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Pumpkin Soup with Yellow Split Peas


pumpkin-soup-intro.jpg
Pumpkins are one of the healthiest vegetables in the world that are low in calories and packed with vitamins. A good cooking pumpkin usually has a lighter color than the typical orange pumpkin, and can be quite large. For this recipe you will need a medium sized pumpkin, two cups of split peas, and one onion. Depending on the size of the pumpkin this soup will serve at least 4-6 people.
Total Preparation and/or Cooking Time:
Step 1:
Gather all your ingredients. To avoid dirt and pesticides, wash or peel the pumpkin. Peeling can be difficult, so be careful! Alternatively, you can use an organic pumpkin, which will still need to be washed, but should be cleaner.
pumpkin-soup-ingredients.jpg
Step 2:
Rinse the split peas and add water to let them soak. It is good to start them soaking the night before you make the soup, however, if you forget then you can let the split peas soak in boiling water about an hour before you use them.
soak-split-peas.jpg
Step 3:
While the split peas are soaking cut the pumpkin into quarters and add it to a large soup pot. Pour around two cups of water into the pot, or enough to cover the bottom with two inches of water, set the heat to medium, and cover with a lid.
steam-pumpkin.jpg
Step 4:
After about 20-30 minutes the pumpkin will be done steaming and will be very hot! Carefully remove the pumpkin using tongs and drain the water from the pot. In the same pot add 2 table spoons of water and set it to high heat. Dice an onion and add it to the pot.
add-onions.jpg
Step 5:
Let the onion cook for about 5 minutes, then add in the split peas with 4 cups of water. You can now add in any spices you like. Cinnamon, and cumin are recommended.
add-split-peas-to-cook.jpg
Step 6:
While the split peas are cooking scoop the seeds of the pumpkin out onto a plate. Be sure the pumpkin has cooled down.
remove-pumpkin-seeds.jpg
Step 7:
Next use a spoon to scoop out the pulp of the pumpkin to a separate plate.
remove-pumpkin-pulp.jpg
Step 8:
You should now have gathered between 2-4 cups of pumpkin pulp.
gathered-pumpkin-pulp.jpg
Step 9:
After the peas have cooked for at least 30 minutes add the pumpkin to the peas and stir. Be sure to taste the soup to adjust the spices.
add-pumpkin-to-peas.jpg
Step 10:
Enjoy your pumpkin soup with a slice of fresh bread, or with a salad.
finished-soup.jpg
More recipes...

Comments.
Name:Rex Hamann
Location:Anoka County, MN
Subject:Looks Simple Enough
Looks easy, and I love the idea, but can the same idea be used with winter squash as well?
Posted on 2011-07-31 15:56:39
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Looks Simple Enough
Hi Rex, thanks for your question. Yes winter squash would also work well. Pumpkin is essentially a type of winter squash!
Posted on 2011-08-02 01:17:49
Name:Susan Tremblay
Location:Duncan, BC
Subject:Pumpkin Soup
Just wondering how many lentils to use?
Posted on 2011-11-21 02:45:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Pumpkin Soup
Hi Susan, thanks for your question. This recipe uses 2 cups of split peas, which require overnight soaking, and at least 4 cups of water/liquid. If you cook with lentils then 2 cups would also be sufficient, but depending on the size of the pumpkin you are cooking with you could add as much as 4 cups of lentils, or as little as 1 cup. It is really up to you. Just be sure you have enough liquid to make the lentils soft. The pumpkin and onions will also add liquid to the soup. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2011-11-21 02:55:59
Name:Chris Rice
Location:Coast
Subject:Pumpkin Soup
I tried this once, seasoning with cumin, and it was rather bland. Next time I put in some panchetta, sautéed with olive oil, the onion and a couple of garlic cloves. The latter really sparked it up without being too spicy. Topped it with a dab of sour cream sprinkled with chopped fresh chives and it got rave reviews!
Posted on 2012-01-29 12:46:25
Name:Frankie
Location:Vancouver
Subject:Butternut Squash & Kabocha Squash
Is butternut squash and kabocha squash a pumpkin? Cause I have more access to Kabocha and Butternut squash then a good pumpkin. Is Kabocha squash higher in Iron than Butternut? My kids needs to eat more iron apparently but not a big fan of salmon and they tend to chew the beef and spit it out without swallowing. Not to mention they are on a liquid diet right now due to contracting hand, food & mouth disease. Please help!!
Posted on 2012-09-27 23:08:42
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Butternut Squash & Kabocha Squash
Hi Frankie, thanks for your question. Pumpkin is actually a kind of squash, as opposed to butternut and kaboca being a kind of pumpkin. So yes, you should be able to substitute them in this recipe. There are no nutrition facts for Kabocha squash, but comparing pumpkin, butternut, and the average winter squash shows that pumpkin and butternut squash have slightly more iron at 3% DV than the average squash at 2% DV. None of them are a good source of iron. Consult the list of high iron foods, and the list of fruits and veggies high in iron, for ideas of what to feed your kids. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-09-29 11:38:26
Name:Bill
Location:Phoenix, AZ
Subject:Wash the skin or use organic?
I am reluctant to cook the whole pumpkin since most have been sprayed with a number of chemicals for bugs and weeds. Maybe you should specify that this recipe is for only organic produce?
Posted on 2013-01-05 07:06:59
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Wash the skin or use organic?
Hi Bill, thanks for bringing up a great point. People should wash the skin of the pumpkin well, or possibly peal the pumpkin first. Use of an organic pumpkin would work as well, but washing the skin would still be a good idea of course. The recipe will now be edited to reflect this. Thanks again for your suggestion.
Posted on 2013-01-09 15:13:34
Name:Veggie lover
Location:Austin
Subject:Bake instead of boil
If you split the pumpkin in half, place on a baking tray, and bake until tender, you eliminate the boiling of the exterior and it is much easier to scoop out the pulp without danger of pesticides.
Posted on 2013-02-01 10:32:20
Name:Michelle
Location:Va Beach
Subject:What kind of pumpkin?
Do you use the smaller cooking pie pumpkin or do you use the one we carve? I have one from Halloween that isn't carved that would be perfect. I am excited to try something new.
Posted on 2013-11-08 01:12:26
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: What kind of pumpkin?
Hi Michelle, thanks for your question. Yes the smaller pie or "cooking" pumpkins are what is preferred for this recipe. You can try a carving pumpkin though, and see how it turns out.
Posted on 2013-11-08 03:25:07
Name:Julie
Location:Beaverton Or.
Subject:Canned pumpkin?
With all that chopping,,cooking,,,ect of the pumpkin....can I use canned pumpkin?
Posted on 2014-01-05 16:31:44
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Canned Pumpkin
Hi Julie, thanks for your question. Yes, canned pumpkin should work just as well, and could save some time, though you may sacrifice some flavor and nutrients.
Posted on 2014-01-13 17:40:51

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Comments.
Name:Rex Hamann
Location:Anoka County, MN
Subject:Looks Simple Enough
Looks easy, and I love the idea, but can the same idea be used with winter squash as well?
Posted on 2011-07-31 15:56:39
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Looks Simple Enough
Hi Rex, thanks for your question. Yes winter squash would also work well. Pumpkin is essentially a type of winter squash!
Posted on 2011-08-02 01:17:49
Name:Susan Tremblay
Location:Duncan, BC
Subject:Pumpkin Soup
Just wondering how many lentils to use?
Posted on 2011-11-21 02:45:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Pumpkin Soup
Hi Susan, thanks for your question. This recipe uses 2 cups of split peas, which require overnight soaking, and at least 4 cups of water/liquid. If you cook with lentils then 2 cups would also be sufficient, but depending on the size of the pumpkin you are cooking with you could add as much as 4 cups of lentils, or as little as 1 cup. It is really up to you. Just be sure you have enough liquid to make the lentils soft. The pumpkin and onions will also add liquid to the soup. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2011-11-21 02:55:59
Name:Chris Rice
Location:Coast
Subject:Pumpkin Soup
I tried this once, seasoning with cumin, and it was rather bland. Next time I put in some panchetta, sautéed with olive oil, the onion and a couple of garlic cloves. The latter really sparked it up without being too spicy. Topped it with a dab of sour cream sprinkled with chopped fresh chives and it got rave reviews!
Posted on 2012-01-29 12:46:25
Name:Frankie
Location:Vancouver
Subject:Butternut Squash & Kabocha Squash
Is butternut squash and kabocha squash a pumpkin? Cause I have more access to Kabocha and Butternut squash then a good pumpkin. Is Kabocha squash higher in Iron than Butternut? My kids needs to eat more iron apparently but not a big fan of salmon and they tend to chew the beef and spit it out without swallowing. Not to mention they are on a liquid diet right now due to contracting hand, food & mouth disease. Please help!!
Posted on 2012-09-27 23:08:42
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Butternut Squash & Kabocha Squash
Hi Frankie, thanks for your question. Pumpkin is actually a kind of squash, as opposed to butternut and kaboca being a kind of pumpkin. So yes, you should be able to substitute them in this recipe. There are no nutrition facts for Kabocha squash, but comparing pumpkin, butternut, and the average winter squash shows that pumpkin and butternut squash have slightly more iron at 3% DV than the average squash at 2% DV. None of them are a good source of iron. Consult the list of high iron foods, and the list of fruits and veggies high in iron, for ideas of what to feed your kids. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-09-29 11:38:26
Name:Bill
Location:Phoenix, AZ
Subject:Wash the skin or use organic?
I am reluctant to cook the whole pumpkin since most have been sprayed with a number of chemicals for bugs and weeds. Maybe you should specify that this recipe is for only organic produce?
Posted on 2013-01-05 07:06:59
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Wash the skin or use organic?
Hi Bill, thanks for bringing up a great point. People should wash the skin of the pumpkin well, or possibly peal the pumpkin first. Use of an organic pumpkin would work as well, but washing the skin would still be a good idea of course. The recipe will now be edited to reflect this. Thanks again for your suggestion.
Posted on 2013-01-09 15:13:34
Name:Veggie lover
Location:Austin
Subject:Bake instead of boil
If you split the pumpkin in half, place on a baking tray, and bake until tender, you eliminate the boiling of the exterior and it is much easier to scoop out the pulp without danger of pesticides.
Posted on 2013-02-01 10:32:20
Name:Michelle
Location:Va Beach
Subject:What kind of pumpkin?
Do you use the smaller cooking pie pumpkin or do you use the one we carve? I have one from Halloween that isn't carved that would be perfect. I am excited to try something new.
Posted on 2013-11-08 01:12:26
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: What kind of pumpkin?
Hi Michelle, thanks for your question. Yes the smaller pie or "cooking" pumpkins are what is preferred for this recipe. You can try a carving pumpkin though, and see how it turns out.
Posted on 2013-11-08 03:25:07
Name:Julie
Location:Beaverton Or.
Subject:Canned pumpkin?
With all that chopping,,cooking,,,ect of the pumpkin....can I use canned pumpkin?
Posted on 2014-01-05 16:31:44
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Canned Pumpkin
Hi Julie, thanks for your question. Yes, canned pumpkin should work just as well, and could save some time, though you may sacrifice some flavor and nutrients.
Posted on 2014-01-13 17:40:51

Post a comment.
Name:          
Location:       
Email:(Optional)
Subject:         

Spam Prevention *(REQUIRED):
Enter the last three letters of this sentence.