dose of the supplement, then watch your INR. People should consult their doctors first though, and also have a steady PT/INR.

Posted on 2013-12-11 11:14:09
Name:Val Washington
Location:Atlanta GA
Subject:Mrs Dash spices?
I have been unable to locate any information regarding the Vitamin K content in Mrs Dash spices and seasonings. Any idea how using these can effect PT/INR?
Posted on 2013-12-24 08:53:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Mrs Dash spices?
Hi Val, thanks for your question. Mrs Dash is mostly made of dried herbs, which can have up to 60% of the DV for vitamin K per tablespoon. If you limit your intake to a tablespoon or less a day, you should be fine. This depends on your daily intake of vitamin K and your Warfarin dose, so proceed with caution. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-12-24 12:26:38
Name:Linda
Location:Central CA
Subject:Vitamin D and oil in capsules
I take Warfarin and was told by my doctor I could take 1 vitamin D tablet daily. The last I bought were capsules and said they could contain corn or palm oil. Will this cause a problem?
Posted on 2014-01-04 15:42:45
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin D and oil in capsules
Hi Linda, thanks for your question. If your doctor approved the vitamin D you should be fine. Palm and corn oil do contain vitamin K, but there is so little in the capsules that vitamin K should not be an issue. Here are the complete nutrition facts for corn and palm oil with the serving size being a tablespoon.
Posted on 2014-01-05 13:42:08
Name:Viki
Location:Athens, Greece
Subject:Buy an INR machine and eat everything
I got my prosthetic aortic valve in may 1998. Doctors have never been able to settle down my INR because they measure it seldom. In Holland the national health system measures it twice a month. Its the least period you should measure it. Otherwise your INR goes up or down. So i eventually bought an inr measurer from Roche: Coaagu check, and I saved myself. I measure it twice a month. Each tape costs around 5 euros. I have it with me wherever I go for more than a day or two. I eat grerns too because they have, except vitamin k, folic acid which is extremely healthy. In time I learned that when I eat more greens in a day, I take a fourth of sintrom tablet more than on days that I don't eat so much greens. I advise everyone to take charge of their inr measuring and eating of greens because doctors can't take good care of you. They have all the inr patients to take care of, while you have only you. In time you will learn how your organism reacts to a certain amount of greens you have eaten. Measure inr at nine in the morning and take sintrom at nine in the evening. And when u have measured your inr, and its somewhat raised or fallen, correct it with less or more sintrom, according to how much raised or fallen it is. Generally, I need a fourth, quarter of a sintrom 4gr pill to raise my inr by half unit. So if my inr is 3.5 and I want it three, I'll take one quarter less on that day, and if its 2.5 and I want it 3, I'll take one quarter more. Simple. All you have to do is buy the machine and tapes, and think. Buy the 24 tapes tube as it will last you for about one year, and cost you 125 euros and you will not have to go to hospitals for measuring your inr, and your life will be safer in your own hands. Not of some doctor. One last thing, when in doubt about an inr issue, don't ask a cardiologist, they don't know enough about it. Ask a hematologist because inr is the question of thrombosis of blood, not anything to do with your heart. It helps your heart, but its about your blood. Cheers!
Posted on 2014-01-10 12:05:59
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Buy an INR machine and eat everything
Hi Vicki, thanks for your nice comment and sharing your experience. For anyone looking to buy an INR meter, they are available from Amazon.com as well as other retail/pharmacy outlets.
Posted on 2014-01-10 15:25:33
Name:Dottie
Location:United States
Subject:Aspirin interactions
I take 2 low dose aspirin for my back daily and it does thin the blood can I still enjoy high vitamin K foods daily and what about vitamin E as beta carotene 3500IU in my daily vitamin supplements?
Posted on 2014-01-14 11:20:20
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Aspirin interactions
Hi Dottie, thanks for your question. Aspirin does not work by antagonizing vitamin K, so eating vitamin K should be fine in your case. Vitamin E does thin the blood, but with just two baby aspirin this should not be a concern and you can keep taking vitamin E. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2014-01-15 13:22:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Spices in Indian and Chinese Food?
Hi Valerie, thanks for your question. Likely it is ok to eat spicy Indian and Chinese foods, as while they contain spices, it is usually less than 1-2 tablespoons, which is usually fine. Remember that consistency is also important.
Posted on 2014-01-15 13:33:07
Name:Barbara
Location:New York City
Subject:Warfarin and cheese, chocolate, etc.
I like cheese, both soft and hard cheeses. Do they fit in with a warfarin diet or are they high in Vitamin K? How about dark chocolate -- I eat a small square every day. I am wary of most foods now, as my INR went up in just two weeks of vacation, altho I tried to eat the same way as I do at home.
Posted on 2014-01-22 14:00:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin and cheese, chocolate, etc.
Hi Barbara, thanks for your question. All dairy products are low in vitamin K, the same goes for dark chocolate. Just be sure the products do not contain soybean oil or soy products. Here is a sample of nutrition facts for dark chocolate, parmesan cheese, and ricotta cheese.
Posted on 2014-01-22 15:36:06
Name:Sharen
Location:IL
Subject:Red cabbage/Raddicchio
Are red cabbage and radicchio the same as the green versions when it comes to vit K?
Posted on 2014-01-22 16:40:04
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Red cabbage/Raddicchio
Hi Sharon, thanks for your question. Red cabbage has about half the vitamin K of green cabbage, but still provides enough that it needs to be limited. Raddicchio provides about 3 times the vitamin K of green cabbage and should be avoided or limited depending on your diet plan. Here is the nutrition facts comparison of green cabbage, red cabbage, and radicchio.
Posted on 2014-01-22 20:04:07
Name:Arnold Rosner
Location:NJ
Subject:INR up with whole grains?
I'm on wafarin, 2 mg/day. Been stable for a couple of years, with INR around 2.5. Within the last 4 weeks it jumped to 4.4. The only change in my diet is more whole grains, moderate amounts. Wha?
Posted on 2014-01-25 16:18:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: INR up with whole grains?
Hi Arnold, thanks for sharing your experience. Whole grains are not particularly high in vitamin K. Here is a list of 100 grains highest in vitamin K. What might be happening is that the whole grain products have some extra ingredient, like spinach pasta, or maybe soybean oil? Check the labels carefully, and if you find out what is going on, please come back and comment.
Posted on 2014-01-26 14:51:26
Name:Jane
Location:Kansas City
Subject:Feed back that may help others
Hi, I agree this is a great site, lots of info. I have read all the stories and just wanted to share my story and my feed back to some of what I read, perhaps it will help some of you. I have been on & off Warfarin four separate times in the past 20 yrs due to blood clots in my leg. Not wanting to stay on the Warfarin, I started taking a supplement called Nattokinase to help thin things out. I had been taking it for about 8 months but I ended up in the ER with so many blood clots in my foot that I almost lost it. Dr.s told me the nattokinase was a supplement & was not regulated by the FDA, that the amounts of active ingredients were not consistent in their caplets so you were never sure how much you were really getting. Believing this supplement would help me in place of the Warfarin almost cost me really high stakes (and it will mess up your INR levels!)

This time they told me I really had to stay on Warfarin or next time it hits me I would lose parts! My family also has a history of blood clots (Hypercoagulative). Knowing I now had to be on Warfarin myself for the duration and concerned about it myself I did my research and learned as much as I could about it. I work hand in hand with the nurse at my Coumadin clinic and have learned that consistency in your diet is the key. When I started taking it they had me eat my regular diet and they adjusted my dosage accordingly to fit my diet. I just have to make sure my diet & my "K" intake remains consistent, again that is the key! A note for Trish from Georgia Re: Multivitamins, try to find "Clotamin", this is a multivitamin minus the "K", made just for us folks and it does not affect your INR levels. I get mine from the local Walgreens drugstore.

Also a note for some of you that say they have been testing your blood 2, 3 & sometimes 4 times a week please note that it does take a few of days for the dosage to regulate in your blood. My mom went thru the same thing, we finally had them back off on the testing so closely together, give it at least a week and her levels started evening out. I think in some cases they have a tendency to over manage the situation. So think about discussing this with your care givers.

One last note, Re: Viki from Greece - "Buy an INR machine & eat everything". I'm also fortunate enough to be able to do self testing at home with the Roche, Coaguchek equipment. My insurance covers 80% of the cost and it's really nice to be able to check my levels without having to go in all the time. It also only requires a little prick of the finger, just a drop of blood, no more getting stabbed in the arm and having vials of blood drawn at a time.

I take 5mg + 1 low dose Aspirin per day, + 1 Clotamin (Multivit - K) per day; then every other day I also take extra Vitamin E & D3, Flax Seed Oil, Red Yeast Red (recommended for high Cholesterol), CoQ10 (only once a week because the Red Yeast Rice depletes the natural levels in the body), and occasionally Fish Oil. I have been on this regiment this time for a year now so far and my Warfarin dosage has been stable for 97% of the time. My daily dose does go lower when I have to go on antibiotics for dental work or what have you. But after the antibiotics are done my dose goes back to 5mg and all is well. My levels should be 2.0 to 3.5 and there have been 2 times when I had a level 4.0 so I would skip 1 dose of Warfarin for that day, eat a good salad and test myself again the next day and my level was back to 2.5 right where it should be. This fact alone tells me that 1.) I missed my salads that week and 2.) Diet does make a difference!

I test every 2 weeks and even though I have made a couple of minor adjustments a couple of times, I do still work hand-in-hand with the nurse at my Coumadin clinic, and keep her filled in on everything I've done. It really is all about knowing your meds, your supplements, your body and how they all work together to keep that balance. It can be done, and it can be done comfortably, you just have to be smart about it. Good luck everyone.
Posted on 2014-02-04 15:32:45
Name:Ezra
Location:Ethopia
Subject:INR and soymilk
HI Since last year I found out that I have blood clotting problem (two types of them) DVT and mesentric Vein thrombosis and had my small bowel re sectioned. Now I began to loose weight significantly (lost about 80lb) in 8 month) and recently I started taking Soy milk because it feels good and has good nutrition factors but I read one comment about Soy milk and its vitamin K content. I'm kind of worried because I'm limited on foods by both the INR and the and the bowel re-section don't eat much. What should I do please? (I take soy milk very little but it feels good for my stomach) no pain inside. One thing Is one Cup same as cooking Cup?
Posted on 2014-03-09 10:07:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: INR and soymilk
Hi Ezra, 1 cup (which is like a cooking cup) of soymilk provides 9% of the DV for vitamin K. So 2 cups, which is like a regular 16oz glass only provides 18% DV. You should be fine drinking 2-3 glasses a day, depending on what other vitamin K foods you eat. Here are the complete nutrition facts for soymilk.
Posted on 2014-03-10 14:59:42
Name:Ann
Location:Michigan
Subject:Vitamin content of peanuts and other nuts
My husband has been on coumadin for 8 years, lately his level checks have been all over the place, usually in the high range. His care giver told him not to eat anything with vit K, including peanut butter. I'm a nurse and this doesn't make sense to me. Where can I find a listing that will tell him the content of each type of nut?
Posted on 2014-03-16 11:04:33
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:Vitamin content of peanuts and other nuts
Hi Ann, Thanks for your question. It does seem like strange advice, as someone with a high INR should try to increase their vitamin K intake to prevent excess bleeding. Peanuts are actually legumes and are low in vitamin K. Unless the peanut butter somehow has soy bean oil, it should be low in vitamin K, with 100 grams of peanut butter having 1% DV of vitmain K. Here are 147 legume products ranked by vitamin K content. Peanut butter is number 102. Here also is a list of 52 nuts and seeds by vitamin K content.
Posted on 2014-03-18 14:53:07
Name:Lesa
Location:Texas
Subject:Life long Warafin usage
Hi, I've recently suffered from my second PE with tissue damage & pleurisy. My doctor said I had borderline protein C deficiency & will keep me on Warafin for the rest of my life, most likely. I'm 51 & use to be an avid runner & very high energy. I also suffered this time with b12 deifieciency. I'm on b12 shots twice a month. I've always eaten a lot of vegetables & fruit. To get my INR in acceptable range for the rest of my life I asked if I could go back to eating lean proteins, veggies & fruit. They have allowed me to do this but have had to raise my Warafin dosage to 10mg a day. Are there long term side effects of being on this high of a dosage of Warafin? They do monitor my INR on a monthly & sometimes bi-monthly basis. I know to watch for excessive bleeding & to eat same amount of vitamin k each week. Just wondering if there are other side effects to having such a high dose of Warafin, year after year. Thanks for your help & love this site! :)
Posted on 2014-03-23 09:33:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Life long Warafin usage
Hi Lesa, thanks for sharing your experience and for your question. The biggest side effect of Coumadin is bleeding. Drugs.com and Coumadin.com both list other possible side effects which are rare, but can occur. There have not been any studies for high dose long term Warfarin, so unfortunately it is difficult to completely answer your question. Your best bet is to take the Warfarin and watch for any of the possible side effects as listed on the referred sites.
Posted on 2014-03-25 13:55:48
Name:Brenda
Location:Tampa
Subject:Coumadin Confusion
Being on Coumadin is so very frustrating. I have been trying to help educate myself with taking Coumadin and the effects of vitamin K. Vitamin K has so many good advantages for you, but if you have to take Coumadin---. This site has been helpful. but I am still left with serious concerns and questions. I just don't believe that no one has the true answers but God. I hope this posts because He is really the only one who knows everything about all things.

I just lost 24 pounds within a month, with no help from anything that has vitamin K {no greens} and my INR went to 6. My doctor told me to eat greens for the weekend and get retested on Monday. I did. The INR was down to 2.3. I was taking 10mg of Coumadin, but doctor reduced the dose to 8mg for a week, then get tested again next Monday. Now it looks like changing my diet to help me loose weight made a drastic difference. I don't know what to do anymore. Still confused. Thank you for your efforts.

Posted on 2014-03-26 14:19:52
Name:Janet Drury
Location:USA
Subject:Nutritionist needed
Taking Warfarin for Afib is complex enough, but adding diabetes is almost impossible determining what is acceptable or inaccetable. I'm 83 and have enough problems with memory loss. It seems one has to be a mathematician as well. The amount of Warfarin also adds to the equation. It is too easy for a doctor to just tell you to be consistent with Vit K intake but unless you delve into it, you don't have any idea what you're doing correctly or incorrectly. Is there a cookbook somewhere that would at least provide menus for people not only on Warfarin but diabetic as well? My insurance does not pay for a dietician and ironically, there are none in a proximity close enough for me to travel. Most answers to my questions regarding this subject are too vague and leave it up to the patient to essentially play "Russian roulette". The medical profession has stated it is one of the most dangerous drugs, so why do they not provide more comprehensive guidelines? So many times I get the distinct impression that once your age is established, so is the help that is out there. Sorry for sounding so negative, but after reading the questions above, I can clearly see I'm not alone in the confusion regarding drugs and diet. Thanks for listening! Jan D
Posted on 2014-03-30 07:23:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Nutritionist needed
Hi Janet, thanks for your comment. You are right that there needs to be more cookbooks and info for managing this medication. When one becomes available it will be added to the article and recommended to others.
Posted on 2014-03-31 01:25:14
Name:C. Y. Ng
Location:Malaysia
Subject:Warfarin and Vitamin K
I have been on warfarin for the last 10 years. To maintain an INR of between 2.5-3.5 it has to be on a trial and error basis when someone commences taking warfarin to determine the dosage. I take 2.5mg per day, but if some other person has a diet with more vitamin k then his dosage should be adjusted higher. No one need deprive themselves of vitamin k. One should always strive for a constant diet of course.
Posted on 2014-04-03 03:05:47

Post a comment.
Name:          
Location:       
Email:(Optional)
Subject:         

Spam Prevention *(REQUIRED):
Enter the last three letters of this sentence.
Comments.
Name:Christine L. Villa
Location:California
Subject:Carrot Intake
My friend recommended my husband to take one bag of carrots (about 6 pieces) to make into carrot juice. My husband is taking WARFARIN and also Lovanox to thin his blood. I think I should not have given him that carrot juice because his INR was 1.3. I might have caused it by giving it to him. He was already low being injected and taking Coumadin and now I was asked to give him a higher dosage of Coumadin tablet for two days plus the injection. Please let me know the limit of carrots ASAP. I was told it will help him cure his cancer.
Posted on 2012-06-09 19:19:14
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Carrot Intake
Hi Christine, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your husband's condition. One large carrot contains 9.5μg (12% DV) of vitamin K. Which means 6 could have had as much as 57μg (72% DV) of vitamin K. This is not necessarily enough vitamin K to make such a change in his INR, did you make any other changes to your husband's diet, or give him any other foods high in vitamin K? If not, it seems that the carrots are the culprit, and you should not give him more than 1-2 carrots a day.

What is it about the carrots that are beneficial to his cancer? Is it the beta-carotene? If so, you can maybe try to give him pumpkin or butternut squash. Both are low in Vitamin K, but have a similar nutrient profile to carrots. They might be good substitutes! Hope that helps.

Posted on 2012-06-10 02:30:31
Name:Stuart
Location:England
Subject:Cups
What is the "cup size"...it says 1/2 cup 1/4 cup etc...but I can't see the actual size...
Posted on 2012-06-11 20:32:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cups
Hi Stuart, thanks for your question. The cup size refers to 1 standard U.S. size cup, which equates to U.S. 8 fluid ounces. To put it in perspective, 100 grams of cooked rice fills half a cup.
Posted on 2012-06-11 21:05:04
Name:Lisa Hayes
Location:Shreveport, LA
Subject:I am new
I am new to this. I started 6/11/12. This has been very scary for me. I have to give myself Lovonox injections 2x a day plus take Coumadin. I'm scared to eat. Half the time I don't know what to eat. I look at the things that are high and the things that are low in Vitamin K. Should I just eat meat and forget about all veggies which I love? They still haven't gotten my levels right. I have to go to the hospital everyday for them to check me. Please help!!!!!
Posted on 2012-06-18 13:15:55
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: I am new
Hi Lisa, thanks for your question. You can eat more than just meat, practically all grains and fruits are low in vitamin K and you can eat them! However, you do have to give up some of the vegetables you love, if you are having trouble getting your levels down, then just eat the vegetables low in vitamin K listed in this article. If you want to have green leafy vegetables, have no more than a 1/4 to 1/2 cup listed here under the vitamin K foods to limit to 1 serving per day, and have the same amount everyday. Hope that helps and feel better soon.
Posted on 2012-06-18 20:47:31
Name:Diana
Location:Ontario, Canada
Subject:Tomatoes and Coumadin
I'm currently taking coumadin and I'm a bit confused as to how much of tomatoes I can eat. Many websites say different things. Thanks!
Posted on 2012-06-20 02:05:11
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Tomatoes and Coumadin
Hi Diana, there have not been any studies which state that tomatoes are bad when taking Coumadin. Obviously, if you find that your PT/INR changes after eating tomatoes, then they are not good for you. Make changes to your diet slowly, and keep monitoring.
Posted on 2012-06-20 09:41:20
Name:Chad
Location:Tennessee
Subject:High INR
I have been on warfarin for about a month now. My levels were good for the first three weeks, but today my INR jumped tremendously. It was 3.2 last Friday and today it was greater than 10. The doctors took more blood than usual to see what was wrong. They took me off warfarin until Monday and I get checked again tomorrow. I think I may have figured out what could have caused it, but I question it. My wife went out of town and left a greenbean caserole. I ate the entire thing in four days. I have a list of foods, but some are different than others. My question is, can green beans cause your INR to jump, especially that much? I have learned my lesson and my doctors seem satisified in that being the cause. Just scared, hate this whole blood clot ordeal!
Posted on 2012-06-23 01:55:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: High INR
Hi Chad, thanks for sharing your experience and your question. Having a high INR means that you actually avoided too many foods high in vitamin K. Target INRs vary, but a range of 2.5-3.5 is common. Vitamin K will lower your INR, increasing your chance for a blood clot. Looking at the nutrition facts for green beans, they only contain about 21% DV of vitamin K in a cup. If you substituted the green beans with another food high in vitamin K, that might be the reason why your INR jumped. Consider keeping a food diary to find any future cause of INR instability.
Posted on 2012-06-23 04:23:30
Name:nhguardsman1
Location:Lowell Ma
Subject:Wine and Coumadin
I have been on coumadin for 3 yrs. While I was attending cooking school we had a wine tasting class every day we would get to sample different wines. Little did I realize what I was doing to my inr so anybody that enjoys their wine should really watch how much they drink. Thanks.
Posted on 2012-06-27 18:44:20
Name:twdancer
Location:Lakewood, CO
Subject:Coumadin and L-lysene
I just had emergency surgery to remove a very large clot in my leg. I am on Lovenox shots twice a day and warferin 2.5 mg once a day. I have a bad cold sore. I usually take L-lysene for that but am not sure that natural remedies are ok with the current blood thinners. Help!
Posted on 2012-07-04 17:36:23
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin and L-lysene
Hi twdancer, thanks for your question. There are no studies to suggest adverse affects from L-lysene and Coumadin, and it seems that they should not interact. Consult a pharmacist, even at a local pharmacy, to be sure.
Posted on 2012-07-05 08:25:16
Name:Ron F.
Location:Rochelle, IL (USA)
Subject:Vitamin K foods also low in sugars
I think your list for foods low in Vitamin K is great. However, being diabetic has an additional dimension to my needs to find those foods that are BOTH low in Vitamin K and low in carbohydrates. For instance, peas on your list would not work because of the complex carbs (starches) in them. Do you know of a tool / service that I can check out that helps sort it out minus the individual checking and cross-checking? Any assistance is greatly appreciated, and thanks!
Posted on 2012-07-29 18:08:31
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin K foods also low in sugars
Hi Ron, thanks for your question. This tool can help you to find foods low in sugar and vitamin K, though you will have to go through the list to find the foods that you commonly eat. If you make a list like that, maybe come back here and share it with others who are also in your situation. Thanks!
Posted on 2012-07-31 06:53:27
Name:Karen
Location:Edmonton, Alberta
Subject:Fruits high in vitamin K
I never knew blueberries and blackberries are high in vitamin K. Now I'm wondering about cherries as I've also been eating them the past few weeks and my PT/INR has been dropping despite taking higher doses of coumadin. What other fruit should I be aware of?
Posted on 2012-08-05 05:07:14
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fruits high in vitamin K
Hi Karen, thanks for your question. Cherries are pretty low in vitamin K, providing 2.1μg (3% DV) per 100 grams, or 2.9μg (4% DV) in a cup. For more, see this list of 1000 fruits high in vitamin K.
Posted on 2012-08-05 05:23:10
Name:Beth Gregg
Location:Asheville NC
Subject:Green Peppers
What levels do green peppers and colored (orange and yellow) contain of vitamin K? My daughter has Cerebral Venus Thrombosis and has always eaten these as a snack. Also, should cucumbers be peeled or not?
Posted on 2012-08-24 16:12:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Green Peppers
Hi Beth, thanks for your questions. Looking at the nutrition facts for peppers, a whole large green or red pepper (164 grams) does not contain more than 15% DV of vitamin K, and should be safe to eat. There is no vitamin K data for yellow peppers, but you could assume that they are low in vitamin K.

Looking at the nutrition facts comparison for peeled vs. unpeeled cucumbers you can see that unpeeled cucumbers have much less vitamin K, so yes, peel the cucumbers! Hope that helps.

Posted on 2012-08-25 06:21:37
Name:Joquetta
Location:Colorado
Subject:Miracle Whip & other condiments & coumadin
I know Mayonaise & Miracle Whip & other salad dressings that I used have loads of vitamin K. I want to know what is in them that has Vitamin K? & how much? Do peanuts have vitamin K? I HATE this coumadin thing. I am on that & plavix & aspirin.
Posted on 2012-09-20 16:05:43
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Miracle Whip & other condiments & coumadin
Hi Joquetta, thanks for your question. It is the vegetable oils in the dressings and condiments which adds the vitamin K. Soybean and canola oil are particularly high in vitmain K, so avoid products which have them. Flaxseed, coconut, peanut, corn, and sunflower oil are all low in vitamin K, so try to buy condiments which use them. Further, peanuts are low in vitamin K. For more information:

List of 50 Fats and Oils Low in Vitamin K

70 Fats and Oils High in vitamin K to avoid

You could also go for fat free condiments and dressings, which should eleminate most of the vitamin K, but check labels carefully!
Posted on 2012-09-20 22:16:33
Name:Sydney
Location:Oxnard, CA
Subject:Coumadin diet
My 13 year old Grand Daughter just had open heart surgery and will be on Coumadin for 6 months...We are proud of her love for healthy food ...now we are struggling to find the magic combo to keep her blood work in compliance. Like all kids she loves chocolate milk or candy ...can this be part of my inability to correct her numbers? As her Caregiver I need HELP.
Posted on 2012-10-05 13:09:32
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin diet
Hi Sydney, thanks for your question. Chocolate milk is low in vitamin K and should be ok for your granddaughter. Most candies and sweets are also low in vitamin K and should be fine. This includes hard candies, marshmallows, and jellybeans. Here is list of 1000 candies low in vitamin K. Hope that helps. Please note that this advice is also only regarding vitamin K. As she has just had heart surgury, you may want to consult with her doctor to be sure.
Posted on 2012-10-07 03:44:08
Name:Linda Howard
Location:Richland, Ms
Subject:Low sodium diet and taking coumadin
My husband is on coumadin 12.5 daily. We did the injections - he had bloodclots in leg and lungs. I am having a time trying to find low sodium foods to eat and watch the Vitamin K, as well. Any help, please?
Posted on 2012-10-17 15:02:50
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low sodium diet and taking coumadin
Hi Linda, thanks for your question. All the fruits and vegetables listed in this article as low in vitamin K are also low in sodium. The grains (except for some pastas) are also low in sodium, just be sure you do not add any salt to them when you are cooking. Meats (other than seafood and canned meats) are also low in sodium and vitamin K. As for legumes, just avoid soybeans and canned beans and you should be fine. So basically you can eat most fruits, veggies, meats, grains, and beans. Just don't add any salt. Here is a list of high sodium foods to avoid. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-10-17 18:40:45
Name:Sally
Location:Cairo
Subject:Coumadin and yoghurt
Hi, my husband has had 3 DVT's and now he is on Coumadin for life. He eats a lot of yoghurt , does it affect his INR? Especially that his INR Is fluctuating and not reaching 2 easily.
Posted on 2012-10-21 20:28:01
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin and yoghurt
Hi Sally, thanks for your question. Yogurt is low in vitamin K and should not be affecting your husband's INR. Is he eating any of these other high vitamin K foods?

Complete nutrition facts for yogurt.
Posted on 2012-10-21 20:31:32
Name:Mark
Location:Warner Robins
Subject:Coumadin and green peas and lima beans
My doctor said I should be careful with green peas. If eating them I should only have a 1/2 cup serving 2 to 3 times daily, however I cannot find anything about this vegetable. I also cannot find anything about lima beans anywhere. Should I limit my intake of this as well? My coumadin dose is 10mg 5 days a week and 7.5 the other two. Any help you can provide would be most helpful as I love my green peas and lima beans.
Posted on 2012-10-25 09:27:42
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin and green peas and lima beans
Hi Mark, thanks for your question. 1 cup of green peas does provide 41μg (52% DV) of vitamin K, so it does make sense to limit it, if that is what your doctor suggests. 1 cup of lima beans contains much less vitamin K with 11μg (13% DV) and should be ok to eat.

Nutrition facts for peas and lima beans.

As a previous poster stated, green peas are also high in carbohydrates and sugars, so if you are diabetic, that might also be a reason why your doctor does not want you to eat peas.

Talk to your doctor about why he does not want you to eat lima beans, and see if you can eat more lima beans in place of green peas. Hope that helps.

Posted on 2012-10-25 13:36:25
Name:Mahi
Location:Canada
Subject:Coumadin dose
My husband is on coumadin since august this year. Right now he is taking 7.5 mg for 3 days and 7 mg for 3 days. His INR was 2.3 last week and the doctor has said that now instead of going weekly for INR, he should go after 2 weeks. Is it safe to continue with the same dose? Is alternating the dose harmful?
Posted on 2012-11-11 11:31:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin dose
Hi Mahi, thanks for your question. Most patients on Coumadin aim for an INR of 2.5-3.5, in this regard, your husband's INR is likely in a good range. When prescribing coumadin, health care providers may aim for a weekly dose.Ref Thus your husband's dose of 7.5mg for 3 days, and 7mg for 3 days would add up to a 6 day total of 43.5mg. It is safe to alternate like this. Just be sure your husband keeps consuming the same amount of vitamin K foods each day.
Posted on 2012-11-12 02:23:49
Name:Brent
Location:Summersville WV
Subject:Asparagus Vitamin K Content
I'm taking Coumadin, can I eat asparagus?
Posted on 2012-11-22 01:14:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Asparagus Vitamin K Content
Hi Brent, thanks for your question. Asparagus is fairly high in vitamin K, half a cup cooked contains 57% DV. This means that you should limit asparagus to no more than 3 servings a day, and regulate your consumption of it with other vitamin K foods and your dosage of coumadin.

Complete nutrition facts for asparagus.

Posted on 2012-11-22 01:56:03
Name:Diann Hamilton
Location:The Villages, Fl
Subject:Coumadin
My husband has been on Coumadin for about 8 months. He has been watching what he eats and this week his level was 1.5. He was taking 2 whole pills a week and half a pill the other five days. They changed it now to 3 whole and half the other 4 days. They want his level between 2 and 2.5. We do not know what else to do to reach that level.
Posted on 2012-11-26 13:45:13
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin
Hi Diann, thanks for your comment. The best you can do is to keep your consumption of vitamin K constant while increasing the dosage. The increased dosage should help get his INR up to 2-2.5.
Posted on 2012-11-26 20:42:58
Name:Rick K.
Location:Oklahoma City, OK
Subject:Grapefruit and Grapefruit juice?
My Warfarin monitors said to avoid grapefruit. I was drinking lots of it because of its low glycemic index. My sugar intake is concentrated in chocolate.

(Other meds include Furosemide and Diltiaz ER - treating afib).

What is the scoop on grapefruit?

Posted on 2012-11-27 17:37:06
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Grapefruit and Grapefruit juice?
Hi Rick, thanks for your question. There are various complications between cardiovascular drugs and grapefruit juice, in this case, the Diltiazem is likely to have the greatest interaction. Studies show that there is no strong effect between Grapefruit juice and Warfarin, but you are still advised to keep grapefruit juice consumption to less than 8oz a day. Maybe try other unsweetened juices such as strawberry or peach? Hope this helps.
Posted on 2012-11-27 23:50:16
Name:Edward Dasaro
Location:Brooklyn, NY
Subject:Soy Milk
Is soy milk high in vitamin K?
Posted on 2012-11-28 12:12:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Soy Milk
Hi Edward, thanks for your question. Soybean oil, and most soy products, are high in vitamin K. A 16 ounce serving (2 cups) of soy milk would provide 18% DV for vitamin K and is probably ok to drink while on Warfarin. Substitutes like almond milk present a vitamin K free option if that works better for you.
Complete nutrition facts for soymilk.
Posted on 2012-11-28 21:49:17
Name:Raymond McCutcheon
Location:Columbus, OH
Subject:Cranberry effect on Warfarin
How do cranberries interact with warfarin?
Posted on 2012-12-04 08:23:44
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cranberry effect on Warfarin
Hi Raymond, thanks for your question. There have been some cases where cranberry juice taken while on Warfarin has increased INR and risk of bleeding in some people. If you are on Warfarin, it is advised that you avoid cranberries, and cranberry juice. For more information on the biochemical theory, see this article.
Posted on 2012-12-04 09:58:48
Name:Liza
Location:Childers, Australia
Subject:Lower dose of Warfarin
Hi, My husband is on 7mg of warfarin daily to keep his level at 2.5-3.5 What can he eat to lower his dose of warfarin but stay on 2.5 - 3.5 level?
Posted on 2012-12-07 19:21:31
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Lower dose of Warfarin
Hi Liza, thanks for your question. If your husband wants to lower his dose then he must slowly reduce his intake of high vitamin K foods. As he does this his INR should increase above 3.5 and your doctor should adjust his prescription down accordingly. Please note you want to discuss these changes with his health care providers so they know, you want to monitor his INR levels more often during this time, and you want to make these changes gradually.
Posted on 2012-12-07 19:26:41
Name:TG
Location:DC, USA
Subject:Juicing
I was an avid juicer prior to getting blood clots and landing in the hospital for 5 days. Now 75% of the fruits and veggies I was using in my daily juices are high in Vitamin K. Is there a web-site for warfarin friendly juices? I've looked everywhere. Also, I'm getting mixed signals on carrots. Some websites say they are high and others say they are low?
Posted on 2012-12-07 19:39:17
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Juicing
Hi TG, thanks for your quesiton, and for making a great suggestion to add some warfarin friendly juicing recipes! The trouble with juicing is that it tends to concentrate calories and nutrients. An average carrot (61g) provides 10% DV for vitamin K, while an 8oz cup of carrot juice (100g) provides 19% of the daily value(DV). Note that most drinking cups are at least 16oz, or 2 "cup servings", meaning that a glass of carrot juice would contain 38% DV of vitamin K. Carrots are probably best avoided! However, the amount of vitamin K you can comsume all depends on your dose of Warfarin. This might explain the mixed signals you have been getting. Monitor your INR carefully with your diet, and keep looking for fruits and vegetables with low vitamin K levels. Check back to this webpage in a couple month for low vitamin K juicing recipes. Or come back and share some you have found!

Complete nutrition facts for carrot juice and carrots.

Posted on 2012-12-07 19:41:11
Name:Aunchalee
Location:TX
Subject:Vitamin K in butter
I use butter to cook food lately, but my husband just said it contains high vitamin k. I feel so sick to cook now. There aren't many things too cook.

By the way my husband has been taking rat poison for three months! I don't want him to take it forever! I wish his inr will be higher than 1.3 next time he goes see the doctor.

Posted on 2012-12-09 12:15:54
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin K in butter.
Hi Aunchalee, thanks for your comment. Not sure where your husband got his information, but butter is low in vitamin K. One tablespoon provides 1% of the DV for vitamin K. Butter, however, is high in cholesterol, and probably best avoided by someone with cardiovascualr disease.
Posted on 2012-12-10 06:10:31
Name:Celia
Location:USA
Subject:Coumadin and coconut
My husband is recently put on coumadin. Can he have coconut? It is not on any of the food lists I have.
Posted on 2012-12-11 12:15:34
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin and coconut
Hi Celia, thanks for your question. Coconut meat, milk, and water are all low in vitamin K and should be fine on a Warfarin (Coumadin) diet.
Complete nutrition facts for coconut meat, milk, and water.
Posted on 2012-12-12 07:45:02
Name:Jim
Location:Libertyville, IL
Subject:Salmon
I eat salmon 8 times a week. Will that significantly affect my coumodin dosage?
Posted on 2012-12-19 12:14:38
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Salmon
Hi Jim, thanks for your question. Salmon, like other meats, is low in vitamin K and should not affect your coumadin dose. Be sure you do not cook it with any herbs, which are high in vitamin K. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-12-19 21:04:28
Name:S
Location:USA
Subject:Vit K content in cauliflower and celery?
Hi: Your table site doesn't tell about the Vit K content of cauliflower and celery. Also olive oil. Can you please give that information? Thanks!
Posted on 2012-12-26 15:42:11
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vit K content in cauliflower and celery?
Hi S, thanks for your question. 1 cup of raw cauliflower (100g) contains 37% of the DV for vitamin K. 1 cup of raw celery (100g) contains 20% of the DV. 2 tablespoons of olive oil provides 22% of the DV for vitamin K. Here are the complete nutrition facts for all three.
Posted on 2012-12-26 20:34:18
Name:Toniixo
Location:Norwich, UK
Subject:Low vitamin K diet and recipes
Does anyone know of any recipe websites and meal plans I could use? I have been on Warfarin for over 6 months now, and my INR is still very unstable. The only 2 things I refuse to cut out of my diet are cheese and garlic (my favorites). Thanks a lot!
Posted on 2012-12-26 20:40:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low vitamin K diet and recipes
Hi Toniixo, thanks for your question. Not sure what recommendations everyone has. The Coumdain Cookbook could be a good resource for you.
Posted on 2012-12-26 20:51:06
Name:Lisa Williams
Location:Ohio
Subject:Warfarin and CoQ10
I suffered PE in August and have, by now, fairly well regulated my warfarin / INR level. I had a full range of blood work done in November, and found that I was very low in B12 and was somewhat on the verge of high cholesterol, so my hematologist recommended I begin taking CoQ10 every day. However, I just read a warning that CoQ10 can contribute to blood clotting. Am I putting myself in danger by taking CoQ10 while I am on warfarin?
Posted on 2013-01-02 08:32:04
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin and CoQ10
Hi Lisa, thanks for your question. The University of Maryland Medical Center suggests a possible interaction between CoQ10 and blood thinning medication such as Warfarin. They suggest you work closely with your health care provider while taking both substances. Further, this study reports a case where CoQ10 appeared to reduce the effectiveness of Warfarin. The short answer is that CoQ10 with Warfarin is potentially putting you in danger and you should ask your doctor about it or seek a second opinion.
Posted on 2013-01-02 22:33:43
Name:Sofia
Location:Toronto
Subject:Coumadin and Sprouts
How do you raise the enzyme levels of a person on Coumadin who also has cancer? Specifically I would like you to comment on the use of sprouted beans and grains as a protein and enzyme source while on Coumadin. The person cannot eat any animal protein. Does it make a difference from the vit. K point if the grains/beans are sprouted or cooked? A second question: what is the vit. K content for quinoa? Thanks!
Posted on 2013-01-04 11:08:29
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin and Sprouts
Hi Sofia, thanks for your questions. Sprouting does increase the amount of vitamin K. Looking at the nutrition comparison of cooked soybeans vs sprouted soybeans we see that 1 cup of cooked beans (172g) provides 41% DV for vitamin K, while 1 cup of cooked sprouted soybeans (94g) provides 83% DV. Unfortunately the vitamin K content of raw soybean sprouts are not available, but you can assume that cooking increases the vitamin K content.

Quinoa contains little or no vitamin K. You can use the nutrition facts comparison tool to look up values of other foods, or the nutrient ranking tool to rank vitamin K values for different foods. Just be careful since values of vitamin K are not available for all foods.

Posted on 2013-01-04 14:15:23
Name:Nelda van Rooyen
Location:Tete, Mozambique
Subject:Warfarin and cayenne pepper
I have read that drinking a cup a hot water and a teaspoon of cayenne pepper twice a day can be very beneficial for so many ailments and that cayenne is a fantastic natural remedy. Is it safe to use it when on warfarin?
Posted on 2013-01-06 10:05:16
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin and cayenne pepper
Hi Nelda, thanks for your question. Cayenne pepper is fairly low in vitamin K. 1 teaspoon only provides 2% DV. However, the chemcial which gives pepper its heat, Capsaicin, increases the risk of bleeding associated with Warfarin. You are probably ok with 1 teaspoon a day, but be aware of the increased risk of bleeding, and let your health care providers know also. Further, see how your PT/INR reacts.
Posted on 2013-01-06 15:50:07
Name:Judie
Location:MA
Subject:Soybeans
I've been unable to find the vitamin K value for soy beans. I've been a vegetarian for over 40 years, and have relied on soy products for a lot of my protein needs. I have contacted several companies that make soy products, but have had no response yet. Please advise.
Posted on 2013-01-09 15:17:45
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Soybeans
Hi Judie, thanks for your question. Soybeans and soy products are generally high in vitamin K. The possible exception being tofu. Tofu provides 8% DV of vitamin K per cup, but might depend on how it is made. Soybean oil provides 32% DV per tablespoon, mature cooked soybeans contain 41% DV per cup, and 1 cup of cooked soybean sprouts provides 83% DV. Here are the nutrition facts for tofu, soybeans, and sprouts.
Posted on 2013-01-09 16:26:12
Name:Vincent
Location:VA
Subject:Consistency of Vitamin K
I read where intake of Vitamin K while on Coumadin should be consistent. However, I might eat a cup of brocolli one time this week and not again for two or more weeks. The same would be true for spinach. Does consistency mean a cup of either should be consumed each week?
Posted on 2013-01-10 17:15:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Consistency of Vitamin K
Hi Vincent, thanks for your question. You need to keep your intake of vitamin K the same from day to day. This means if you eat 1 cup of broccoli one day, you need to eat something with the same amount of vitamin K the next day. Spinach has 5 times the amount of vitamin K as broccoli, so one cup of cooked spinach = 5 cups of cooked broccoli. Be sure to check nutrition facts and find equivalent foods for each day.
Posted on 2013-01-10 23:37:41
Name:Jacquie
Location:BC
Subject:Lemons
I have been on Warfarin for the past 8 months due to a blood clot in my leg, the first thing I had to give up was my green tea. I thought I was being so healthy only drinking green tea (who knew). After 8 months of up and down INR readings I am struggling to keep my numbers between 2 & 3. I was told taking lemon would help thin down my blood, is this true?
Posted on 2013-01-11 17:51:02
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Lemons
Hi Jacquie, thanks for your question. There is no evidence to show that lemon thins blood. This 2010 study on the effect of limes and Warfarin in rodents found that lime juice actually reduces the blood thinning effect of Warfarin. Like grapefruit juice, it is probably best to limit or eliminate lemon from your diet.
Posted on 2013-01-11 18:53:20
Name:Sonia Smith
Location:Gloucester UK
Subject:Glucosamine Sulphate, garlic tablets, and fish oil
I have always taken glucosamine sulphate 1000MG tablets, but have ben told not to take them on Warfarin, could you please explain why? I need them for my joints.

I also take garlic tablets, is this ok? And fish oil tablets? Would be grateful for your help.

Posted on 2013-01-14 13:16:27
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Glucosamine Sulphate, garlic tablets, and fish oil
Hi Sonia, thanks for your questions. According to the U.S. Library of Medicine Glucosamine Sulphate increases the effect of Warfarin, which increases risk of excessive bleeding. Unfortunately, the same is likely true about fish oil tablets, and you should avoid them. Further, you should not take the garlic tablets while on Warfarin.
Posted on 2013-01-14 16:52:42
Name:Betty
Location:NV
Subject:Chilis?
I am a new receiver of Warfarin. I have always used a lot of seasonings when cooking, but now see that some of them are not good. I am curious about Ortego Chili's, I don't seen any thing about using chilies.
Posted on 2013-01-15 01:21:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Chilis
Hi Betty, thanks for your question. While chilis and bell peppers are relatively low in vitamin K, they do contain capsaicin. Capsaicin is the chemical which makes chilies spicy, and when combined with Warfarin, increases risk of bleeding. Chilis are best avoided.
Posted on 2013-01-15 01:54:22
Name:Rajneesh
Location:Jaipur India
Subject:Food with high b12 but less K
Hi, My wife is on acitrom and the doctor asked her to avoid food which contains vitamin K. She also has deficiency of Vitamin B12. Are there any vegetarian foods which are high in B12 but low in vitamin K?
Posted on 2013-01-18 09:37:27
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:Food with high b12 but less K
Hi Rajneesh, thanks for your question. Vitamin B12 can only naturally be found in animal products. Does your wife eat milk, yogurt, and eggs? If so, these would be the best sources of vitamin B12. Milk is the highest, followed by yogurt, and eggs. Here are the complete nutrition facts for all 3 foods. All 3 foods are also very low in vitamin K. However, as these foods are high in cholesterol, they may not be the best for your wife. Likely, it is best for your wife to take vitamin B12 supplements, or eat fortified foods.
Posted on 2013-01-18 17:41:06
Name:DeAnna
Location:Indiana
Subject:Started on warfarin yesterday and was not told to watch vitamin K consumption
I had a doctor place me on Warfarin yesterday at 5mg and to stay on my plavix which I have been on for years. Never said anything to me about what to eat or not to eat...just that my situation was serious and I needed to start on it immediately because of a two genetic blood clotting mutations and history of stroke. Doing more testing for other mutations but why in the world would a doc not tell their patient all of this I am reading?..I know nothing about this med and everything I am reading here is news to me. This concerns me given my doc didn't tell me about this stuff. Is it maybe he wanted to see what my normal readings will be with my normal eating habits maybe?
Posted on 2013-02-02 13:25:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Started on warfarin yesterday and was not told to watch vitamin K consumption
Hi DeAnna, thanks for your comment. It is strange you doctor did not mention anything about vitamin K. Plavix is a blood thinner which does not interact with vitamin K, but as long as you are on warfarin you should keep your vitamin K consumption constant. Even if your doctor wanted to establish your baseline level, warning you to keep your consumption constant would have been the right thing to do. Ask your doctor about it on your next visit and please come back to share what you learn for the benefit of others reading this article.
Posted on 2013-02-02 13:42:36
Name:DeAnna
Location:Indiana
Subject:Follow up
I certainly will be asking when I go back and let you all know what I find out..and I am staying close to this website and bookmarking it so I can learn things I need to know. Thank you soo much for your response and for providing a resourceful place for folks to turn to.
Posted on 2013-02-02 14:04:20
Name:S
Location:Utah
Subject:Onions
I read boiled onions are high in Vit K and then read raw and cooked onions are low in Vit K. Are onions safe to eat?
Posted on 2013-02-03 13:50:17
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Onions
Thanks for your question. Onions are low in vitamin K, and boiling them should not increase their level. Not sure why you read otherwise. Onion is related to garlic, which can interact with warfarin. As such, try to keep your level of onion consumption at an average, or below average level.
Posted on 2013-02-03 15:22:35
Name:Samantha
Location:Australia
Subject:How much vitamin K to eat at the start of Warfarin?
Hi, I'm on Warfarin and have been told to avoid ALL high in vitamin K foods altogether (all green food plus herbs/spices). In regards to other foods being high in Vitamin K, is there a maximum % of DV of Vitamin K that I would be allowed? So I have a rule of thumb of what I am allowed and I am not. Thanks!
Posted on 2013-02-04 01:15:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How much vitamin K to eat at the start of Warfarin?
Hi Samantha, thanks for your question. How much vitamin K you can eat depends a lot on your situation, your dose of warfarin, and your PT/INR. As you have been told to avoid all vitamin K, stick to the fruits and vegetables that are low in vitamin K listed in this article. That is to say, fruits and veggies with less than 10% DV (Daily Value) of vitamin K. Grains, meats, dairy products, and beans (except soy) also fit in this category. Basically aim to consume 100% or less of the daily value (DV) for vitamin K each day.
Posted on 2013-02-04 01:29:55
Name:Genesis
Subject:Can I be vegetarian while taking Coumadin?
I just left the hospital yesterday after getting a DVT in my arm. The hematologist told me to avoid Vitamin K altogether while I'm on Coumadin (which will probably be for the remainder of my life, and I'm only 22) but I'm having a hard time knowing what to eat being that I'm vegetarian/vegan. Should I re-introduce animal products into my diet, or do you think given that I find a good balance, I can be vegetarian while on anticoagulants? Spinach, Kale, Cranberries, Blueberries, Broccoli, and Green Tea were staples in my diet - I'm afraid that I'll be missing a lot of key nutrients if I cut out Vitamin K and don't re-introduce something else.
Posted on 2013-02-04 13:55:39
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Can I be vegetarian while taking Coumadin?
Hi Genesis, you can be vegetarian or vegan while on Coumdain (Warfarin). Just be sure you eat plenty of whole grains, beans (except soy beans), and the vegetables/fruits listed in this article as "low vitamin K foods". You will get all the nutrients you need, except vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 is found naturally in animal products, you can either supplement, or try to eat fortified foods. Not sure what range of grains you ate as a vegan, but quinoa is a complete protein source, providing all the essential amino acids. Beans and legumes are high in fiber, and perfect for you. As you progress in taking Coumadin you can talk to your doctor about increasing your dose as you start to eat some vitamin K foods (greens) again. Get your PT/INR tested weekly if you go in this direction. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-02-04 16:26:59
Name:Shailendra
Location:Saudi Arabia
Subject:Warfarin diet Self Monitoring
Hi, I have been on Warfarin since the 26th of Jan. As of today I am taking 6.5mg and my INR is 3.0 I understand its advisable to have at least 2 INR samples within the same range? Secondly, after reading all FAQs I must ask: How much time it takes for INR to alter once any alteration in Vitamin K intake has happened? Is it 12/24/48 hrs? All above answers end with that the bottom line is to check vitamin K intake. Practically, its very difficult for individuals to monitor it. And hence so many queries. Correct me if I am wrong. Is it the best practice to write down each day what and how much you eat in your diet? This will give a fair idea of vitamin K intake and then utilize a spread sheet to calculate daily vitamin K intake. Finally I assume, the body needs a specific amount of vitamin K which must be met everyday? What are Vitamin K deficiency effects? If some one has to stay on Warfarin for a long time, he may consciously consume less Vita-K. Finally please suggest a diet when on Warfarin + Constipation prone piles/Fissure problem. I know this is a lot of questions, but hope they address many people. Thanks in advance. Shailendra
Posted on 2013-02-06 16:13:35
Name:Pii
Location:Hawaii
Subject:Shellfish and a Coumadin Diet
I just started Coumadin and have been doing a lot of research on VK. This is so very difficult to try to balance. I had an ICD put in 9 months ago and my cardiologist highly recommended a blood thinner. He gave me a sample of Pradaxa, and after researching this med decided I did not want the risks involved. My problem is figuring out the amounts by US measurement in lieu of grams/micrograms etc. This site has really been informative with the breakdown and the problems/solutions. I did not see anything regarding seafood and VK effects. Can you give some pros/cons on shell fish (which I love) and also on red wine (how much is safe to consume. I drink 4-6 oz with dinner each day. Mahalo, Pii
Posted on 2013-02-18 18:34:39
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Shellfish and a Coumadin Diet
Hi Pii, thanks for your questions. Shellfish are low in vitamin K and should be fine to eat with Coumadin (Warfarin). The only reservation is that most shellfish is high in cholesterol, so you want to watch your cholesterol level. It is best to eliminate alcohol if you can, but 4-6oz a day is acceptable. Do not drink more than 3 glasses a day. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-02-18 20:42:54
Name:Umbers
Subject:Yogurt and Bacteria which produce Vitamin K
I saw in the comments that someone had asked about yogurt, and if it would have any effect on INR. I just wanted to point out that even though yogurt is very low in vitamin K, it does have beneficial bacteria, and bacteria in human body produces Vitamin K. So if people are having a hard time keeping their numbers within the INR zone their doctors have set, it may be because the bacteria the consume in the yogurt is adding to the Vitamin K producing bacteria already inside of them. They should try going without yogurt for a while, to see if their problems resolve.
Posted on 2013-02-26 01:04:30
Name:Beck Duncan
Location:Clayton County, Georgia
Subject:Very Informative
I have been taking coumadin for about a month now. My doctor told me not to eat leafy greens. This site has shown that, if we are consistent, we can actually eat the dreaded leafy greens. I have osteopena an am afraid of making matters worse by not getting enough vitamin k.
Posted on 2013-03-05 12:51:34
Name:Mary
Location:Indiana
Subject:Iceberg lettuce
Is iceberg lettuce ok while taking blood thinners?
Posted on 2013-03-05 19:01:02
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Iceberg lettuce
Hi Mary, thanks for your question. One cup of shredded Iceberg lettuce contains 17μg (22% DV) of vitamin K. Given this fact, it should be fine for most people on Warfarin to eat 2 cups of shredded ice-berg lettuce a day. However, it depends greatly on your dose and what other foods you are eating. Make changes to your diet slowly. So you may want to start with half a cup of iceberg lettuce for a week, then a cup for a week, then 2 cups. Hope that helps. Here are the complete nutrition facts for iceberg lettuce.
Posted on 2013-03-06 19:39:32
Name:Coco
Location:TX
Subject:Green Anti inflammatory Smoothies and Pradaxa (Dabigatran)
Hi, I have recently started to do the Green Smoothie and smoothies in general to help me with my health. I had looked at doing a smoothie for anti inflammatory, because my feet swell. I recently got diagnosed with my second superficial blood clot and I notice that the list of foods/vegs/supplements that I would need to use for this smoothie are on your high/medium K list! I am currently on PRADAXA temporarily until my blood work comes back.

Can I still do this smoothie in moderation?

Posted on 2013-04-16 16:51:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Green Anti inflammatory Smoothies and Pradaxa (Dabigatran)
Hi Coco, thanks for your question. Are you on Warfarin and Pradaxa? Or just Pradaxa? Are you planning to go on Warfarin soon? Did you doctor tell you not to eat vitamin K foods? If you answer yes to any of the previous questions, then you probably need to stop the smoothies, or just have 8 ounces a day. If you are just taking Pradaxa then you should not have to change your diet at all. Pradaxa claims to have no special diet requirements. This is because Pradaxa works in a different way from Warfarin. Hope that information helps.
Posted on 2013-04-16 18:52:11
Name:Jim C
Location:North Carolina
Subject:Warfarin/Exoxaparin
About 2 weeks ago my doctor discovered a clot in the upper groin area of my left leg. He put me on Xarelto 15 mg 2 times daily and sent me home. I was scheduled to see the doctor 1 week later for a follow up but a few hours before my appointment the clot entered my left lung and I was hospitalized for 4 days. In the hospital they placed me on warfarin and 2 injections of exoxaparin. When I left the hospital my INR was 1.5. I continued the injections for 2 days at home and also took 5mg warfarin daily. On the 3rd day my INR was still only at 1.6. I get it checked again tomorrow but I am beginning to think I will never get above 2.0. The doctor wants it between 2.0 and 3.0. I am not eating any vitamin K to my knowledge. What could be my problem.
Posted on 2013-04-16 20:17:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin/Exoxaparin
Hi Jim, sorry to hear about your condition and thanks for your questions. Not sure why your INR is not adjusting higher. Are you sure you are not eating any vitamin K? Here is a more detailed list of high vitamin K foods you can check. Further, you may need a higher dose of Warfarin. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2013-04-17 03:59:40
Name:Kathy
Location:Chicago
Subject:Keep a food diary while on Warfarin
Anyone who is on Warfarin should keep a food diary. I have done this for a year and it helps. It's too easy to think in your head you did or didn't do something. So when you write it down consistently day to day you will have a better overview of what you are doing. Most importantly, write down the portions of your fruits and veggies and milk that you have daily. Try it, it works.
Posted on 2013-05-14 03:44:48
Name:Joyce
Location:New Jersey
Subject:Ginger tea
I recently started Coumadin and Lovenox injections after a DVT and PE. I steep ginger several times a week to make tea. Is this still safe?
Posted on 2013-05-19 22:10:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Ginger tea
Hi Joyce, check the first section under "General point when taking Warfin". Ginger is listed under the herbs and/or supplements to avoid. You would be best not drinking ginger tea.
Posted on 2013-05-20 03:01:11
Name:Vicki
Location:Early Tx
Subject:Plavix, vitamin K, and Miracle Whip
My husband had a stent in after having a heart attack. He has been put on Plavix and told to avoid foods high in Vit K. He doesn't eat green leafy veggies. Mostly green beans, pintos, corn, green peas. He also uses miracle whip. (That's the only thing he will use as dressing) I didn't see these on your list. Will they be ok? Thanks.
Posted on 2013-05-22 18:15:43
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Plavix, vitamin K, and Miracle Whip
Hi Vicki, thanks for your questions. Plavix works differently from Warfarin, and it does not interact with vitamin K. As such, it should be ok to eat vitamin K foods while on Plavix. However, given the doctor said to avoid vitamin K, your husband may be on some other medication to avoid it, or it may just be a good idea given his heart condition. All the foods you mentioned are fine except for Miracle Whip. Miracle whip is high in cholesterol, saturated fat, sugar, and vitamin K. It is not a heart healthy food, and your husband should not eat it, or most oils, and a simple vinegar dressing might be best. Hope that helps, here are the complete nutrition facts for miracle whip.
Posted on 2013-05-23 02:43:38
Name:Audrey
Location:West Sussex
Subject:Cabbage, beans, swedes, parsnips, and leeks?
2 weeks ago I was taken in to hospital with PE on both lungs I love vegetables to the point that my husband & I have an allotment and grow them ourselves. I do eat a lot of green vegetables including cabbage, leeks, swede, parsnips runner beans french beans and Chinese cabbage. These are vegetables I cant find amount of K vitamin in them. Also I am dairy intolerant and so have to use soya milk. I don't use a lot unless I am making a dessert with it, could this be a problem?
Posted on 2013-05-25 15:46:11
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cabbage, beans, swedes, parsnips, and leeks?
Hi Audrey, thanks for your question. Cabbage is high in vitamin K and you should avoid it. 1 cup of raw cabbage provides 85% of the DV for vitamin K. As for Chinese (Napa) Cabbage, leeks, beans, there is no vitamin K data, but you are best to avoid them, or limit them considerably. When in doubt with green vegetables, don't eat them! The good news is that both parsnips and swedes (rutabagas) are low in vitamin K and fine to eat, just the roots, not the greens! As for soy milk, it provides 9% DV of vitamin K per cup, and should be fine. Remember, the main thing is to keep your consumption consistent and in line with your dose. You can use the nutrition facts comparison tool to find vitamin K values for more foods. Here are the nutrition facts for cabbage, parsnips, and soy milk. And here are the facts for swedes (rutabagas).
Posted on 2013-05-27 00:39:41
Name:Crystal
Location:Findlay
Subject:Raw vs Cooked
I'm confused, I am on warfarin and everything I look up refers to raw veggies only. Does the Vitamin K level break down after cooking or does it stay the same?
Posted on 2013-05-27 03:29:29
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Raw vs Cooked
Hi Crystal, thanks for your question. Vitamin K does not break down with cooking, and if anything, becomes more concentrated. For example, look at the nutrition comparison of raw spinach vs boiled spinach.
Posted on 2013-05-28 01:00:28
Name:Rita
Location:Philadelphia
Subject:Warfarin and Green Tea
Can you have green tea or a green tea extract when taking warfarin? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-05-28 22:04:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin and Green Tea
Hi Rita, thanks for your question. This single case study suggests that green tea hampers the effect of Warfarin, and lowers INR, increasing the chance for blood clots. You should avoid green tea, and green tea supplements. This study also lists green tea as something to avoid. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-05-29 03:19:58
Name:Casey
Location:Illinois
Subject:Juicing and Vitamin K
You wrote last year 'Check back to this webpage in a couple month for low vitamin K juicing recipes.'. Did you manage to find any?
Posted on 2013-06-04 19:14:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Juicing and Vitamin K
Hi Casey, thanks for bringing this issue back up. A list of low vitamin K juice recipes has now been created. You could make any juice with the list of low vitamin K fruits and veggies above, except for tomatoes, cucumbers, ice berg lettuce, artichokes, grapefruit, and cranberries. Hope you find the recipes useful.
Posted on 2013-06-05 04:08:56
Name:Tammy
Location:Ohio
Subject:Nutrition labels and avoiding black/orange pekoe tea
I'm on warfarin for the rest of my life starting 5/10/13 and have been struggling with the INR. Thank you for your site! I have been checking the packages for vitamin k, but much to my surprise olive oil and carrots don't list it on the nutrition label. I was just making carrots with olive oil as a snack, when I started reading this site, I'm not eating them now! Also, for others struggling with this, I was told to not drink so much black/orange pekoe tea, I was drinking a gallon a day and my DR believes that it was affecting my INR.
Posted on 2013-06-09 18:27:06
Name:Sue
Location:Ontario, Canada
Subject:Warfarin, Food, and my experience
I've been on Warfarin for over thirty years - take it from me "be cautious" but don't sweat the eating thing .. just make sure PT/INR is checked. My dosage is 8.5 mg per day and my INR is to be kept between 2.5 and 3.5.
Posted on 2013-06-28 23:20:06
Name:Donald
Location:Riverside, CA
Subject:Mechanical valve and eating salad
I had a mechanical valve for over a year. My levels are supposed to be between 1.8 and 2.5. I take 4mg warfarin 5 days a week and 2mg 2 days a week and a baby asperin every day. I eat hardly any high Vit k foods but would like to start having salads and veggies more now. Some sites list green leaf lettuce as medium and some list it as low. If I eat a good sized salad every day with low k veggies and I miss a day or 2 do I have to be concerned about my INR?
Posted on 2013-06-29 03:20:44
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Mechanical valve and eating salad
Hi Donald, thanks for your question. The difference in the lettuce could be by type. In general, ice-berg lettuce is lower in vitamin K, and romain is lower than green leaf. Try make your salad mostly with ice-berg lettuce, with only a little Romain mixed in.Consistency is important with INR, and it would depend on how you make your salad if missing 2 days would really be that bad. Perhaps eating some other vitamin K food to balance the salad could work, but it would be better to be consistent. Also, avoid using oil in your salad dressing, particularly soy bean oil, which is high in vitamin K. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-06-29 19:10:58
Name:Trish
Location:Georgia
Subject:Vitamin Supplements and Coumadin
My husband is on Coumadin for multiple PE's. We have been struggling to get his INR between 2 and 3. We had an Aha moment today when we realized the multivitamins he is taking contain Vitamin K! Here's hoping that stopping the vitamins will help get him in the proper range!
Posted on 2013-07-04 02:24:41
Name:Sandi
Location:Colorado
Subject:Warfarin and Weight Gain
Does warfarin cause people to gain weight because of the Vitamin K restrictions? I have gained 20 pounds since starting the med in 2011. Please help me choose the correct diet to get my weight back down.
Posted on 2013-07-08 10:14:47
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin and Weight Gain
Hi Sandi, thanks for your question. Warfarin does eliminate dark leafy greens which are a big part of salads and weight loss. However, you can still eat low calorie vegetables like mushrooms and winter squash. Most fruits, like the low vitamin K fruits listed in this article, are also available. Try to eat fewer grains and meats, and eat more fruits and vegetables. Beyond that, there is not too much else to weight loss specific to Warfarin. Increasing your level of activity and exercise should also help. Hope those thoughts are useful.
Posted on 2013-07-09 09:07:47
Name:Mike Griffin
Location:United States
Subject:Broccoli and warfarin
I am a Warfarin patient that loves vegetables. Your chart indicates (3) 1 cup servings of raw broccoli per day is ok. I prefer mine steamed or boiled. Will this change the daily limit?
Posted on 2013-07-16 15:03:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Broccoli and warfarin
Hi Mike, thanks for your question. Cooking broccoli tends to reduce its water content, therefore concentrating the vitamins in it. In short, 1/2 a cup of raw broccoli contains more water than 1/2 a cup boiled and drained, and therefore, the 1/2 a cup which has been boiled contains almost twice as much vitamin K! The way to measure this is to take 3 cups of raw broccoli and cook them. They should cook down to 1-2 cups of broccoli and will have the same amount of vitamin K as the original raw 3 cups. Hope that makes sense! Here is the nutrition facts comparison of raw vs cooked broccoli.
Posted on 2013-07-17 13:09:16
Name:Ann M.
Location:Pennsylvania
Subject:Confused and Frustrated with Warfarin
Hello, I am a 59 year old woman who comes from a family of nine in which 6 have or have had issues with clots, (father passed at the age of 57 from a clot to his heart after surgery). We have all been tested for Factor V and I am the only one who was negative. I am currently and will always be on warfarin because in the past I have had a clot in my leg and one in my lung. My INR numbers have been all over the place and just driving me crazy. Most recently, over the past couple of months and with no changes to my diet or other medications that I am taking I have had to have my blood taken two, three or sometimes four times a week because the levels are either extremely high or extremely low. As of a week ago, totally baffled with this whole coumadin/warfarin issue (which I hate), I found the Coumadin Cookbook at the local library and have been following the information as well as keeping my vitamin K intake as low as 35 to 40 mcgs daily (sometimes even lower) and journaling all information in a diary. In the beginning of the week of using the cookbook and its recipes, I started with a INR of 3.66 and three days later dropped to 2.46. I am expected for a recheck of my blood in two days and am reaching out for help. My question is... is it unhealthy or harmful if a person is taking in such a low amount of vitamin K? Will it have any adverse affects to the liver, pancreas or any other organ? I have read in several books, the average person eats an average of 60 to 80 mcgs vitamin k daily. This whole thing "SCARES" me to death and I feel like I'm hitting a wall. Your help is greatly appreciated. Thank you!!
Posted on 2013-07-19 15:19:26
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Confused and Frustrated with Warfarin
Hi Ann, thanks for your comments and sharing your experience with the Coumadin Cookbook. When on Warfarin (Coumadin) the main thing is to keep your level of vitamin K intake constant. So if you are eating 60-80mcgs of vitamin K a day, it should be ok, as long as your Warfarin dose accounts for it, and your INR is constant. The main function of vitamin K is to cause the blood to coagulate. This is why the risk of bleeding is the main risk associated with Warfarin, however, the thinning of blood is also its main benefit. Vitamin K also help metabolize some proteins, and calcium. Low vitamin K levels can increase risk of heart disease due to calcification of arteries. Other symptoms of vitamin K deficiency include bruises and other marks on the skin. The long term effects of Warfarin have not been studied well, but risk of bleeding is the greatest risk. Damage to the liver and other organs should not occur. Hope that information helps, for now, try to keep your level of vitamin K constant and take things day by day.
Posted on 2013-07-21 14:08:51
Name:Danyelle
Location:Florida
Subject:Being so young and my new lifestyle
So, I just had a mitral valve replacement (mechanical) and I'm only 20 years old. Being so young, I worry that I will not be able to drink and eat to experience the world of foods I love and alcohol.... How does alcohol play a role in my life now on warfarin (Coumadin) ? And balancing my diet, will I need to eat the same amount of vitamin k everyday? My levels have jumped to 6.4 then to 1.5 but I'm only 3.5 weeks into this new life. It's just hard to take all in and I'm confused. Please help?
Posted on 2013-07-24 08:32:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Being so young and my new lifestyle
Hi Danyelle, thanks for your questions. Alcohol does affect PT/INR and is best avoided. You do need to eat the same amount of vitamin K each day to stay healthy and keep your PT/INR constant. Try keeping a food diary, and try new foods that work for you! Hope that helps!
Posted on 2013-07-25 23:22:34
Name:Vito
Location:Italy
Subject:Coumadin and food when travelling
Hello, I had DVT and pulmonary embolism 3 weeks ago. I am taking coumadin half tablet daily. My question is this. Before this happened I booked a trip to Thailand with my GF. We should leave in two weeks. I just started coumadin so I am going every 3 days for blood test and until now everything seems ok. Do you thin k I can leave for 2 weeks (I will ask my doctor to give a 2 weeks schedule for coumadin) or I am risking too much? I look k forward to hearing from you, Best regards and compliments for the site and info you give!
Posted on 2013-07-31 13:23:38
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin and food when travelling
Hi Vito, thanks for your question. Definitely talk with your doctor about taking the trip. One thing to keep in mind is that there is a higher risk of DVT (Deep Vein Thrombosis) when you are sitting on a long flight. If you take the flight, be sure stretch often and walk about the plane cabin. Avoid all alcohol and tea which can dehydrate you, and drink plenty of water. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-07-31 14:57:07
Name:Wife
Location:Indiana
Subject:Beets juice supplements
Hello, my husband has been on Warfarin for just over a year and his INR stays between 2.5-3.5. A friend is suggesting he take beet juice supplements. Will this interfere with his Warfarin? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-09-06 12:43:42
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Beet juice supplements
Hi and thanks for your question. From the perspective of vitamin K, there should not be a problem, as beets are low in vitamin K. However, there have been no studies regarding beet juice supplements and vitamin K. What your husband could do is take some of the supplements a bit before his INR test and see if there are any noticeable changes.
Posted on 2013-09-08 23:38:16
Name:My mother
Location:Iran
Subject:Garlic as a blood thinner
My mother had mithral valve replacement operation and triscopid repair and AF ablation 1.5 months ago. She takes warfarin and aspirin, and some other tablets can't remember now.

Her INR and PT test two weeks ago shows she is stable. In an essay I read garlic is a blood thinner and can be eaten one piece a day, now in this site I read that it should be avoided until the doctor advises. Please let me know can she take garlic in a day? Thanks in advance for your reply.

Posted on 2013-09-11 10:07:27
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Garlic as a blood thinner
Hi and thanks for your question. It is true that garlic acts as a blood thinner. The thing to keep in mind is that your mother is already on blood thinners (Warfarin and Aspirin). It is ok for her to have 1-2 pieces of garlic a day, as long as it does not affect her PT/INR test too much and cause it to become unstable. Try 1 piece a day, and see what her PT/INR shows at her next test. If her PT/INR increases too much, then stop the garlic, or reduce the Warfarin dose. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-09-11 21:02:33
Name:VI Wife
Location:St Thomas
Subject:Coumadin with Juicing and Cancer
Hi, In 2011 my husband was dx with mucoepodermoid carconoma, In 2013 he was dx with pneumonia and a blood clot in his lung. He has always been on a green leafy diet for his cancer but that contradicts the treatment for the blood clot. Can you clarify what options there are for both a healthy green(ish) diet and still maintaining a healthy INR level. I'm afraid that I will do something wrong and make his situation worse.
Posted on 2013-09-16 05:17:29
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin with Juicing and Cancer
Hi and thanks for your question. Unfortunately, leafy greens are out when it comes to taking Warfarin. The best you could do is perhaps a bit of ice-berg lettuce with cucumbers, onions, and mushrooms. Winter squash is also high in vitamin A and can be a good part of an anti-cancer diet. Another option can be to ask you doctor for another blood thinning medication which does not interfere with vitamin K.
Posted on 2013-09-17 06:22:13
Name:Auribe
Location:California
Subject:Salt
Is it best to stay away from salt altogether while on coumadin? I'm having knee replacement surgery and will be on coumadin for a month. I bought some prepared food (frozen) for when I come home thinking it would be easy for meals. But now worry about salt intake after reading many of the comments.
Posted on 2013-09-18 17:29:53
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Salt
Hi Auribe, thanks for your question. Of course, you want to try keep your blood pressure low while on Warfarin, or even in general. However, if your meals have sodium around 10-20% of the daily value (DV) they should be fine. You do not have to avoid salt and sodium completely.
Posted on 2013-09-19 00:08:17
Name:Garrett Marlowe
Location:Eastern Seaboard
Subject:Be aware that Vitamin K may be an alternative to Warfarin
You may get the impression that Vitamin K is the opposite of Warfarin and that it coagulates blood instead of being an anticoagulant. Not true. Actually Vitamin K simply increases the number of anticoagulant proteins in your body. It's the weird way that warfarin works that causes the bad interaction. So my advice is, stay on the green veggies, even if you do take warfarin, and fully discuss the options with your doctor. If your condition is not critical, and your proteins are not genetically malformed, you may be able to use Vitamin K as an anticoagulant and avoid the risks of a chemical drug.

For more see:
Which anticoagulant proteins Vitamin K increases

How warfarin and Vitamin K interact

Be healthy.
Posted on 2013-09-26 09:38:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Be aware that Vitamin K may be an alternative to Warfarin
Hi Garrett, thanks for highlighting these interesting details on vitamin K and Warfarin, however, it does not seem right to claim that vitamin K is an alternative to Warfarin. Instead, you could say that vitamin K regulates blood coagulation. Is there any source that suggests vitamin K increases INR to an appropriate level? You are right that Warfarin does not officially antagonize vitamin K, "but rather antagonizes vitamin K1 recycling, depleting active vitamin K1." However, that does not mean you should eat a lot of vitamin K while on a steady dose of Warfarin. Instead, as The National Library of Medicine suggests Vitamin K intake should be kept constant while on Warfarin.
Posted on 2013-09-26 23:11:07
Name:Terri
Location:NYC
Subject:Beans
This site has been so informative and a great resource for a Coumadin diet. I am confused about beans. When you say to avoid them are you talking about string beans, green beans, or all legumes? I love cooking with cannelini, kidney, and roman beans. Are these also high in vitamin k?
Posted on 2013-09-29 16:45:29
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Beans
Hi Terri, thanks for your question, and glad the page is useful. Besides soy beans, soy products, and green beans, all other beans and legumes are fine for a low vitamin K Warfarin diet. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-01 05:03:48
Name:Linda
Location:NYC
Subject:Iced Tea, Soda, and Balsamic Vinaigrette
First, thanks for this website. I just started Coumadin at the beginning of the month. DVT in leg. I know not to drink Green tea (which I was since I gave up soda in June) but what about regular Ice Tea, say like Snapple, or Dunkin Doughnuts? I saw one comment about Black Tea, but most store bought ice teas don't specifically list what tea, they just say Tea leafs. Any help with this would be great. Also is soda ok? And also is Balsamic Vinaigrette ok to take while on Coumadin?
Posted on 2013-10-02 09:40:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Iced Tea, Soda, and Balsamic Vinaigrette
Hi Linda thanks for your comments and questions. Iced tea is typically made from "black" tea leaves unless the label on the front specifics otherwise. In any case, if the tea looks dark, it is likely black tea. Tea is ok to drink as long as the caffeine doesn't raise your blood pressure too much. The same goes for caffeine in sodas. Sodas are ok to drink on Warfarin but are not the best for your health in general. Balsamic vinaigrette is also ok, the problem with Warfarin is being able to have a decent salad...Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-03 02:19:30
Name:Donna
Location:Ontario
Subject:Warfarin Dose and Protein S Deficiency
In reading some of the responses there has been reference made to the amount of vitamin K consumed being dependent on the individual's dose of warfarin. What does this mean? I am currently taking 15mg 6x and 12.5mg 1x, or 102.5mg weekly. Does having 'Protein S deficiency' have any added issues with vitamin K or do I follow the same guidelines?
Posted on 2013-10-09 12:13:43
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin Dose and Protein S Deficiency
Hi Donna, thanks for your question. When you are on warfarin, you are trying to keep your INR in a specific range of 2.5 to 3.5. That range is such that your blood is thin enough to avoid clots but not so thin that your bleed excessively. Thus people on a high dose of Warfarin could eat more vitamin K to keep their INR in the right range. That is why dose matters. With a protein S deficiency, your chances of a blood clot are even higher, so you need to take more Warfarin to compensate, which explains why your dose is a little higher than most. You should still regulate your intake of vitamin K to keep your INR level as consistent as possible.
Posted on 2013-10-10 05:42:16
Name:Josephine
Location:Michigan
Subject:Flaxseed and My Years of Experience Taking Warfarin
I have been on warfarin for 9 yrs. My dosage has been 2 mgs daily. Once in a while an adjustment needs to be made because numbers have shifted after long travels. I am to keep my numbers between 2 and 3. I do watch my green intake and a few times had too many and like I said an adjustment to the medication was made. For the past 3 mos. I have been on 2 mg (5 days) and 1 mg(2 days).

I have had a weight problem most of my life and just recently came across a book called wheat belly by a Dr Davis. I started following it and Ii feel wonderful by totally eliminating wheat from my diet. There are some recipes that call for flaxseed in order to make certain bread recipes.for example you would use 1/4 cup flaxseed to 2 cups of almond flour or coconut flour and garbanzo flour. My question is should that amt of flaxseed affect the warfarin and blood levels.

I was told that I would have to remain on Coumadin for ever because my Afib is not reversible...

Posted on 2013-10-11 12:06:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Flaxseed and My Years of Experience Taking Warfarin
Hi Josephine, thanks for your question and sharing your experience. Flaxseed is quite low in vitamin K, 1 cup of whole flaxseed provides 7μg (9% DV) of vitamin K, and 1 cup of flaxseed oil contains 20μg (25% DV). Here are the complete nutrition facts. Please note, The National Library of Medicine states that flax seed can thin blood, and increase your risk of bruises and bleeding while on Warfarin. A quarter cup per day should be fine, but be on the watch if you start getting bruises. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-11 18:20:56
Name:Mike
Location:Chicago
Subject:Avocado
My mother is wondering if avocados are alright, she taking blood thinner and now can not have vitamin k in her diet.
Posted on 2013-10-14 13:20:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Avocado
Hi Mike, thanks for your question. An average avocado (201 grams) contains 42μg (53% DV) of vitamin K. Depending on your Mom's intake of other vitamin K foods, half an avocado a day (~27% DV) should be fine. Here are the complete nutrition facts.
Posted on 2013-10-15 05:15:43
Name:Linda
Location:NYC
Subject:Coumadin vs. XARELTO
I can't seem to get my levels above 2 and my doctor wants to switch me to XARELTO and I am not sure if I should as it is such a new med and I have read some really bad reviews. As I seem to get the best answers here, I though I would ask what your thoughts were. Thanks.
Posted on 2013-10-15 05:47:52
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin vs. XARELTO
Hi Linda, thanks for your question. Both Coumadin and Xarelto will have side effects, and so it is a tough choice. At this stage, your INR is not at a good level, so on top of side effects, you have to consider your risk of a blood clot, which is also bad. You might try Xarelto and see how it works for you. If the side effects are too bad, you could try something else. At least you would be able to regain a more normal diet. The National Library of Medicine has a Xarelto page on what foods/drugs to avoid, as well as a list of side effects to watch out for. Perhaps anyone else on Xarelto will share their experience here. This study found Xarelto more effective at preventing clots, but does state the long term effects are not well understood. Given your risk of a blood clot, you might try Xarelto and go from there. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2013-10-15 05:58:07
Name:Jeanette
Location:Australia
Subject:Diet vs Warfarin: Is there a natural way?
I'm curious as to know why we cannot eat a diet that is high/rich in blood thinning compounds instead of taking Warfarin with its side affects? We are having to decrease what is normally seen as required in a healthy diet, whilst we take a drug that is very unstable.
Posted on 2013-10-18 12:21:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Diet vs Warfarin: Is there a natural way?
Hi Jeanette, thanks for your question. While some foods are natural blood thinners, they are less stable and potent than Warfarin. Some blood thinning medications exist which operate independently of vitamin K, allowing for a more normal diet, but Warfarin is still the most popular, and considered the safest.
Posted on 2013-10-19 06:58:56
Name:Susan
Location:Modimolle RSA
Subject:Low Vit K for Warferin/Diabetic
I have my hands in my hair. Food that is good for a diabetic is NOT good for Warferin users. Please help me. What a fantastic job you are doing. Keep it up! Easy to research.
Posted on 2013-10-23 09:36:47
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low Vit K for Warferin/Diabetic
Hi Susan, thanks for your comments and suggestion. No doubt lots of people are in the same predicament, and a list of low vitamin K foods suitable for diabetes will be created.
Posted on 2013-10-24 07:00:21
Name:Dan Coman
Location:Romania
Subject:Bodybuilding and staying healthy
I have a trombophilia caused by an irreversible mutation in factor V, Leyden. I had a pulmonary infarction at the end of July and doctors gave me 2mgs of Sintrom, acenocumarol. We don't have Warfarin in Romania. My INR is usually between 2 and 3, but I have a different condition from average man, because I used to do lots of sports, particularly gym, not quite professional bodybuilding. I plan to restart going to the gym and take things gradually. But this is linked to a healthy food and this means lots of vegetables. I see most of them have high amounts of vitamin K. What's your advise, please? Should I only eat meat? What about olive oil in connection with vitamin K? Should I fear osteoporosis, due to my intention of keeping low levels of vitamin K? As a gym addict, should I lower down my training with weights because rabdomyolise can cause thrombosis?! Sorry for so many questions, but I am worried! Thanks! Dan
Posted on 2013-11-06 09:26:14
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Bodybuilding and staying healthy
Hi Dan, thanks for your questions. As long as your INR stays in a good range, working out should be fine. Weight lifting should help prevent osteoporosis, so you are ok there. 2 tablespoons of olive oil a day is also ok. A list of vegetables low in vitamin K is provided. Try to limit yourself to these. Keep a food diary, and keep track of your INR. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-11-07 04:57:12
Name:Laura Lee Reid
Location:Canada
Subject:Blood clots and I love this site.
I am so thankful for this site. I have received more information from this one site than all the others I have come across. Thank you for your 'lists'. I had a full right shoulder replacement surgery recently, and for whatever reason, I came out of it with pulmonary embolism. (my lungs). I am on Coumadin and my INR numbers are up then down, then up. It has been 44 days now and I am scared like the dickens. My shoulder is doing wonderful but my lungs.... Well, I am frightened but a little less so, knowing that I can come here and read and learn and do what I need to do to survive in this strange world of warfarin and blood clots, and all the rest of it. Thank you for your kind manner and informative messages.
Posted on 2013-11-27 15:14:12
Name:Kevin
Location:United States
Subject:Coumadin guidelines for ingredients and supplements
You're providing an incredible service. I've been taking warfarin since mitral valve replacement in 2005 and still struggle to get my PT/INR in check.

I work with a lot of clients in the health and nutrition field. It is frustrating to be so limited in what I can ingest not knowing if it will interact with coumadin. This resource is a big help.

I'd love to hear any further guidelines you have on ingredients often found in things like protein shakes. I was surprised to find that one I'd been taking had about 500% daily of vit K. Beyond K, are there any of those "sub-ingredients" you know of that need to be avoided?

Also, I've been taking a coconut concentrated MCT oil supplement. I see that coconuts are low in K, but is a C-8 MCT high enough to affect INR?

Thanks! Kevin

Posted on 2013-12-10 11:42:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coumadin guidelines for ingredients and supplements
Hi Kevin, thanks for your kind words, suggestions, and questions. Common ingredients which may present a problem in vitamin K content include soybean oil, dried herbs, dried fruit, and pickled cucumbers.

In regards to supplements, other readers sharing comments might be the best way to find out if there is a problem with Warfarin. Unfortunately, MCT oil has not been analyzed for vitamin K content, so it is difficult to say if it is a problem or not. A good strategy might be to keep your diet constant and try a low dose of the supplement, then watch your INR. People should consult their doctors first though, and also have a steady PT/INR.

Posted on 2013-12-11 11:14:09
Name:Val Washington
Location:Atlanta GA
Subject:Mrs Dash spices?
I have been unable to locate any information regarding the Vitamin K content in Mrs Dash spices and seasonings. Any idea how using these can effect PT/INR?
Posted on 2013-12-24 08:53:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Mrs Dash spices?
Hi Val, thanks for your question. Mrs Dash is mostly made of dried herbs, which can have up to 60% of the DV for vitamin K per tablespoon. If you limit your intake to a tablespoon or less a day, you should be fine. This depends on your daily intake of vitamin K and your Warfarin dose, so proceed with caution. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-12-24 12:26:38
Name:Linda
Location:Central CA
Subject:Vitamin D and oil in capsules
I take Warfarin and was told by my doctor I could take 1 vitamin D tablet daily. The last I bought were capsules and said they could contain corn or palm oil. Will this cause a problem?
Posted on 2014-01-04 15:42:45
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin D and oil in capsules
Hi Linda, thanks for your question. If your doctor approved the vitamin D you should be fine. Palm and corn oil do contain vitamin K, but there is so little in the capsules that vitamin K should not be an issue. Here are the complete nutrition facts for corn and palm oil with the serving size being a tablespoon.
Posted on 2014-01-05 13:42:08
Name:Viki
Location:Athens, Greece
Subject:Buy an INR machine and eat everything
I got my prosthetic aortic valve in may 1998. Doctors have never been able to settle down my INR because they measure it seldom. In Holland the national health system measures it twice a month. Its the least period you should measure it. Otherwise your INR goes up or down. So i eventually bought an inr measurer from Roche: Coaagu check, and I saved myself. I measure it twice a month. Each tape costs around 5 euros. I have it with me wherever I go for more than a day or two. I eat grerns too because they have, except vitamin k, folic acid which is extremely healthy. In time I learned that when I eat more greens in a day, I take a fourth of sintrom tablet more than on days that I don't eat so much greens. I advise everyone to take charge of their inr measuring and eating of greens because doctors can't take good care of you. They have all the inr patients to take care of, while you have only you. In time you will learn how your organism reacts to a certain amount of greens you have eaten. Measure inr at nine in the morning and take sintrom at nine in the evening. And when u have measured your inr, and its somewhat raised or fallen, correct it with less or more sintrom, according to how much raised or fallen it is. Generally, I need a fourth, quarter of a sintrom 4gr pill to raise my inr by half unit. So if my inr is 3.5 and I want it three, I'll take one quarter less on that day, and if its 2.5 and I want it 3, I'll take one quarter more. Simple. All you have to do is buy the machine and tapes, and think. Buy the 24 tapes tube as it will last you for about one year, and cost you 125 euros and you will not have to go to hospitals for measuring your inr, and your life will be safer in your own hands. Not of some doctor. One last thing, when in doubt about an inr issue, don't ask a cardiologist, they don't know enough about it. Ask a hematologist because inr is the question of thrombosis of blood, not anything to do with your heart. It helps your heart, but its about your blood. Cheers!
Posted on 2014-01-10 12:05:59
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Buy an INR machine and eat everything
Hi Vicki, thanks for your nice comment and sharing your experience. For anyone looking to buy an INR meter, they are available from Amazon.com as well as other retail/pharmacy outlets.
Posted on 2014-01-10 15:25:33
Name:Dottie
Location:United States
Subject:Aspirin interactions
I take 2 low dose aspirin for my back daily and it does thin the blood can I still enjoy high vitamin K foods daily and what about vitamin E as beta carotene 3500IU in my daily vitamin supplements?
Posted on 2014-01-14 11:20:20
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Aspirin interactions
Hi Dottie, thanks for your question. Aspirin does not work by antagonizing vitamin K, so eating vitamin K should be fine in your case. Vitamin E does thin the blood, but with just two baby aspirin this should not be a concern and you can keep taking vitamin E. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2014-01-15 13:22:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Spices in Indian and Chinese Food?
Hi Valerie, thanks for your question. Likely it is ok to eat spicy Indian and Chinese foods, as while they contain spices, it is usually less than 1-2 tablespoons, which is usually fine. Remember that consistency is also important.
Posted on 2014-01-15 13:33:07
Name:Barbara
Location:New York City
Subject:Warfarin and cheese, chocolate, etc.
I like cheese, both soft and hard cheeses. Do they fit in with a warfarin diet or are they high in Vitamin K? How about dark chocolate -- I eat a small square every day. I am wary of most foods now, as my INR went up in just two weeks of vacation, altho I tried to eat the same way as I do at home.
Posted on 2014-01-22 14:00:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin and cheese, chocolate, etc.
Hi Barbara, thanks for your question. All dairy products are low in vitamin K, the same goes for dark chocolate. Just be sure the products do not contain soybean oil or soy products. Here is a sample of nutrition facts for dark chocolate, parmesan cheese, and ricotta cheese.
Posted on 2014-01-22 15:36:06
Name:Sharen
Location:IL
Subject:Red cabbage/Raddicchio
Are red cabbage and radicchio the same as the green versions when it comes to vit K?
Posted on 2014-01-22 16:40:04
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Red cabbage/Raddicchio
Hi Sharon, thanks for your question. Red cabbage has about half the vitamin K of green cabbage, but still provides enough that it needs to be limited. Raddicchio provides about 3 times the vitamin K of green cabbage and should be avoided or limited depending on your diet plan. Here is the nutrition facts comparison of green cabbage, red cabbage, and radicchio.
Posted on 2014-01-22 20:04:07
Name:Arnold Rosner
Location:NJ
Subject:INR up with whole grains?
I'm on wafarin, 2 mg/day. Been stable for a couple of years, with INR around 2.5. Within the last 4 weeks it jumped to 4.4. The only change in my diet is more whole grains, moderate amounts. Wha?
Posted on 2014-01-25 16:18:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: INR up with whole grains?
Hi Arnold, thanks for sharing your experience. Whole grains are not particularly high in vitamin K. Here is a list of 100 grains highest in vitamin K. What might be happening is that the whole grain products have some extra ingredient, like spinach pasta, or maybe soybean oil? Check the labels carefully, and if you find out what is going on, please come back and comment.
Posted on 2014-01-26 14:51:26
Name:Jane
Location:Kansas City
Subject:Feed back that may help others
Hi, I agree this is a great site, lots of info. I have read all the stories and just wanted to share my story and my feed back to some of what I read, perhaps it will help some of you. I have been on & off Warfarin four separate times in the past 20 yrs due to blood clots in my leg. Not wanting to stay on the Warfarin, I started taking a supplement called Nattokinase to help thin things out. I had been taking it for about 8 months but I ended up in the ER with so many blood clots in my foot that I almost lost it. Dr.s told me the nattokinase was a supplement & was not regulated by the FDA, that the amounts of active ingredients were not consistent in their caplets so you were never sure how much you were really getting. Believing this supplement would help me in place of the Warfarin almost cost me really high stakes (and it will mess up your INR levels!)

This time they told me I really had to stay on Warfarin or next time it hits me I would lose parts! My family also has a history of blood clots (Hypercoagulative). Knowing I now had to be on Warfarin myself for the duration and concerned about it myself I did my research and learned as much as I could about it. I work hand in hand with the nurse at my Coumadin clinic and have learned that consistency in your diet is the key. When I started taking it they had me eat my regular diet and they adjusted my dosage accordingly to fit my diet. I just have to make sure my diet & my "K" intake remains consistent, again that is the key! A note for Trish from Georgia Re: Multivitamins, try to find "Clotamin", this is a multivitamin minus the "K", made just for us folks and it does not affect your INR levels. I get mine from the local Walgreens drugstore.

Also a note for some of you that say they have been testing your blood 2, 3 & sometimes 4 times a week please note that it does take a few of days for the dosage to regulate in your blood. My mom went thru the same thing, we finally had them back off on the testing so closely together, give it at least a week and her levels started evening out. I think in some cases they have a tendency to over manage the situation. So think about discussing this with your care givers.

One last note, Re: Viki from Greece - "Buy an INR machine & eat everything". I'm also fortunate enough to be able to do self testing at home with the Roche, Coaguchek equipment. My insurance covers 80% of the cost and it's really nice to be able to check my levels without having to go in all the time. It also only requires a little prick of the finger, just a drop of blood, no more getting stabbed in the arm and having vials of blood drawn at a time.

I take 5mg + 1 low dose Aspirin per day, + 1 Clotamin (Multivit - K) per day; then every other day I also take extra Vitamin E & D3, Flax Seed Oil, Red Yeast Red (recommended for high Cholesterol), CoQ10 (only once a week because the Red Yeast Rice depletes the natural levels in the body), and occasionally Fish Oil. I have been on this regiment this time for a year now so far and my Warfarin dosage has been stable for 97% of the time. My daily dose does go lower when I have to go on antibiotics for dental work or what have you. But after the antibiotics are done my dose goes back to 5mg and all is well. My levels should be 2.0 to 3.5 and there have been 2 times when I had a level 4.0 so I would skip 1 dose of Warfarin for that day, eat a good salad and test myself again the next day and my level was back to 2.5 right where it should be. This fact alone tells me that 1.) I missed my salads that week and 2.) Diet does make a difference!

I test every 2 weeks and even though I have made a couple of minor adjustments a couple of times, I do still work hand-in-hand with the nurse at my Coumadin clinic, and keep her filled in on everything I've done. It really is all about knowing your meds, your supplements, your body and how they all work together to keep that balance. It can be done, and it can be done comfortably, you just have to be smart about it. Good luck everyone.
Posted on 2014-02-04 15:32:45
Name:Ezra
Location:Ethopia
Subject:INR and soymilk
HI Since last year I found out that I have blood clotting problem (two types of them) DVT and mesentric Vein thrombosis and had my small bowel re sectioned. Now I began to loose weight significantly (lost about 80lb) in 8 month) and recently I started taking Soy milk because it feels good and has good nutrition factors but I read one comment about Soy milk and its vitamin K content. I'm kind of worried because I'm limited on foods by both the INR and the and the bowel re-section don't eat much. What should I do please? (I take soy milk very little but it feels good for my stomach) no pain inside. One thing Is one Cup same as cooking Cup?
Posted on 2014-03-09 10:07:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: INR and soymilk
Hi Ezra, 1 cup (which is like a cooking cup) of soymilk provides 9% of the DV for vitamin K. So 2 cups, which is like a regular 16oz glass only provides 18% DV. You should be fine drinking 2-3 glasses a day, depending on what other vitamin K foods you eat. Here are the complete nutrition facts for soymilk.
Posted on 2014-03-10 14:59:42
Name:Ann
Location:Michigan
Subject:Vitamin content of peanuts and other nuts
My husband has been on coumadin for 8 years, lately his level checks have been all over the place, usually in the high range. His care giver told him not to eat anything with vit K, including peanut butter. I'm a nurse and this doesn't make sense to me. Where can I find a listing that will tell him the content of each type of nut?
Posted on 2014-03-16 11:04:33
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:Vitamin content of peanuts and other nuts
Hi Ann, Thanks for your question. It does seem like strange advice, as someone with a high INR should try to increase their vitamin K intake to prevent excess bleeding. Peanuts are actually legumes and are low in vitamin K. Unless the peanut butter somehow has soy bean oil, it should be low in vitamin K, with 100 grams of peanut butter having 1% DV of vitmain K. Here are 147 legume products ranked by vitamin K content. Peanut butter is number 102. Here also is a list of 52 nuts and seeds by vitamin K content.
Posted on 2014-03-18 14:53:07
Name:Lesa
Location:Texas
Subject:Life long Warafin usage
Hi, I've recently suffered from my second PE with tissue damage & pleurisy. My doctor said I had borderline protein C deficiency & will keep me on Warafin for the rest of my life, most likely. I'm 51 & use to be an avid runner & very high energy. I also suffered this time with b12 deifieciency. I'm on b12 shots twice a month. I've always eaten a lot of vegetables & fruit. To get my INR in acceptable range for the rest of my life I asked if I could go back to eating lean proteins, veggies & fruit. They have allowed me to do this but have had to raise my Warafin dosage to 10mg a day. Are there long term side effects of being on this high of a dosage of Warafin? They do monitor my INR on a monthly & sometimes bi-monthly basis. I know to watch for excessive bleeding & to eat same amount of vitamin k each week. Just wondering if there are other side effects to having such a high dose of Warafin, year after year. Thanks for your help & love this site! :)
Posted on 2014-03-23 09:33:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Life long Warafin usage
Hi Lesa, thanks for sharing your experience and for your question. The biggest side effect of Coumadin is bleeding. Drugs.com and Coumadin.com both list other possible side effects which are rare, but can occur. There have not been any studies for high dose long term Warfarin, so unfortunately it is difficult to completely answer your question. Your best bet is to take the Warfarin and watch for any of the possible side effects as listed on the referred sites.
Posted on 2014-03-25 13:55:48
Name:Brenda
Location:Tampa
Subject:Coumadin Confusion
Being on Coumadin is so very frustrating. I have been trying to help educate myself with taking Coumadin and the effects of vitamin K. Vitamin K has so many good advantages for you, but if you have to take Coumadin---. This site has been helpful. but I am still left with serious concerns and questions. I just don't believe that no one has the true answers but God. I hope this posts because He is really the only one who knows everything about all things.

I just lost 24 pounds within a month, with no help from anything that has vitamin K {no greens} and my INR went to 6. My doctor told me to eat greens for the weekend and get retested on Monday. I did. The INR was down to 2.3. I was taking 10mg of Coumadin, but doctor reduced the dose to 8mg for a week, then get tested again next Monday. Now it looks like changing my diet to help me loose weight made a drastic difference. I don't know what to do anymore. Still confused. Thank you for your efforts.

Posted on 2014-03-26 14:19:52
Name:Janet Drury
Location:USA
Subject:Nutritionist needed
Taking Warfarin for Afib is complex enough, but adding diabetes is almost impossible determining what is acceptable or inaccetable. I'm 83 and have enough problems with memory loss. It seems one has to be a mathematician as well. The amount of Warfarin also adds to the equation. It is too easy for a doctor to just tell you to be consistent with Vit K intake but unless you delve into it, you don't have any idea what you're doing correctly or incorrectly. Is there a cookbook somewhere that would at least provide menus for people not only on Warfarin but diabetic as well? My insurance does not pay for a dietician and ironically, there are none in a proximity close enough for me to travel. Most answers to my questions regarding this subject are too vague and leave it up to the patient to essentially play "Russian roulette". The medical profession has stated it is one of the most dangerous drugs, so why do they not provide more comprehensive guidelines? So many times I get the distinct impression that once your age is established, so is the help that is out there. Sorry for sounding so negative, but after reading the questions above, I can clearly see I'm not alone in the confusion regarding drugs and diet. Thanks for listening! Jan D
Posted on 2014-03-30 07:23:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Nutritionist needed
Hi Janet, thanks for your comment. You are right that there needs to be more cookbooks and info for managing this medication. When one becomes available it will be added to the article and recommended to others.
Posted on 2014-03-31 01:25:14
Name:C. Y. Ng
Location:Malaysia
Subject:Warfarin and Vitamin K
I have been on warfarin for the last 10 years. To maintain an INR of between 2.5-3.5 it has to be on a trial and error basis when someone commences taking warfarin to determine the dosage. I take 2.5mg per day, but if some other person has a diet with more vitamin k then his dosage should be adjusted higher. No one need deprive themselves of vitamin k. One should always strive for a constant diet of course.
Posted on 2014-04-03 03:05:47

Post a comment.
Name:          
Location:       
Email:(Optional)
Subject:         

Spam Prevention *(REQUIRED):
Enter the last three letters of this sentence.

References

  1. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.
  2. ODS Fact Sheet on Coumadin