Napa Cabbage


Napa Cabbage (Brassica rapa) aka: Chinese Cabbage, Celery Cabbage, Pe Tsai, and Peking Cabbage, is an oblong vegetable of tightly clustered light green leaves.

Health Benefits of Napa Cabbage:
  • Increased Immune Function
  • Protection Against Heart Disease
  • Slowing Aging
  • DNA Repair and Protection
  • Promoted Eye Health
  • Alzheimer's Protection
  • Osteoporosis†Protection
  • Antioxidant Protection
  • Prevention of Epileptic Seizures
  • Alleviation of the Common Cold
  • Prevention of Alopecia (Spot Baldness)

  • *Some of these health benefits are due to the nutrients highly concentrated in Napa Cabbage, and may not necessarily be related to Napa Cabbage.

Natural vitamins, minerals, and nutrients found in Napa Cabbage: Vitamin B9 (Folate, Folic Acid) | Manganese | Iron | Zinc |

Click here to compare these nutrition facts with other vegetables.
Nutrition Facts
Cabbage Napa Cooked
Serving Size 100g
Calories 12
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.17g0%
    Saturated Fat ~g0%
Cholesterol 0mg0%
Sodium 11mg0%
Total Carbohydrate 2.23g1%
    Dietary Fiber ~g~%
    Sugar ~g~
Protein 1.1g~
Vitamin A5%Vitamin C5%
Calcium3%Iron4%
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Vitamins  %DV
Vitamin A 263IU5%
    Retinol equivalents 13μg~
    Retinol 0μg~
    Alpha-carotene 49μg~
    Beta-carotene 133μg~
    Beta-cryptoxanthin 0μg~
Vitamin C 3.2mg5%
Vitamin E ~mg~%
Vitamin K ~μg~%
Vitamin B12 0μg0%
Thiamin 0.005mg0%
Riboflavin 0.025mg1%
Niacin 0.466mg2%
Pantothenic acid 0.035mg0%
Vitamin B6 0.037mg2%
Folate 43μg11%
    Folic Acid 0μg~
    Food Folate 43μg~
    Dietary Folate Equivalents 43μg~
Choline ~mg~
Lycopene 0μg~
Lutein+zeazanthin ~μg~
Minerals  %DV
Calcium 29mg3%
Iron 0.74mg4%
Magnesium 8mg2%
Phosphorus 19mg2%
Sodium 11mg0%
Potassium 87mg2%
Zinc 3.75mg25%
Copper 0.096mg5%
Manganese 0.203mg10%
Selenium 0.4μg1%
Water 96.33g~
Ash 0.17g~

Useful Stats
Percent of Daily Calorie Target
(2000 calories)
0.6%
Percent Water Composition 96.33%
Protein to Carb Ratio (g/g) 0.49g

How to choose Napa Cabbage: Look for bright vibrant leaves with no signs of wilting.

Climate and origin: Napa cabbage originated in China around 500 A.D. Not found in the wild, Napa cabbage is thought to be a cross between bok choi and turnips.

Taste: Napa cabbage has a sharp, spicy, and pungent taste with a light crisp texture.

Substitutes with more vitamins: Mustard Greens

Miscellaneous information: Napa cabbage first became popular in the U.S. around the 1970s and gets its name from Napa Valley California where it was first cultivated in the U.S.

Similar tasting produce: Mustard Greens

Recipes using Napa Cabbage: Steamed Napa Cabbage





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▼ References
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