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FAQ

  1. HealthAliciou....WHAT?!!?
    Health.Alicious.Ness, a kind of cross between health and delicious, with a ness at the end for emphasis. HealthAliciousNess is a website dedicated to presenting nutrition information in a simple easy to understand format.
  2. Who creates all this information?
    Please see the about page.
  3. Why are all your nutrient rankings based on 100 grams?
    In the end, there are many pitfalls and problems with nutrient rankings, so some way to rank foods had to be chosen. Ultimately it was decided to go by weight since the idea of the lists is to change eating habits, not adapt to them.
  4. Do you have a nutrient ranking for...?
    Maybe, check the nutrient ranking listings, if the nutrient you are looking for is not there feel free to send in your requests.
  5. Can we write about HealthAliciousNess in our blog?
    Yes! Let HealthAliciousNess, nutrition, and good health be the next topic on your blog. Write about the top ten lists, like top ten foods highest in iron, and don't forget the great "how to" recipe section.
  6. What foods will lower my cholesterol?
    Check the article on cholesterol lowering foods, and related articles like how much green tea and almonds will lower your cholesterol.
  7. What is the difference between the Recommended Daily Allowance(RDA) and the Daily Value(DV)?
    According to Office of Dietary Supplements: RDAs are recommended daily intakes of a nutrient for healthy people. They tell you how much of that nutrient you should get on average each day. RDAs are developed by the Food and Nutrition Board at the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. They vary by age, gender and whether a woman is pregnant or breastfeeding; so there are many different RDAs for each nutrient.

    DVs, established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), are used on food and dietary supplement labels. For each nutrient, there is one DV for all people ages 4 years and older. Therefore, DVs aren't recommended intakes, but suggest how much of a nutrient a serving of the food or supplement provides in the context of a total daily diet. DVs often match or exceed the RDAs for most people, but not in all cases.

    DVs are presented on food and supplement labels as a percentage. They help you compare one product with another. As an example, the %DV for calcium on a food label might say 20%. This means it has 200 mg (milligrams) of calcium in one serving because the DV for calcium is 1,000 mg/day. If another food has 40% of the DV for calcium, it's easy to see that it provides much more calcium than the first food.

Comments.
Name:Lisa Carrier
Location:Columbus GA
Subject:Mushrooms
I love mushrooms and I wonder what health benefits they have and how much of them I can eat per day. I couldn't find anything about them on your site. I love your site I am finding great info on nutrition except for info about mushrooms.
Posted on 2012-05-04 22:53:36
Name:Patti
Location:Illinois
Subject:Want to make life changes...
I am 56 years old and weigh 170 lbs 5'2, I have now started having issues with my health...glucose 106, LDR 129, total cholesterol 207. What do you think I should do?
Posted on 2012-05-08 02:32:53
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Want to make life changes...
Hi Patti, thanks for your question, it is never too late to start making life changes. Given your body mass index (BMI) is around 31, you need to try lose around 60 pounds. Aim to lose 5 pounds a month for a year and this will be possible! Eat more fresh fruits and vegetables. Avoid bad high calorie foods, and high sugar foods. Also, consider eating more cholesterol lowering foods, especially bran. Set a plan for your weight loss and stick to it. Adopt a form of exercise you can do everyday. Start with 10-15 minutes a day, and try to build it up to 1 hour a day of exercise, with some weight lifting if possible. Don't let your age discourage you, even people in their 70s, 80s, 90s, and so on need to exercise, there is never any reason to let age stop you. Hope these suggestions help give you a good start.
Posted on 2012-05-09 03:10:30
Name:Faith
Location:Dallas, TX
Subject:life changes...
Like Patti, I am noticing various life changes. Up until now, nothing real serious, but I tend to forget to eat occasionally and definitely have not eaten properly. So, I am not trying to cram (without overdoing it) basic nutrient needs into my body and have started exercising a little.

What are some basic "staples" to cover all nutrient needs for the pantry/frig for someone on a budget?

I definitely am becoming more health-conscious now and have a real need-to-know.

Thank you, Faith

Posted on 2012-07-22 19:50:24
Name:Mike
Location:Newcastle UK
Subject:Lutein and the eyes
Have just been reading your web pages. What a fantastic resource! Thanks for all your work. My question relates to the best way to take in lutein, as we grow older in order to help fight macular disease in the eyes. What is the best way for the body to absorb the lutein? Supplements or vegetables and, if vegetables, what is the best way to prepare them? Raw/boiled etc. Apologies if you have answered this already but I couldn't find it. Hopefully, your advice would help a great many. Thanks.
Posted on 2012-10-15 17:37:01
Name:Leo
Location:NYC
Subject:Algea
I noticed no listings of either spirulina or chlorella. Are they excluded from these lists or are they too low in any nutrients to deserve inclusion in any of the lists?
Posted on 2012-11-15 12:16:04
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Algea
Hi Leo, thanks for your question. Algea, like Spirulina, is really nutritious. It is just not often listed in the article since most people are not familiar with it, and do not eat it in quantity. However, spirunlina is listed in the riboflavin (vitamin B2), protein, magnesium, and potassium articles. You just have to scroll down to the extended tables.

Complete nutrition facts for Spirulina (Algea).

Posted on 2012-11-15 20:57:18
Name:Nadine
Location:Canada
Subject:Fruit Juices
I have known for a while that fruit juices are full of sugar and relatively low in nutrients, however my kids are always begging for juice! Are there types of juices that are healthier or alternatives you can recommend?
Posted on 2012-11-26 20:57:26
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fruit Juices
Hi Nadine, thanks for your question. It is true that fruit juices can spike blood sugar. Try to find 100% whole fruit juices, preferably ones which still have pulp. The pulp can help to mediate a spike in glycemic load, which can lead to a loss of insulin senstivity and type II diabetes. Basically whole 100% juice with fiber minimizes the bad effects of sugar. Giving your kids a high fat or protein snack with the juice can also help to do regulate the uptake of sugar.
Posted on 2012-11-26 20:57:26
Name:Tamara
Location:Beaumont , California
Subject:Thank you
I wanted to thank you for all the information on this website. It was extremely useful to my husband and I. THANK YOU!!!!
Posted on 2012-11-29 20:35:37
Name:Leo
Location:USA
Subject:RE: Fruit Juices
An alternative to fruit juices might be fruit flavored ice teas sweetened with either stevia or xylitol. I used to drink a lot of juice that was 1/12 orange juice, 5/12 apple juice and half water and despite it being so watered down, it was nevertheless a great contributing factor to my diabetes. So, now I drink mansala ice tea sweetened with stevia and am looking to try fruit teas.
Posted on 2013-01-02 11:59:57
Name:Theone
Location:Louisiana
Subject:Potassium Overdose
Hey I just wanted to know if too much potassium will kill you. I take 1080mg potassium citrate twice a day. I got them from my Dad. I have not been treated for any disorders. Does it cause cardiac arrest(sudden death)?
Posted on 2013-01-02 12:07:23
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Potassium Overdose
Hi Theone, as long as you are healthy, potassium from natural sources is well regulated by the body. Potassium from supplements, however, can be dangerous and lead to a cardiac arrest. The Percent Daily Value (%DV) for potassium is 3500mg. As you are taking around 2000mg a day, you should be ok. Still, if you have a diet with some fruits, vegetables, and other high potassium foods, you should not need to supplement at all.
Posted on 2013-01-02 15:00:45
Name:Max
Location:Germany
Subject:Iphone or android app
Have you considered making an app for smartphones with all this highly informative information?
Posted on 2013-01-13 04:46:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Iphone or android app
Hi Max, thanks for the suggestion. A mobile version of the site should be coming in the next year or so. Would there be any features you would like to see in an app?
Posted on 2013-01-14 17:26:52
Name:Ghina
Subject:What is food folate?
Hi, you have an informative website. I see that your nutrition labels are much more detailed and this is wonderful. However, I see that you differentiate between folic acid and "food folate". Could you tell me what the chemical "food folate" is? Thanks, Ghina
Posted on 2013-01-29 00:27:50
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: What is food folate?
Hi Ghina, thanks for your question. Folate is expressed 3 ways on nutrition fact labels. There is folic acid, food folate, and dietary folate equivalents. Folic acid is the (usually) synthetic form of folate, and is absorbed in a greater quantity by the body. That is to say, it is more bio-available. Food folate is folate which occurs naturally in food. Dietary folate equivalents (DFE) are calculated as a combination of the two using the following formula:

DFE = food folate + 1.7*(folic-acid)

Thus dietary folate equivalents (DFE) take into account that folic acid is absorbed more efficiently by the body, 1.7 times that of food folate. Thus DFE can give you an accurate idea of how much folate a food provides.
Posted on 2013-01-29 18:55:18
Name:Joseph
Location:Australia
Subject:B12 in Cereal
Hi, on your site it mentions how much B12 there is in Kellogg's cereals such as special K and cornflakes yet when I go to their web site it is not mentioned even though other B vitamins are...I am just wondering why that would be?
Posted on 2013-03-30 22:27:38
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: B12 in Cereal
Hi Joseph, thanks for your question. There are a few possible reasons. First is that the cereal companies have so many different products that some could have vitamin B12 and others not, so you really have to check the label to be sure it has vitamin B12. If you are having trouble, Total Brand Cereal is usually a safe bet. Second, sometimes vitamin B12 is listed as "cyanocobalamin" with no hint to vitamin B12. Hope that helps explain things.
Posted on 2013-03-30 22:41:12
Name:Jody Ball
Location:East Lansing Mich
Subject:Research and References
Hello, just found your site and love your nutritional information on foods. I’m trying to move away of supplements and find my needed sources in foods. One concern or question is that some of your comments around saturated fat, good and bad cholesterol seem to be a bit “mainstream”. What is the source/science you use when responding to your many guest on this site. For example..its is well known and published that 80% or so of the cholesterol is produced in the liver and most likely “high cholesterol” in individuals is not from foods eaten. This is not a rebuttal to your site at all..just want to know what you use as your source.
Posted on 2013-11-10 13:44:03
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Research and References
Hi Jody, thanks for your question and comment. It is true that the primary purpose of this site is to simply rank foods by nutrient content. The data to create this ranking comes from the U.S. Agricultural Research Service Nutrition Facts Database Release 21-25 (see the about page). In the case of some nutrients, saturated fat of note, controversy seems unavoidable. Even though the saturated fat article stresses that research on the nutrient is undecided and controversial, people seem to interpret the article as biased. This perhaps says more about current fads surrounding saturated fat than the article itself. To answer your question, references in the comments are usually linked directly to the studies they are referencing. The studies can be found through search engines like Pubmed or Google Scholar.

From there, people are welcome to form their own opinions based on their own experience with nutrition, their own (and family's) experience with different diets, and their own interpretation of different scientists and various nutritionists. Really, this site is intended to minimize editorializing, rank the foods, and let people decide what is best for them with the information given. Hope that answers your question.

Posted on 2013-11-10 16:45:26

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Comments.
Name:Lisa Carrier
Location:Columbus GA
Subject:Mushrooms
I love mushrooms and I wonder what health benefits they have and how much of them I can eat per day. I couldn't find anything about them on your site. I love your site I am finding great info on nutrition except for info about mushrooms.
Posted on 2012-05-04 22:53:36
Name:Patti
Location:Illinois
Subject:Want to make life changes...
I am 56 years old and weigh 170 lbs 5'2, I have now started having issues with my health...glucose 106, LDR 129, total cholesterol 207. What do you think I should do?
Posted on 2012-05-08 02:32:53
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Want to make life changes...
Hi Patti, thanks for your question, it is never too late to start making life changes. Given your body mass index (BMI) is around 31, you need to try lose around 60 pounds. Aim to lose 5 pounds a month for a year and this will be possible! Eat more fresh fruits and vegetables. Avoid bad high calorie foods, and high sugar foods. Also, consider eating more cholesterol lowering foods, especially bran. Set a plan for your weight loss and stick to it. Adopt a form of exercise you can do everyday. Start with 10-15 minutes a day, and try to build it up to 1 hour a day of exercise, with some weight lifting if possible. Don't let your age discourage you, even people in their 70s, 80s, 90s, and so on need to exercise, there is never any reason to let age stop you. Hope these suggestions help give you a good start.
Posted on 2012-05-09 03:10:30
Name:Faith
Location:Dallas, TX
Subject:life changes...
Like Patti, I am noticing various life changes. Up until now, nothing real serious, but I tend to forget to eat occasionally and definitely have not eaten properly. So, I am not trying to cram (without overdoing it) basic nutrient needs into my body and have started exercising a little.

What are some basic "staples" to cover all nutrient needs for the pantry/frig for someone on a budget?

I definitely am becoming more health-conscious now and have a real need-to-know.

Thank you, Faith

Posted on 2012-07-22 19:50:24
Name:Mike
Location:Newcastle UK
Subject:Lutein and the eyes
Have just been reading your web pages. What a fantastic resource! Thanks for all your work. My question relates to the best way to take in lutein, as we grow older in order to help fight macular disease in the eyes. What is the best way for the body to absorb the lutein? Supplements or vegetables and, if vegetables, what is the best way to prepare them? Raw/boiled etc. Apologies if you have answered this already but I couldn't find it. Hopefully, your advice would help a great many. Thanks.
Posted on 2012-10-15 17:37:01
Name:Leo
Location:NYC
Subject:Algea
I noticed no listings of either spirulina or chlorella. Are they excluded from these lists or are they too low in any nutrients to deserve inclusion in any of the lists?
Posted on 2012-11-15 12:16:04
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Algea
Hi Leo, thanks for your question. Algea, like Spirulina, is really nutritious. It is just not often listed in the article since most people are not familiar with it, and do not eat it in quantity. However, spirunlina is listed in the riboflavin (vitamin B2), protein, magnesium, and potassium articles. You just have to scroll down to the extended tables.

Complete nutrition facts for Spirulina (Algea).

Posted on 2012-11-15 20:57:18
Name:Nadine
Location:Canada
Subject:Fruit Juices
I have known for a while that fruit juices are full of sugar and relatively low in nutrients, however my kids are always begging for juice! Are there types of juices that are healthier or alternatives you can recommend?
Posted on 2012-11-26 20:57:26
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fruit Juices
Hi Nadine, thanks for your question. It is true that fruit juices can spike blood sugar. Try to find 100% whole fruit juices, preferably ones which still have pulp. The pulp can help to mediate a spike in glycemic load, which can lead to a loss of insulin senstivity and type II diabetes. Basically whole 100% juice with fiber minimizes the bad effects of sugar. Giving your kids a high fat or protein snack with the juice can also help to do regulate the uptake of sugar.
Posted on 2012-11-26 20:57:26
Name:Tamara
Location:Beaumont , California
Subject:Thank you
I wanted to thank you for all the information on this website. It was extremely useful to my husband and I. THANK YOU!!!!
Posted on 2012-11-29 20:35:37
Name:Leo
Location:USA
Subject:RE: Fruit Juices
An alternative to fruit juices might be fruit flavored ice teas sweetened with either stevia or xylitol. I used to drink a lot of juice that was 1/12 orange juice, 5/12 apple juice and half water and despite it being so watered down, it was nevertheless a great contributing factor to my diabetes. So, now I drink mansala ice tea sweetened with stevia and am looking to try fruit teas.
Posted on 2013-01-02 11:59:57
Name:Theone
Location:Louisiana
Subject:Potassium Overdose
Hey I just wanted to know if too much potassium will kill you. I take 1080mg potassium citrate twice a day. I got them from my Dad. I have not been treated for any disorders. Does it cause cardiac arrest(sudden death)?
Posted on 2013-01-02 12:07:23
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Potassium Overdose
Hi Theone, as long as you are healthy, potassium from natural sources is well regulated by the body. Potassium from supplements, however, can be dangerous and lead to a cardiac arrest. The Percent Daily Value (%DV) for potassium is 3500mg. As you are taking around 2000mg a day, you should be ok. Still, if you have a diet with some fruits, vegetables, and other high potassium foods, you should not need to supplement at all.
Posted on 2013-01-02 15:00:45
Name:Max
Location:Germany
Subject:Iphone or android app
Have you considered making an app for smartphones with all this highly informative information?
Posted on 2013-01-13 04:46:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Iphone or android app
Hi Max, thanks for the suggestion. A mobile version of the site should be coming in the next year or so. Would there be any features you would like to see in an app?
Posted on 2013-01-14 17:26:52
Name:Ghina
Subject:What is food folate?
Hi, you have an informative website. I see that your nutrition labels are much more detailed and this is wonderful. However, I see that you differentiate between folic acid and "food folate". Could you tell me what the chemical "food folate" is? Thanks, Ghina
Posted on 2013-01-29 00:27:50
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: What is food folate?
Hi Ghina, thanks for your question. Folate is expressed 3 ways on nutrition fact labels. There is folic acid, food folate, and dietary folate equivalents. Folic acid is the (usually) synthetic form of folate, and is absorbed in a greater quantity by the body. That is to say, it is more bio-available. Food folate is folate which occurs naturally in food. Dietary folate equivalents (DFE) are calculated as a combination of the two using the following formula:

DFE = food folate + 1.7*(folic-acid)

Thus dietary folate equivalents (DFE) take into account that folic acid is absorbed more efficiently by the body, 1.7 times that of food folate. Thus DFE can give you an accurate idea of how much folate a food provides.
Posted on 2013-01-29 18:55:18
Name:Joseph
Location:Australia
Subject:B12 in Cereal
Hi, on your site it mentions how much B12 there is in Kellogg's cereals such as special K and cornflakes yet when I go to their web site it is not mentioned even though other B vitamins are...I am just wondering why that would be?
Posted on 2013-03-30 22:27:38
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: B12 in Cereal
Hi Joseph, thanks for your question. There are a few possible reasons. First is that the cereal companies have so many different products that some could have vitamin B12 and others not, so you really have to check the label to be sure it has vitamin B12. If you are having trouble, Total Brand Cereal is usually a safe bet. Second, sometimes vitamin B12 is listed as "cyanocobalamin" with no hint to vitamin B12. Hope that helps explain things.
Posted on 2013-03-30 22:41:12
Name:Jody Ball
Location:East Lansing Mich
Subject:Research and References
Hello, just found your site and love your nutritional information on foods. I’m trying to move away of supplements and find my needed sources in foods. One concern or question is that some of your comments around saturated fat, good and bad cholesterol seem to be a bit “mainstream”. What is the source/science you use when responding to your many guest on this site. For example..its is well known and published that 80% or so of the cholesterol is produced in the liver and most likely “high cholesterol” in individuals is not from foods eaten. This is not a rebuttal to your site at all..just want to know what you use as your source.
Posted on 2013-11-10 13:44:03
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Research and References
Hi Jody, thanks for your question and comment. It is true that the primary purpose of this site is to simply rank foods by nutrient content. The data to create this ranking comes from the U.S. Agricultural Research Service Nutrition Facts Database Release 21-25 (see the about page). In the case of some nutrients, saturated fat of note, controversy seems unavoidable. Even though the saturated fat article stresses that research on the nutrient is undecided and controversial, people seem to interpret the article as biased. This perhaps says more about current fads surrounding saturated fat than the article itself. To answer your question, references in the comments are usually linked directly to the studies they are referencing. The studies can be found through search engines like Pubmed or Google Scholar.

From there, people are welcome to form their own opinions based on their own experience with nutrition, their own (and family's) experience with different diets, and their own interpretation of different scientists and various nutritionists. Really, this site is intended to minimize editorializing, rank the foods, and let people decide what is best for them with the information given. Hope that answers your question.

Posted on 2013-11-10 16:45:26

Post a comment.
Name:          
Location:       
Email:(Optional)
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Enter the last three letters of this sentence.