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Top 10 Foods Highest in Vitamin E


Vitamin E is a group of 8 fat-soluble vitamins which help prevent oxidative stress to the body, and other vitamins within the body. Adequate amounts of vitamin E can help protect against heart disease, cancer, and age related eye damage (macular degeneration). Conversely, too much vitamin E from supplements can lead to excessive bleeding, or hemorrhaging. Vitamin E foods, like the ones listed below, are considered to be safe and healthy. The current DV for vitamin E is 20mg. Below is a list of foods high in vitamin E by common serving size, for more, see the list of high vitamin E foods by nutrient density, and the extended list of vitamin E rich foods.

#1: Tofu (Light, Silken)
Vitamin E in 100gPer 1/5 package (91g)Per 3 oz (85g)
5.3mg (25% DV)4.8mg (23% DV)4.5mg (21% DV)
Firm Tofu is also High in Vitamin E providing 21% DV per 3 oz serving. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#2: Spinach (Cooked)
Vitamin E in 100gPer cup (180g)Per 10 oz pack (Raw - 284g)
2.1mg (10% DV)3.7mg (18% DV)5.8mg (28% DV)
Other Leafy Greens High in Vitamin E (%DV per cup cooked): Swiss Chard (16%), Turnip Greens (13%), Collards (8%), and Kale (5%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#3: Nuts (Almonds)
Vitamin E in 100gPer cup (Whole - 143g)Per ounce (28g)
26.2mg (127% DV)37.5mg (181% DV)7.3mg (35% DV)
Other nuts high in vitamin E (%DV per ounce):Hazelnuts (21%), Pistachios (3%), Pecans (2%), and Walnuts (2%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#4: Sunflower Seeds (Roasted)
Vitamin E in 100gPer cup (135g)Per ounce (28g)
36.3mg (176% DV)49.1mg (237% DV)10.2mg (49% DV)
Other Seeds providing Vitamin E (%DV per ounce): Pumpkin & Squash Seeds (3%) and Sesame Seeds (3%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#5: Avocados
Vitamin E in 100gPer cup cubed (150g)Per Avocado (201g)
2.1mg (10% DV)3.1mg (15% DV)4.2mg (20% DV)
Half an avocado contains approximately 160 calories. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#6: Shellfish (Shrimp)
Vitamin E in 100gPer 3 oz serving (85g)Per 4 Shrimp (22g)
2.2mg (11% DV)1.9mg (9% DV)0.5mg (2% DV)
Other Shellfish High in Vitamin E (%DV per 3 oz Cooked): Crayfish (6%) and Oysters (7%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#7: Fish (Rainbow Trout)
Vitamin E in 100gPer 3 oz (85g)Per fillet (71g)
2.8mg (13% DV)2.4mg (11% DV)2.0mg (10% DV)
Other Fish High in Vitamin E (%DV per 3 oz): Swordfish (10%), Herring (6%), Smoked Salmon (6%), and Salmon (5%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#8: Plant Oils (Olive Oil)
Vitamin E 100gPer tablespoon (14g)Per teaspoon (5g)
14.4mg (69% DV)2.0mg (10% DV)0.7mg (3% DV)
Other Plant Oils High in Vitamin E (%DV per Tablespoon): Wheat Germ (101%), Sunflower (28%), Grapeseed (19%), Canola (12%), and Corn Oil (10%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#9: Broccoli (Cooked)
Vitamin E 100gPer cup (Chopped - 156g)Per stalk (180g)
1.5mg (7% DV)2.3mg (10% DV)2.6mg (13% DV)
Broccoli contains only 54 calories per cup, chopped and cooked. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#10: Squash & Pumpkin (Cooked Butternut Squash)
Vitamin E in 100gPer cup cubed (140g)
1.3mg (6% DV)2.6mg (13% DV)
Pumpkin is also a good source of Vitamin E providing 9% DV per cup cooked. A cup of cooked mashed Sweet Potato provides 15% DV. Click to see complete nutrition facts.





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Top 10 High Vitamin E Foods by Nutrient Density (Vitamin E per Gram)

#1: Plant Oils (Wheat Germ) 149.4mg (722% DV) per 100 grams20.9mg (101% DV) per tablespoon (14 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Plant Oils
#2: Spices (Chili Powder or Paprika) 38.1mg (184% DV) per 100 grams3.1mg (15% DV) per tablespoon (8 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Spices
#3: Sunflower Seeds 36.3mg (176% DV) per 100 grams10.2mg (49% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sunflower Seeds
#4: Almonds 26.2mg (127% DV) per 100 grams7.3mg (35% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Almonds
#5: Hazelnuts 15.3mg (75% DV) per 100 grams4.3mg (21% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Hazelnuts
#6: Dried Herbs (Oregano) 18.3mg (88% DV) per 100 grams0.4mg (2% DV) per teaspoon, ground (2 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Herbs
#7: Pine Nuts 9.3mg (45% DV) per 100 grams2.6mg (13% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pine Nuts
#8: Peanuts 6.9mg (33% DV) per 100 grams1.9mg (9% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Peanuts
#9: Dried Apricots 4.3mg (21% DV) per 100 grams5.6mg (27% DV) per cup (130 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Apricots
#10: Olives 3.8mg (18% DV) per 100 grams1.1mg (5% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Olives

Other Vitamin E Rich Foods

Sweet Potato Chips 9.8mg (47% DV) per 100 gram serving 3.3mg (16% DV) per packet (34 grams) 2.8mg (13% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sweet Potato Chips
Carrots 1.0mg (5% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.6mg (8% DV) per cup Slices (156 grams) 0.5mg (2% DV) per carrot (46 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Carrots
Jalapeno Peppers 3.6mg (17% DV) per 100 gram serving 3.2mg (16% DV) per cup sliced (90 grams) 0.5mg (2% DV) per pepper (14 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Jalapeno Peppers
Bell Peppers1.6mg (8% DV) per 100 gram serving1.5mg (7% DV) per cup (92 grams)1.9mg (9% DV) in a medium sized pepper (119 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Red Bell Pepppers
Peaches, Nectarines & Apricots (Apricots) 0.9mg (4% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.5mg (7% DV) per cup Slices (165 grams) 0.3mg (1% DV) per apricot (35 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Apricots
Parsnips 1.5mg (7% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.0mg (10% DV) per cup slices (133 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Parsnips
Berries (Blackberries) 1.2mg (6% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.7mg (8% DV) per cup (144 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Blackberries
Kiwis1.5mg (7% DV) per 100 gram serving2.6mg (89% DV) per cup (177 grams)1.1mg (5% DV) in a medium kiwi fruit (76 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Kiwi Fruit
Mango1.1mg (5% DV) per 100 gram serving1.9mg (9% DV) per cup (165 grams)2.3mg (11% DV) in a mango (207 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Mangoes
Tomato0.5mg (3% DV) per 100 gram serving1mg (5% DV) in 1 cup sliced (180 grams)0.7mg (3% DV) in a medium sized tomato (123 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Tomatoes
Asparagus1.5mg (7% DV) per 100 gram serving1.4mg (7% DV) per cup (90 grams)0.9mg (4% DV) in 4 spears (60 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Asparagus
Spirulina Seaweed (Dried) 5.0mg (24% DV) per 100 gram serving 5.6mg (27% DV) per cup (112 grams) 0.4mg (2% DV) per tablespoon (7 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Spirulina
Tortilla Chips 4.3mg (21% DV) per 100 gram serving 9.1mg (44% DV) per large packet (213 grams) 1.2mg (6% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Tortilla Chips
Canned Fish in Oil (Anchovy) 3.3mg (16% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.5mg (7% DV) per 2 oz can (45 grams) 0.1mg (1% DV) per anchovy (4 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Canned Anchovies
Butter 2.3mg (11% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.3mg (2% DV) per tablespoon (14 grams) 2.6mg (13% DV) per pat (113 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Butter
Caviar 1.9mg (9% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.3mg (1% DV) per tablespoon (16 grams) 0.5mg (3% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Caviar
Quinoa(Cooked) 0.6mg (3% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.2mg (6% DV) per cup (185 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Quinoa
Low Fat Popcorn 5.0mg (24% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.4mg (7% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Low Fat Popcorn
Rice Bran 4.9mg (24% DV) per 100 gram serving 5.8mg (28% DV) per cup (118 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Rice Bran
Taro (Cooked) 2.9mg (14% DV) per 100 gram serving 3.9mg (19% DV) per cup slices (132 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Taro
For more foods high in vitamin E use the nutrient ranking tool.

Health Benefits of Vitamin E

  • Reduced Risk of Heart Disease - Vitamin E is thought to help prevent heart disease by inhibiting oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and helping to prevent blood clots which could lead to a heart attack.3,4 Studies report mixed results as to the effectiveness of supplements.5,6
  • Reduced Cancer Risk (*Controversial) - Vitamin E may help reduce cancer risk by acting as an antioxidant and by preventing formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines formed in the stomach from nitrites in foods.7,8
  • Promoted Eye Health (Prevention from Macular Degeneration) (*Controversial) - At least one study has shown intake of the DV for vitamin E reduces risk of age related eye damage (macular degeneration) by 20%.9,10 Other studies, however, fail to find any association.11,12
  • Alleviation of Chronic Inflammation - Preliminary studies show that vitamin E can help mediate the inflammatory response, and may help those with type II diabetes, or chronic heart failure, who suffer from chronic inflammation.13-15
  • Reduced Risk of Dementia (Cognitive Decline) (*Controversial) - Preliminary findings have shown increased levels of vitamin E to have a protective effect on mental functioning as people age. Further studies need to be conducted to confirm this finding.16
  • Reduced Risk of ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Lou Gehrig's Disease) (*Controversial) - A long range study found that increased intake of Vitamin E over 5 years could reduce risk of ALS. Further studies are needed as the sample size was small.17

Recipes High in Vitamin E

Blackberry Salad
Spicy Lentil Cabbage

Warnings

  • High doses of vitamin E supplements can greatly suppress blood coagulation and clotting thus increasing risk of excessive bleeding or hemorrhage.2
  • Nuts, seeds, and oils are high calorie foods and should be eaten in moderate amounts by people with a high body mass index.

Buy Vitamin E Foods

Sunflower Seeds, Dry Roasted Peanuts, Almonds, Dried Herbs, Flax Seeds



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▼ References
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  1. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.
  2. Office Of Dietary Supplements Fact Sheet: Vitamin E
  3. Institute of Medicine. Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes: Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 2000.
  4. Glynn RJ, Ridker PM, Goldhaber SZ, Zee RY, Buring JE. Effects of random allocation to vitamin E supplementation on the occurrence of venous thromboembolism: report from the Women's Health Study. Circulation 2007;116:1497-1503.
  5. Stampfer MJ, Hennekens CH, Manson JE, Colditz GA, Rosner B, Willett WC. Vitamin E consumption and the risk of coronary disease in women. N Engl J Med 1993;328:1444-9.
  6. Traber MG. Heart disease and single-vitamin supplementation. Am J Clin Nutr 2007;85:293S-9S.
  7. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 16-1, 2004. http://www.ars.usda.gov/ba/bhnrc/ndl
  8. Weitberg AB, Corvese D. Effect of vitamin E and beta-carotene on DNA strand breakage induced by tobacco-specific nitrosamines and stimulated human phagocytes. J Exp Clin Cancer Res 1997;16:11-4.
  9. Chong EW-T, Wong TY, Kreis AJ, Simpson JA, Guymer RH. Dietary antioxidants and primary prevention of age-related macular degeneration: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ 2007;335:755.
  10. Evans J. Primary prevention of age related macular degeneration. BMJ 2007;335:729.
  11. Taylor HR, Tikellis G, Robman LD, McCarty CA, McNeil JJ. Vitamin E supplementation and macular degeneration: randomized controlled trial. BMJ 2002;325:11.
  12. Teikari JM, Virtamo J, Rautalahti M, Palmgren J, Liesto K, Heinonen OP. Long-term supplementation with alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene and age-related cataract. Acta Ophthalmol Scand 1997;75:634-40.
  13. http://news.illinois.edu/news/08/1204vitamine.html
  14. Huey KA, Fiscus G, Richwin AF, Johnson RW, Meador BM. In vivo vitamin E administration attenuates IL-6 and IL-1 responses to an acute inflammatory insult in mouse skeletal and cardiac muscle. Exp Physiology. 2008.
  15. Meador BM., Fiscus G, Richwine AF, Johnson RW, Huey KA. Effects of Vitamin E on Cytokine Responses to an Inflammatory Insult in Mouse Skeletal Muscle. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: May 2008 - Volume 40 - Issue 5 - pp S162-S163.
  16. K.H. Masaki, MD, K.G. Losonczy, MA, G. Izmirlian, PhD, D.J. Foley, MS, G.W. Ross, MD, H. Petrovitch, MD, R. Havlik, MD and L.R. White, MD. Association of vitamin E and C supplement use with cognitive function and dementia in elderly men. Neurology March 28, 2000 vol. 54 no. 6 1265-1272.
  17. Ascherio A. Vitamin E Intake and Risk of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Pooled Analysis of Data From 5 Prospective Cohort Studies. Am. J. Epidemiol. (2011) 173 (6): 595-602.