Home   Top 10 Lists   Nutrition Facts   Super Foods   Fruits   Vegetables   Recipes   Blog   FAQ   

How Much Do Almonds Lower Cholesterol?


Photo of Almonds
Almonds are a HealthAliciousNess Superfood, a good source of vitamin E and calcium, and also have the potential to lower your cholesterol.

Numerous studies report up to a 10% reduction of bad Cholesterol (LDLs) for study particpants consuming almonds versus those who don't. This reduction occurs without harming levels of good cholesterol (HDLs).1-4 The results show you simply have to consume almonds without making any other changes to your diet. However, cutting all animal fats and many other high cholesterol foods will certainly help lower your LDL cholesterol numbers further.

How Many Almonds Should I Eat?

In order to achieve a 10% reduction in LDL cholesterol aim to eat around 73 grams of almonds per day. That is about half a cup of almonds, and around 400 calories from almonds alone. One dose-response study of almonds showed a 5% reduction in LDL cholesterol per 1/4 cup of almonds, and 10% for a 1/2 cup.2 Studies have not been done if you eat a full cup of almonds. However, since almonds are high in calories, it is not recommended that you eat more than a cup a day. Below is a graph representing how almonds might affect your cholesterol numbers. It assumes your current cholesterol level is 200 (mg/dL).

Graph showing cholesterol reduction from almonds

The Bottom Line with Almonds and Cholesterol

With several studies1-4 reporting a 10% decline in LDL cholesterol from eating almonds, it is recommended that you eat almonds as part of your plan to lower your cholesterol numbers. As always, consider buying a home cholesterol test kit so you can keep track of your own numbers, without expensive doctor bills and long waits, to see what foods work for you. Come back and comment on this article if you experience the same 10% reduction from eating almonds! Also, be sure to read the article on cholesterol lowering foods.





Advertisement



Comments.
Name:Carlos Augusto
Location:Venice, California
Subject:225 Cholesterol HDL
Started eating almonds, Oct 20, 2011. And want to keep track of lowering my cholesterol.
Posted on 2011-10-21 13:38:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: 225 Cholesterol HDL
Hi Carolos, thanks for keeping us posted and good luck lowering your level! Consider purchasing a home cholesterol test kit to keep track of your numbers. An electronic test kit that uses test strips can be a good investment, though it is expensive. As always, also consider eating other cholesterol lowering foods, unless you want to test the effect of almonds alone. Keep us posted!
Posted on 2011-10-22 15:33:41
Name:Kazmis
Location:Pakistan
Subject:Misguidence about Almonds
Taking lot of Almonds daily and reducing 10% LDL is not fair. In fact if you reduce taking saturated fats 10% LDL will automaticly decrease, and it is not the Almonds.
Posted on 2011-12-28 03:14:00
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Misguidence about Almonds
Hi Kazmus, thanks for your comment. The 10% reduction in LDL cholesterol comes directly from the dose response study by the American Heart Association. In that study almonds were eaten as a snack with no other changes in diet. Therefore, saturated fats should not have been reduced by the study participants. The exact reason why almonds so effectively lower cholesterol across so many studies is not known. It could be due to the fiber, protein, mono-saturated fats, or some other chemical in almonds.
Posted on 2011-12-28 08:01:51
Name:Tracy
Location:SF, CA
Subject:Almond Milk
I'm vegan and do use almonds but was wondering if my raw almond milk also works? I don't have heart issues (maybe because of a plant based diet) but was curious just the same.
Posted on 2012-03-31 14:37:10
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Almond Milk
Hi Tracy, thanks for your question. There are no studies on raw almond milk and cholesterol, but there is no reason to think raw almond milk would not be just as effective as almonds. This is especially true if the almond milk as no added sugar, or full fat dairy. The sugar is not directly related to cholesterol, but can increase your level of triglycerides, which much like cholesterol, are bad for your heart health.
Posted on 2012-03-31 17:27:52
Name:Tom
Location:Orange
Subject:Roasted or Raw?
Do the beneficial effects of almonds depend on whether one eats them raw? I like the roasted varieties much more.
Posted on 2012-04-07 02:40:27
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Roasted or Raw?
Hi Tom, thanks for your question. The reduction numbers quoted in this article come from raw unblanched almonds, however, a study between raw and roasted almonds showed that both significantly lower LDL cholesterol. Interestingly, the study also showed that roasted almond butter does not lower LDL cholesterol, but does increase the good HDL cholesterol. Basically, you can expect close to the same LDL lowering effect from unblanched roasted almonds, but not almond butter.
Posted on 2012-04-07 23:14:27
Name:Carol
Location:Florida
Subject:Raw plain almonds made into butter
I have a tooth problem and cannot eat almonds but would like to take raw almonds and make almond butter. Will I get the same benefits?
Posted on 2012-07-06 08:45:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Raw plain almonds made into butter
Hi Carol, thanks for your question. You will get the same benefit from raw almond butter. Particularly if you do not add other ingredients, like sugar.
Posted on 2012-07-07 01:24:25
Name:Pete
Location:Manchester
Subject:How to Make Almond Butter?
How do you make the almond butter from the almonds?
Posted on 2012-07-20 08:51:58
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How to Make Almond Butter
Hi Pete, thanks for your question. Almond butter can be made by simply grinding raw almonds in a food processor. Some people like to add oil or honey at the end. Here is a good step by step recipe.
Posted on 2012-07-20 11:19:18
Name:Jayant Giri
Location:Nagpur, India
Subject:Benefits of Almonds and Weight Gain
While eating almonds may be good for reducing the LDL, can you tell me if its sustained use will lead to weight gain?
Posted on 2012-08-09 06:09:14
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Benefits of Almonds and Weight Gain
Hi Jayant, thanks for your question. As stated in the article, the recommended half a cup of almonds amounts to about 400 calories. Over time, this can lead to weight gain if you do not cut other foods from your diet, or exercise. However, exercise is also recommended for lowering bad LDL cholesterol and increasing good HDL cholesterol.
Posted on 2012-08-09 08:42:52
Name:Acacia
Location:Wisconsin
Subject:Why does roasted almond butter not have the same effect?
If roasted almonds lower LDL cholesterol, why doesn't the almond butter made from them have the same effect?
Posted on 2012-09-17 21:56:50
Name:Alastair
Location:Wales
Subject:The effect of almonds
Raw, unblanched almonds are a great source of magnesium and Calcium. These minerals are used by the body to buffer increased internal acidity caused by poor dietary choices. Almond butter probably doesn't have the same effect as I would imagine these almonds are not deemed suitable for direct sale due to the skin flaking away and the nut inside being susceptible to mold. When eating almonds you should ensure the brown skin is intact and ideally soak them for at least 8hrs to activate the enzymes and make them a living food. Weight is gained by eating acidizing food not high calorie alkalizing food. The body encapsulates the acid and stores it away to be dealt with later - hence weight gain. to lose weight eat more green vegetables, cut out/reduce alcohol, caffeine, dairy, animal protein and drink 2-4 glasses of water with a tsp bicarbonate of soda. Increase activity enough to generate a sweat response for at least 15mins a day. Drink plenty of alkaline water.
Posted on 2012-09-23 21:22:49
Name:Shan
Subject:Almonds without skin
For increasing the HDL, is there any need to remove the skin of the almond? I've heard many saying that the almond's skin is not good for cholesterol.
Posted on 2012-11-09 03:52:13
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Almonds without skin
Hi Shan, thanks for your question. Almonds and almond skins do lower LDL cholesterol, while having little effect on HDL cholesterol. You should be fine eating the skins, which can lower your LDL cholesterol, which is considered better for your cardiovascular health.
Posted on 2012-11-09 03:59:12
Name:Angie
Location:Springdale, AR
Subject:Over what period of time?
What period of time does the lowering of the cholesterol happen? How long was the study? Not questioning the results, I'm just curious.
Posted on 2012-11-14 20:24:15
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Over what period of time?
Hi Angie, thanks for your question. The data in the chart is from a dose response study that measured results after 2 and 4 weeks, meaning that the effect of the almonds was observed only after 4 weeks! The second study lasted 9 weeks. You should start to see results from almonds within 2-9 weeks.
Posted on 2012-11-14 22:31:43
Name:George H
Location:Chicago
Subject:A cup of any nuts is a lot of calories and Omega-6
1/4 cup is most one should have if consumed daily. A lot of fat, thus calories.

Unless someone takes this as part of the daily diet plan, caution is necessary.

Posted on 2013-01-16 23:01:20
Name:Nannette
Location:North Carolina
Subject:Testing the theory after 2 weeks
I am 120 lbs, have genetic high cholesterol, can't take statins (allergic to them), also had BC last year and am on daily Arimidex to fight estrogen. My total cholesterol is 300, but HDL is over 60 and Tris are around 100. I am eating 1/2 cup of roasted almonds a day to see if it makes a difference in my cholesterol levels, however Arimidex is known to raise cholesterol even more, so after I have my fasting cholesterol checked on 3-28-23 will let you know if the almonds helped, but it will be hard to tell since I'm taking Arimidex, and I also quit smoking 3 months ago...which should help it fall as well. I too, do not drink milk. I take supplements and drink Almond milk only. Will keep you posted.
Posted on 2013-03-13 19:17:51
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Testing the theory after 2 weeks
Hi Nannette, thanks for sharing your experience and look forward to hearing your result in a few weeks. 2 weeks may not be enough time, but hopefully your cholesterol will go down. Consider adding at least 20 minutes of aerobic exercise a day if you can.
Posted on 2013-03-13 21:10:11
Name:Deborah
Location:Sri Lanka
Subject:Cholesterol levels and interpreting lipid panel results
Hi, thanks for the load of information on lowering of Cholesterol. I started taking almonds only today and hope that when I see my Dr again after one week, there will be even a slight change. My total cholesterol is 230.1, while HDL is 54.1,LDL 154.8, tris are 106.2, VLDL 21.2 and CHO/HDL 4.25. Could you let me know what these levels denote? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-05-31 10:48:37
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cholesterol levels and interpreting lipid panel results
Hi Deborah, Thanks for your question.
HDL is your good cholesterol that is thought to be good for your heart.
LDL is the bad cholesterol thought to be bad for you.
You want HDL to go up, but LDL to go down.
Triglycerides are also bad for you, they are the fats made from eating sugary foods.
VLDL are very dense LDLs, and are also bad for you.
The CHO/HDL is your total cholesterol to HDL ratio. Less than 5 is ok, but less than 3.5 is optimal and reduces your risk of heart disease.
For more details see the Medline Plus page on Understanding Cholesterol Results, and the American Heart Association page on Cholesterol Levels.
Posted on 2013-06-05 03:43:20
Name:Marcel
Location:California
Subject:How many almonds?
This is good info, but what is the best amount to eat? Half cup or full cup? Thats a big difference each day! This article it says: "-10% for a 1/2 cup. Studies have not been done if you eat a full cup of almonds."

However another article here "10 foods to lower cholesterol" states: "Several studies report that eating up to a cup of almonds can reduce cholesterol levels by up to 10%. In a dose response study it was found that half a cup of almonds reduces cholesterol by 5% and 1 cup causes the full 10% reduction."

This is conflicting information. Could you please make an update here? Thanks!

Posted on 2013-11-11 07:12:22
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How many almonds?
Hi Marcel, thanks for your comment and questions. Half a cup is the maximum amount, and the cholesterol lowering foods article has now been amended to reflect the correct amount of half a cup. The full text of the dose response study can be found here. They list a half dose of whole raw almonds as 37grams per day, and a full dose as 73 grams per day. As one whole cup of almonds weights 143 grams, their doses correspond to 1/4 and 1/2 of a cup of whole almonds. Thanks for pointing out the discrepancy!
Posted on 2013-11-11 16:49:41
Name:Michael Coogan
Location:Ireland
Subject:Almonds and krill oil worked for me
Hi, 6 Weeks ago I had my total cholesterol measured at 6.8. Since them I've been eating 400 grams of ground almonds a week, along with plant sterols which I'd been taking all along. Plenty of Salmon and also taking red krill oil supplements. I also use quite a bt of cinnamon, turmeric, and ginger (all natural anti-inflammatories) - had my cholesterol measured again last week - 4.4 total - Almonds and krill oil are really the only thing I added to my diet - worth a shot. I don't like krill oil but put a tablespoon 80 - 100 ml of water or juice and knock it back, does the job, Michael.
Posted on 2013-12-23 09:29:01

Post a comment.
Name:          
Location:       
Email:(Optional)
Subject:         

Spam Prevention *(REQUIRED):
Enter the last three letters of this sentence.
Comments.
Name:Carlos Augusto
Location:Venice, California
Subject:225 Cholesterol HDL
Started eating almonds, Oct 20, 2011. And want to keep track of lowering my cholesterol.
Posted on 2011-10-21 13:38:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: 225 Cholesterol HDL
Hi Carolos, thanks for keeping us posted and good luck lowering your level! Consider purchasing a home cholesterol test kit to keep track of your numbers. An electronic test kit that uses test strips can be a good investment, though it is expensive. As always, also consider eating other cholesterol lowering foods, unless you want to test the effect of almonds alone. Keep us posted!
Posted on 2011-10-22 15:33:41
Name:Kazmis
Location:Pakistan
Subject:Misguidence about Almonds
Taking lot of Almonds daily and reducing 10% LDL is not fair. In fact if you reduce taking saturated fats 10% LDL will automaticly decrease, and it is not the Almonds.
Posted on 2011-12-28 03:14:00
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Misguidence about Almonds
Hi Kazmus, thanks for your comment. The 10% reduction in LDL cholesterol comes directly from the dose response study by the American Heart Association. In that study almonds were eaten as a snack with no other changes in diet. Therefore, saturated fats should not have been reduced by the study participants. The exact reason why almonds so effectively lower cholesterol across so many studies is not known. It could be due to the fiber, protein, mono-saturated fats, or some other chemical in almonds.
Posted on 2011-12-28 08:01:51
Name:Tracy
Location:SF, CA
Subject:Almond Milk
I'm vegan and do use almonds but was wondering if my raw almond milk also works? I don't have heart issues (maybe because of a plant based diet) but was curious just the same.
Posted on 2012-03-31 14:37:10
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Almond Milk
Hi Tracy, thanks for your question. There are no studies on raw almond milk and cholesterol, but there is no reason to think raw almond milk would not be just as effective as almonds. This is especially true if the almond milk as no added sugar, or full fat dairy. The sugar is not directly related to cholesterol, but can increase your level of triglycerides, which much like cholesterol, are bad for your heart health.
Posted on 2012-03-31 17:27:52
Name:Tom
Location:Orange
Subject:Roasted or Raw?
Do the beneficial effects of almonds depend on whether one eats them raw? I like the roasted varieties much more.
Posted on 2012-04-07 02:40:27
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Roasted or Raw?
Hi Tom, thanks for your question. The reduction numbers quoted in this article come from raw unblanched almonds, however, a study between raw and roasted almonds showed that both significantly lower LDL cholesterol. Interestingly, the study also showed that roasted almond butter does not lower LDL cholesterol, but does increase the good HDL cholesterol. Basically, you can expect close to the same LDL lowering effect from unblanched roasted almonds, but not almond butter.
Posted on 2012-04-07 23:14:27
Name:Carol
Location:Florida
Subject:Raw plain almonds made into butter
I have a tooth problem and cannot eat almonds but would like to take raw almonds and make almond butter. Will I get the same benefits?
Posted on 2012-07-06 08:45:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Raw plain almonds made into butter
Hi Carol, thanks for your question. You will get the same benefit from raw almond butter. Particularly if you do not add other ingredients, like sugar.
Posted on 2012-07-07 01:24:25
Name:Pete
Location:Manchester
Subject:How to Make Almond Butter?
How do you make the almond butter from the almonds?
Posted on 2012-07-20 08:51:58
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How to Make Almond Butter
Hi Pete, thanks for your question. Almond butter can be made by simply grinding raw almonds in a food processor. Some people like to add oil or honey at the end. Here is a good step by step recipe.
Posted on 2012-07-20 11:19:18
Name:Jayant Giri
Location:Nagpur, India
Subject:Benefits of Almonds and Weight Gain
While eating almonds may be good for reducing the LDL, can you tell me if its sustained use will lead to weight gain?
Posted on 2012-08-09 06:09:14
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Benefits of Almonds and Weight Gain
Hi Jayant, thanks for your question. As stated in the article, the recommended half a cup of almonds amounts to about 400 calories. Over time, this can lead to weight gain if you do not cut other foods from your diet, or exercise. However, exercise is also recommended for lowering bad LDL cholesterol and increasing good HDL cholesterol.
Posted on 2012-08-09 08:42:52
Name:Acacia
Location:Wisconsin
Subject:Why does roasted almond butter not have the same effect?
If roasted almonds lower LDL cholesterol, why doesn't the almond butter made from them have the same effect?
Posted on 2012-09-17 21:56:50
Name:Alastair
Location:Wales
Subject:The effect of almonds
Raw, unblanched almonds are a great source of magnesium and Calcium. These minerals are used by the body to buffer increased internal acidity caused by poor dietary choices. Almond butter probably doesn't have the same effect as I would imagine these almonds are not deemed suitable for direct sale due to the skin flaking away and the nut inside being susceptible to mold. When eating almonds you should ensure the brown skin is intact and ideally soak them for at least 8hrs to activate the enzymes and make them a living food. Weight is gained by eating acidizing food not high calorie alkalizing food. The body encapsulates the acid and stores it away to be dealt with later - hence weight gain. to lose weight eat more green vegetables, cut out/reduce alcohol, caffeine, dairy, animal protein and drink 2-4 glasses of water with a tsp bicarbonate of soda. Increase activity enough to generate a sweat response for at least 15mins a day. Drink plenty of alkaline water.
Posted on 2012-09-23 21:22:49
Name:Shan
Subject:Almonds without skin
For increasing the HDL, is there any need to remove the skin of the almond? I've heard many saying that the almond's skin is not good for cholesterol.
Posted on 2012-11-09 03:52:13
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Almonds without skin
Hi Shan, thanks for your question. Almonds and almond skins do lower LDL cholesterol, while having little effect on HDL cholesterol. You should be fine eating the skins, which can lower your LDL cholesterol, which is considered better for your cardiovascular health.
Posted on 2012-11-09 03:59:12
Name:Angie
Location:Springdale, AR
Subject:Over what period of time?
What period of time does the lowering of the cholesterol happen? How long was the study? Not questioning the results, I'm just curious.
Posted on 2012-11-14 20:24:15
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Over what period of time?
Hi Angie, thanks for your question. The data in the chart is from a dose response study that measured results after 2 and 4 weeks, meaning that the effect of the almonds was observed only after 4 weeks! The second study lasted 9 weeks. You should start to see results from almonds within 2-9 weeks.
Posted on 2012-11-14 22:31:43
Name:George H
Location:Chicago
Subject:A cup of any nuts is a lot of calories and Omega-6
1/4 cup is most one should have if consumed daily. A lot of fat, thus calories.

Unless someone takes this as part of the daily diet plan, caution is necessary.

Posted on 2013-01-16 23:01:20
Name:Nannette
Location:North Carolina
Subject:Testing the theory after 2 weeks
I am 120 lbs, have genetic high cholesterol, can't take statins (allergic to them), also had BC last year and am on daily Arimidex to fight estrogen. My total cholesterol is 300, but HDL is over 60 and Tris are around 100. I am eating 1/2 cup of roasted almonds a day to see if it makes a difference in my cholesterol levels, however Arimidex is known to raise cholesterol even more, so after I have my fasting cholesterol checked on 3-28-23 will let you know if the almonds helped, but it will be hard to tell since I'm taking Arimidex, and I also quit smoking 3 months ago...which should help it fall as well. I too, do not drink milk. I take supplements and drink Almond milk only. Will keep you posted.
Posted on 2013-03-13 19:17:51
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Testing the theory after 2 weeks
Hi Nannette, thanks for sharing your experience and look forward to hearing your result in a few weeks. 2 weeks may not be enough time, but hopefully your cholesterol will go down. Consider adding at least 20 minutes of aerobic exercise a day if you can.
Posted on 2013-03-13 21:10:11
Name:Deborah
Location:Sri Lanka
Subject:Cholesterol levels and interpreting lipid panel results
Hi, thanks for the load of information on lowering of Cholesterol. I started taking almonds only today and hope that when I see my Dr again after one week, there will be even a slight change. My total cholesterol is 230.1, while HDL is 54.1,LDL 154.8, tris are 106.2, VLDL 21.2 and CHO/HDL 4.25. Could you let me know what these levels denote? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-05-31 10:48:37
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cholesterol levels and interpreting lipid panel results
Hi Deborah, Thanks for your question.
HDL is your good cholesterol that is thought to be good for your heart.
LDL is the bad cholesterol thought to be bad for you.
You want HDL to go up, but LDL to go down.
Triglycerides are also bad for you, they are the fats made from eating sugary foods.
VLDL are very dense LDLs, and are also bad for you.
The CHO/HDL is your total cholesterol to HDL ratio. Less than 5 is ok, but less than 3.5 is optimal and reduces your risk of heart disease.
For more details see the Medline Plus page on Understanding Cholesterol Results, and the American Heart Association page on Cholesterol Levels.
Posted on 2013-06-05 03:43:20
Name:Marcel
Location:California
Subject:How many almonds?
This is good info, but what is the best amount to eat? Half cup or full cup? Thats a big difference each day! This article it says: "-10% for a 1/2 cup. Studies have not been done if you eat a full cup of almonds."

However another article here "10 foods to lower cholesterol" states: "Several studies report that eating up to a cup of almonds can reduce cholesterol levels by up to 10%. In a dose response study it was found that half a cup of almonds reduces cholesterol by 5% and 1 cup causes the full 10% reduction."

This is conflicting information. Could you please make an update here? Thanks!

Posted on 2013-11-11 07:12:22
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How many almonds?
Hi Marcel, thanks for your comment and questions. Half a cup is the maximum amount, and the cholesterol lowering foods article has now been amended to reflect the correct amount of half a cup. The full text of the dose response study can be found here. They list a half dose of whole raw almonds as 37grams per day, and a full dose as 73 grams per day. As one whole cup of almonds weights 143 grams, their doses correspond to 1/4 and 1/2 of a cup of whole almonds. Thanks for pointing out the discrepancy!
Posted on 2013-11-11 16:49:41
Name:Michael Coogan
Location:Ireland
Subject:Almonds and krill oil worked for me
Hi, 6 Weeks ago I had my total cholesterol measured at 6.8. Since them I've been eating 400 grams of ground almonds a week, along with plant sterols which I'd been taking all along. Plenty of Salmon and also taking red krill oil supplements. I also use quite a bt of cinnamon, turmeric, and ginger (all natural anti-inflammatories) - had my cholesterol measured again last week - 4.4 total - Almonds and krill oil are really the only thing I added to my diet - worth a shot. I don't like krill oil but put a tablespoon 80 - 100 ml of water or juice and knock it back, does the job, Michael.
Posted on 2013-12-23 09:29:01

Post a comment.
Name:          
Location:       
Email:(Optional)
Subject:         

Spam Prevention *(REQUIRED):
Enter the last three letters of this sentence.

References

  1. Abbey M., Noakes M., Belling G.B., Nestel, P. Partial replacement of saturated fatty acids with almonds or walnuts lowers total plasma cholesterol and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 1994;59:995-9.
  2. David J.A. Jenkins, MD; Cyril W.C. Kendall, PhD; Augustine Marchie, BSc; Tina L. Parker, RD; Philip W. Connelly, PhD; Wei Qian, PhD; James S. Haight, MD; Dorothea Faulkner, RD; Edward Vidgen, BSc; Karen G. Lapsley, DSc; Gene A. Spiller, PhD Dose Response of Almonds on Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors: Blood Lipids, Oxidized Low-Density Lipoproteins, Lipoprotein(a), Homocysteine, and Pulmonary Nitric Oxide. The American Heart Assoiciation, 2002;106:1327.
  3. Gene A. Spiller, PhD, DSc, FACN, David A. J. Jenkins, MD, PhD, FACN, Ottavio Bosello, MD, Joan E. Gates, RD, MPH, Liz N. Cragen, RD and Bonnie Bruce, DrPH, RD, FACN Nuts and Plasma Lipids: An Almond-Based Diet Lowers LDL-C while Preserving HDL-C. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, Vol. 17, No. 3, 285-290 (1998).
  4. David JA Jenkins, Cyril WC Kendall, Augustine Marchie, Dorothea A Faulkner, Julia MW Wong, Russell de Souza, Azadeh Emam, Tina L Parker, Edward Vidgen, Elke A Trautwein, Karen G Lapsley, Robert G Josse, Lawrence A Leiter, William Singer and Philip W Connelly Direct comparison of a dietary portfolio of cholesterol-lowering foods with a statin in hypercholesterolemic participants. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, February 2005, vol. 81, no. 2, 380-387.