Kiwifruit

Kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis) aka: Chinese gooseberries, are small oval shaped fruits with a thin brown furry skin, light green inner pulp, and little black edible seeds at their center.

Health Benefits of Kiwifruit:
  • Increased Immune Function
  • Reduced Cancer Risk
  • Reduced Risk of Colon Cancer
  • Protection Against Heart Disease
  • Protection Against Dementia
  • Alleviation of Cardiovascular Disease
  • Alleviation of Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)
  • Promoted Eye Health
  • Alzheimer's Protection
  • Osteoporosis Protection
  • Alleviation of Inflammation
  • Kiwi fruit contains nutrients and antioxidants believed to help protect DNA from damage, it can also be used as a blood thinner. Kiwi fruit has a protein dissolving enzyme called actinidin, thus it can be used as a meat tenderizer, like papaya.
    *Some of these health benefits are due to the nutrients highly concentrated in Kiwifruit, and may not necessarily be related to Kiwifruit.
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Natural vitamins, minerals, and nutrients found in Kiwifruit: Vitamin C | Vitamin K | Vitamin E | Calcium | Dietary Fiber | Copper |

Click here to compare these nutrition facts with other fruits.
Nutrition Facts
Kiwifruit green raw           
Serving Size 100g
Calories 61
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.52g1%
    Saturated Fat 0.029g0%
Cholesterol 0mg~%
Sodium 3mg0%
Total Carbohydrate 14.7g5%
    Dietary Fiber 3g12%
    Sugar 9g~
Protein 1.1g~
Vitamin A2%Vitamin C155%
Calcium3%Iron2%
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Vitamins  %DV
Vitamin A 87IU2%
    Retinol equivalents 4μg~
    Retinol 0μg~
    Alpha-carotene 0μg~
    Beta-carotene 52μg~
    Beta-cryptoxanthin 0μg~
Vitamin C 92.7mg155%
Vitamin D 0IU (0μg)~%
    D2 Ergocalciferol ~IU (~μg)
    D3 Cholecalciferol ~IU (~μg)
Vitamin E 1.46mg7%
Vitamin K 40.3μg50%
    K1 - Dihydrophylloquinone 0μg~
    K2 - Menaquinone-4 ~μg~
Vitamin B12 0μg~%
Thiamin 0.027mg2%
Riboflavin 0.025mg1%
Niacin 0.341mg2%
Pantothenic acid 0.183mg2%
Vitamin B6 0.063mg3%
Folate 25μg6%
    Folic Acid 0μg~
    Food Folate 25μg~
    Dietary Folate Equivalents 25μg~
Choline 7.8mg~
Lycopene 0μg~
Lutein+Zeaxanthin 122μg~
Minerals  %DV
Calcium 34mg3%
Iron 0.31mg2%
Magnesium 17mg4%
Phosphorus 34mg3%
Sodium 3mg0%
Potassium 312mg9%
Zinc 0.14mg1%
Copper 0.13mg7%
Manganese 0.098mg5%
Selenium 0.2μg0%
Water 83.07g~
Ash 0.61g~
Fatty Acids
Omega 3 to Omega 6 Ratio0.17
Omega 6 to Omega 3 Ratio5.86
Total Omega 3s42mg
18D3 Linolenic42mg
18D3CN3 Alpha Linolenic(ALA)~mg
18D4 Stearidonic (SDA)0mg
20D3N3 Eicosatrienoic~mg
20D5 Eicosapentaenoic(EPA)0mg
22D5 Docosapentaenoic(DPA)0mg
22D6 Docosahexaenoic(DHA)0mg
Total Omega 6s246mg
18D2246mg
18D2CN6 Linoleic(LA)~mg
18D2CLA Conjugated Linoleic(CLA)~mg
18D3CN6 Gamma-linolenic (GLA)~mg
20D2CN6 Eicosadienoic~mg
20D3N6 Di-homo-gamma-linolenic (DGLA)~mg
20D4N6 Arachidonic (AA)~mg
22D4 Adrenic (AA)~mg
Essential Amino Acids  %RDI
Tryptophan 15mg5%
Threonine 47mg4%
Isoleucine 51mg4%
Leucine 66mg2%
Lysine 61mg3%
Methionine 24mg3%
Cystine 31mg11%
Phenylalanine 44mg5%
Tyrosine 34mg4%
Valine 57mg3%
Stats
Percent of Daily CalorieTarget
(2000 calories)
3.05%
Percent Water Composition 83.1%
Protein to Carb Ratio (g/g) 0.07

How to choose Kiwifruit: Kiwifruit are ready to eat when they yield gently to pressure and have a sweet smell. Avoid kiwis which are overly soft, or withered. Kiwis which are still firm can be bought and kept to ripen till they become soft.

How to store Kiwifruit: Ripe kiwis can keep in the refrigerator for up to a week, when bought firm they can last for up to eight weeks at room temperature. Store kiwis in a paper bag ripen them quickly.

Climate and origin: Kiwifruit originated in East Asia, probably China, and in the 1800s spread to most of the rest of the world. The climate they can tolerate depends on type, but most do well in warm temperate climates with a few being able to survive colder areas. (Zones 4-9 in the U.S.)

Taste: Kiwifruit have a tart taste and a mushy texture.

Miscellaneous information: Although commonly associated with New Zealand, Italy is actually the top producer of kiwi fruit, growing over four hundred thousand metric tons a year. Over one million metric tons are grown each year in the world.



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