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Top 10 Foods Highest in Vitamin E


Vitamin E is a group of 8 fat-soluble vitamins which help prevent oxidative stress to the body, and other vitamins within the body. Adequate amounts of vitamin E can help protect against heart disease, cancer, and age related eye damage (macular degeneration). Conversely, too much vitamin E from supplements can lead to excessive bleeding, or hemorrhaging. Vitamin E foods, like the ones listed below, are considered to be safe and healthy. The current DV for vitamin E is 20mg. Below is a list of foods high in vitamin E by common serving size, for more, see the list of high vitamin E foods by nutrient density, and the extended list of vitamin E rich foods.

#1: Tofu (Light, Silken)
Vitamin E in 100gPer 1/5 package (91g)Per 3 oz (85g)
5.3mg (25% DV)4.8mg (23% DV)4.5mg (21% DV)
Firm Tofu is also High in Vitamin E providing 21% DV per 3 oz serving. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#2: Spinach (Cooked)
Vitamin E in 100gPer cup (180g)Per 10 oz pack (Raw - 284g)
2.1mg (10% DV)3.7mg (18% DV)5.8mg (28% DV)
Other Leafy Greens High in Vitamin E (%DV per cup cooked): Swiss Chard (16%), Turnip Greens (13%), Collards (8%), and Kale (5%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#3: Nuts (Almonds)
Vitamin E in 100gPer cup (Whole - 143g)Per ounce (28g)
26.2mg (127% DV)37.5mg (181% DV)7.3mg (35% DV)
Other nuts high in vitamin E (%DV per ounce):Hazelnuts (21%), Pistachios (3%), Pecans (2%), and Walnuts (2%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#4: Sunflower Seeds (Roasted)
Vitamin E in 100gPer cup (135g)Per ounce (28g)
36.3mg (176% DV)49.1mg (237% DV)10.2mg (49% DV)
Other Seeds providing Vitamin E (%DV per ounce): Pumpkin & Squash Seeds (3%) and Sesame Seeds (3%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#5: Avocados
Vitamin E in 100gPer cup cubed (150g)Per Avocado (201g)
2.1mg (10% DV)3.1mg (15% DV)4.2mg (20% DV)
Half an avocado contains approximately 160 calories. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#6: Shellfish (Shrimp)
Vitamin E in 100gPer 3 oz serving (85g)Per 4 Shrimp (22g)
2.2mg (11% DV)1.9mg (9% DV)0.5mg (2% DV)
Other Shellfish High in Vitamin E (%DV per 3 oz Cooked): Crayfish (6%) and Oysters (7%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#7: Fish (Rainbow Trout)
Vitamin E in 100gPer 3 oz (85g)Per fillet (71g)
2.8mg (13% DV)2.4mg (11% DV)2.0mg (10% DV)
Other Fish High in Vitamin E (%DV per 3 oz): Swordfish (10%), Herring (6%), Smoked Salmon (6%), and Salmon (5%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#8: Plant Oils (Olive Oil)
Vitamin E 100gPer tablespoon (14g)Per teaspoon (5g)
14.4mg (69% DV)2.0mg (10% DV)0.7mg (3% DV)
Other Plant Oils High in Vitamin E (%DV per Tablespoon): Wheat Germ (101%), Sunflower (28%), Grapeseed (19%), Canola (12%), and Corn Oil (10%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#9: Broccoli (Cooked)
Vitamin E 100gPer cup (Chopped - 156g)Per stalk (180g)
1.5mg (7% DV)2.3mg (10% DV)2.6mg (13% DV)
Broccoli contains only 54 calories per cup, chopped and cooked. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#10: Squash & Pumpkin (Cooked Butternut Squash)
Vitamin E in 100gPer cup cubed (140g)
1.3mg (6% DV)2.6mg (13% DV)
Pumpkin is also a good source of Vitamin E providing 9% DV per cup cooked. A cup of cooked mashed Sweet Potato provides 15% DV. Click to see complete nutrition facts.



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Top 10 High Vitamin E Foods by Nutrient Density (Vitamin E per Gram)

#1: Plant Oils (Wheat Germ) 149.4mg (722% DV) per 100 grams20.9mg (101% DV) per tablespoon (14 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Plant Oils
#2: Spices (Chili Powder or Paprika) 38.1mg (184% DV) per 100 grams3.1mg (15% DV) per tablespoon (8 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Spices
#3: Sunflower Seeds 36.3mg (176% DV) per 100 grams10.2mg (49% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sunflower Seeds
#4: Almonds 26.2mg (127% DV) per 100 grams7.3mg (35% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Almonds
#5: Hazelnuts 15.3mg (75% DV) per 100 grams4.3mg (21% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Hazelnuts
#6: Dried Herbs (Oregano) 18.3mg (88% DV) per 100 grams0.4mg (2% DV) per teaspoon, ground (2 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Herbs
#7: Pine Nuts 9.3mg (45% DV) per 100 grams2.6mg (13% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pine Nuts
#8: Peanuts 6.9mg (33% DV) per 100 grams1.9mg (9% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Peanuts
#9: Dried Apricots 4.3mg (21% DV) per 100 grams5.6mg (27% DV) per cup (130 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Apricots
#10: Olives 3.8mg (18% DV) per 100 grams1.1mg (5% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Olives

Other Vitamin E Rich Foods

Sweet Potato Chips 9.8mg (47% DV) per 100 gram serving 3.3mg (16% DV) per packet (34 grams) 2.8mg (13% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sweet Potato Chips
Carrots 1.0mg (5% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.6mg (8% DV) per cup Slices (156 grams) 0.5mg (2% DV) per carrot (46 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Carrots
Jalapeno Peppers 3.6mg (17% DV) per 100 gram serving 3.2mg (16% DV) per cup sliced (90 grams) 0.5mg (2% DV) per pepper (14 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Jalapeno Peppers
Bell Peppers1.6mg (8% DV) per 100 gram serving1.5mg (7% DV) per cup (92 grams)1.9mg (9% DV) in a medium sized pepper (119 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Red Bell Pepppers
Peaches, Nectarines & Apricots (Apricots) 0.9mg (4% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.5mg (7% DV) per cup Slices (165 grams) 0.3mg (1% DV) per apricot (35 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Apricots
Parsnips 1.5mg (7% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.0mg (10% DV) per cup slices (133 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Parsnips
Berries (Blackberries) 1.2mg (6% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.7mg (8% DV) per cup (144 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Blackberries
Kiwis1.5mg (7% DV) per 100 gram serving2.6mg (89% DV) per cup (177 grams)1.1mg (5% DV) in a medium kiwi fruit (76 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Kiwi Fruit
Mango1.1mg (5% DV) per 100 gram serving1.9mg (9% DV) per cup (165 grams)2.3mg (11% DV) in a mango (207 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Mangoes
Tomato0.5mg (3% DV) per 100 gram serving1mg (5% DV) in 1 cup sliced (180 grams)0.7mg (3% DV) in a medium sized tomato (123 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Tomatoes
Asparagus1.5mg (7% DV) per 100 gram serving1.4mg (7% DV) per cup (90 grams)0.9mg (4% DV) in 4 spears (60 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Asparagus
Spirulina Seaweed (Dried) 5.0mg (24% DV) per 100 gram serving 5.6mg (27% DV) per cup (112 grams) 0.4mg (2% DV) per tablespoon (7 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Spirulina
Tortilla Chips 4.3mg (21% DV) per 100 gram serving 9.1mg (44% DV) per large packet (213 grams) 1.2mg (6% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Tortilla Chips
Canned Fish in Oil (Anchovy) 3.3mg (16% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.5mg (7% DV) per 2 oz can (45 grams) 0.1mg (1% DV) per anchovy (4 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Canned Anchovies
Butter 2.3mg (11% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.3mg (2% DV) per tablespoon (14 grams) 2.6mg (13% DV) per pat (113 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Butter
Caviar 1.9mg (9% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.3mg (1% DV) per tablespoon (16 grams) 0.5mg (3% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Caviar
Quinoa(Cooked) 0.6mg (3% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.2mg (6% DV) per cup (185 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Quinoa
Low Fat Popcorn 5.0mg (24% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.4mg (7% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Low Fat Popcorn
Rice Bran 4.9mg (24% DV) per 100 gram serving 5.8mg (28% DV) per cup (118 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Rice Bran
Taro (Cooked) 2.9mg (14% DV) per 100 gram serving 3.9mg (19% DV) per cup slices (132 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Taro
For more foods high in vitamin E use the nutrient ranking tool.

Health Benefits of Vitamin E

  • Reduced Risk of Heart Disease - Vitamin E is thought to help prevent heart disease by inhibiting oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and helping to prevent blood clots which could lead to a heart attack.3,4 Studies report mixed results as to the effectiveness of supplements.5,6
  • Reduced Cancer Risk (*Controversial) - Vitamin E may help reduce cancer risk by acting as an antioxidant and by preventing formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines formed in the stomach from nitrites in foods.7,8
  • Promoted Eye Health (Prevention from Macular Degeneration) (*Controversial) - At least one study has shown intake of the DV for vitamin E reduces risk of age related eye damage (macular degeneration) by 20%.9,10 Other studies, however, fail to find any association.11,12
  • Alleviation of Chronic Inflammation - Preliminary studies show that vitamin E can help mediate the inflammatory response, and may help those with type II diabetes, or chronic heart failure, who suffer from chronic inflammation.13-15
  • Reduced Risk of Dementia (Cognitive Decline) (*Controversial) - Preliminary findings have shown increased levels of vitamin E to have a protective effect on mental functioning as people age. Further studies need to be conducted to confirm this finding.16
  • Reduced Risk of ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Lou Gehrig's Disease) (*Controversial) - A long range study found that increased intake of Vitamin E over 5 years could reduce risk of ALS. Further studies are needed as the sample size was small.17

Recipes High in Vitamin E

Blackberry Salad
Spicy Lentil Cabbage

Warnings

  • High doses of vitamin E supplements can greatly suppress blood coagulation and clotting thus increasing risk of excessive bleeding or hemorrhage.2
  • Nuts, seeds, and oils are high calorie foods and should be eaten in moderate amounts by people with a high body mass index.

Buy Vitamin E Foods

Sunflower Seeds, Dry Roasted Peanuts, Almonds, Dried Herbs, Flax Seeds




Comments.
Name:Kazmis
Location:Pakistan
Subject:Vit E & Mortality
It is correct that a high dose of Vit E is not good for blood due to inhibited coagulation, but what do you say about a high intake of seeds etc like almonds regarding mortality especially when other things like paprika, olives, etc etc are also being consumed.
Posted on 2012-01-08 10:20:15
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vit E & Mortality
Hi Kazmis, thanks for your question. The primary risks associated with vitamin E toxicity come from supplements. Vitamin E obtained from natural foods is well regulated and it is very unlikely that you will consume too much vitamin E from foods.
Posted on 2012-01-11 14:03:46
Name:Mitchell
Location:Australia
Subject:Vit E to Calorie Ratio
Hi I'm constructing a balanced diet that contains all the RDI's of all vitamins and minerals and currently the only one I am struggling with is vitamin E as most foods rich in it are also high energy/high calorie foods. I was wondering if anyone knew what food has the highest vitamin e to calorie ratio, aka the highest amount of vitamin e for the least calories? Would really appreciate it.
Posted on 2012-01-23 01:53:26
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vit E to Calorie Ratio
Hi Mitchell, thanks for your comment and request. The Nutrient Ranking Tool can now calculate and rank ratios for a variety of nutrients. Searching for foods with the highest vitamin E to calorie ratio shows that dark leafy greens like spinach and swiss chard are good, as well as spices like paprika. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-01-26 06:59:35
Name:Roberto
Subject:Vitamin E and Vitamin K
@Kazmis I'd imagine it might be true but I don't know the exact statistics. But anyway if you get enough Vitamin K (found in vegetable oil (soybean oil), collard greens, and kale), then your blood clotting will be fine.
Posted on 2012-05-04 22:46:00
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin E and Vitamin K
Hi Roberto, thanks for your comment and making a good point that eating adequate amounts of vitamin K foods can help prevent some of the anticoagulant effects of excess vitamin E (Hypervitaminosis E).Ref
Posted on 2012-05-07 03:11:37
Name:Honey
Location:London
Subject:Vitamin E and Pregnancy
What does vitamin E provide and do to help a pregnant woman? Kudos and thumbs up!
Posted on 2012-06-20 15:02:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin E and Pregnancy
Hi Honey, thanks for your question. There have not many studies to analyze the benefits of vitamin E during pregnancy. Results are mixed as to the benefits, with some claiming it can help development, while other studies suggest that too much vitamin E may cause some defects. The guideline is to try eat a moderate amount of vitamin E till anything conclusive can really be found.
Posted on 2012-06-21 02:57:22
Name:Candace
Location:Los Angeles
Subject:Vitamin E and Skin Health
My whole life I had scars on my legs and forearms due to various accidents that normal over- the- counter ointments couldn't rid of. My doctor recommended that I take vitamin E supplements. Will this improve my scars?
Posted on 2012-08-06 04:17:28
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin E and Skin Health
Hi Candace, thanks for your question. There really isn't any evidence that vitamin E supplements will help with your scars. You can try it for 2 months and let us know, but it is unlikely to help.
Posted on 2012-08-06 04:25:20
Name:Anonymous
Subject:Vit e hair growth
Is vitamin E also good for hair growth?
Posted on 2012-10-26 11:22:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vit e hair growth
Thanks for your question. There are no studies to confirm that vitamin E helps hair growth. However, you might find that vitamin D, selenium, and zinc can help.
Posted on 2012-10-26 13:48:35
Name:Maggie
Location:United States
Subject:Does vitamin E help with period cramps?
I read online that Vitamin E is good for stopping period cramps. Is that true?
Posted on 2012-11-05 17:01:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Does vitamin E help with period cramps?
Hi Maggie, thanks for your question. There are no studies to confirm that vitamin E helps with period cramps, and you are best not to take a lot of vitamin E. A lot of vitamin E does lead to bleeding which is maybe why you heard that vitamin E might help. One study has found that fish oil combined with vitamin B12 can reduce the severity of period cramps. Further, high magnesium foods have been known to help alleviate symptoms of PMS, and to help with muscle cramps. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-11-06 10:53:18
Name:Ahturah Ahkdeyah
Location:Israel
Subject:Natural vitamin E supplements
Shalom. I can not eat wheat or wheat products. What are the natural vitamin E supplements made from? Thank You.
Posted on 2012-11-20 07:15:23
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Natural vitamin E supplements
Hi Ahturah, thanks for your question. What a particular natural vitamin E supplement is made of can vary, and depends on the brand/type. Vitabase sells a natural vitamin E supplement which does not contain sugar, salt, dairy, yeast, wheat, corn, preservatives, artificial colors or flavors. Hope it is useful to you.
Posted on 2012-11-21 02:14:14
Name:Thomas young jr
Location:Liberia
Subject:Vitamin E and Asthma
How does vitamin E affect an asthmatic condition? Does it in some way add some value to the treatment of this medical condition? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-01-15 05:13:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin E and Asthma
Hi Thomas, thanks for your question. While some initial studies suggest that asthma can be alleviated with vitamin E. There is still not very good evidence that this is true. This study found that vitamin E did not help at all. Despite this evidence, vitamin E was initially thought useful since it has anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant properties. Being sure you consume enough vitamin E, or even a little more than enough, could not hurt, and would likely help a little bit.
Posted on 2013-01-15 14:16:37
Name:Mike
Location:Azerbaijan
Subject:How much vitamin E is in Olive Oil?
How much vitamin E is in extra virgin olive oil? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-04-03 10:16:34
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How much vitamin E is in Olive Oil?
Hi Mike, thanks for your question. 100 grams of olive oil provides 14mg (69% DV) of vitamin E. That is 31mg (150% DV) per cup, and 2mg (10% DV) per tablespoon. Here are the complete nutrition facts for olive oil.
Posted on 2013-04-03 23:34:34
Name:Paula
Location:Ontario
Subject:Heating foods
I am in the belief that heating foods of any sort will "delete" their effectiveness, is this true for most vitamins and is Vitamin E not affected by heating as well?
Posted on 2013-05-26 23:15:13
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Heating foods and Vitamin Quality
Hi Paula, thanks for your question. Wikipedia has information on the effect of cooking and vitamin content. Vitamin E is estimated to be diminished by 11%. Looking at the nutrition fact comparison between raw almonds, dry roasted, and oil roasted, there does not seem to be much loss of vitamin E at all. Less than 1%.
Posted on 2013-05-27 04:01:29
Name:Sunflower
Location:Japan
Subject:Vitamin E and Vitamin D
Is it ok to take vit.E and vit. D at the same time? I have a systemic sclerosis, my first doctor told me to take calcium w/ vit. D, then the second doctor advised me to take vit. E. Can I take them at the same time?
Posted on 2013-07-01 10:18:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin E and Vitamin D
Hi Sunflower, thanks for your question. From the perspective of just taking vitamin D, E, and calcium, you should be fine taking all of them together. Vitamin E may enhance the effect of blood thinners and cause bleeding, so be aware of that fact if you are on blood thinners. Check with your pharmacist if you are taking any other medications. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-07-01 11:11:50
Name:Sumi Saiyan
Location:Gujarat
Subject:Vitiligo Patches
I am suffering from vitiligo and have a vitiligo patch of around 1x1cms. Will the intake of vitamin E will help me cure this?
Posted on 2013-08-07 07:37:01
Name:Healthaliciousness
Subject:RE: Vitiligo Patches
Hi Sumi, thanks for your question. This study found that vitamin E does not help with the treatment of Vitiligo. This study, on the other hand, found that using vitamin B12, folic acid (B9), and sunlight, for 2 years, can stop the progression of vitiligo in 50% of people, can lead to improvement in 38%, and can even lead to total recovery for 6% of people. If you are going to try a diet change, or taking supplements, then try vitamin B12, and/or folic acid. Also be sure to get out in the sun!
Posted on 2013-08-07 11:27:41
Name:Sylvia
Location:USA
Subject:Vitamin E and Plavix
I am on Plavix and a low dose of aspirin. I just came across an article that states that Vitamin E is not good while on a blood thinner. It does not state if in a supplement form or in food intake. Just a little confused.
Posted on 2013-09-21 16:49:23
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin E and Plavix
Hi Sylvia, thanks for your question. Vitamin E, like Plavix, thins the blood and can increase risk of bleeding. However, most of the worry comes from taking vitamin E supplements, and not from food. To be safe, you could avoid the most nutrient dense vitamin E foods.
Posted on 2013-09-23 04:19:09
Name:Yayan
Location:Singapore
Subject:Is Macadamia nut oil rich in vitamin E?
I've been using mac nut oil for cooking & I'm wondering if it is a good source vitamin E?
Posted on 2013-11-09 20:10:45
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Is Macadamia nut oil rich in vitamin E?
Hi Yayan, thanks for your question. Macadamia nuts are not very high in vitamin E, 1 cup of raw or roasted macadamia nuts only provide 0.75mg (4% DV) of vitamin E. Try wheat germ oil or sunflower seed oil for vitamin E. Here are the complete nutrition facts for macadamia nuts.
Posted on 2013-11-10 06:27:02
Name:Amanda
Location:Hong Kong
Subject:How much is too much Vitamin E?
What is the normal daily requirement of Vitamin E for an adult? Does a long distance runner require more Vitamin E?
Posted on 2013-12-05 12:16:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How much is too much Vitamin E?
Hi Amanda thanks for your question. The U.S. Office of Dietary supplements sets the upper limit of vitamin E intake at 1000mg (1500 IU) per day. Risk comes mainly from supplements, and not from foods which are better regulated by the body. Consuming vitamin E from foods is considered safer. In regards to exercise this study found vitamin E may protect against exercise induced oxidative damage.Vitamin C can also help support the immune system of those who exercise for long periods.
Posted on 2013-12-09 19:45:57
Name:Alvan Ng
Location:Singapore
Subject:Gout Patient Be Selective
Folks suffering from gout have to be selective with what consume. Nuts, shrimps, certain seafood, tomato (with seeds) are high in uric acid / purines and may cause a gout attack.
Posted on 2014-01-04 09:37:53
Name:Anne
Location:Maryland
Subject:Fibrosystic breasts
I am in my mid 60s, in my 20s I started having aching in my breast which was diagnosed as Fibrocystic.. The Dr at the time told me just to take Vitamin E supplements and that would alleviate the soreness. Well I for one can tell you it does, if I miss a morning the next day a slight aching will begin. I take 300 mg dry form with Selenium as the selenium helps the body absorb the Vit E.
Posted on 2014-01-06 18:05:03

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Comments.
Name:Kazmis
Location:Pakistan
Subject:Vit E & Mortality
It is correct that a high dose of Vit E is not good for blood due to inhibited coagulation, but what do you say about a high intake of seeds etc like almonds regarding mortality especially when other things like paprika, olives, etc etc are also being consumed.
Posted on 2012-01-08 10:20:15
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vit E & Mortality
Hi Kazmis, thanks for your question. The primary risks associated with vitamin E toxicity come from supplements. Vitamin E obtained from natural foods is well regulated and it is very unlikely that you will consume too much vitamin E from foods.
Posted on 2012-01-11 14:03:46
Name:Mitchell
Location:Australia
Subject:Vit E to Calorie Ratio
Hi I'm constructing a balanced diet that contains all the RDI's of all vitamins and minerals and currently the only one I am struggling with is vitamin E as most foods rich in it are also high energy/high calorie foods. I was wondering if anyone knew what food has the highest vitamin e to calorie ratio, aka the highest amount of vitamin e for the least calories? Would really appreciate it.
Posted on 2012-01-23 01:53:26
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vit E to Calorie Ratio
Hi Mitchell, thanks for your comment and request. The Nutrient Ranking Tool can now calculate and rank ratios for a variety of nutrients. Searching for foods with the highest vitamin E to calorie ratio shows that dark leafy greens like spinach and swiss chard are good, as well as spices like paprika. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-01-26 06:59:35
Name:Roberto
Subject:Vitamin E and Vitamin K
@Kazmis I'd imagine it might be true but I don't know the exact statistics. But anyway if you get enough Vitamin K (found in vegetable oil (soybean oil), collard greens, and kale), then your blood clotting will be fine.
Posted on 2012-05-04 22:46:00
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin E and Vitamin K
Hi Roberto, thanks for your comment and making a good point that eating adequate amounts of vitamin K foods can help prevent some of the anticoagulant effects of excess vitamin E (Hypervitaminosis E).Ref
Posted on 2012-05-07 03:11:37
Name:Honey
Location:London
Subject:Vitamin E and Pregnancy
What does vitamin E provide and do to help a pregnant woman? Kudos and thumbs up!
Posted on 2012-06-20 15:02:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin E and Pregnancy
Hi Honey, thanks for your question. There have not many studies to analyze the benefits of vitamin E during pregnancy. Results are mixed as to the benefits, with some claiming it can help development, while other studies suggest that too much vitamin E may cause some defects. The guideline is to try eat a moderate amount of vitamin E till anything conclusive can really be found.
Posted on 2012-06-21 02:57:22
Name:Candace
Location:Los Angeles
Subject:Vitamin E and Skin Health
My whole life I had scars on my legs and forearms due to various accidents that normal over- the- counter ointments couldn't rid of. My doctor recommended that I take vitamin E supplements. Will this improve my scars?
Posted on 2012-08-06 04:17:28
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin E and Skin Health
Hi Candace, thanks for your question. There really isn't any evidence that vitamin E supplements will help with your scars. You can try it for 2 months and let us know, but it is unlikely to help.
Posted on 2012-08-06 04:25:20
Name:Anonymous
Subject:Vit e hair growth
Is vitamin E also good for hair growth?
Posted on 2012-10-26 11:22:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vit e hair growth
Thanks for your question. There are no studies to confirm that vitamin E helps hair growth. However, you might find that vitamin D, selenium, and zinc can help.
Posted on 2012-10-26 13:48:35
Name:Maggie
Location:United States
Subject:Does vitamin E help with period cramps?
I read online that Vitamin E is good for stopping period cramps. Is that true?
Posted on 2012-11-05 17:01:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Does vitamin E help with period cramps?
Hi Maggie, thanks for your question. There are no studies to confirm that vitamin E helps with period cramps, and you are best not to take a lot of vitamin E. A lot of vitamin E does lead to bleeding which is maybe why you heard that vitamin E might help. One study has found that fish oil combined with vitamin B12 can reduce the severity of period cramps. Further, high magnesium foods have been known to help alleviate symptoms of PMS, and to help with muscle cramps. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-11-06 10:53:18
Name:Ahturah Ahkdeyah
Location:Israel
Subject:Natural vitamin E supplements
Shalom. I can not eat wheat or wheat products. What are the natural vitamin E supplements made from? Thank You.
Posted on 2012-11-20 07:15:23
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Natural vitamin E supplements
Hi Ahturah, thanks for your question. What a particular natural vitamin E supplement is made of can vary, and depends on the brand/type. Vitabase sells a natural vitamin E supplement which does not contain sugar, salt, dairy, yeast, wheat, corn, preservatives, artificial colors or flavors. Hope it is useful to you.
Posted on 2012-11-21 02:14:14
Name:Thomas young jr
Location:Liberia
Subject:Vitamin E and Asthma
How does vitamin E affect an asthmatic condition? Does it in some way add some value to the treatment of this medical condition? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-01-15 05:13:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin E and Asthma
Hi Thomas, thanks for your question. While some initial studies suggest that asthma can be alleviated with vitamin E. There is still not very good evidence that this is true. This study found that vitamin E did not help at all. Despite this evidence, vitamin E was initially thought useful since it has anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant properties. Being sure you consume enough vitamin E, or even a little more than enough, could not hurt, and would likely help a little bit.
Posted on 2013-01-15 14:16:37
Name:Mike
Location:Azerbaijan
Subject:How much vitamin E is in Olive Oil?
How much vitamin E is in extra virgin olive oil? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-04-03 10:16:34
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How much vitamin E is in Olive Oil?
Hi Mike, thanks for your question. 100 grams of olive oil provides 14mg (69% DV) of vitamin E. That is 31mg (150% DV) per cup, and 2mg (10% DV) per tablespoon. Here are the complete nutrition facts for olive oil.
Posted on 2013-04-03 23:34:34
Name:Paula
Location:Ontario
Subject:Heating foods
I am in the belief that heating foods of any sort will "delete" their effectiveness, is this true for most vitamins and is Vitamin E not affected by heating as well?
Posted on 2013-05-26 23:15:13
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Heating foods and Vitamin Quality
Hi Paula, thanks for your question. Wikipedia has information on the effect of cooking and vitamin content. Vitamin E is estimated to be diminished by 11%. Looking at the nutrition fact comparison between raw almonds, dry roasted, and oil roasted, there does not seem to be much loss of vitamin E at all. Less than 1%.
Posted on 2013-05-27 04:01:29
Name:Sunflower
Location:Japan
Subject:Vitamin E and Vitamin D
Is it ok to take vit.E and vit. D at the same time? I have a systemic sclerosis, my first doctor told me to take calcium w/ vit. D, then the second doctor advised me to take vit. E. Can I take them at the same time?
Posted on 2013-07-01 10:18:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin E and Vitamin D
Hi Sunflower, thanks for your question. From the perspective of just taking vitamin D, E, and calcium, you should be fine taking all of them together. Vitamin E may enhance the effect of blood thinners and cause bleeding, so be aware of that fact if you are on blood thinners. Check with your pharmacist if you are taking any other medications. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-07-01 11:11:50
Name:Sumi Saiyan
Location:Gujarat
Subject:Vitiligo Patches
I am suffering from vitiligo and have a vitiligo patch of around 1x1cms. Will the intake of vitamin E will help me cure this?
Posted on 2013-08-07 07:37:01
Name:Healthaliciousness
Subject:RE: Vitiligo Patches
Hi Sumi, thanks for your question. This study found that vitamin E does not help with the treatment of Vitiligo. This study, on the other hand, found that using vitamin B12, folic acid (B9), and sunlight, for 2 years, can stop the progression of vitiligo in 50% of people, can lead to improvement in 38%, and can even lead to total recovery for 6% of people. If you are going to try a diet change, or taking supplements, then try vitamin B12, and/or folic acid. Also be sure to get out in the sun!
Posted on 2013-08-07 11:27:41
Name:Sylvia
Location:USA
Subject:Vitamin E and Plavix
I am on Plavix and a low dose of aspirin. I just came across an article that states that Vitamin E is not good while on a blood thinner. It does not state if in a supplement form or in food intake. Just a little confused.
Posted on 2013-09-21 16:49:23
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin E and Plavix
Hi Sylvia, thanks for your question. Vitamin E, like Plavix, thins the blood and can increase risk of bleeding. However, most of the worry comes from taking vitamin E supplements, and not from food. To be safe, you could avoid the most nutrient dense vitamin E foods.
Posted on 2013-09-23 04:19:09
Name:Yayan
Location:Singapore
Subject:Is Macadamia nut oil rich in vitamin E?
I've been using mac nut oil for cooking & I'm wondering if it is a good source vitamin E?
Posted on 2013-11-09 20:10:45
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Is Macadamia nut oil rich in vitamin E?
Hi Yayan, thanks for your question. Macadamia nuts are not very high in vitamin E, 1 cup of raw or roasted macadamia nuts only provide 0.75mg (4% DV) of vitamin E. Try wheat germ oil or sunflower seed oil for vitamin E. Here are the complete nutrition facts for macadamia nuts.
Posted on 2013-11-10 06:27:02
Name:Amanda
Location:Hong Kong
Subject:How much is too much Vitamin E?
What is the normal daily requirement of Vitamin E for an adult? Does a long distance runner require more Vitamin E?
Posted on 2013-12-05 12:16:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How much is too much Vitamin E?
Hi Amanda thanks for your question. The U.S. Office of Dietary supplements sets the upper limit of vitamin E intake at 1000mg (1500 IU) per day. Risk comes mainly from supplements, and not from foods which are better regulated by the body. Consuming vitamin E from foods is considered safer. In regards to exercise this study found vitamin E may protect against exercise induced oxidative damage.Vitamin C can also help support the immune system of those who exercise for long periods.
Posted on 2013-12-09 19:45:57
Name:Alvan Ng
Location:Singapore
Subject:Gout Patient Be Selective
Folks suffering from gout have to be selective with what consume. Nuts, shrimps, certain seafood, tomato (with seeds) are high in uric acid / purines and may cause a gout attack.
Posted on 2014-01-04 09:37:53
Name:Anne
Location:Maryland
Subject:Fibrosystic breasts
I am in my mid 60s, in my 20s I started having aching in my breast which was diagnosed as Fibrocystic.. The Dr at the time told me just to take Vitamin E supplements and that would alleviate the soreness. Well I for one can tell you it does, if I miss a morning the next day a slight aching will begin. I take 300 mg dry form with Selenium as the selenium helps the body absorb the Vit E.
Posted on 2014-01-06 18:05:03

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References

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  2. Office Of Dietary Supplements Fact Sheet: Vitamin E
  3. Institute of Medicine. Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes: Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 2000.
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  13. http://news.illinois.edu/news/08/1204vitamine.html
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