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Top 10 Foods Highest in Vitamin A


Vitamin A is an essential vitamin required for vision, gene transcription, boosting immune function, and great skin health. A deficiency in vitamin A can lead to blindness and increased viral infection, however deficiency is only considered a problem in developing countries where it is a leading cause of blindness in children. Over consumption of vitamin A can lead to jaundice, nausea, loss of appetite, irritability, vomiting, and even hair loss. Vitamin A if a fat soluble vitamin, and therefore, needs to be consumed with fat in order to have optimal absorption. The current percent daily value for Vitamin A is 5000 international units (IU). Below is a list high vitamin A foods, click here for high vitamin A foods by nutrient density, and here for an extended list of vitamin A rich foods.

#1: Sweet Potato (Cooked)
Vitamin A in 100gPer cup (200g)Per medium potato (114g)
19218IU (384% DV)38436IU (769% DV)21909IU (438% DV)
Other Types of Sweet Potato High in Vitamin A (%DV per cup): Frozen Sweet Potato, cooked, cubed (578%), Canned Sweet Potato (444%), and Raw Sweet Potato, cubed (377%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#2: Carrots (Cooked)
Vitamin A in 100gPer cup, sliced (156g)Per carrot (46g)
17033IU (341% DV)26572IU (532% DV)7835IU (157% DV)
Other Types of Carrot High in Vitamin A (%DV per cup): Frozen Carrots, cooked, cubed (494%), and Raw Carrots, sliced (408%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#3: Dark Leafy Greens (Kale, Cooked)
Vitamin A in 100gPer cup, chopped (130g)
13621IU (272% DV)17707IU (354% DV)
Other Dark Leafy Greens High in Vitamin A (%DV per cup, cooked): Frozen Spinach (458%), Frozen Collards (391%), Frozen Kale (382%), Frozen Turnip Greens (353%), Spinach (377%), Collards (289%), Dandelion Greens (305%), Beet Greens & Turnip Greens (220%), Swiss Chard (214%), and Pak Choi (144%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#4: Squash (Butternut, Cooked)
Vitamin A in 100gPer cup, cubes (205g)Per 1/2 cup, cubes (53g)
11155IU (223% DV)22868IU (457% DV)11434IU (229% DV)
Other Squash High in Vitamin A (%DV per cup, cooked): Hubbard, cubed (275%), Pumpkin, mashed (282%), and an average of All Varieties Of Winter Squash, cubed (214%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#5: Cos or Romaine Lettuce
Vitamin A in 100gPer cup, shredded (47g)Per head (626g)
8710IU (174% DV)4094IU (82% DV)54525IU (1090% DV)
Other Types of Lettuce High in Vitamin A (%DV per cup, shredded): Green Leaf (53%), Red Leaf (42%), Butterhead (36%), and Chicory (33%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#6: Dried Apricots
Vitamin A in 100gPer cup (119g)Per 1/2 cup (60g)
12669IU (253% DV)15076IU (302% DV)7538IU (151% DV)
Other Dried Fruit High in Vitamin A (%DV per 1/2 cup): Prunes (24%), and Dried Peaches (17%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#7:Cantaloupe Melon
Vitamin A in 100gPer cup, cubes (160g)Per medium wedge (69g)
3382IU (68% DV)5411IU (108% DV)2334IU (47% DV)
A medium wedge of cantaloupe melon contains 23 calories and 0.1g fat. Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#8: Sweet Red Peppers
Vitamin A in 100g1 cup chopped (149g)1 large pepper (164g)
3131IU (63% DV)4665IU (93% DV)5135IU (103% DV)
Other Peppers Providing Vitamin A (%DV per large pepper): Sweet Green Peppers (12%), and Sweet Yellow Peppers (7%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#9: Tuna Fish (Bluefin, Cooked)
Vitamin A in 100gPer 3oz (85g)Per ounce (28g)
2520IU (50% DV)2142IU (43% DV)714IU (14% DV)
Other Fish and Seafood High in Vitamin A (%DV per 3oz, cooked): Sturgeon (15%), Mackerel (14%), and Oysters (8%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#10: Tropical Fruit (Mango)
Vitamin A in 100gPer cup, pieces (165g)Per mango (336g)
1082IU (22% DV)1785IU (36% DV)3636IU (73% DV)
Other Tropical Fruit High in Vitamin A (%DV per fruit): Papaya, small (30%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.




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Top 10 High Vitamin A Foods by Nutrient Density (Vitamin A per Gram)

#1: Liver (Veal, cooked) 70564IU (1411% DV) per 100 grams59979IU (1199% DV) per 3oz (85 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Liver
#2: Spices (Paprika, Cayenne, Chili Powder) 49254IU (985% DV) per 100 grams985IU (20% DV) per teaspoon (2 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Spices
#3: Sweet Potato (Cooked) 19218IU (384% DV) per 100 grams21909IU (438% DV) per medium potato (114 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sweet Potato
#4: Carrots (Cooked) 17033IU (341% DV) per 100 grams7835IU (157% DV) per carrot (46 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Carrots
#5: Kale (Frozen, cooked) 14704IU (294% DV) per 100 grams19115IU (382% DV) per cup, chopped (130 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Frozen Kale
#6: Dried Apricots 12669IU (253% DV) per 100 grams15076IU (302% DV) per cup (119 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Apricots
#7: Butternut Squash (Cooked) 11155IU (223% DV) per 100 grams22868IU (457% DV) per cup, cubes (205 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Butternut Squash
#8: Dried Herbs (Mint) 10579IU (212% DV) per 100 grams106IU (2% DV) per teaspoon (1 gram)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Herbs
#9: Cos or Romaine Lettuce 8710IU (174% DV) per 100 grams4094IU (82% DV) per cup, shredded (47 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cos or Romaine Lettuce
#10: Fresh Herbs (Parsley) 8424IU (168% DV) per 100 grams337IU (7% DV) per tablespoon (4 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fresh Herbs


Other Vitamin A Rich Foods

Zucchini (Cooked) 1117IU (22% DV) per 100 gram serving 2011IU (40% DV) per cup, sliced (180 grams) 1340IU (27% DV) per 1/2 cup, mashed (120 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Zucchini
Carrot Juice 19124IU (382% DV) per 100 gram serving 45133IU (903% DV) per cup (236 grams) 5737IU (115% DV) per fluid ounce (30 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Carrot Juice
Pâté de Foie Gras 3333IU (67% DV) per 100 gram serving 433IU (9% DV) per tablespoon (13 grams) 933IU (19% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pâté de Foie Gras
Watercress 3191IU (64% DV) per 100 gram serving 1085IU (22% DV) per cup, chopped (34 grams) 798IU (16% DV) per 10 sprigs (25 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Watercress
Apricots 1926IU (39% DV) per 100 gram serving 2985IU (60% DV) per cup, halves (155 grams) 674IU (13% DV) per apricot (35 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Apricots
Passion Fruit 1272IU (25% DV) per 100 gram serving 3002IU (60% DV) per cup (236 grams) 229IU (5% DV) per fruit (18 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Passion Fruit
Garden Cress 6917IU (138% DV) per 100 gram serving 3459IU (69% DV) per cup (50 grams) 69IU (1% DV) per sprig (1 gram) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Garden Cress
Broccoli Raab (Cime di Rapa) 2622IU (52% DV) per 100 gram serving 1049IU (21% DV) per cup, chopped (40 grams) 498IU (10% DV) per stalk (19 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Broccoli Raab
Butter 2499IU (50% DV) per 100 gram serving 350IU (7% DV) per tablespoon (14 grams) 125IU (2% DV) per pat (5 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Butter
Eel (Cooked) 3787IU (76% DV) per 100 gram serving 3219IU (64% DV) per 3oz (85 grams) 6021IU (120% DV) per fillet (159 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Eel
Liverwurst 27667IU (553% DV) per 100 gram serving 4980IU (100% DV) per slice (18 grams) 7747IU (155% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Liverwurst
Silken Tofu 1913IU (38% DV) per 100 gram serving 1741IU (35% DV) per 1/5 package (91 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Silken Tofu
Canned Pumpkin 15563IU (311% DV) per 100 gram serving 38129IU (763% DV) per cup (245 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Canned Pumpkin
Goat Cheese (Hard) 1745IU (35% DV) per 100 gram serving 489IU (10% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Goat Cheese
Green Peas2100IU (42% DV) per 100 gram serving3360IU (68% DV) per cup (160 grams)1680IU (34% DV) in a half cup (80 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cooked Green Peas
Tomatoes833IU (17% DV) per 100 gram serving1499IU (30% DV) per cup chopped (180 grams)1025IU (20% DV) in an average tomato (123 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Red Ripe Tomatoes
Fortified Skim (Non-Fat) Milk*204IU (4% DV) per 100 gram serving500IU (10% DV) per cup (245 grams)63IU (1% DV) in a fluid ounce (31 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fortified Skim Milk
Whole Milk162IU (3% DV) per 100 gram serving395IU (8% DV) per cup (244 grams)50IU (1% DV) in a fluid ounce (31 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Whole Milk
Eggs (Yolks)538IU (11% DV) per 100 gram serving269IU (5% DV) in one large egg (50 grams)245IU (5% DV) in a large yolk (17 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Eggs
Oatmeal (Fortified)433IU (9% DV) per 100 gram serving1013IU (20% DV) per cup (234 grams)507IU (10% DV) in a half-cup (117 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Instant Fortified Oatmeal
For more foods high in vitamin A use the nutrient ranking tool.
*Amount of vitamin A may vary greatly between products. Be sure to check nutrition labels for the exact amount of vitamin A from each individual product.



Health Benefits of Vitamin A

  • Increased Protection from Bacterial and Viral Infections - Vitamin A is essential for healthy surface linings of the eyes, mucous membranes, respiratory, urinary, and intestinal tracts.3-6
  • Proper Immune Functioning - Vitamin A is essential to regulate the immune system, and plays a key role in making white blood cells which fight off infections in the body.4,5,7-9
  • Cancer Protection (*Food Sources Only) - Studies suggest beta-carotene and vitamin A lower risk of many types of cancer.10 This effect could mainly be from a diet high in vegetables and not from supplements. Vitamin A supplements have been shown to increase risk of cancer.11-13

High Risk Groups for a Vitamin A Deficiency

  • Alcoholics - Excessive consumption of alcohol can deplete levels of vitamin A in the body, and even moderate consumption can interfere with vitamin A absorption.
  • People with Long Term Problems Absorbing Fat - Problems absorbing fat in the long term can lead to diarrhea and vitamin A deficiency. This includes people with:
    • Celiac disease - Gluten Intolerance
    • Crohn's disease - Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    • Pancreatic disorders - The pancreas releases enzymes for proper digestion of fats
    • Cystic Fibrosis - Leads to a pancreatic disorder and improper absorption of fats



Warnings

  • Liver and whole milk are high cholesterol foods which should be eaten in moderate amounts and avoided by people at risk of heart disease or stroke.


Buy High Vitamin A Foods from Amazon.com

Paprika, Chili Powder, Liver Pâté, Dried Herbs, Dried Apricots.



Comments.
Name:Hannah
Subject:Supplement Health Risks
What if your taking multivitamin supplement which includes 100% of vitamins A B2 B5 B6 C D and E also contains 100% omega3 will it include any health risks? thankyou
Posted on 2011-07-07 09:14:24
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Supplement Health Risks
Hi Hannah, thanks for your question. Provided you are healthy without a health condition and you are not taking a medication which could react wit the supplement then taking a supplement which provides no more than 100% of the DV should not be risky. As always getting your vitamins from whole foods is the safest and often, the cheapest source.
Posted on 2011-07-07 09:31:51
Name:Whispering Sage
Location:Northeastern California
Subject:Vitamin A Mislabled
I find consistently that "experts" wrongly claim vitamin A to be be present in fruits and vegetables. This is scientifically wrong, and technically wrong. What fruits and vegetables have are "carotenes" which are previtamin A. That means, it doesn't turn into vitamin A (retinol) until it is activated by enzymes in the digestive system, and also must be accompanied by adequate fats for this to occur, (butter on carrots for example) If a person has an impairment of this sort in the digestive system (IBS, surgery in the past or other various imperfections that prevent this from happening,) all bets are off. That person is not going to turn their beta carotene into vitamin A and they are at risk for becoming deficient. This site as well as most other news sources are in constant violation of this principle, and I say shame. The only true source of vitamin A are animal, cod liver oil, and liver sources are the highest, also eggs. Used to be milk did but since cows aren't allowed out on fresh green grass anymore (confined indoors) they are also deficient and their milk cannot be considered a rich source as it once was.
Posted on 2011-08-24 11:21:50
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin A Mislabeled
Hi Whispering Sage, thanks for your thoughtful comment, and for pointing out this important distinction so well. While none of the fruits and vegetables truly contain vitamin A, their carotene precursors do get converted into vitamin A. The de facto inclusion of this conversion goes beyond experts and news sources and has been included in the nutrition facts released by the United States Agricultural Research Service (ARS) from where these and most other nutrition facts are sourced. So while it is a fair technical point, for all practical purposes, and in most cases, the foods listed here can and should be taken as great natural sources of vitamin A.
Posted on 2011-08-24 11:30:18
Name:Akanksha
Location:New Delhi, India
Subject:White Spots & Ulcers
Hi, My husband has white spots on the inner cheek of his mouth and also gets regular ulcers. He has taken many medicines on doctor's advice but nothing seems to help. I read in a few websites that a diet rich in Vitamin-A will help. Is it true?
Posted on 2011-09-07 15:57:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: White Spots & Ulcers
Hi Akanksha, thanks for your question. Vitamin A foods may help your husband's ulcers by boosting his immune system, but are unlikely to completely cure the ulcers. Your husband may be deficient in riboflavin (vitamin B2) and could benefit from eating more high vitamin B2 foods.
Posted on 2011-09-07 16:02:10
Name:Pandibida
Location:London
Subject:Diet High in Vitamin A
Hi! Is there any risk with consuming more than your DV of vitamin A because of eating fruits and vegetables that are high in vitamin A?
Posted on 2011-09-11 12:01:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Diet High in Vitamin A
Hi Pandibida, thanks for your question. Vitamin A coming from plant sources, such as fruits and vegetables, is considered safe and it is extremely rare for any toxicity to occur. Fruits and vegetables contain carotenoids which are later converted to vitamin A. Most vitamin A toxicity occurs from meat sources like liver, or from consumption of supplements. Over consumption of high vitamin A from fruits and vegetables can lead to a slight yellow discoloration of the skin known as Carotenodermia. This condition only causes a slight change in skin color and is considered harmless.
Posted on 2011-09-12 05:24:35
Name:Ashwini
Location:India
Subject:Pregnancy and Vitamin A
Hi, I have read that during pregnancy Vitamin A damages the foetus. So is it better to stay away from Vitamin A foods?
Posted on 2011-10-30 23:43:59
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Pregnancy and Vitamin A
Hi Ashwini, thanks for your question. There is a very rare condition caused by excess intake of retinoids called fatal retinoid syndrome. To current knowledge, this disease only comes from synthetic forms of vitamin A, while the vitamin A which comes from foods is considered safe and is even essential for the proper developement of your child. Keep eating foods high in vitamin A, and if you are worried, avoid vitamin A supplements and pills unless your doctor advises you otherwise.
Posted on 2011-10-31 18:23:43
Name:Fortune
Location:Nigeria
Subject:Vitamin A and HIV
How often should someone living with HIV take food and fruit that contains vitamin A and what type of food and fruit is recommended for such a person?
Posted on 2011-12-29 18:38:51
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin A and HIV
Hi Fortune, thanks for your question. Since vitamin A boosts your immune system, it would be a good idea to eat as many vitamin A foods as possible. Some studies also show that vitamin C foods and vitamin E foods can help. This is due to the antioxidants in the foods. This study found that vitamin E foods are more effective in slowing the progression of HIV-1 than vitamin A.
Posted on 2012-01-04 10:17:35
Name:Denverite
Location:Denver
Subject:Vitamin A and Acne
Hello, Can eating foods high in Vitamin A help in controlling or preventing acne flare ups?
Posted on 2012-01-10 08:21:31
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin A and Acne
Hello and thanks for your question. Some derivatives of vitamin A are used in treatment of acne, both topically in the form of a cream and orally in the form of a medicine. These treatments however, do have side effects and are not the same as eating foods high in vitamin A. Eating high vitamin A foods is still likely to help a little bit with acne, as well as eating more fruits and vegetables. Studies suggest that eating high sugar foods strongly correlates with increasing acne. Thus, avoiding foods high in sugar is likely the most effective dietary change you can make to help your acne.
Posted on 2012-01-10 09:42:40
Name:Vivaroo
Location:Brisbane
Subject:Vegetarians - Risk of Vit A deficiency
You mention vegetarians & vegans would need at least 5 servings of veg daily so not to be deficient in Vit A if not eating animal sources. If one medium carrot has 204% DV of Vit A, why need more? Eating 5+ serves of veg is no problem for me, just curious. Thank you.
Posted on 2012-02-17 22:14:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vegetarians - Risk of Vit A deficiency
Hi Vivaroo, thanks for your question. Animal foods contain preformed vitamin A that can be readily absorbed, while plant foods contain provitamin A carotenoids that have to be converted into vitamin A by the body. For simplicity, the estimated conversion of carotenoids is quoted as the content of vitamin A for any fruit, vegetable, or plant food; however, the actual conversion can vary widely and depends on various factors such as how much fat is consumed with the food, and on a person's own digestive system. Thus, to be safe, vegetarians and vegans should consume plenty of vitamin A foods to be sure they meet their daily requirement.
Posted on 2012-02-18 15:26:03
Name:Arindam
Location:Bangalore, India
Subject:Halibut Liver Oil
We give our son almost all the fruits and vegetables listed above for Vitamin A. However, would you suggest Halibut Liver Oil instead and a preferred dosage please??? He is 4 and a half years...
Posted on 2012-02-19 09:09:00
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Halibut Liver Oil
Hi Arindam, thanks for your question. As long as your son is not showing any signs of vitamin A deficiency he is probably fine and you do not need to supplement with Halibut liver oil. Currently there is no nutrient data on Halibut liver oil, but Cod liver oil will provide 500IU, 10% of the DV per teaspoon. If you must supplement, a teaspoon would be a good dosage. Check the nutrition label of your Halibut liver oil to be sure.
Posted on 2012-02-19 14:01:52
Name:Lana
Location:South Africa
Subject:Hair Loss
Hi, I am 28 years old and recently experiencing more than usual hair loss. Me and my husband eat mostly red meat and starch. Will the intake of more fruit and veg help cure my hair loss?
Posted on 2012-02-23 04:18:16
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hair Loss
Hi Lana, thanks for your question. Hair loss has many causes, and may be due to excess vitamin A. This typically is from vitamin A supplements in excess of 20,000IU. Hair loss can also be caused by a deficiency in zinc, and/or selenium. Try eat more zinc foods, and selenium foods to see if your condition improves after a couple weeks. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-02-23 18:25:01
Name:Anonymous
Subject:Vitamin A and Warts
Hi, I've been struggeling with plantar warts for 5+ years. I've tried everything under the sun from doctors to alternative. My warts seem to spread everytime I try to treat them. I've read about vitamin A in large amounts for 1 month internally will cure them. Also, puncturing a vitamin A supplement and applying in topically. What are you thoughts? Thanks so much.
Posted on 2012-03-03 21:25:24
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin A and Warts
Hi thanks for your question. First off, you want to be careful with consuming large amounts of any supplement. If you are going to increase your intake of vitamin A try to use natural sources, and even then, do so with caution. In regards to applying vitamin A topically, there is one study which found that an ointment with 2% vitamin A applied topically cured 17 of 50 people with plantar warts, that means about a third of the people were cured. You could try it and see if it works for you. Amazon sells an ointment with vitamin A for about $4. Not sure if it is the same potency as the ointment used in the study, but it could be worth a try and cheaper than supplements.
Posted on 2012-03-03 21:34:17
Name:Halle
Location:Trinidad
Subject:Headaches
Can foods rich in vitamin A assist in curing constant headaches caused from computer glare?
Posted on 2012-03-19 18:11:50
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Headaches
Hi Halle, thanks for your question. Vitamin A is good for your eyes, but there have been no studies to suggest that it can help reduce headaches from computer glare. You can try flux, which is a free program to adjust your computers brightness to the time of day. You can also try purchase an anti-glare screen.
Posted on 2012-03-19 19:20:10
Name:Julia
Location:United States
Subject:Tiny Skin Bumps
Hi, I have tiny bumps all over the back of my upper arms, sometimes on the front of my thighs, and the back of my calves. They are occasionally itchy. I read that this skin condition could be caused by a deficiency in Vitamin A. Is this true? I am currently breastfeeding, but have never had these bumps until a few months ago. Will eating sweet potatoes help, or would cod liver oil be more effective?
Posted on 2012-05-03 15:45:11
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Tiny Skin Bumps
Hi Julia, thanks for your question. There is a condition called Keratosis Pilaris which some people believe can be triggered by a vitamin A deficiency. However, the U.S. National Library of Medicine does not mention vitamin A deficieny as a cause on their Keratosis Pilaris page. Rather, your condition can be caused by genetics, or dry air. You can try various lotions and some sources recommend adding vitamin A as a cream topically. As you are breastfeeding you need to be sure you get enough (but not too much) vitamin A for your baby. For now, try having a sweet potato and another vitamin A food to see if your skin improves. Adding butter, olive oil, or some fat to the food you eat will help absorption of vitamin A.
Posted on 2012-05-08 04:13:51
Name:K.Vee.Shanker
Location:Chennai, India
Subject: Why is Onion left out?
I'm surprised that the vegetable Red Onion (aka Allium) is left out in the list. It is a regular vegetable with Asians, and is said to be rich in Vitamin A, similar to animal products. I've a question too: Why is a sythetic vitamin A supplement toxic after a certain level while the natural one is practically harmless?
Posted on 2012-05-22 03:06:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Why is Onion left out?
Hi K. Vee thanks for your question. Red onions are not in the nutrition facts database, however, ordinary raw onions do not contain any vitamin A, and it is unlikely that red onions provide very much. In regards to your question about supplements, vitamin A found in most foods comes in a form which needs to be modified by the body to truely become vitamin A. This process allows the body to better regulate the level of vitamin A. The vitamin A found in the liver of certain animals, and supplements, is found in a certain form and concentration such that absorption cannot be easily mediated.
Posted on 2012-05-22 03:33:08
Name:Murgatroyd
Location:USA
Subject:Beta Carotene
Research on provitamin A (beta carotene) suggests that beta carotene forms almost equal amounts of Vitamin A agonists and Vitamin A antagonists in the body. An antagonist competes for a vitamin's receptor site on the surface of cells and blocks the vitamin's effect. This may be the reason for the greater number of cancer and/or deaths in studies providing smokers with mega doses of beta carotene.
Posted on 2012-05-25 23:05:01
Name:William Palmerini
Location:Saugus, MA
Subject:Psoriasis
What roll does vitiam A play in the healing or curing of psoriasis? If I eat more of the foods containing vitiam A would this be helpful in the treatment of this dreaded decease? Thank You.
Posted on 2012-05-29 19:51:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Psoriasis
Hi William, thanks for your question. Vitamin A included in a cream/ointment and applied to the skin can be used to treat Psoriasis, however, eating vitamin A foods has not been shown to help. As your doctor may have suggested you might get the most benefit from a cortisone cream.
Posted on 2012-05-29 22:48:12
Name:Ranu
Location:Delhi
Subject:Vitamin A and Breast Feeding
Good day, Is deficiency of vitamin A going to affect breast feeding, like a lower quantity of milk being produced?
Posted on 2012-06-29 17:02:20
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin A and Breast Feeding
Hi Ranu, thanks for your question. Adequate levels of Vitamin A is necessary for proper developement of your baby. Having a lower volume of breast milk is associated with vitamin A deficiency, but there have not been enough studies to confirm this. Basically, try to maintain adequate levels of vitamin A or supplement when breastfeeding.
Posted on 2012-06-30 11:17:36
Name:Chucky
Location:California,U.S.
Subject:Vitamin A bad for livers?
In your opinion is vitamin A bad for your liver? I have a fatty liver & I read somewhere that vitamin A is damaging to your liver. Does this mean I have to watch out for all foods containing vitamin A?
Posted on 2012-10-31 21:33:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin A bad for livers?
Hi Chucky, thanks for your question. Not sure of your particular condition, but it is unlikely that eating vitamin A foods will have much effect. Vitamin A is stored in the liver, but it is well regulated by the body. You can have problems if you take a lot of vitamin A supplements, or eat a lot of vitamin A from liver, otherwise you should be fine. If you do have vitamin A toxicity, you should feel dizyness, nausea, headaches, and skin irritaion. Consult with your health care provider if you feel these symptoms, or if you feel you are having a problem with regulating you vitamin A storage. Otherwise, you should be fine eating foods high in vitamin A (excluding liver).
Posted on 2012-10-31 23:54:05
Name:Orla
Location:UK
Subject:Too much vitamin A?
Hi, I'm 20 years old and for the past 3 weeks have been suffering from the bacterial mouth infection 'angular cheilitis'. I do eat the foods on your list and for the past 2 months I have been taking a multivitamin which contains 100% of my RDA of vitamin A. I read on a forum that an over consumption of vitamin A can flair up this infection, but irregardless of whether it was the cause of the angular cheilitis, would you advise stopping my multivitamin at the moment in case the excess of vitamin A in my diet is making the condition worse? (It's bad and painful at the moment) thanks for your advice.
Posted on 2012-11-10 08:55:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Too much vitamin A?
Hi Orla, thanks for your question. Yes, too much vitamin A can cause this condition or make it worse. However, angular chelitis can also be caused by a lack of riboflavin (Vitamin B2), iron, or zinc. Maybe try to find a multi-vitamin without vitamin A, or eat more vitamin B2, iron, and zinc foods.
Posted on 2012-11-12 02:59:33
Name:Ang
Location:Canada
Subject:Trying to AVOID Vitamin A
It has been suggested that I try to avoid Vitamin A. After an intentional 35lb weight loss in a 5 month period (tried to be healthy while doing this), I have been losing my hair for the past 7 months and it's still falling out. I have been told that Vitamin A can make this problem worse. Does this make sense?
Posted on 2013-01-03 14:27:31
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Trying to AVOID Vitamin A
Hi Ang, thanks for your question. Excess vitamin A (typically 20,000IU+) from supplements has been associated with hair loss. Your hair loss may also be due to a deficiency in zinc or selenium. Try eat more zinc foods, and selenium foods to see if your condition improves after a couple weeks. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-01-03 16:58:45
Name:DeSales Ward
Location:Annapolis, MD
Subject:Orange Skin and Absorption of Vitamin A
I was getting a massage a few years ago and the therapist noted that the bottoms of my feet were an orange color. She told me it was a sign that I'm not absorbing my Vitamin A and that it was depositing in my skin instead of being absorbed. I eat really, really healthy and consume a lot of fruits and vegetables but I am constantly battling severely dry skin. I do drink my share of water every day. I just can't figure it out. Do you think that statement is true? If so, what can I do?
Posted on 2013-03-20 19:22:36
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Orange Skin and Absorption of Vitamin A
Hi DeSales, Thanks for your question. Carotenaemia is a harmless condition where the skin can become orange from too much beta carotene or vitamin A. Basically the therapist was incorrect in her deduction. Yellow skin, or carotenaemia, is typically caused by consuming too much vitamin A. In rarer cases, it can also be caused by failure of your body to properly metabolize carotenoids (vitamin A), and remove them from your body. This may have been what your therapist was referring too, but ether way, you should be absorbing plenty of vitamin A.
Posted on 2013-03-20 21:02:25
Name:Heather
Location:Pennsylvania
Subject:Vitamin A and intracranial hypertension
Hi - I was recently diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and all the websites about it say to be careful and avoid vitamin A. I'm wondering if I should be avoiding spinach and carrots, or if I don't need to worry about that because they only contain beta carotene and my body can't make too much A from that. I know I'm supposed to avoid liver and animal versions of vitamin A. Have you any insight on this conundrum? I'm terrified to drink carrot juice and don't know if I need to be worried about it, and even my doctor seems confused about it due to the beta carotene / vitamin A confusion.
Posted on 2013-03-27 09:36:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin A and intracranial hypertension
Hi Heather, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your condition. Basically it appears that intracranial hypertension can be caused and affected by vitamin A in high doses found in medications or supplements. Vitamin A from natural foods should be fine, that said, you may want to play it safe and limit vitamin A foods. Beta-carotene, which gets converted into vitamin A, should also be limited. So in other words, it is probably ok to eat a carrot each day, but avoid the carrot juice. Hope those thoughts help, and feel better soon.
Posted on 2013-03-27 13:58:28
Name:Mike
Location:Azerbaijan
Subject:Beta carotene conversion
...So how much of beta carotene is actually converted into vitamin A? I know absorption and digestion is involved, but is there a latest research that shows approximate numbers of conversion? Carrot is my major source of vitamin A. Thank you!
Posted on 2013-03-30 13:32:52
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Beta carotene conversion
Hi Mike, thanks for your question. Since carrots do not naturally contain vitamin A, the vitamin A shown on the nutrition facts, and quoted in this article, takes into account the conversion of beta-carotene and other retinol equivalents. So the amount of vitamin A shown gives you a rough estimate of how much beta-carotene and other retinol equivalents get converted to vitamin A. Roughly speaking, 1 International Unit of vitamin A is equal to 0.6 micrograms (μg) of beta-carotene. Thus if an average carrot has 5053μg of beta-carotene, that would get converted, roughly speaking, to 3032IU of vitamin A, or 61% DV. This is from the beta-carotene only, and not counting other retinol equivalents. The U.S. Agricultural Research Service has a document relating to this, and how other nutrition facts are determined.
Posted on 2013-03-30 23:34:42
Name:Mew
Location:India
Subject:Eggs
Is egg a source of vitamin A?
Posted on 2013-04-30 09:03:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Eggs
Hi Mew, thanks for your question. Eggs are a good source of vitamin A, and have been added to the extended list of vitamin A rich foods. Almost all of the vitamin A in eggs is found in their yolks. In general, the darker yellow an egg yolk is, the more vitamin A it provides. Chickens which eat grass and vegetables (as opposed to grain), are more likely to produce eggs high in vitamin A. On average, a large egg provides 269IU (5% DV) of vitamin A. One large egg yolk will provide 245IU (5% DV). Here are the complete nutrition facts for eggs.
Posted on 2013-05-01 03:24:06
Name:Brian
Location:Texas, USA
Subject:Alcohol and vitamin A
Hello, I read in a raw food book that limiting alcohol consumption is essential, since alcohol depletes vitamin A? Is this true? I have also been greatly reducing my addition of oils to food(mainly getting fats from plant sources flax meal, avocados, bananas, nuts, etc.), but this is the first I've heard about fats and vitamin A conversion. Are there other nutrients that require certain food combinations to absorb them and is there a list of such; especially if eating solely plant-based food diet? Thank you!
Posted on 2013-05-09 18:25:32
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Alcohol and vitamin A
Hi Brian, thanks for your question. This study confirms that consuming alcohol, particularly in the long term, will deplete your vitamin A levels. Drinking alcohol while consuming vitamin A foods can also hinder absorption of vitamin A. As for the amount of nutrients which are better absorbed in combination, it is difficult to tell. Beyond absorption, many nutrients work together metabolically. To make a list of all these interactions would be a daunting task, but an article on the topic will be started here eventually. Till then, a general rule of thumb is to eat a diverse array of foods (fats, protein, carbs) together. This can still work for a raw plant-based diet, with the exception of vitamin B12 which can only be found naturally in animal products.
Posted on 2013-05-10 04:06:12
Name:Intracranial Hypertension
Location:United States of America
Subject:Vitamin A Restricted Diet for Intracranial Hypertension and Headaches
I was researching foods high in vitamin A so that I may avoid them with my specific diet for Pseudotumor Cerebri or Intracranial Hypertension. My neurologist, neuro-opthamologist and neuro-surgeon are all in agreement that vitamin A in excess of 100% USDA would actually cause more cerebral spinal fluid to be made by the system which would defeat the whole purpose of treatment. I say this only for people who mentioned "headaches" as this was my first symptom.
Posted on 2013-06-04 12:20:38
Name:Eliz
Location:MD, USA
Subject:Palm oil and Beta-carotene
How high is the vitamin A or beta-carotene content of palm oil?
Posted on 2013-08-02 22:19:44
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Palm oil and Beta-carotene
Hi Eliz, thanks for your question. According to the nutrition facts, palm oil has no vitamin A or beta-carotene. It has some vitamin E, however.
Posted on 2013-08-02 22:29:31
Name:Connie Lisembee
Location:Texas
Subject:Macular Degeneration and Lung Cancer Risk with Vitamin A
I was told that Dry Macular Degeneration can be slowed down with the addition of zinc and vitamin A. I was also told that excessive vitamin A can make lung cancer more likely in smokers. Any truth to this?
Posted on 2013-08-09 10:22:06
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Macular Degeneration and Lung Cancer Risk with Vitamin A
Hi Connie, thanks for your question. There is a 2008 review paper which looked at four studies on beta-carotene (vitamin A) supplementation and lung cancer risk in smokers. The result showed that smokers will have a higher risk of lung cancer while on high doses (20-30mg/day) of beta carotene. The good news is that former smokers, and non-smokers, will not have an increased risk. So if you want to improve your eyes and reduce your lung cancer risk, quitting smoking is your best bet. Also, beta-carotene (Vitamin A) from natural food sources has been shown to reduce cancer risk, the cancer danger is really only from supplements. The paper noted, mainly from supplements sold for eye health, like the ones you are worried about. So you can also try to get more vitamin A just from foods. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-08-09 12:24:46
Name:Leit
Location:Planet Earth
Subject:Vegans and Veggies in high risk?
Seriously, why is it posted, that vegans and vegetarians are in high risk of vitamine a deficiency if not consuming eggs and diary? If you look at their own table just above, it says that you have to consume 20 eggs pr day to reach DV. (5%) pr. egg = 20 eggs = 100% DV. Who in the world consumes 20 eggs a day?!! Also it is listed, that 32% DV Vitamine A is consumed pr. mango. Could easily consume 2-3 mangos a day. And no wonder if I or a million other people did that - we are vegetarians. I don't understand why vegans and vegetarians are in "so high risks" of everything, when it's not true!! proof! Right there! Beat you with your own results. Eat clean, train mean, get LEAN!
Posted on 2013-08-14 06:21:31
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vegans and Veggies in high risk?
Hi Liet, thanks for your comment, which has now caused vegans and vegetarians to be removed from the high risk of deficiency listing. Vegans and vegetarians were originally there since plant foods do not actually contain vitamin A, but vitamin A precursors, which are then converted to vitamin A in the body. To counter this problem, the warning was simply there to suggest that vegetarians and vegans eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, which they likely do anyway. So the listing has been removed.
Posted on 2013-08-15 03:01:29
Name:T
Location:London
Subject:26g of sweet potatoes?
Can approximately 26 grams of sweet potatoes literally provide all our Vitamin A requirements for one day? Or have I got confused someone? If so how is that even possible? Why the need for supplements and are we over eating on vitamins naturally? Because I am sure I can eat more than 26 grams of SP...
Posted on 2013-09-01 07:38:13
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:26 grams of sweet potatoes
Hi T, thanks for your question. 26 grams of sweet potatoes does provide 100% of the DV for vitamin A. That is all you need. It is ok to eat more than 100% of the DV of vitamin A if it comes from natural sources.
Posted on 2013-09-01 08:39:04
Name:L
Location:Australia
Subject:Too much Carotene?
Hi, I understand the dangers of ingesting too much vitamin A, but am I correct that "toxicity" is unlikely to occur unless you are taking supplements, or eating liver etc? It's just that I have carotenemia (orange-tinged skin, blood vit A levels are 3x the average), and I presume this is from eating lots of carrots, greens, nori and green tea etc, as I don't take supplements and am vegetarian. I'm just wondering whether this is just a cosmetic concern, or whether it is actually possible to 'overdose' from plant dietary sources if you consume a lot? Thank you :)
Posted on 2013-10-09 08:30:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Too much Carotene?
Hi L, thanks for your question. The U.S. Office of Dietary supplements maintains that vitamin A toxicity from eating pre-formed "plant" vitamin A is rare and unlikely to lead to "major adverse affects". Other than cosmetics, carotenemia is considered harmless. However, vitamin A does build up in the body over time, and can harm the liver and bone mineral density. As such, you may consider scaling back your consumption of vitamin A foods, and beta carotene foods. It does take a long time for vitamin A levels in the body to decline to a normal range, and there is some debate on what a healthy amount of vitamin A is, so this would only be a general guideline, and it is difficult to say what is best. You can keep track of your bone mineral density, or any other symptoms of high vitamin A like nausea, headaches, skin irritation, and joint pain before getting too worried. Likely there is no problem. Sorry the post can't be more clear, but it is a bit of a complicated issue. In conclusion, you can keep your current diet, but be aware and on the look out for any other ill effects from high vitamin A other than carotenemia.
Posted on 2013-10-10 07:08:01
Name:Laylah
Location:Qatar
Subject:How much do I need per day?
Hi, How much of vitamin A do I need per day? I'm 25 yrs old weighting 45kg. Thanks!
Posted on 2013-10-19 18:52:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How much do I need per day?
Hi Laylah, thanks for your question. Aim to consume 5000 IU (International Units) a day, or 900 micrograms (mcg) of vitamin A or retinol equivalents. The Office of Dietary supplements has more info on vitamin A requirements.
Posted on 2013-10-20 04:13:56

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Comments.
Name:Hannah
Subject:Supplement Health Risks
What if your taking multivitamin supplement which includes 100% of vitamins A B2 B5 B6 C D and E also contains 100% omega3 will it include any health risks? thankyou
Posted on 2011-07-07 09:14:24
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Supplement Health Risks
Hi Hannah, thanks for your question. Provided you are healthy without a health condition and you are not taking a medication which could react wit the supplement then taking a supplement which provides no more than 100% of the DV should not be risky. As always getting your vitamins from whole foods is the safest and often, the cheapest source.
Posted on 2011-07-07 09:31:51
Name:Whispering Sage
Location:Northeastern California
Subject:Vitamin A Mislabled
I find consistently that "experts" wrongly claim vitamin A to be be present in fruits and vegetables. This is scientifically wrong, and technically wrong. What fruits and vegetables have are "carotenes" which are previtamin A. That means, it doesn't turn into vitamin A (retinol) until it is activated by enzymes in the digestive system, and also must be accompanied by adequate fats for this to occur, (butter on carrots for example) If a person has an impairment of this sort in the digestive system (IBS, surgery in the past or other various imperfections that prevent this from happening,) all bets are off. That person is not going to turn their beta carotene into vitamin A and they are at risk for becoming deficient. This site as well as most other news sources are in constant violation of this principle, and I say shame. The only true source of vitamin A are animal, cod liver oil, and liver sources are the highest, also eggs. Used to be milk did but since cows aren't allowed out on fresh green grass anymore (confined indoors) they are also deficient and their milk cannot be considered a rich source as it once was.
Posted on 2011-08-24 11:21:50
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin A Mislabeled
Hi Whispering Sage, thanks for your thoughtful comment, and for pointing out this important distinction so well. While none of the fruits and vegetables truly contain vitamin A, their carotene precursors do get converted into vitamin A. The de facto inclusion of this conversion goes beyond experts and news sources and has been included in the nutrition facts released by the United States Agricultural Research Service (ARS) from where these and most other nutrition facts are sourced. So while it is a fair technical point, for all practical purposes, and in most cases, the foods listed here can and should be taken as great natural sources of vitamin A.
Posted on 2011-08-24 11:30:18
Name:Akanksha
Location:New Delhi, India
Subject:White Spots & Ulcers
Hi, My husband has white spots on the inner cheek of his mouth and also gets regular ulcers. He has taken many medicines on doctor's advice but nothing seems to help. I read in a few websites that a diet rich in Vitamin-A will help. Is it true?
Posted on 2011-09-07 15:57:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: White Spots & Ulcers
Hi Akanksha, thanks for your question. Vitamin A foods may help your husband's ulcers by boosting his immune system, but are unlikely to completely cure the ulcers. Your husband may be deficient in riboflavin (vitamin B2) and could benefit from eating more high vitamin B2 foods.
Posted on 2011-09-07 16:02:10
Name:Pandibida
Location:London
Subject:Diet High in Vitamin A
Hi! Is there any risk with consuming more than your DV of vitamin A because of eating fruits and vegetables that are high in vitamin A?
Posted on 2011-09-11 12:01:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Diet High in Vitamin A
Hi Pandibida, thanks for your question. Vitamin A coming from plant sources, such as fruits and vegetables, is considered safe and it is extremely rare for any toxicity to occur. Fruits and vegetables contain carotenoids which are later converted to vitamin A. Most vitamin A toxicity occurs from meat sources like liver, or from consumption of supplements. Over consumption of high vitamin A from fruits and vegetables can lead to a slight yellow discoloration of the skin known as Carotenodermia. This condition only causes a slight change in skin color and is considered harmless.
Posted on 2011-09-12 05:24:35
Name:Ashwini
Location:India
Subject:Pregnancy and Vitamin A
Hi, I have read that during pregnancy Vitamin A damages the foetus. So is it better to stay away from Vitamin A foods?
Posted on 2011-10-30 23:43:59
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Pregnancy and Vitamin A
Hi Ashwini, thanks for your question. There is a very rare condition caused by excess intake of retinoids called fatal retinoid syndrome. To current knowledge, this disease only comes from synthetic forms of vitamin A, while the vitamin A which comes from foods is considered safe and is even essential for the proper developement of your child. Keep eating foods high in vitamin A, and if you are worried, avoid vitamin A supplements and pills unless your doctor advises you otherwise.
Posted on 2011-10-31 18:23:43
Name:Fortune
Location:Nigeria
Subject:Vitamin A and HIV
How often should someone living with HIV take food and fruit that contains vitamin A and what type of food and fruit is recommended for such a person?
Posted on 2011-12-29 18:38:51
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin A and HIV
Hi Fortune, thanks for your question. Since vitamin A boosts your immune system, it would be a good idea to eat as many vitamin A foods as possible. Some studies also show that vitamin C foods and vitamin E foods can help. This is due to the antioxidants in the foods. This study found that vitamin E foods are more effective in slowing the progression of HIV-1 than vitamin A.
Posted on 2012-01-04 10:17:35
Name:Denverite
Location:Denver
Subject:Vitamin A and Acne
Hello, Can eating foods high in Vitamin A help in controlling or preventing acne flare ups?
Posted on 2012-01-10 08:21:31
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin A and Acne
Hello and thanks for your question. Some derivatives of vitamin A are used in treatment of acne, both topically in the form of a cream and orally in the form of a medicine. These treatments however, do have side effects and are not the same as eating foods high in vitamin A. Eating high vitamin A foods is still likely to help a little bit with acne, as well as eating more fruits and vegetables. Studies suggest that eating high sugar foods strongly correlates with increasing acne. Thus, avoiding foods high in sugar is likely the most effective dietary change you can make to help your acne.
Posted on 2012-01-10 09:42:40
Name:Vivaroo
Location:Brisbane
Subject:Vegetarians - Risk of Vit A deficiency
You mention vegetarians & vegans would need at least 5 servings of veg daily so not to be deficient in Vit A if not eating animal sources. If one medium carrot has 204% DV of Vit A, why need more? Eating 5+ serves of veg is no problem for me, just curious. Thank you.
Posted on 2012-02-17 22:14:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vegetarians - Risk of Vit A deficiency
Hi Vivaroo, thanks for your question. Animal foods contain preformed vitamin A that can be readily absorbed, while plant foods contain provitamin A carotenoids that have to be converted into vitamin A by the body. For simplicity, the estimated conversion of carotenoids is quoted as the content of vitamin A for any fruit, vegetable, or plant food; however, the actual conversion can vary widely and depends on various factors such as how much fat is consumed with the food, and on a person's own digestive system. Thus, to be safe, vegetarians and vegans should consume plenty of vitamin A foods to be sure they meet their daily requirement.
Posted on 2012-02-18 15:26:03
Name:Arindam
Location:Bangalore, India
Subject:Halibut Liver Oil
We give our son almost all the fruits and vegetables listed above for Vitamin A. However, would you suggest Halibut Liver Oil instead and a preferred dosage please??? He is 4 and a half years...
Posted on 2012-02-19 09:09:00
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Halibut Liver Oil
Hi Arindam, thanks for your question. As long as your son is not showing any signs of vitamin A deficiency he is probably fine and you do not need to supplement with Halibut liver oil. Currently there is no nutrient data on Halibut liver oil, but Cod liver oil will provide 500IU, 10% of the DV per teaspoon. If you must supplement, a teaspoon would be a good dosage. Check the nutrition label of your Halibut liver oil to be sure.
Posted on 2012-02-19 14:01:52
Name:Lana
Location:South Africa
Subject:Hair Loss
Hi, I am 28 years old and recently experiencing more than usual hair loss. Me and my husband eat mostly red meat and starch. Will the intake of more fruit and veg help cure my hair loss?
Posted on 2012-02-23 04:18:16
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hair Loss
Hi Lana, thanks for your question. Hair loss has many causes, and may be due to excess vitamin A. This typically is from vitamin A supplements in excess of 20,000IU. Hair loss can also be caused by a deficiency in zinc, and/or selenium. Try eat more zinc foods, and selenium foods to see if your condition improves after a couple weeks. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-02-23 18:25:01
Name:Anonymous
Subject:Vitamin A and Warts
Hi, I've been struggeling with plantar warts for 5+ years. I've tried everything under the sun from doctors to alternative. My warts seem to spread everytime I try to treat them. I've read about vitamin A in large amounts for 1 month internally will cure them. Also, puncturing a vitamin A supplement and applying in topically. What are you thoughts? Thanks so much.
Posted on 2012-03-03 21:25:24
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin A and Warts
Hi thanks for your question. First off, you want to be careful with consuming large amounts of any supplement. If you are going to increase your intake of vitamin A try to use natural sources, and even then, do so with caution. In regards to applying vitamin A topically, there is one study which found that an ointment with 2% vitamin A applied topically cured 17 of 50 people with plantar warts, that means about a third of the people were cured. You could try it and see if it works for you. Amazon sells an ointment with vitamin A for about $4. Not sure if it is the same potency as the ointment used in the study, but it could be worth a try and cheaper than supplements.
Posted on 2012-03-03 21:34:17
Name:Halle
Location:Trinidad
Subject:Headaches
Can foods rich in vitamin A assist in curing constant headaches caused from computer glare?
Posted on 2012-03-19 18:11:50
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Headaches
Hi Halle, thanks for your question. Vitamin A is good for your eyes, but there have been no studies to suggest that it can help reduce headaches from computer glare. You can try flux, which is a free program to adjust your computers brightness to the time of day. You can also try purchase an anti-glare screen.
Posted on 2012-03-19 19:20:10
Name:Julia
Location:United States
Subject:Tiny Skin Bumps
Hi, I have tiny bumps all over the back of my upper arms, sometimes on the front of my thighs, and the back of my calves. They are occasionally itchy. I read that this skin condition could be caused by a deficiency in Vitamin A. Is this true? I am currently breastfeeding, but have never had these bumps until a few months ago. Will eating sweet potatoes help, or would cod liver oil be more effective?
Posted on 2012-05-03 15:45:11
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Tiny Skin Bumps
Hi Julia, thanks for your question. There is a condition called Keratosis Pilaris which some people believe can be triggered by a vitamin A deficiency. However, the U.S. National Library of Medicine does not mention vitamin A deficieny as a cause on their Keratosis Pilaris page. Rather, your condition can be caused by genetics, or dry air. You can try various lotions and some sources recommend adding vitamin A as a cream topically. As you are breastfeeding you need to be sure you get enough (but not too much) vitamin A for your baby. For now, try having a sweet potato and another vitamin A food to see if your skin improves. Adding butter, olive oil, or some fat to the food you eat will help absorption of vitamin A.
Posted on 2012-05-08 04:13:51
Name:K.Vee.Shanker
Location:Chennai, India
Subject: Why is Onion left out?
I'm surprised that the vegetable Red Onion (aka Allium) is left out in the list. It is a regular vegetable with Asians, and is said to be rich in Vitamin A, similar to animal products. I've a question too: Why is a sythetic vitamin A supplement toxic after a certain level while the natural one is practically harmless?
Posted on 2012-05-22 03:06:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Why is Onion left out?
Hi K. Vee thanks for your question. Red onions are not in the nutrition facts database, however, ordinary raw onions do not contain any vitamin A, and it is unlikely that red onions provide very much. In regards to your question about supplements, vitamin A found in most foods comes in a form which needs to be modified by the body to truely become vitamin A. This process allows the body to better regulate the level of vitamin A. The vitamin A found in the liver of certain animals, and supplements, is found in a certain form and concentration such that absorption cannot be easily mediated.
Posted on 2012-05-22 03:33:08
Name:Murgatroyd
Location:USA
Subject:Beta Carotene
Research on provitamin A (beta carotene) suggests that beta carotene forms almost equal amounts of Vitamin A agonists and Vitamin A antagonists in the body. An antagonist competes for a vitamin's receptor site on the surface of cells and blocks the vitamin's effect. This may be the reason for the greater number of cancer and/or deaths in studies providing smokers with mega doses of beta carotene.
Posted on 2012-05-25 23:05:01
Name:William Palmerini
Location:Saugus, MA
Subject:Psoriasis
What roll does vitiam A play in the healing or curing of psoriasis? If I eat more of the foods containing vitiam A would this be helpful in the treatment of this dreaded decease? Thank You.
Posted on 2012-05-29 19:51:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Psoriasis
Hi William, thanks for your question. Vitamin A included in a cream/ointment and applied to the skin can be used to treat Psoriasis, however, eating vitamin A foods has not been shown to help. As your doctor may have suggested you might get the most benefit from a cortisone cream.
Posted on 2012-05-29 22:48:12
Name:Ranu
Location:Delhi
Subject:Vitamin A and Breast Feeding
Good day, Is deficiency of vitamin A going to affect breast feeding, like a lower quantity of milk being produced?
Posted on 2012-06-29 17:02:20
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin A and Breast Feeding
Hi Ranu, thanks for your question. Adequate levels of Vitamin A is necessary for proper developement of your baby. Having a lower volume of breast milk is associated with vitamin A deficiency, but there have not been enough studies to confirm this. Basically, try to maintain adequate levels of vitamin A or supplement when breastfeeding.
Posted on 2012-06-30 11:17:36
Name:Chucky
Location:California,U.S.
Subject:Vitamin A bad for livers?
In your opinion is vitamin A bad for your liver? I have a fatty liver & I read somewhere that vitamin A is damaging to your liver. Does this mean I have to watch out for all foods containing vitamin A?
Posted on 2012-10-31 21:33:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin A bad for livers?
Hi Chucky, thanks for your question. Not sure of your particular condition, but it is unlikely that eating vitamin A foods will have much effect. Vitamin A is stored in the liver, but it is well regulated by the body. You can have problems if you take a lot of vitamin A supplements, or eat a lot of vitamin A from liver, otherwise you should be fine. If you do have vitamin A toxicity, you should feel dizyness, nausea, headaches, and skin irritaion. Consult with your health care provider if you feel these symptoms, or if you feel you are having a problem with regulating you vitamin A storage. Otherwise, you should be fine eating foods high in vitamin A (excluding liver).
Posted on 2012-10-31 23:54:05
Name:Orla
Location:UK
Subject:Too much vitamin A?
Hi, I'm 20 years old and for the past 3 weeks have been suffering from the bacterial mouth infection 'angular cheilitis'. I do eat the foods on your list and for the past 2 months I have been taking a multivitamin which contains 100% of my RDA of vitamin A. I read on a forum that an over consumption of vitamin A can flair up this infection, but irregardless of whether it was the cause of the angular cheilitis, would you advise stopping my multivitamin at the moment in case the excess of vitamin A in my diet is making the condition worse? (It's bad and painful at the moment) thanks for your advice.
Posted on 2012-11-10 08:55:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Too much vitamin A?
Hi Orla, thanks for your question. Yes, too much vitamin A can cause this condition or make it worse. However, angular chelitis can also be caused by a lack of riboflavin (Vitamin B2), iron, or zinc. Maybe try to find a multi-vitamin without vitamin A, or eat more vitamin B2, iron, and zinc foods.
Posted on 2012-11-12 02:59:33
Name:Ang
Location:Canada
Subject:Trying to AVOID Vitamin A
It has been suggested that I try to avoid Vitamin A. After an intentional 35lb weight loss in a 5 month period (tried to be healthy while doing this), I have been losing my hair for the past 7 months and it's still falling out. I have been told that Vitamin A can make this problem worse. Does this make sense?
Posted on 2013-01-03 14:27:31
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Trying to AVOID Vitamin A
Hi Ang, thanks for your question. Excess vitamin A (typically 20,000IU+) from supplements has been associated with hair loss. Your hair loss may also be due to a deficiency in zinc or selenium. Try eat more zinc foods, and selenium foods to see if your condition improves after a couple weeks. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-01-03 16:58:45
Name:DeSales Ward
Location:Annapolis, MD
Subject:Orange Skin and Absorption of Vitamin A
I was getting a massage a few years ago and the therapist noted that the bottoms of my feet were an orange color. She told me it was a sign that I'm not absorbing my Vitamin A and that it was depositing in my skin instead of being absorbed. I eat really, really healthy and consume a lot of fruits and vegetables but I am constantly battling severely dry skin. I do drink my share of water every day. I just can't figure it out. Do you think that statement is true? If so, what can I do?
Posted on 2013-03-20 19:22:36
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Orange Skin and Absorption of Vitamin A
Hi DeSales, Thanks for your question. Carotenaemia is a harmless condition where the skin can become orange from too much beta carotene or vitamin A. Basically the therapist was incorrect in her deduction. Yellow skin, or carotenaemia, is typically caused by consuming too much vitamin A. In rarer cases, it can also be caused by failure of your body to properly metabolize carotenoids (vitamin A), and remove them from your body. This may have been what your therapist was referring too, but ether way, you should be absorbing plenty of vitamin A.
Posted on 2013-03-20 21:02:25
Name:Heather
Location:Pennsylvania
Subject:Vitamin A and intracranial hypertension
Hi - I was recently diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and all the websites about it say to be careful and avoid vitamin A. I'm wondering if I should be avoiding spinach and carrots, or if I don't need to worry about that because they only contain beta carotene and my body can't make too much A from that. I know I'm supposed to avoid liver and animal versions of vitamin A. Have you any insight on this conundrum? I'm terrified to drink carrot juice and don't know if I need to be worried about it, and even my doctor seems confused about it due to the beta carotene / vitamin A confusion.
Posted on 2013-03-27 09:36:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin A and intracranial hypertension
Hi Heather, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your condition. Basically it appears that intracranial hypertension can be caused and affected by vitamin A in high doses found in medications or supplements. Vitamin A from natural foods should be fine, that said, you may want to play it safe and limit vitamin A foods. Beta-carotene, which gets converted into vitamin A, should also be limited. So in other words, it is probably ok to eat a carrot each day, but avoid the carrot juice. Hope those thoughts help, and feel better soon.
Posted on 2013-03-27 13:58:28
Name:Mike
Location:Azerbaijan
Subject:Beta carotene conversion
...So how much of beta carotene is actually converted into vitamin A? I know absorption and digestion is involved, but is there a latest research that shows approximate numbers of conversion? Carrot is my major source of vitamin A. Thank you!
Posted on 2013-03-30 13:32:52
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Beta carotene conversion
Hi Mike, thanks for your question. Since carrots do not naturally contain vitamin A, the vitamin A shown on the nutrition facts, and quoted in this article, takes into account the conversion of beta-carotene and other retinol equivalents. So the amount of vitamin A shown gives you a rough estimate of how much beta-carotene and other retinol equivalents get converted to vitamin A. Roughly speaking, 1 International Unit of vitamin A is equal to 0.6 micrograms (μg) of beta-carotene. Thus if an average carrot has 5053μg of beta-carotene, that would get converted, roughly speaking, to 3032IU of vitamin A, or 61% DV. This is from the beta-carotene only, and not counting other retinol equivalents. The U.S. Agricultural Research Service has a document relating to this, and how other nutrition facts are determined.
Posted on 2013-03-30 23:34:42
Name:Mew
Location:India
Subject:Eggs
Is egg a source of vitamin A?
Posted on 2013-04-30 09:03:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Eggs
Hi Mew, thanks for your question. Eggs are a good source of vitamin A, and have been added to the extended list of vitamin A rich foods. Almost all of the vitamin A in eggs is found in their yolks. In general, the darker yellow an egg yolk is, the more vitamin A it provides. Chickens which eat grass and vegetables (as opposed to grain), are more likely to produce eggs high in vitamin A. On average, a large egg provides 269IU (5% DV) of vitamin A. One large egg yolk will provide 245IU (5% DV). Here are the complete nutrition facts for eggs.
Posted on 2013-05-01 03:24:06
Name:Brian
Location:Texas, USA
Subject:Alcohol and vitamin A
Hello, I read in a raw food book that limiting alcohol consumption is essential, since alcohol depletes vitamin A? Is this true? I have also been greatly reducing my addition of oils to food(mainly getting fats from plant sources flax meal, avocados, bananas, nuts, etc.), but this is the first I've heard about fats and vitamin A conversion. Are there other nutrients that require certain food combinations to absorb them and is there a list of such; especially if eating solely plant-based food diet? Thank you!
Posted on 2013-05-09 18:25:32
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Alcohol and vitamin A
Hi Brian, thanks for your question. This study confirms that consuming alcohol, particularly in the long term, will deplete your vitamin A levels. Drinking alcohol while consuming vitamin A foods can also hinder absorption of vitamin A. As for the amount of nutrients which are better absorbed in combination, it is difficult to tell. Beyond absorption, many nutrients work together metabolically. To make a list of all these interactions would be a daunting task, but an article on the topic will be started here eventually. Till then, a general rule of thumb is to eat a diverse array of foods (fats, protein, carbs) together. This can still work for a raw plant-based diet, with the exception of vitamin B12 which can only be found naturally in animal products.
Posted on 2013-05-10 04:06:12
Name:Intracranial Hypertension
Location:United States of America
Subject:Vitamin A Restricted Diet for Intracranial Hypertension and Headaches
I was researching foods high in vitamin A so that I may avoid them with my specific diet for Pseudotumor Cerebri or Intracranial Hypertension. My neurologist, neuro-opthamologist and neuro-surgeon are all in agreement that vitamin A in excess of 100% USDA would actually cause more cerebral spinal fluid to be made by the system which would defeat the whole purpose of treatment. I say this only for people who mentioned "headaches" as this was my first symptom.
Posted on 2013-06-04 12:20:38
Name:Eliz
Location:MD, USA
Subject:Palm oil and Beta-carotene
How high is the vitamin A or beta-carotene content of palm oil?
Posted on 2013-08-02 22:19:44
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Palm oil and Beta-carotene
Hi Eliz, thanks for your question. According to the nutrition facts, palm oil has no vitamin A or beta-carotene. It has some vitamin E, however.
Posted on 2013-08-02 22:29:31
Name:Connie Lisembee
Location:Texas
Subject:Macular Degeneration and Lung Cancer Risk with Vitamin A
I was told that Dry Macular Degeneration can be slowed down with the addition of zinc and vitamin A. I was also told that excessive vitamin A can make lung cancer more likely in smokers. Any truth to this?
Posted on 2013-08-09 10:22:06
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Macular Degeneration and Lung Cancer Risk with Vitamin A
Hi Connie, thanks for your question. There is a 2008 review paper which looked at four studies on beta-carotene (vitamin A) supplementation and lung cancer risk in smokers. The result showed that smokers will have a higher risk of lung cancer while on high doses (20-30mg/day) of beta carotene. The good news is that former smokers, and non-smokers, will not have an increased risk. So if you want to improve your eyes and reduce your lung cancer risk, quitting smoking is your best bet. Also, beta-carotene (Vitamin A) from natural food sources has been shown to reduce cancer risk, the cancer danger is really only from supplements. The paper noted, mainly from supplements sold for eye health, like the ones you are worried about. So you can also try to get more vitamin A just from foods. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-08-09 12:24:46
Name:Leit
Location:Planet Earth
Subject:Vegans and Veggies in high risk?
Seriously, why is it posted, that vegans and vegetarians are in high risk of vitamine a deficiency if not consuming eggs and diary? If you look at their own table just above, it says that you have to consume 20 eggs pr day to reach DV. (5%) pr. egg = 20 eggs = 100% DV. Who in the world consumes 20 eggs a day?!! Also it is listed, that 32% DV Vitamine A is consumed pr. mango. Could easily consume 2-3 mangos a day. And no wonder if I or a million other people did that - we are vegetarians. I don't understand why vegans and vegetarians are in "so high risks" of everything, when it's not true!! proof! Right there! Beat you with your own results. Eat clean, train mean, get LEAN!
Posted on 2013-08-14 06:21:31
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vegans and Veggies in high risk?
Hi Liet, thanks for your comment, which has now caused vegans and vegetarians to be removed from the high risk of deficiency listing. Vegans and vegetarians were originally there since plant foods do not actually contain vitamin A, but vitamin A precursors, which are then converted to vitamin A in the body. To counter this problem, the warning was simply there to suggest that vegetarians and vegans eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, which they likely do anyway. So the listing has been removed.
Posted on 2013-08-15 03:01:29
Name:T
Location:London
Subject:26g of sweet potatoes?
Can approximately 26 grams of sweet potatoes literally provide all our Vitamin A requirements for one day? Or have I got confused someone? If so how is that even possible? Why the need for supplements and are we over eating on vitamins naturally? Because I am sure I can eat more than 26 grams of SP...
Posted on 2013-09-01 07:38:13
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:26 grams of sweet potatoes
Hi T, thanks for your question. 26 grams of sweet potatoes does provide 100% of the DV for vitamin A. That is all you need. It is ok to eat more than 100% of the DV of vitamin A if it comes from natural sources.
Posted on 2013-09-01 08:39:04
Name:L
Location:Australia
Subject:Too much Carotene?
Hi, I understand the dangers of ingesting too much vitamin A, but am I correct that "toxicity" is unlikely to occur unless you are taking supplements, or eating liver etc? It's just that I have carotenemia (orange-tinged skin, blood vit A levels are 3x the average), and I presume this is from eating lots of carrots, greens, nori and green tea etc, as I don't take supplements and am vegetarian. I'm just wondering whether this is just a cosmetic concern, or whether it is actually possible to 'overdose' from plant dietary sources if you consume a lot? Thank you :)
Posted on 2013-10-09 08:30:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Too much Carotene?
Hi L, thanks for your question. The U.S. Office of Dietary supplements maintains that vitamin A toxicity from eating pre-formed "plant" vitamin A is rare and unlikely to lead to "major adverse affects". Other than cosmetics, carotenemia is considered harmless. However, vitamin A does build up in the body over time, and can harm the liver and bone mineral density. As such, you may consider scaling back your consumption of vitamin A foods, and beta carotene foods. It does take a long time for vitamin A levels in the body to decline to a normal range, and there is some debate on what a healthy amount of vitamin A is, so this would only be a general guideline, and it is difficult to say what is best. You can keep track of your bone mineral density, or any other symptoms of high vitamin A like nausea, headaches, skin irritation, and joint pain before getting too worried. Likely there is no problem. Sorry the post can't be more clear, but it is a bit of a complicated issue. In conclusion, you can keep your current diet, but be aware and on the look out for any other ill effects from high vitamin A other than carotenemia.
Posted on 2013-10-10 07:08:01
Name:Laylah
Location:Qatar
Subject:How much do I need per day?
Hi, How much of vitamin A do I need per day? I'm 25 yrs old weighting 45kg. Thanks!
Posted on 2013-10-19 18:52:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How much do I need per day?
Hi Laylah, thanks for your question. Aim to consume 5000 IU (International Units) a day, or 900 micrograms (mcg) of vitamin A or retinol equivalents. The Office of Dietary supplements has more info on vitamin A requirements.
Posted on 2013-10-20 04:13:56

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