Jackfruit

Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus) is a large oval shaped fruit with a green/yellow spiky outer skin that encloses clusters of segments each containing a single seed.

Health Benefits of Jackfruit:
  • Increased Protection from Bacterial and Viral Infections
  • Increased Immune Function
  • Reduced Cancer Risk
  • Protection Against Heart Disease
  • Alleviation of Cardiovascular Disease
  • Alleviation of Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)
  • Osteoporosis�Protection
  • Reduced Risk of Type II Diabetes
  • Reduced Frequency of Migraine Headaches
  • Alleviation of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)
  • Antioxidant Protection
  • Prevention of Epileptic Seizures
  • Prevention of Alopecia (Spot Baldness)

  • *Some of these health benefits are due to the nutrients highly concentrated in Jackfruit, and may not necessarily be related to Jackfruit.

Natural vitamins, minerals, and nutrients found in Jackfruit: Carbohydrates | Vitamin A | Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) | Vitamin B6 | Vitamin C | Dietary Fiber | Magnesium | Manganese | Copper |

Click here to compare these nutrition facts with other fruits.
Nutrition Facts
Jackfruit raw                 
Serving Size 100gg
Calories 95
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.64g1%
    Saturated Fat 0.195g1%
Cholesterol 0mg0%
Sodium 2mg0%
Total Carbohydrate 23.3g8%
    Dietary Fiber 1.5g6%
    Sugar 19.1g~
Protein 1.7g~
Vitamin A2%Vitamin C23%
Calcium2%Iron1%
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Vitamins  %DV
Vitamin A 110IU2%
    Retinol equivalents 5μg~
    Retinol 0μg~
    Alpha-carotene 6μg~
    Beta-carotene 61μg~
    Beta-cryptoxanthin 5μg~
Vitamin C 13.7mg23%
Vitamin D ~IU (~μg)0%
    D2 Ergocalciferol ~IU (~μg)
    D3 Cholecalciferol ~IU (~μg)
Vitamin E 0.34mg2%
Vitamin K ~μg0%
    K1 - Dihydrophylloquinone ~μg~
    K2 - Menaquinone-4 ~μg~
Vitamin B12 0μg0%
Thiamin 0.105mg7%
Riboflavin 0.055mg3%
Niacin 0.92mg5%
Pantothenic acid 0.235mg2%
Vitamin B6 0.329mg16%
Folate 24μg6%
    Folic Acid 0μg~
    Food Folate 24μg~
    Dietary Folate Equivalents 24μg~
Choline ~mg~
Lycopene 0μg~
Lutein+zeazanthin 157μg~
Minerals  %DV
Calcium 24mg2%
Iron 0.23mg1%
Magnesium 29mg7%
Phosphorus 21mg2%
Sodium 2mg0%
Potassium 448mg13%
Zinc 0.13mg1%
Copper 0.076mg4%
Manganese 0.043mg2%
Selenium ~μg0%
Water 73.46g~
Ash 0.94g~

Useful Stats
Percent of Daily Calorie Target
(2000 calories)
4.75%
Percent Water Composition 73.5%
Protein to Carb Ratio (g/g) 0.07
Omega 3 to Omega 6 Ratio5.27
Omega 6 to Omega 3 Ratio0.19
Total Omega 3s158mg
Total Omega 6s30mg

How to choose Jackfruit: A ripe jackfruit will have a smell of a very ripe, almost rotten, melon which some people find disagreeable. However, the pungent smell can be deceiving as the fruit inside will have a pleasant flavor.

Climate and origin: Jackfruits originated on the Indian subcontinent and Asian mainland. Jack-fruit is tropical requiring a hot and moist climate. (Zone 10 in the U.S.)

Taste: Jackfruit generally has a pungent and subtly sweet taste with either a thick viscous texture or a crisp texture, depending on variety.

Miscellaneous information: Jackfruit is the largest fruit to grow from a tree, and can reach weights up to 80 pounds (36kg).




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