Top 10 Foods Highest in Potassium

Potassium is an essential nutrient used to maintain fluid and electrolyte balance in the body. A deficiency in potassium causes fatigue, irritability, and hypertension (high blood pressure). Unless you are on dialysis, or have a special condition, overdose of potassium from natural sources is nearly impossible; however, it is possible to consume too much potassium via potassium salts which can lead to nausea, vomiting, and even cardiac arrest.

High potassium foods include beans, dark leafy greens, potatoes, squash, yogurt, fish, avocados, mushrooms, and bananas. The current daily value for potassium is 3,500 milligrams (mg). Below is a list of high potassium foods ranked by common serving sizes, for more see the lists of high potassium foods by nutrient density, potassium rich foods, fruits high in potassium, and vegetables high in potassium.


  1. White Beans
  2. 1004mg (29% DV) in 1 cup (179g)
    561mg (16% DV) in 100g

    Other Beans High in Potassium (%DV per cup): Adzuki (35%), Soy (28%), Lima (28%), Kidney (20%), Great Northern (20%), Pinto (18%) and others at an average of 15% DV per cup cooked. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


  3. Dark Leafy Greens (Spinach)
  4. 839mg (24% DV) in 1 cup cooked (180g)
    167mg (5% DV) in 1 cup raw (30g)
    558mg (16% DV) in 100g

    Other Greens High in Potassium (%DV per cup cooked): Swiss Chard (27% DV), Kale (8% DV), and Collards (6% DV).
    Click to see complete nutrition facts.


  5. Baked Potatoes (With Skin)
  6. 926mg (26% DV) in an average potato (173g)
    535mg (15% DV) in 100g

    Warning: Potatoes are high in simple carbohydrates and not recommended for people with diabetes. Sweet potatoes are actually better for regulation blood sugar, an average baked sweet potato with skin (114g) provides 542mg (15% DV) of potassium. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


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  7. Dried Apricots
  8. 576mg (22% DV) in 1/2 cup (65g)
    1162mg (33% DV) in 100g

    Other Dried Fruits High in Potassium (%DV per 1/2 cup): Peaches (22% DV), Prunes (20% DV), Raisins (18% DV).
    Warning: Dried fruits are high in sugar. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


  9. Baked Acorn Squash
  10. 896mg (25% DV) in 1 cup (205g)
    437mg (12% DV) in 100g

    Other Squash High in Potassium (%DV per cup baked): Hubbard (21%), Butternut (17% DV), Zucchini (14% DV), Average Winter Squash (10% DV). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


  11. Yogurt (Plain, Skim/Non-Fat)
  12. 625mg (17% DV) in 1 cup (8 fl oz) (245g)
    255mg (7% DV) in 100g

    Other Yogurt High in Potassium (%DV per cup): Whole-Fat (11% DV), Chocolate Yogurt (24% DV). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


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  13. Fish (Salmon)
  14. 534mg (15% DV) in 3 oz (85g)
    628mg (18% DV) in 100g

    Other Fish High in Potassium (%DV per 3oz fillet (85g)): Pompano (15% DV), Lingcod (14% DV), Halibut (13% DV), Yellowfin Tuna (13% DV), Anchovies (12% DV), Mackerel (10% DV), Herring (10% DV) and most other fish at an average of 10% DV. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


  15. Avocados
  16. 1116mg (32% DV) in 1 cup, pureed (230g)
    975mg (28% DV) in an average avocado (201g)
    485mg (14% DV) in 100g

    An average avocado provides 322 calories, half a cup purred contains 184 calories. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


  17. Mushrooms (White)
  18. 428mg (12% DV) in 1 cup sliced (108g)
    396mg (11% DV) in 100g

    1 cup cooked sliced white mushrooms contain 28 calories.
    Other mushrooms high in potassium (%DV per cup sliced): Portabella (9% DV), Brown or Crimini (9% DV), Enoki (7% DV), Shiitake (5% DV), Maitake (4% DV). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


  19. Bananas
  20. 806mg (23% DV) in 1 cup, mashed (225g)
    422mg (12% DV) in an average banana (118g)
    358mg (10% DV) in 100g

    Plantains are also high in potassium with 1 cup mashed providing 930mg (27%DV).
    See the full list of high potassium fruits.
    Click to see complete nutrition facts.





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    Infographic for High Potassium Foods


    #1: Dried Herbs (Parsley, Chervil, Coriander, Basil, Dill)
    4740mg (135% DV) per 100 grams
    95mg (3% DV) per tablespoon (2 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Herbs

    #2: Sun-Dried Tomatoes
    3427mg (98% DV) per 100 grams
    69mg (2% DV) per piece (2 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sun Dried Tomatoes

    #3: Cocoa Powder and Dark Chocolate
    2509mg (72% DV) per 100 grams
    125mg (4% DV) per tablespoon (5 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cocoa Powder

    #4: Whey Powder
    2289mg (65% DV) per 100 grams
    69mg (2% DV) per tablespoon (3 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Whey Powder

    #5: Paprika and Chili Powder
    2280mg (65% DV) per 100 grams
    160mg (5% DV) per tablespoon (7 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Paprika and Chili Powder

    #6: Yeast Extract Spread (Marmite)
    2100mg (60% DV) per 100 grams
    126mg (4% DV) per teaspoon (6 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Yeast Extract Spread (Marmite)

    #7: Rice Bran
    1485mg (42% DV) per 100 grams
    1752mg (50% DV) per cup (118 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Rice Bran

    #8: Molasses
    1464mg (42% DV) per 100 grams
    293mg (8% DV) per tablespoon (20 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Molasses

    #9: Dry Roasted Soybeans
    1364mg (39% DV) per 100 grams
    2346mg (67% DV) per cup (172 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dry Roasted Soybeans

    #10: Dry Seaweed (Spirulina)
    1363mg (39% DV) per 100 grams
    95mg (3% DV) per tablespoon (7 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dry Seaweed (Spirulina)

    Pistachios
    1007mg (29% DV) per 100 gram serving
    1239mg (35% DV) per cup (123 grams)
    282mg (8% DV) per ounce (49 nuts or 28g)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pistachios

    Chestnuts
    592mg (17% DV) per 100 gram serving
    847mg (24% DV) per cup (143 grams)
    166mg (5% DV) per ounce (3 nuts or 28g)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Chestnuts

    Almonds
    705mg (20% DV) per 100 gram serving
    1008mg (29% DV) per cup (143 grams)
    197mg (6% DV) per ounce (23 nuts or 28g)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Almonds

    Cashews
    565mg (16% DV) per 100 gram serving
    774mg (22% DV) per cup (137 grams)
    158mg (5% DV) per ounce (28g)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cashews

    Walnuts
    441mg (13% DV) per 100 gram serving
    441mg (13% DV) per cup halves (100 grams)
    123mg (4% DV) per ounce (14 halves or 28g)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Walnuts

    Squash and Pumpkin Seeds
    919mg (26% DV) per 100 gram serving
    588mg (17% DV) per cup (64 grams)
    257mg (7% DV) per ounce (85 seeds or 28g)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Squash and Pumpkin Seeds

    Sunflower Seeds
    850mg (24% DV) per 100 gram serving
    1088mg (31% DV) per cup hulled (128 grams)
    238mg (7% DV) per ounce (85 seeds or 28g)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sunflower Seeds

    Watermelon Seeds
    648mg (19% DV) per 100 gram serving
    700mg (20% DV) per cup (108 grams)
    181mg (5% DV) per ounce (28 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Watermelon Seeds

    Coconut Water (Juice)
    250mg (7% DV) per 100 gram serving
    600mg (17% DV) in a cup (240 grams)
    515mg (15% DV) per coconut (206 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Coconut Water (Juice)

    Orange Juice
    200mg (6% DV) per 100 gram serving
    496mg (14% DV) in a cup (248 grams)
    172mg (5% DV) in the juice of one orange (86 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Orange Juice

    Brussels Sprouts (Raw)
    389mg (11% DV) per 100 gram serving
    342mg (10% DV) per cup (88 grams)
    74mg (2% DV) per brussel sprout (19 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Brussels Sprouts

    Palm Hearts
    177mg (5% DV) per 100 gram serving
    258mg (26% DV) per cup (146 grams)
    58mg (2% DV) per piece (33 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Canned Palm Hearts

    Clams
    628mg (18% DV) per 100 gram serving
    534mg (15% DV) per 3 ounce serving (85 grams)
    1.2g (34% DV) in 20 small clams (190 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cooked Clams

    Whelk
    694mg (20% DV) per 100 gram serving
    350mg (15% DV) per 3oz serving (85 grams)
    117mg (5% DV) per ounce (28 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Whelk

    Dried Figs
    680mg (19% DV) per 100 gram serving
    1g (29% DV) per cup (149 grams)
    54mg (2% DV) in a single fig (8 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Figs

    Dates
    696mg (20% DV) per 100 gram serving
    167mg (5% DV) in a single large date (24 grams)
    Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dates (Medjool)

    To find even more high potassium foods, use the nutrient ranking tool.

    • Osteoporosis Protection - Several studies have found a relation between increased bone density and increased intake of dietary potassium. These studies were true even for post menopausal women and older men.2-4
    • Reduced Risk of Stroke - Several observational studies have found that those with high potassium levels experience a lower risk of stroke. The health benefits are likely through reduction of blood pressure combined with a diet high in fruits and vegetables.5-9
    • Alleviation of High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) - Studies show that a diet high in potassium, especially potassium from fruits and vegetables, lowers blood pressure. This is especially true if the increase in potassium foods is not accompanied by an increase in high sodium foods. 10-12
    • Alcoholics
    • People taking Diuretics - Especially thiazide or furosemide
    • Long distance athletes - People who exercise over long distances lose electrolytes via sweat and need to replenish their sodium, potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus levels.
    • Dehydration - People who consume excess alcohol, or suffer severe vomiting/diarrhea, or can be otherwise dehydrated need to replenish their sodium, potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus levels.
    • Anorexics or bulimics
    • People with a magnesium deficiency
    • People taking Certain Medications13,14
      • Beta-adrenergic agonists - Epinephrine
      • Decongestants - Pseudoephedrine, phenylpropanolamine
      • Bronchodilators - Albuterol, terbutaline, pirbuterol, isoetharine, fenoterol, ephedrine, isoproterenol, metaproterenol, theophylline
      • Tocolytic (labor suppressing) agents - Ritodrine, nylidrin
      • Diuretics - Acetazolamide, thiazides, chlorthalidone, indapamide, metolazone, quinethazone, bumetanide, ethacrynic acid, furosemide, torsemide
      • Mineralocorticoids - Fludrocortisone
      • Substances with mineralocorticoid effects - Licorice, carbenoxolone, gossypol
      • High-dose glucocorticoids
      • High-dose antibiotics - Penicillin, nafcillin, carbenicillin
      • Other - Caffeine, phenolphthalein, sodium polystyrene sulfonate
    1. White Beans - 1004mg (29% DV) in 1 cup
    2. Spinach - 839mg (24% DV) in 1 cup cooked
    3. Baked Potatoes With Skin - 926mg (26% DV) in an average potato
    4. Dried Apricots - 576mg (22% DV) in 1/2 cup
    5. Baked Acorn Squash - 896mg (25% DV) in 1 cup
    6. Yogurt (Plain, Skim/Non-Fat) - 625mg (17% DV) in 1 cup
    7. Salmon - 534mg (15% DV) in 3 oz
    8. Avocados - 975mg (28% DV) in an average avocado
    9. Mushrooms (White Button) - 428mg (12% DV) in 1 cup sliced
    10. Bananas - 422mg (12% DV) in an average banana

    To print this list just copy and paste it to a word processor, or text file.

    1. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 25 and 28.
    2. New SA, Bolton-Smith C, Grubb DA, Reid DM. Nutritional influences on bone mineral density: a cross-sectional study in premenopausal women. Am J Clin Nutr. 1997;65(6):1831-1839.
    3. New SA, Robins SP, Campbell MK, et al. Dietary influences on bone mass and bone metabolism: further evidence of a positive link between fruit and vegetable consumption and bone health? Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;71(1):142-151.
    4. Tucker KL, Hannan MT, Chen H, Cupples LA, Wilson PW, Kiel DP. Potassium, magnesium, and fruit and vegetable intakes are associated with greater bone mineral density in elderly men and women. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999;69(4):727-736.
    5. Ascherio A, Rimm EB, Hernan MA, et al. Intake of potassium, magnesium, calcium, and fiber and risk of stroke among US men. Circulation. 1998;98(12):1198-1204.
    6. Iso H, Stampfer MJ, Manson JE, et al. Prospective study of calcium, potassium, and magnesium intake and risk of stroke in women. Stroke. 1999;30(9):1772-1779.
    7. Fang J, Madhavan S, Alderman MH. Dietary potassium intake and stroke mortality. Stroke. 2000;31(7):1532-1537.
    8. Bazzano LA, He J, Ogden LG, et al. Dietary potassium intake and risk of stroke in US men and women: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I epidemiologic follow-up study. Stroke. 2001;32(7):1473-1480.
    9. Green DM, Ropper AH, Kronmal RA, Psaty BM, Burke GL. Serum potassium level and dietary potassium intake as risk factors for stroke. Neurology. 2002;59(3):314-320.
    10. Barri YM, Wingo CS. The effects of potassium depletion and supplementation on blood pressure: a clinical review. Am J Med Sci. 1997;314(1):37-40.
    11. Hajjar IM, Grim CE, George V, Kotchen TA. Impact of diet on blood pressure and age-related changes in blood pressure in the US population: analysis of NHANES III. Arch Intern Med. 2001;161(4):589-593.
    12. Appel LJ, Moore TJ, Obarzanek E, et al. A clinical trial of the effects of dietary patterns on blood pressure. DASH Collaborative Research Group. N Engl J Med. 1997;336(16):1117-1124.
    13. Gennari FJ. Hypokalemia. N Engl J Med. 1998;339(7):451-458.
    14. https://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/minerals/potassium/potassiumrefs.html
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