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How to Cook Brown Rice


intro.jpg
Brown rice is preferred to white since brown rice has a lower glycemic load. The sugars from white rice enter the blood stream much faster than brown rice, leading you to feel a hunger spike and eat more in one sitting. This is why some people are actually addicted to white rice and will not eat brown rice. However, one only needs to eat brown rice two or three times to start preferring it, and its health advantages go well beyond the glycemic load; brown rice is also a better source of bran, fiber, several vitamins, minerals, and gram per gram, is lower in calories. This recipe will need one cup of brown rice and will serve 2 to 3 people.
Click to see nutrition comparison of Brown vs. White Rice
Total Preparation and/or Cooking Time:
Step 1:
Get a cup of brown rice.
brown-rice-ingredients.jpg
Step 2:
Next add two cups of water to a pot and set it to high heat to boil. While waiting for the water to boil add the rice to a basin and rinse it 2-3 times.
brown-rice-boiling-water.jpg
Step 3:
When the water starts boiling add in your washed rice.
add-brown-rice.jpg
Step 4:
Give the rice a stir to make sure it is spread evenly across the pot, next turn the heat down to low and pop a lid on top of the pot.
pot-with-lid.jpg
Step 5:
After 15-20 minutes the rice should look fluffy and all the liquid should be absorbed. However, add 10 minutes for each additional cup of rice, and depending on your stove, allow up to an hour. Once cooked, turn off the heat and let the rice sit with the lid on for another 5 minutes.
cooked-brown-rice.jpg
Step 6:
You now have cooked rice, a perfect side for steamed vegetables, stews, or bean sauces.
Click to see complete nutrition facts for Brown Rice
Buy Brown Rice from Amazon.com
brown-rice.jpg
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Comments.
Name:Greg Gasiorowski
Location:Toledo Ohio USA
Subject:15-20 minutes is too short of a cooking time
Granted I used short grain that I assume would take a bit longer but cooking at 20 minutes on low resulted in half the water still remaining. I had to cook a good 10-15 minutes longer on medium (lid off) to evaporate. I let sit for 5 minutes with lid on as suggested & the result was a soupy but palatable batch of rice so I assume the cooking time is way off on this. The "Total Cooking Time: 40 Minutes" listed at the top doesn't add up assuming this is total prep time. (15-20 minutes to wash the rice & boil the water???). The Millet listing here works to perfection but this one is way off.
Posted on 2012-04-06 10:07:28
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: 15-20 minutes is too short of a cooking time
Hi Greg, thanks for your comment. Were you cooking more than 1 cup of brown rice? If so, this would increase the cooking time. Cooking time can also be affected by the strength of your stove, and how well your cooking pot retains heat. Thanks for pointing this out, it will be noted in the recipe.
Posted on 2012-04-06 10:07:28
Name:Carol Steavens
Location:Deerfield Beach, FL
Subject:Fluffy Brown Rice
I have tried various cooking times for short grain brown. I have NEVER achieved a satisfactory result and have never gotten a fluffy finished rice. I wonder if soaking it over night will help or will that remove too many nutrients?
Posted on 2012-07-06 08:31:11
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fluffy Brown Rice
Hi Carol, thanks for your question. Soaking the rice overnight is unlikely to help make it fluffy. The key might be to switch to long grain brown rice instead of short grain. Short grain rice rarely becomes fluffy, but rather, becomes sticky with a firmer texture.
Posted on 2012-07-07 01:05:26
Name:Lorna
Location:NZ
Subject:Brown Rice

Don't know where Greg got his recipe - any rice needs boiling to absorb the liquid, warm water just does not cut it!

I always use eco long grain brown rice from Thailand - cheapest in the shops and just as good if not better than named long grain browns.

Use one and a half cups water for one cup brown rice. Wash rice, drain and put rice in pot. Add amount of water required, put lid on pot and bring to boil. As soon as rice is boiling lower heat and leave to steam/cook for twice as long as white rice ( a good hour at least). Do not remove lid as you need the trapped steam to cook the rice. By then all the water will have been absorbed and rice will be properly cooked. Chicken/beef stock can be added depending on what one is serving with the rice and giving the rice a quick stir ONCE also helps but remember to replace the lid. Rice cookers are always reliable, just let it sit in the warm position for half an hour longer for brown rice.

As taught to me by my amah who assured me that there would always be a crust of rice left at the bottom of the pot. She used to let the crust with its side edges dry out and used it as a basket to serve any small bits and pices that were to go with the meal (after removing it from the pot of course). Dried rice baskets - very pretty filled with tomato, cucumber and assorted local samabal.

Just remeber, brown rice needs half again as much water as white plus the extra cooking time.

Posted on 2012-07-19 03:07:31
Name:Melissa
Location:Long Beach, CA
Subject:Soaking Brown Rice
A friend of mine suggested that I soak it at least 30 minutes, tried it, and it worked perfectly!
Posted on 2012-09-07 07:11:15
Name:Rice Loving Family
Location:Europe
Subject:Is parboiled rice brown rice?
Is parboiled rice considered brown rice?

Where I live there are very few options in the regular grocery store for rice. The very dark brown rice, usually called wild rice, is really pricy, if even available. And all the other options available are obviously white rice from appearance, except parboiled rice. What is sold as parboiled rice is not a dark brown, but browner then the white rice. A kind of caramel color I would say. I was told by a local nutritionist that parboiled rice was a healthy choice, it is also inexpensive here, and I have been using that for my family. But I am always quite confused if parboiled rice is brown rice, or just a better option than white rice, but not as healthy as brown. Thank you so much for your time.

Posted on 2013-04-09 06:04:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Is parboiled rice brown rice?
Hello, and thanks for your question. Parboiling rice is a process meant to drive nutrients from the bran (outer skin of rice) to the germ (center of rice). Parboiling allows for the bran to be removed while preserving nutrients. Most parboiled rices are also enriched with nutrients. The main difference between brown rice and parboiled rice is that brown rice still has bran and therefore provides more fiber, otherwise, both parboiled and brown rice are almost equally nutritious. If parboiled rice is readily available in your area, then it is a good choice. When affordable brown rice becomes available you can switch. To get more details, here is a complete nutrition facts comparison of parboiled, brown, and white rice.
Posted on 2013-04-10 02:25:01
Name:Berk Walker
Location:Oregon
Subject:Fluffy Brown Rice
Might I suggest first cooking the starch on the outside of the kernels. This can be done in oil or without (best, needs ventilation), brown to an average stained wood color. Water varies greatly due to vapor loss, you can always add more if needed. Best flavor is from "Better Than Bullion" chicken flavor. Enjoy!
Posted on 2013-07-08 22:11:15
Name:Ali
Location:Canada
Subject:My way to cook brown rice
Don't boil the water at first, instead add the rice and turn the heat up. Let the water boil with the rice in it. When the water starts to boil at the edge but not the center, then turn the heat down, and wait 10 minutes. Then, turn off the heat and let the rice sit 5 more minutes. Now your rice is all fluffy and ready to eat.
Posted on 2013-08-29 21:15:53
Name:Chikanga
Location:Gold Coast
Subject:How I prepare brown rice
When I boil brown rice, I bring water to boil first, then pop in the brown rice usually cook for about 40 minutes or until tender. Then if I am using it hot I rinse with boiled water to wash away the sticky starch, if I am using it cold I rinse it in cold water, rinse until water runs clear, your rice will never be sticky....
Posted on 2013-11-05 04:20:49
Name:Peter
Location:Birmingham, UK
Subject:This really isn't difficult
Maybe because I only ever use Tilda rice, but I've never had a problem with mushy/hard brown rice. Simply: Put the required amount of rice in suitable sized pan (remember that rice swells a lot with cooking)
Add plenty of boiling water to cover the rice by about 10cm (doesn't have to be exact, you just don't want the rice to dry out)
Bring to the boil, then turn down heat to simmer and leave cooking for 25-30 mins depending on preference (I cook for 30mins).
Drain and rinse with hot/boiling water to wash out the excess starch. leave to drain in colander for 2-3mins before serving.

NB/. If the water level falls below the rice whilst simmering, simply add some more boiling water. It won't hurt the rice to have to excess water, but obviously it is a waste of energy to put more in than required.
Posted on 2013-11-13 05:19:17
Name:Luz
Location:California, USA
Subject:Brown Rice Baskets-Lorna in NZ
Greetings, I share your method for cooking brown rice in a pot, and enjoyed learning of your Amah's dried rice baskets. What a great idea! I would like to do this too. Request: Please explain process for getting crust to dry-out and release from bottom of pot as single piece/basket. Currently I soak and scrape this from pot then put into compost bag -- I would rather utilize as pretty serving basket with the meal. Thank you :-)
Posted on 2013-12-27 22:56:43
Name:Lorna
Location:NZ
Subject:RE: Rice serving basket
Hi Luz

I have always just used the well cooked rice from the top and left a thin crust in the bottom to dry out. Plus I think a good heavy based pot is better then a rice cooker if I am trying to make a basket! It doesn't always work but is attractive when it does. I have actually never really thought about the way to achieve it - it just happens - probably because I wash the rice several times until the water runs clear ( amah very particular about this) so there is very little starch left in it when I cook it. I never scrape the bottom of the pot and leave the rice until it is thoroughly dry before I empty the pot. That said - for entertaining I always cook the rice the day before, keeps wonderfully in the fridge and can be zapped in the microwave when needed. It gives the pot base time to dry out - I hate serving rice straight away! It is so much better overnighted in the fridge, thoroughly separated with cold wet fingers next day and reheated in the dish it is to be served in. Also freezes beautifully - I make a big pot at a time so always have some spare to freeze for fried rice etc. Not usually such an appalling speller - was so embarrassed when I reread my first post! Hope this helps and happy basketing :-)

Posted on 2013-12-27 23:56:06
Name:Anonymous
Subject:Is brown rice polished?
Hi, I thought the brown rice is the unpolished rice with full bran. But the one shown in the figure seems to be different. Please comment.
Posted on 2014-02-07 02:25:31
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Is brown rice polished?
Hi and thanks for your question. Brown rice can be polished while retaining most of its bran. Polishing is meant only to enhance the look and taste of rice, but it is not the process by which the bran and germ are removed to make white rice. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2014-02-07 12:52:35

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Comments.
Name:Greg Gasiorowski
Location:Toledo Ohio USA
Subject:15-20 minutes is too short of a cooking time
Granted I used short grain that I assume would take a bit longer but cooking at 20 minutes on low resulted in half the water still remaining. I had to cook a good 10-15 minutes longer on medium (lid off) to evaporate. I let sit for 5 minutes with lid on as suggested & the result was a soupy but palatable batch of rice so I assume the cooking time is way off on this. The "Total Cooking Time: 40 Minutes" listed at the top doesn't add up assuming this is total prep time. (15-20 minutes to wash the rice & boil the water???). The Millet listing here works to perfection but this one is way off.
Posted on 2012-04-06 10:07:28
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: 15-20 minutes is too short of a cooking time
Hi Greg, thanks for your comment. Were you cooking more than 1 cup of brown rice? If so, this would increase the cooking time. Cooking time can also be affected by the strength of your stove, and how well your cooking pot retains heat. Thanks for pointing this out, it will be noted in the recipe.
Posted on 2012-04-06 10:07:28
Name:Carol Steavens
Location:Deerfield Beach, FL
Subject:Fluffy Brown Rice
I have tried various cooking times for short grain brown. I have NEVER achieved a satisfactory result and have never gotten a fluffy finished rice. I wonder if soaking it over night will help or will that remove too many nutrients?
Posted on 2012-07-06 08:31:11
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fluffy Brown Rice
Hi Carol, thanks for your question. Soaking the rice overnight is unlikely to help make it fluffy. The key might be to switch to long grain brown rice instead of short grain. Short grain rice rarely becomes fluffy, but rather, becomes sticky with a firmer texture.
Posted on 2012-07-07 01:05:26
Name:Lorna
Location:NZ
Subject:Brown Rice

Don't know where Greg got his recipe - any rice needs boiling to absorb the liquid, warm water just does not cut it!

I always use eco long grain brown rice from Thailand - cheapest in the shops and just as good if not better than named long grain browns.

Use one and a half cups water for one cup brown rice. Wash rice, drain and put rice in pot. Add amount of water required, put lid on pot and bring to boil. As soon as rice is boiling lower heat and leave to steam/cook for twice as long as white rice ( a good hour at least). Do not remove lid as you need the trapped steam to cook the rice. By then all the water will have been absorbed and rice will be properly cooked. Chicken/beef stock can be added depending on what one is serving with the rice and giving the rice a quick stir ONCE also helps but remember to replace the lid. Rice cookers are always reliable, just let it sit in the warm position for half an hour longer for brown rice.

As taught to me by my amah who assured me that there would always be a crust of rice left at the bottom of the pot. She used to let the crust with its side edges dry out and used it as a basket to serve any small bits and pices that were to go with the meal (after removing it from the pot of course). Dried rice baskets - very pretty filled with tomato, cucumber and assorted local samabal.

Just remeber, brown rice needs half again as much water as white plus the extra cooking time.

Posted on 2012-07-19 03:07:31
Name:Melissa
Location:Long Beach, CA
Subject:Soaking Brown Rice
A friend of mine suggested that I soak it at least 30 minutes, tried it, and it worked perfectly!
Posted on 2012-09-07 07:11:15
Name:Rice Loving Family
Location:Europe
Subject:Is parboiled rice brown rice?
Is parboiled rice considered brown rice?

Where I live there are very few options in the regular grocery store for rice. The very dark brown rice, usually called wild rice, is really pricy, if even available. And all the other options available are obviously white rice from appearance, except parboiled rice. What is sold as parboiled rice is not a dark brown, but browner then the white rice. A kind of caramel color I would say. I was told by a local nutritionist that parboiled rice was a healthy choice, it is also inexpensive here, and I have been using that for my family. But I am always quite confused if parboiled rice is brown rice, or just a better option than white rice, but not as healthy as brown. Thank you so much for your time.

Posted on 2013-04-09 06:04:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Is parboiled rice brown rice?
Hello, and thanks for your question. Parboiling rice is a process meant to drive nutrients from the bran (outer skin of rice) to the germ (center of rice). Parboiling allows for the bran to be removed while preserving nutrients. Most parboiled rices are also enriched with nutrients. The main difference between brown rice and parboiled rice is that brown rice still has bran and therefore provides more fiber, otherwise, both parboiled and brown rice are almost equally nutritious. If parboiled rice is readily available in your area, then it is a good choice. When affordable brown rice becomes available you can switch. To get more details, here is a complete nutrition facts comparison of parboiled, brown, and white rice.
Posted on 2013-04-10 02:25:01
Name:Berk Walker
Location:Oregon
Subject:Fluffy Brown Rice
Might I suggest first cooking the starch on the outside of the kernels. This can be done in oil or without (best, needs ventilation), brown to an average stained wood color. Water varies greatly due to vapor loss, you can always add more if needed. Best flavor is from "Better Than Bullion" chicken flavor. Enjoy!
Posted on 2013-07-08 22:11:15
Name:Ali
Location:Canada
Subject:My way to cook brown rice
Don't boil the water at first, instead add the rice and turn the heat up. Let the water boil with the rice in it. When the water starts to boil at the edge but not the center, then turn the heat down, and wait 10 minutes. Then, turn off the heat and let the rice sit 5 more minutes. Now your rice is all fluffy and ready to eat.
Posted on 2013-08-29 21:15:53
Name:Chikanga
Location:Gold Coast
Subject:How I prepare brown rice
When I boil brown rice, I bring water to boil first, then pop in the brown rice usually cook for about 40 minutes or until tender. Then if I am using it hot I rinse with boiled water to wash away the sticky starch, if I am using it cold I rinse it in cold water, rinse until water runs clear, your rice will never be sticky....
Posted on 2013-11-05 04:20:49
Name:Peter
Location:Birmingham, UK
Subject:This really isn't difficult
Maybe because I only ever use Tilda rice, but I've never had a problem with mushy/hard brown rice. Simply: Put the required amount of rice in suitable sized pan (remember that rice swells a lot with cooking)
Add plenty of boiling water to cover the rice by about 10cm (doesn't have to be exact, you just don't want the rice to dry out)
Bring to the boil, then turn down heat to simmer and leave cooking for 25-30 mins depending on preference (I cook for 30mins).
Drain and rinse with hot/boiling water to wash out the excess starch. leave to drain in colander for 2-3mins before serving.

NB/. If the water level falls below the rice whilst simmering, simply add some more boiling water. It won't hurt the rice to have to excess water, but obviously it is a waste of energy to put more in than required.
Posted on 2013-11-13 05:19:17
Name:Luz
Location:California, USA
Subject:Brown Rice Baskets-Lorna in NZ
Greetings, I share your method for cooking brown rice in a pot, and enjoyed learning of your Amah's dried rice baskets. What a great idea! I would like to do this too. Request: Please explain process for getting crust to dry-out and release from bottom of pot as single piece/basket. Currently I soak and scrape this from pot then put into compost bag -- I would rather utilize as pretty serving basket with the meal. Thank you :-)
Posted on 2013-12-27 22:56:43
Name:Lorna
Location:NZ
Subject:RE: Rice serving basket
Hi Luz

I have always just used the well cooked rice from the top and left a thin crust in the bottom to dry out. Plus I think a good heavy based pot is better then a rice cooker if I am trying to make a basket! It doesn't always work but is attractive when it does. I have actually never really thought about the way to achieve it - it just happens - probably because I wash the rice several times until the water runs clear ( amah very particular about this) so there is very little starch left in it when I cook it. I never scrape the bottom of the pot and leave the rice until it is thoroughly dry before I empty the pot. That said - for entertaining I always cook the rice the day before, keeps wonderfully in the fridge and can be zapped in the microwave when needed. It gives the pot base time to dry out - I hate serving rice straight away! It is so much better overnighted in the fridge, thoroughly separated with cold wet fingers next day and reheated in the dish it is to be served in. Also freezes beautifully - I make a big pot at a time so always have some spare to freeze for fried rice etc. Not usually such an appalling speller - was so embarrassed when I reread my first post! Hope this helps and happy basketing :-)

Posted on 2013-12-27 23:56:06
Name:Anonymous
Subject:Is brown rice polished?
Hi, I thought the brown rice is the unpolished rice with full bran. But the one shown in the figure seems to be different. Please comment.
Posted on 2014-02-07 02:25:31
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Is brown rice polished?
Hi and thanks for your question. Brown rice can be polished while retaining most of its bran. Polishing is meant only to enhance the look and taste of rice, but it is not the process by which the bran and germ are removed to make white rice. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2014-02-07 12:52:35

Post a comment.
Name:          
Location:       
Email:(Optional)
Subject:         

Spam Prevention *(REQUIRED):
Enter the last three letters of this sentence.