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Top 10 Foods Highest in Vitamin K


Vitamin K is an essential vitamin required for protein modification and blood clotting. Recent studies suggest that vitamin K may play a role in treating osteoporosis and Alzheimer's, and that consuming increased levels of vitamin K can help protect against cancer and heart disease. Unless you are taking medicaiton to prevent blood clots, like Warfarin or Coumadin, there is no known risk of vitamin K toxicity, and no reason not to eat a lot of it. If you are on Warfarin (Coumadin), please check the article on low vitamin K foods for a Warfarin diet. Below is a list of foods high in vitamin K1. The current percent daily value for Vitamin K is 80 micrograms (μg).

#1: Herbs (Dried and Fresh)
Long used for medicinal purposes, herbs are packed with nutrients and vitamin K is no exception. Dried Basil, Dried Sage, and Dried Thyme all contain the most with 1715μg (2143% DV) per 100g serving, or up to 51μg (64% DV) per tablespoon. They are followed by Fresh Parsley (82% DV per tblsp), Dried Coriander, Dried Marjoram, Dried Oregano, and finally fresh basil with 10μg (13% DV) per tablespoon. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#2: Dark Leafy Greens
Crisp, fresh, and delicious, dark leafy greens are great in a salad or steamed as a side. As a bonus they are also high in calcium. Kale provides the most vitamin K with 882μg (1103% DV) per 100g serving, or 547μg (684% DV) per cup chopped. It is followed by Dandelion Greens (535% DV per cup chopped), Collards, Cress, Spinach, Turnip Greens, Mustard Greens, Beet Greens, Swiss Chard, Broccoli Raab, Radicchio, and finally Lettuce with 62.5μg (78% DV) per cup shredded. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#3: Spring Onions (Scallions)
Great as a topping on soup or stew, as well as a good ingredient in salads and salad wraps, 100 grams of spring onions (or 1 cup chopped) will provide 207μg (259% DV) of vitamin K.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#4: Brussels Sprouts
A delicious side or snack, and reputed for being able to prevent a hang over, brussel sprouts are packed with Vitamin K. 100 grams will provide 194μg (242% DV) of vitamin K, that is 156μg (195% DV) per cup, and 33.6μg (42% DV) of vitamin K in a single brussel sprout.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#5: Broccoli
Vitamin K is just another reason to eat everyone's favorite vegetable. Broccoli contains 141μg (176% DV) of vitamin K per 100g serving, that is 220μg (276% DV) per cup, and 52μg (65% DV) in an average spear, or piece, of brocolli.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#6: Chili Powder, Curry, Paprika, and Cayenne
Also high in vitamins E and C, chili powder is a great addition to spice up a stew, calzone, or just about anything. 100 grams will provide 106μg (132% DV) of vitamin K per 100g serving, or 8.5μg (11% DV) per tablespoon. Curry powder will provide 7% DV per tablespoon, Paprika (7% DV), and Cayenne (5% DV).
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#7: Asparagus
Asparagus is best eaten steamed. 100 grams will provide 80μg (100% DV) of vitamin K, that is 144μg (180% DV) per cup, and 48μg (60% DV) in 4 spears.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#8: Cabbage
Eaten cooked or in coleslaw, cabbage provides 76μg (95% DV) of vitamin K per 100 gram serving which is 68μg (85% DV) per cup chopped, and 690μg (830% DV) in a 5(3/4)inch head of lettuce.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#9: Pickled Cucumber
If you like pickles then now you have good reason to eat more of them. 100 grams will provide 77μg (96% DV) of vitamin K, or 130μg (163% DV) per cup sliced, and 27μg (34% DV) in a medium pickle. For best health (and the most vitamin K) eat the low sodium variety.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#10: Prunes
High in fiber, zinc, and even iron, prunes are great health food. 100 grams will provide 60μg (74% DV) of vitamin K, or 104μg (129% DV) per cup, and 6μg (7% DV) in a single prune.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.


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Other Vitamin K Rich Foods

Sun-Dried Tomatoes43μg (54% DV) per 100 gram serving23μg (29% DV) per cup (87 grams)1μg (1% DV) per piece (2 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sun-Dried Tomatoes
Okra40μg (50% DV) per 100 gram serving64μg (80% DV) per cup (160 grams)34μg (43% DV) in 8 pods (85 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cooked Okra
Soybean Oil184μg (230% DV) per 100 gram serving401μg (501% DV) per cup (218 grams)26μg (32% DV) per tablespoon (14 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Soybean Oil (Salad or Cooking)
Carrots13μg (17% DV) per 100 gram serving14.5μg (18% DV) per cup grated (110 grams)8μg (10% DV) in a medium sized carrot (61 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Carrots
Celery29μg (37% DV) per 100 gram serving29.6μg (37% DV) per cup (101 grams)12μg (15% DV) in a medium stalk (40 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Celery
Jute (Meloukhia)108μg (135% DV) per 100 gram serving94μg (117% DV) per cup (87 grams)47μg (59% DV) per half-cup (2 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Jute (Meloukhia)
Cloves (Ground)142μg (177% DV) per 100 gram serving9.9μg (12% DV) per tablespoon (7 grams)3μg (4% DV) per teaspoon (2 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Ground Cloves
Dry-Roasted Soybeans (Edamame)37μg (46% DV) per 100 gram serving63.6μg (80% DV) per cup (172 grams)31.8μg (40% DV) in half a cup (88 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dry-Roasted Soybeans (Edamame)
Dry-Roasted Cashews35μg (43% DV) per 100 gram serving47.5μg (59% DV) per cup (137 grams)3μg (4% DV) per tablespoon (9 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dry-Roasted Cashews
Blackberries20μg (25% DV) per 100 gram serving28.5μg (36% DV) per cup (144 grams)14μg (18% DV) in half a cup (72 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Blackberries
Blueberries19μg (24% DV) per 100 gram serving28.5μg (36% DV) per cup (148 grams)13μg (16% DV) in 50 blueberries ~half a cup (68 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Blueberries
Mulberries8μg (10% DV) per 100 gram serving11μg (14% DV) per cup (140 grams)1.2μg (1% DV) in 10 mulberries (15 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Mulberries
Raspberries8μg (10% DV) per 100 gram serving10μg (12% DV) per cup (123 grams)1.5μg (2% DV) in 10 raspberries (19 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Raspberries
Figs4.7μg (6% DV) per 100 gram serving3μg (4% DV) in a large fig (64 grams)2μg (2% DV) in a small fig (40 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Figs
Pears4.5μg (6% DV) per 100 gram serving6μg (8% DV) in one cup sliced (140 grams)8μg (10% DV) in a medium pear (178 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Pears

Health Benefits of Vitamin K

  • Bone Health and Osteoporosis - Vitamin K is necessary for creation of the protein: S. Osteocalcin, which in turn synthesizes osteoblasts: bone forming cells. In short, vitamin K is necessary for the strength and maintenance of bones.2-4
  • Alzheimer's Protection (*Controversial) - Vitamin K has been shown to inhibit nerve cell death due to oxidative stress, the degree to which supplementation prevents Alzheimer's still needs to be researched.5

Vitamin K Guidelines when taking Warfarin (Coumadin)

  • A low INR means you have increased risk of clotting
  • A high INR means you have an increased risk of bleeding
  • Warfarin increases INR. Vitamin K decreases it
  • Most doctors aim to keep INR around 2.5-3.5
  • Regularly check your PT/INR levels
  • Take the same amount of Warfarin at the same time each day
  • Keep your intake of vitamin K consistent from day to day
  • When a doctor prescribes Warfarin, they are trying to balance it with how much vitamin K you eat
The amount of vitamin K you can eat depends on your dosage of Warfarin, but in general...
  • Eat no more than 1 serving of food that contains 200%-600% DV of vitamin K
  • Eat no more than 3 servings of foods that contain 60-200% DV of vitamin K
  • Eliminate alcohol if you can, or limit yourself to no more than 3 drinks a day
  • Take no more than 800IU of vitamin E supplements
  • Avoid cranberries and cranberry juice as they can raise INR and risk of bleeding
  • Limit or avoid grapefruit and grapefruit juice
  • Avoid drinking green tea as it antagonizes Warfarin and lowers INR
  • Work with your doctor when taking CoQ10 as it can hamper the effectiveness of Warfarin
  • Many natural supplements affect PT/INR levels, so it is best to avoid them unless your doctor advises otherwise. The following supplements definitely affect PT/INR levels: arnica, bilberry, butchers broom, cat's claw, dong quai, feverfew, forskolin, garlic, ginger, gingko, horse chestnut, insositol hexaphosphate, licorice, melilot(sweet clover), pau d'arco, red clover, St. John's wort, sweet woodruff, turmeric, willow bark, and wheat grass.
  • To find foods low in vitamin K, see the article on low vitamin K foods, check the nutrition facts for a particular food, or use the nutrient ranking tool to find low vitamin K foods in a particular food group.
Source: Office of Dietary Supplements Fact Sheet on Warfarin and Vitamin K

Recipes High in Vitamin K

Wine Steamed Kale
Blackberry Salad
Spicey Lentil Cabbage
Carrot Cucumber Salad with Mint

Warnings

  • Soybean Oil, Dry Roasted Soybeans, and Cashews are high calorie foods and should be eaten in moderate amounts by people with a high body mass index.
  • People taking Warfarin (or Coumadin) in an attempt to reduce their risk of harmful blood clots should keep their intake vitamin K the same from day to day, and limit their intake of vitamin K in accordance with their dosage and doctor's instructions.6 See the article on Low Vitamin K Foods for more info.

Further Reading




Comments.
Name:Ellyn Landman
Location:Glenview,IL
Subject:Vitamin K Toxicity?
How much vitamin k is thought to be not too much for one day? Do you measure it in mgs? I was surprised to know cranberry juice has it. I had that and a salad the other night with a little celery and now wonder what my blood test will look like tomorrow.
Posted on 2011-12-04 22:58:37
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin K Toxicity
Hi Ellyn, thanks for your question. Vitamin K is measured in micrograms (mcg) and not miligrams (mg). Currently there is no upper limit of vitamin K intake if you are only consuming natural foods. You only need to be cautious if you are taking a vitamin K supplement, or if you are on particular medications, like Warfarin (or Coumadin). Pregnant women may also want to moderate their vitamin K intake.
Posted on 2011-12-05 09:49:58
Name:Samantha
Location:Adelaide South Australia
Subject:Vitamin K and Warfarin
I'm on Warfarin, and would like to know if I can eat strawberries, cherries, and drink orange juice.
Posted on 2011-12-10 17:37:51
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin K and Warfarin
Hi Samantha, thanks for your quesiton. Both strawberries and cherries are low in vitamin K, and orange juice does not appear to contain any, so you should be fine eating all those foods with your Warfarin medication. Click here for the complete nutrition facts on strawberries, cherries, and orange juice. You can also check with your pharmacist in case of any other further interactions.
Posted on 2011-12-13 19:51:22
Name:Gregory Evans
Location:Carrollton , Texas
Subject:Coconut Water
Hi I'm on Warfarin medication is it safe to consume coconut water?
Posted on 2011-12-19 07:29:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coconut Water
Hi Gregory, thanks for your comment. Coconut water does not contain any vitamin K, and the coconut meat has very little. From the perspective of vitamin K you should be fine drinking coconut water with Warfarin. Here are the complete nutrition facts for coconut water and coconut meat.
Posted on 2011-12-19 07:29:35
Name:Anonymous
Subject:What to eat on Warfarin?
I'm on warfarin, and having a tough time trying to eat just the right foods. Most prepared foods have at least something with a lot of vitamin K, and it's difficult to shop for food now. I think I may be better off just eating a regular diet daily, and fitting my dose to my diet. (No Cranberries!)
Posted on 2011-12-23 16:15:10
Name:Bob
Location:San Antonio
Subject:Vit K Effect on Glucose
Is there any data on how much Vit K to take daily in order to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose control?
Posted on 2012-01-03 16:16:05
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vit K Effect on Glucose
Hi Bob, thanks for your question. There have been few studies on the effect of vitamin K and glucose, however a 1999 study on rats found that a 20% vitamin K deficiency, or low levels of vitamin K, correlated with poor regulation of glucose and insulin. Thus a diet with adequate levels of vitamin K could help regulate insulin and glucose, and diets especially rich in vitamin K, or vitamin K supplements, would likely have little effect.
Posted on 2012-01-11 14:24:10
Name:Sunida
Location:Nelson, New Zealand
Subject:I'm on Warfarin
Hi there, I'm on Warfarin now. What about cucumber (not pickled), zucchini and green pepper? Thanks!
Posted on 2012-01-17 03:24:37
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: I'm on Warfarin
Hi Sunida, thanks for your comment. Both a medium sized zucchini and a medium sized green pepper contain around 9μg (11% DV) of vitamin K and so can probably be eaten in moderate amounts. Raw cucumbers, however, contain 49μg (62% DV) of vitamin K and are best limited while you are on Warfarin. Click here for the complete nutrition facts comparison.
Posted on 2012-01-17 04:08:33
Name:JC
Location:India
Subject:My 3yr old on warfarin
Hi there, my 3 yr old child is on Warfarin. Please advise vegetables that are safe for the child. Confused, as a dietitian has asked to avoid tomatoes, soy beans, and cabbage.
Posted on 2012-01-30 13:30:59
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: My 3yr old on Warfarin
Hi JC, thanks for your question. Tomatoes, soy beans, and cabbage are all good sources of vitamin K which can counteract the effect of Warfarin. Using the nutrient ranking tool, vegetables which are low in vitamin K include sweet corn, mushrooms, turnips, beets, onions, pumpkin, squash, potatoes, and sweet potatoes. These vegetables should be safe for your child, but consult with your dietitian to be sure.
Posted on 2012-01-30 23:30:17
Name:TF
Location:CT
Subject:Misperception
It's a common misperception that those taking warfarin must limit certain foods. Not true. What is important is that the level of foods containing vitamin k stays the same week after week so that the clotting time, and the amount of warfarin the patient takes, stays the same.
Posted on 2012-02-05 08:31:47
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Misperception
Hi TF, thanks for making an important point. The National Library of Medicine echos your sentiment to keep vitamin K levels stable, but also endorses limiting foods high in vitamin K. The Office of Dietary Supplements suggests having no more than 1 serving of a vitamin K food with 200%-600% Daily Vaue (DV) of vitamin K, and no more than 3 servings of foods with 60-199% DV.
Posted on 2012-02-05 08:40:07
Name:Gran
Location:NC
Subject:Vitamin K and Warfarin
Please tell me how to keep my intake levels of Vitamin K the same weekly. My INR levels fluctuate enormously from week to week. If I eliminate food with vitamin K it leaves no way to eat a balanced diet that I can see. It basically leaves bread, potatoes, some fruits and meats or seafood. How do you measure what you eat???? I am 79 and never been on a diet.
Posted on 2012-02-23 09:04:13
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin K and Warfarin
Hi Gran, thanks for your comment. Starting a diet low in vitamin K can be a challenge. As stated in a previous post, vegetables low in vitamin K include sweet corn, mushrooms, turnips, beets, onions, pumpkin, squash, potatoes, and sweet potatoes. This hopefully gives you some variety to choose from. Otherwise, you can use an ordinary measuring cup to measure the foods you eat. Avoid all dark leafy greens.
Posted on 2012-02-24 14:34:21
Name:Gideon Swart
Location:Pretoria
Subject:Vitamin K and Heart Disease
Hi. I am now totally confused. Please help. Had a heart attack and double by pass 2.5 years ago. Changed my diet a lot regarding fat and red meat consumption. Second heart attack (mild-according to doctor) on 17 Feb. I started reading about herbs and came to the conclusion that chilli and especially cayenne (3 teaspoonfulls daily) is the answer for heart problems. Being very high in vitamin K is this not producing a thicker blood that is harmfull for the heart?
Posted on 2012-02-25 03:48:10
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin K and Heart Disease
Hi Gideon, thanks for your comment and sorry to hear of your heart problems. You are right that chili peppers and cayenne are thought to promote blood flow and reduce blood pressure. They are also high potassium foods. It is difficult to know with the vitamin K content how much they help or hurt. If you have been consistently taking 3 teaspoons of cayenne a day, perhaps revisit your doctor for a blood test to see if they suggest a revision to your prescription of Warfarin, or other anticoagulant.
Posted on 2012-02-25 14:45:27
Name:Jay
Location:Mumbai, India
Subject:Warfarin Diet
Currently I am on Warfarin. As per my doctor's advice I am avoiding the following: Cabbage, Cauliflower, all leafy vegetables, soybeans, spring onions, and eating the following vegetables: Bitter Gourd, Long Beans, Bottle Gourd, Ivy Gourd, Cluster Beans, Double Beans, French Beans, Snake Gourd, Capsicum, Onions, Spounge Gourd, Brinjals, Lady Fingers, and Ridge Gourd. I want to know, can I eat Green Peas, Corn, Drumsticks, Radish, Beetroot, Sweet Potato, Cucumber, Carrots etc...?
Posted on 2012-02-28 04:11:06
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin Diet
Hi Jay, thanks for your question. Green beans, and likely all the other beans you are eating, are high in vitamin K, so be careful about eating them! Green peas, cucumbers, and carrots are also all high in vitamin K and best limited while you are on Warfarin. Corn, chicken drumsticks, radishes, beet roots, and sweet potatoes are all low in vitamin K and should be fine to eat. If you are curious about the amount of vitmain K in any food, you can use the nutrition facts tool to find the complete nutrition facts for any food, including the amount of vitamin K.
Posted on 2012-02-28 13:25:57
Name:Pam
Location:Greensburg, Indiana
Subject:Vitamin K and warfarin
I started on warfarin about 2 yrs ago. For a while I tried to limit my greens or anything with vitamin k, but I really loved all those green vegetables, so since November I went back to eating them. I havn't got my INR consistent yet, but I'd rather have thick blood than wind up with Alzhemier's. I have a strong history for that since my Mother and Grandmother both had that. Greens are good for the brain!
Posted on 2012-02-28 16:10:52
Name:Lori
Location:Idaho
Subject:Warfarin, vitamin K, and weight
I was put on warfarin because of a stroke 6 weeks ago. I am so confused on what to eat. I was told carrots were ok to eat. But it sounds like I need to give up most veggies and start eating fruits. The problem with fruit is the sugar content. I am not sure what to eat other fish and chicken, red meats are not good for you either. I give up.
Posted on 2012-03-17 21:12:28
Name:Lynette
Location:Alberton, South Africa
Subject:Warfarin
I have just been diagnosed with DVT (Deep Vein Thrombosis). Just started with Warfarin, and the doctor says to stay away from all green leafy vegetables. Will most likely only be on warfarin for about 3 months, but in the meantime I would want to eat properly to get my INR levels right. Could you list a few good fruits and veg that I can eat, as I am confused, some say sweet potatoes are good and other say no for that. I enjoy my fruit and veg, and also enjoy eating curries and spicy foods, is that good???? Please help, I am so ignorant when it comes to this subject.
Posted on 2012-03-18 02:25:22
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin
Hi Lynette, thanks for your question. You can use the nutrition facts tool to look up the nutrient values of different foods.The Office of Dietary Supplements suggests having no more than 1 serving of a vitamin K food with 200%-600% DV of vitamin K, and no more than 3 servings of foods with 60-199% DV.

You can also use the nutrient ranking tool to find foods lowest in vitamin K by food group. Using this tool the following vegetables are very low in vitamin K and are the best foods for you to eat: sweet corn, mushrooms, turnips, beets, onions, pumpkin, squash, potatoes, and sweet potatoes (sweet potatoes should be fine). As for fruits: oranges, watermelon, apples, and bananas are all fine. Thanks to your comment a new section will be made for people on Warfarin, so check back soon.

Posted on 2012-03-19 00:20:20
Name:Lake
Location:San Diego
Subject:Effient and vitamin K
Hi, I have been on Effient (described as super plavix) for 6 weeks. I was told to not take any supplements boosting vitamin k but eating vegetables like spinach, carrots, and others with vitamin k were fine. Do you have any advice regarding "Effient" and vitamin k intake? I believe it is a new drug on the market because there is no generic brands and not too many people have heard of it. Thank you.
Posted on 2012-03-21 00:42:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Effient and vitamin K
Hi Lake, thanks for your question. There are new drugs coming into the market that are intended to be more "user friendly" and easier to manage than Warfarin. Effient helps prevent blod clots by inhibiting the function of platets, and so it works somewhat independently of vitamin K. Therefore, your doctor is right in saying you can have a more normal diet in regards to vitamin K. However, every new pharmaceutical has its own costs and benefits, and people reading this should definitly consult with their doctors since Effient has an increased risk of excessive bleeding.
Posted on 2012-03-22 15:36:23
Name:Debbie
Location:Buffalo NY
Subject:Warfarin and Low fat Diet
Help! I too am very confused. I need to eat lowfat and want to have a few iceburg salads a week. Is that ok?
Posted on 2012-04-04 10:53:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin and Low Fat Diet
Hi Debbie, thanks for your question. Basically you want your intake of vitamin K to be the same from day to day. One cup of shredded ice-berg lettuce contains 17μg (22% DV) for vitamin K. Based on the opinions of The Office of Dietary Supplements this amount of vitamin K is OK and you can eat the salad each day. As always, keep monitoring your INR level.
Posted on 2012-04-04 11:52:22
Name:Gary
Location:Coquitlam BC
Subject:Heart Valve
I have been eating a lot of these foods over the last month or so and now it's playing games with my INR. Over the last 3 weeks, it's been up and down, now it's up to 8.4 and I was told before leaving the hospital, to stay away from just leafy greens.
Posted on 2012-04-08 15:39:19
Name:R.J.
Location:USA
Subject:Leafy greens
If your INR is 8.4 you need to eat more greens. 8.4 means your blood is too thin and Vit K helps to balance it. I eat leafy greens and I make sure I eat vegetables or greens containing the same amount of Vit K each day. It is working for me. My body needs Vit K. My INR levels are pretty balanced.
Posted on 2012-04-12 11:25:33
Name:Joan
Location:Green Bay WI
Subject:Pea Soup/ Warfarin diet
My husband is taking Coumadin, can he eat pea soup with carrots and potatoes?
Posted on 2012-04-18 20:15:13
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Pea Soup/ Warfarin diet
Hi Joan, thanks for your question. The amount of vitamin K your husband can consume depends on his INR and his current dose of Warfarin. It is also important that he keeps his vitamin K intake consistent from day to day. The Office of Dietary Supplements recommends eating foods that provide less than 60% of the Daily Value (DV) for vitamin K.

When you are making the pea soup, are you using split peas or green peas? Green peas provide too much vitamin K and split peas are better.

1 cup of split peas with 1 carrot and 1 potato provide around 24% DV for vitamin K. (Nutrition Facts for Split peas, carrots, and potatoes). If you add 2 more carrots it is 40% DV. A serving of soup with this quantity of ingredients should be good for your husband. Be sure to keep checking INR levels and working with your health care provider.

Posted on 2012-04-18 22:36:32
Name:Margaret Bailey
Location:UK
Subject:ITP
I have CLL and my Doc is wondering if I have mild ITP because my platelets are dropping slightly, although still just in the normal range. I read that foods rich in Vit K can help the platelets - I think that I eat a pretty good varied diet but some things like too much cows milk, carrots, and onions irritate my IBS. What do you think? I'm keen to try and help my platelets increase! Thanks.
Posted on 2012-04-19 09:09:05
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: ITP
Hi Maragret, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your condition. Vitamin K helps platelets coagulate blood and stop bleeding, but does not actually increase the production of platelets. As such, eating vitamin K foods is not likely to help you. The National Library of Medicine recommends some treatments for ITP (none of which are supplements or nutrients), and given your leukemia (CLL), you would want to discuss with your doctor which treatment would be best before taking any supplements or anything of that nature.
Posted on 2012-04-19 13:52:14
Name:L Dixon
Location:Oklahoma City
Subject:Vitamin K Supplement
If my diet is not a healthy one and am having signs of Vitamin K deficiency, how much of a supplement should I take? I do not take any blood thinners at all. Or, if diet was the answer, how much in mcg, should be consumed for a 54 yr female?
Posted on 2012-05-19 12:11:52
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin K Supplement
Hi L, thanks for your quesiton. You should try to get at least 80 micrograms (μg) of vitamin K per day. This is the daily value set by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. If you are not taking blood thinners and are worried about deficiency, then try to eat around 300-500% of the DV (240μg-400μg), or even more. If your deficiency does not go away, you want to see a doctor about the cause. If none of the vitamin K rich foods listed here are appealing to you, there are also many vitmain K supplements available at affordable prices.
Posted on 2012-05-19 12:25:33
Name:Kumowarrior
Location:CA
Subject:Warfarin or Natto?
Why would anyone take Warfarin (Rat Poison) when Natto is safe and more effective because of the Nattokinase? Besides being a dangerous drug, Warfarin promotes the rapid calcification of the arteries by inhibiting vitamin K, the hormone vitamin which dissolves calcium from arteries and organs and transports the calcium to the bones and teeth where it should be. Natto consumes excess fibrin and thus inhibits or if you will "eats" clots and keeps the blood safely flowing. Please, stop the insanity.
Posted on 2012-05-19 21:48:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin or Natto?
Hi Kumowarrior, thanks for your comment. It should be noted that it is the natto extract Nattokinase, which is extracted and concentrated, that has showed some promise in serving to suppress blood clots. This is different from eating natto by itself. It should also be noted that nattokinase has not undergone clincal trials and therefore is classified as a supplement. Further, natto is high in vitamin K, and therefore people taking warfarin should approach natto with caution.
Posted on 2012-05-19 21:55:41
Name:PJ Hampton
Location:Vandalia, OH
Subject:Warfarin and Grapefruit
I need a clarification, having been on warfarin for more than 10 yrs I was ALWAYS told to stay away from grapefruit yet HealthAlicious states it is fine?????
Posted on 2012-05-24 18:56:58
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin and Grapefruit
Hi PJ, thanks for your question. There is some controversy surrounding consumption of grapefruit with Warfarin, even though grapefruit has little to no vitamin K, and this study found that grapefruit juice does not significantly affect PT/INR, grapefruit might as well be avoided when there is such an easy substitute with oranges. The previous comment will be changed to exclude grapefruit. Keep avoiding grapefruit and stick to the diet that works for you while taking Warfarin.
Posted on 2012-05-25 04:18:48
Name:Crystal
Location:Ontario, Canada
Subject:Still unstable at 15mg of Coumadin
Hello, I have been on coumadin and Lovanox for 2 months now and have only once been able to go over an INR reading of 2 to 2.1 that was a week ago and have since been taking lovanox and told to maintain 15 Coumadin and my levels have come down to 1.7 again. My diet stays fairly regular and I am concerned with the potential of the DVT breaking up...is there anyway that I can counteract the vit K foods with others that thin the blood (if so what would those be?)
Posted on 2012-06-09 14:03:43
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Still unstable at 15mg of Coumadin
Hi Crystal, thanks for your question. If your diet is staying constant as well as your dosage of Coumadin, then your INR should be at the level your doctors want. If they want the level to be higher then you are best trying to eat foods low in vitamin K, while limiting your intake of the high vitamin K foods listed here. Foods high in vitamin E can thin the blood, but whether or not eating high vitmain E foods can work with managing your INR is yet unstudied and untested. You are better off slowly reducing your vitamin K intake. Remember, don't make any sudden changes in your diet!
Posted on 2012-06-10 02:53:07
Name:Diana
Location:Ontario, Canada
Subject:Fruits, Chocolate, and Popcorn on Coumadin
Hi I was wondering if chocolate or popcorn contain any vitamin k? Also, are any fruits high in vitamin K? How much vitamin K am I allowed a day? Thanks!
Posted on 2012-06-20 02:02:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fruits, Chocolate, and Popcorn on Coumadin
Hi Diana, thanks for your quesiton. Looking at the nutrition facts for popcorn and chocolate neither are high in vitamin K and should be fine. Here is a list of 200 fruits high in vitamin K as you can see, most fruits are not high in vitamin K and should be fine. To get a basic guide of what to eat on a wafarin diet, see the article on low vitamin K foods for a warfarin diet.
Posted on 2012-06-20 09:34:30
Name:Loretta
Subject:Grapes
I was on Coumadin for 6 months for DVT. I am no longer taking it, but am taking aspirin almost daily. I recently ate a bunch of grapes and the leg which was affected by the DVT started hurting again. Are grapes high in Vitamin K?
Posted on 2012-06-28 13:37:17
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Grapes
Hi Loretta, thanks for your comment. Grapes are moderately high in vitamin K, with 22μg (28% DV) in a cup of grapes. This is probably not enough to cause your leg to start hurting.
Posted on 2012-06-28 20:14:05
Name:Darlene
Location:Georgia, USA
Subject:Avocados
I have had a-fib for almost 4 years and had a stroke 2 years ago. I take 5 mg warfarin on odd days and 6 mg on even days. It has taken 2 years to get my INR levels constantly between 2.5 and 3.5. Recently I discovered avocados. I just love them and have been eating 1-2 a day for about a week. I just found out they are high in vitamin K. I am concerned that this may have put my INR totaly out of wack. Is there anything I can eat to counteract the effect of excess K? Am I doomed to a life without avocados? They are better than chocolate!
Posted on 2012-07-08 03:43:05
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Avocados
Hi Darlene, thanks for your question, you are right that avocados are a great food. An average avocado contains 42mcg (53% DV). This is a moderate amount of vitamin K, but may not be enough to affect your level. Have you had your INR tested since eating avocados? If the avocados are definitely affecting your level then you either have to substitute them for some other vitamin K food in your diet or take even more warfarin. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-07-08 04:20:39
Name:Jessica
Location:Oregon
Subject:Vitamin K and Pregnancy
I am 24 weeks pregnant and lacking in vitamin K. I saw a reference in the thread to being careful about vitamin K intake while pregnant. What is a good amount? I plan to do this using foods rather than any suppliment.
Posted on 2012-07-13 16:01:14
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin K and Pregnancy
Hi Jessica, thanks for your question. Even though Medline Plus warns against too much vitamin K during pregnancy, it is important. This publication in the American Journal of Nutrition suggests increasing your intake of vitamin K by 10μg when pregnant, and by 20μg when lactating. That is 10-20μg over the daily value of 80μg, so aim for 90-100μg. Any of the foods listed in this article can easily provide you with that much vitamin K. As long as you are obtaining vitamin K from foods, and not supplements, your body can regulate your levels of vitamin K. If your levels of vitamin K have not increased in 2-3 weeks then you want to work with your doctor to find out why your vitamin K is low and consider suppelements.
Posted on 2012-07-14 00:24:16
Name:Rachels Mom
Location:Missouri
Subject:Von Willebrandís
My 11yr old AfghanHound female has VW and is due for major surgery at the end of the month. With this bleeding disorder we have to OD her on Vit K to slow down the internal bleeding. By boosting her vit K before hand would this help slow the bleeding process down? She is very good at eating everything in her bowl so adding to her regular diet is no problem.
Posted on 2012-08-10 10:10:04
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Von Willebrandís
Thanks for your question and comment. Vitamin K is used to treat Von Willebrand disease. Your veterinarian is likely to inject your pet with vitamin K to help stop bleeding. Adding extra vitamin K to her diet might cause complications in the amount of vitamin K the vet should use. The safest course is to consult your vet for particular instructions.
Posted on 2012-08-10 11:54:27
Name:Brian
Location:Austin, TX
Subject:Curious About This
I have been on Coumadin for 10 years now for a one time DVT. My doctor never once recommended a diet LOW in vitamin K, an asprin or two a day ,and cod liver oils, or omega 3's. Seems using warafin would be a last resort considering how dangerous the drug is and the therapudic range is so narrow! Any thoughts or is taking Coumadin just the easy way out for the doctors and the pharmacy companies?
Posted on 2012-08-27 16:02:32
Name:P. Walker
Location:Sydney, Australia
Subject:Warfarin advice
I have been on Warfarin for well over 12 months and fluctuates badly. The booklet mentions broccoli, however after researching Vit K, I found fresh coriander higher than that mentioned in the booklet. This makes it extremely difficult for users when the company does not give good examples. I would like to know why could one not eat broccoli with onion in the same meal, that is a blood thinning food to counteract the Vit K. I understand one can consume Vit K foods but this has to be on a regular basis so ensure a good INR reading along with a static dose. So would love to know your thoughts on balancing Vit K foods with those listed as thinning foods. Thank you, Peter.
Posted on 2012-09-02 00:53:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin and a Blood Thinning Diet
Hi Brian and P. Walker, thanks for your questions and comments. Bascially, there has not been a study shown to say that consuming "blood thinning foods" or other blood thinners, like apsirin, can substitute for Warfarin. Not sure if anyone reading this article can comment otherwise, or has succeeded in eliminating Warfarin through some other more natural means. Trying to control your PT/INR by balancing vitamin K foods with blood thinning foods would likely be ineffective, inconsistent, and difficult. Unfortunately there is no study to demonstrate it can be done safely. The best you can do, so far, is manage your vitamin K intake with Warfarin.
Posted on 2012-09-02 08:56:19
Name:William a Senior
Location:Sun City, C.A.
Subject:Natto and Calcification of Blood Vessels
A recent x-ray of my lower back showed possibility of severe vascular calcifications and possibility of a aortic aneurysm. Will Natto and Vit. K help reduce the calcifications? Thanks William
Posted on 2012-10-01 19:29:47
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Natto and Calcification of Blood Vessels
Hi William, thanks for your question and sorry to hear about the calcification. Studies show that adequate vitamin K helps prevent the calcification of blood vessels. One study in rats found that really high levels of vitamin K can reverse or reduce calcification. It should be noted that in this study rats were given Warfarin to induce their calcification. To reduce calcification of blood vessels, you may want to aim for 800μg (1000% DV) of vitamin K or more, and consult with your doctor before doing so, especially if you are on blood thinners like Warfain.

Regarding natto specifically, some studies have shown it can help maintain higher blood levels of vitamin K. Natto also contains vitamin K2 (menaquinone), however, it is uncertain whether this form of vitamin K is more beneficial. One cup of natto provides 40.4μg (51% DV) of vitamin K. So unless you really like eating a lot of natto, you may want to try eating some of the other vitamin K rich foods listed in this article. Hope that helps.

Posted on 2012-10-01 21:00:04
Name:Violet
Location:Lincoln
Subject:Low vitamin K and Osteoporosis - Alzeihmer's
Because I am on warfarin and have to watch my vitamin k intake, does this mean that I am more at risk to suffering from osteoporosis and Alzheimer's?
Posted on 2012-10-22 06:57:10
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low vitamin K and Osteoporosis - Alzeihmer's
Hi Violet, thanks for your question. Yes, because you are eating less vitamin K you are at higher risk for osteoporosis and Alzeihmer's. This affect has not been well studied however, so the extent of the risk is not well understood, and you might not have that much of a higher risk.
Posted on 2012-10-23 19:14:01
Name:EFD
Location:AZ
Subject:Diabetes
How does Vitamin K effect a person on Humulin and Lantus? Will it lower the blood glucose test results and help control diabetes?
Posted on 2012-11-15 15:00:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Diabetes
Hi EFD, thanks for your question. The effect of vitamin K on Humulin and/or Lantus has not been well studied. Studies, however, suggest that vitamin K can help to regulate blood glucose up to half an hour after eating, but not fasting blood glucose. Thus, vitamin K has an effect on glucose tolerance and may help prevent type II diabetes.
Posted on 2012-11-16 03:26:25
Name:George Dakis
Location:New York
Subject:G6PD Deficiency and Vitamin K
I have the absence of enzyme G6PD deficiency and I have been always told that vitamin k is not good for me. I understand that vitamin k is good for you and many herbs, vegetables, and fruits have it so what should I do?
Posted on 2012-12-10 19:54:01
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: G6PD Deficiency and Vitamin K
Hi George, thanks for your question. It appears that only vitamin K3 (menaphthone or menadione) is bad for G6PD deficiency. Vitamin K3 is a form of vitamin K found only in supplements and not in natural foods. You should be fine consuming vitamin K in the natural foods listed here. Consult with your doctor or health care provider to be sure.
Posted on 2012-12-11 07:40:00
Name:LiamIAm
Location:KY
Subject:But these are not the top 10 for K2
I'm at a loss to understand why one would continue to ingest warfarin, a known calcifier in lab animals and humans, while trying to watch the diet (minimizing K1 sources) to avoid antagonizing the K1 antagonist!

Once it is realized that vitamin K2 reverses calcification it seems one would want to cease ingesting warfarin and start ensuring that the K2 status in the body is optimized. Yes, vitamin K1 clots blood but vitamin K2 does so much more that K1 does not!

Also, the list only covers the top sources of phylloquinone (K1). What about the menaquinones (K2)? I see no natto, foie gras, organ meats, or hard cheeses (among others) listed. But since K1 and K2 are not differentiated here, this is not surprising.

If someone asks 'which foods are highest in vitamin K', one has to ask in return, 'which K' to supply an accurate answer.

Posted on 2012-12-11 07:48:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: But these are not the top 10 for K2
Hi Liam, thanks for your comment. The introduction now specifies vitamin K1, which is the form of vitamin K made by plants. Vitamin K1 is then used by humans and other animals to make vitamin K2 in the body. However, since some people may also seek vitamin K2 from dietary sources, a separate article for vitamin K2 will be created. Thanks for your suggestion.
Posted on 2012-12-11 07:58:29
Name:Ann Lester
Location:United States
Subject:Vit K and Osteoporosis
I have been diagnosed as having osteoporosis. I would like to avoid taking pills so how much Vit K would I need to eat daily to help this condition?
Posted on 2012-12-31 15:58:14
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vit K and Osteoporosis
Hi Ann, thanks for your question, and congratulations for trying to solve this problem naturally. The link between vitamin K and osteoporsis is not very strong and requires further study. Vitamin K1 is thought to help through its anti-inflammatory effects, and K2 by activating osteocalcin: a protein which increases absorption of calcium into the body's bones. Vitamin K2 is made by bacteria in your body, and also found in fermented foods like natto, tofu, and miso. Vitamin K1 foods are listed in this article. Eating 2-3 times the DV should be fine. Other natural ways of helping osteoporosis include getting plently of exercise, particularly muscle building, or resistance exercise. Vitamin D can also help, so get more sunshine (at least 20 minutes a day), or eat more vitamin D foods. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-01-01 19:42:48
Name:KS
Location:AZ
Subject:Jantoven (Branded Generic) for coumadin
Just found your website for finding Vit. K values. It does help sort out the values of K and quantity of portions. Been on thinners for 16 years and the hematologist recommended Jantoven, (branded generic) made in conjunction with Coumadin's manufacturers. Much less expensive and consistent INRs as with the brand coumadin. Had more difficulty regulating INRs with generic warfarins.
Posted on 2013-01-25 18:28:26
Name:Aj
Location:Australia
Subject:My Warfarin Experience
Hi, I was on warfarin over a year ago for 3 months because of PE and dvt which led to venous incompetence in my legs. I was told not to eat cranberries and leafy greens. Also, I was told not to change my diet as changing what you eat will make your inr go all over the place. Now recently diagnosed again with more PE, and now on lifelong warfin. I didn't change my diet but tried to stay away from the greens, however, I still eat a little greens and my inr is stable.
Posted on 2013-02-09 21:08:43
Name:Theron
Subject:K2 is more important than K1
Vitamin K1 and K2 are not the same thing. In fact, it is difficult to have a K1 deficiency if you are not on medications. K2, however, is a different story. In our modern society with modern foods, processing, and production, we get very little K2. K2 is needed to place calcium into the bones, remove calcium from the soft tissues (e.g, blood vessels), and protect the neurons in the brain.

Basically, K1 is boring and we really don't need to worry about it. K2 is where we need to focus our attention.

Eat hard cheeses, grass-fed organ meats and butter, and fermented vegetables. Those dark leafy greens are only slightly important for the K1 content, but they pale in significance to K2.

It's 2013... can we please stop referring to Vitamin K as if it's just one vitamin? Can we please stop confusing K1 as "Vitamin K"? Can we please start focusing attention back to sources of K2, which has a stronger and more direct affect on heart, blood, brain, and bone health?

Posted on 2013-03-20 20:48:26
Name:MS
Location:Az
Subject:Jantoven and Warfarin
Agree w/KS, in AZ. Jantoven has identical ingredients as Coumadin. I keep fairly even levels of K by using online lists of values. The Dr. says to eat what I like, watch amounts, test once a month, and he'll adjust the dosages to what I like. Been doing this for 18 yrs. Very regular on Jantoven or Coumadin. Now my brother has also switched from Coumadin to Jantoven with regular results and less cost. Previously on generic warfarins, but extra ingredients vary greatly causing chaos in INR.
Posted on 2013-05-06 04:00:04
Name:Liz
Location:Missouri
Subject:Does green tea have vitamin K?
I recently developed a DVT post surgery and have experienced headaches that occur each evening and last until the following day, late morning. Also slight nausea and lack of appetite . Is this something others have noted? Does green tea have a high level of vitamin K? It is very hard to adjust to the dietary changes of limiting vitamin k. For someone that loves salads!
Posted on 2013-05-30 21:27:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Does green tea have vitamin K?
Hi Liz, thanks for your question. Green tea does have vitamin K and is among a list of things to be avoided if you are on Warfarin (Coumadin).
Posted on 2013-06-05 02:53:50
Name:Tammy
Location:Ohio
Subject:Mrs Dash
Is Mrs Dash high in vitamin K? I started using it to replace salt since I'm on a low salt diet, but then I was reading about the herbs and now I'm worried that it's high in vitamin K. I'm on warfarin for the rest of my life and have been having problems controlling my INR. Thanks!
Posted on 2013-06-09 18:28:37
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Mrs Dash
Hi Tammy, thanks for your question. Mrs Dash contains garlic, which you should avoid, in addition to other dried herbs. The vitamin K content of Mrs Dash is not available, however it seems reasonable that you could use a teaspoon a day. Consistency is important when maintaining your INR and your doctor can adjust your Warfarin dose to meet your vitamin K intake. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2013-06-10 02:29:41
Name:Annie
Location:Whitewater, WI
Subject:Moderation worked for me
I've been on Warfarin for 5 years now and look to be on it for the rest of my life. I still enjoy all the things I love to eat. I have learned that a smaller amount of those items high in vitamin K can be just as satisfying as a larger serving. My PT/INR numbers have been stable for a long time by doing this. It's just like everything else - most everything is ok done in moderation. I hope this helps someone.
Posted on 2013-08-13 14:40:15
Name:Chris
Location:South Africa
Subject:Warfarin and finding natural alternatives
Warfarin - according to Wikipedia: "...It was initially introduced in 1948 as a pesticide against rats and mice and is still used for this purpose, although more potent poisons such as brodifacoum have since been developed..."

3 Adverse effects
3.1 Hemorrhage
3.2 Warfarin necrosis
3.3 Osteoporosis
3.4 Purple toe syndrome
3.5 Calcification of valves and arteries
3.6 Drug interactions
3.7 Reversal of action
(Source)

But don't worry, there are plenty of other drugs they can put you on one day when all these side effects become too much and even more drugs to treat those side effects.

I am reasonably sure that there are foods that can act like warfarin without side effects and drug/food interactions.

Cinnamon for example is great at reducing blood sugar levels naturally for those with diabetes. Potassium rich foods like banana, helps reduce blood pressure - the more you eat the better it works (more the most part I presume).

Please recommend foods that help thin the blood as well, or almost as well as Warfarin.

Please also advise good sources of other forms of Vitamin K as there are quite a few varieties of this Vitamin. Certain cheeses are high in vitamin K3 for example (if I remember correctly).

Another fact about Vitamin K, like Vitamin D and magnesium, it is important in helping send calcium into bones and increasing bones density I believe.

Posted on 2013-10-01 02:16:22
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin and finding natural alternatives
Hi Chris, thanks for your comment and suggestions. Indeed Warfarin is not the best of medicines, and beyond the side effects, the diet restrictions also make it unpleasant. The goal of this site is definitely to prevent or treat any condition in a natural way, however, people need to consult their doctors and follow their advice as well.

Vitamin K does come in many forms and an article for vitamin K2 is forth coming in the next few months. Vitamin K does have a lot of health benefits, including bone strength.

Posted on 2013-10-01 06:20:57
Name:Ellen
Location:Texas
Subject:Brusing on Plavix and Vitamin K
I am on Plavix and bruise very easily. I heard that Vitamin K would reduce bruising. Is this true?
Posted on 2013-10-10 21:08:45
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Brusing on Plavix and Vitamin K
Hi Ellen, thanks for your question. Vitamin K helps blood to coagulate and clot, which would prevent bruises. However, you are on Plavix, a drug designed to thin the blood, regardless of your vitamin K level. An unfortunate side effect of taking Plavix to thin blood and prevent clots is easy bruising. As long as you are on the drug, there may not be anything you can do about bruising.
Posted on 2013-10-11 05:40:21
Name:John
Location:New York
Subject:High Vitamin K levels
Hi! My vitamin K level is 4500. One month ago is was 3700. What causes the Vit. K level to increase? I stay away from all green vegetables, and dairy products. Are high levels of Vit K dangerous?
Posted on 2013-10-17 21:18:14
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: High Vitamin K levels
Hi John, thanks for your question. Not sure why your levels are rising, vitamin K is typically well regulated by the body, and toxicity is rare, further there are no known symptoms from high vitamin k levels. If you are not taking a blood thinner, like warfarin, there should not be need for concern.
Posted on 2013-10-18 07:02:58
Name:Malcolm
Location:UK
Subject:Wafarin and Omega 7 supplements
Hi, I am on wafarin blood thinning medicine daily. Can I take omega 7 at the same time? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-11-01 04:20:20
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Wafarin and Omega 7 supplements
Hi Malcolm, thanks for your question. If you are taking the omega 7 in the form of a pill or two that does not amount to more than a tablespoon, you should be fine. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-11-01 06:40:36
Name:KC
Location:USA
Subject:Freezing, Cooking, and Vitamin K
Is vitamin K destroyed or otherwise diminished by freezing (frozen blueberries), heating (herbs and spices in tea or cooking) and/or water-soluble?
Posted on 2013-11-06 20:26:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Freezing, Cooking, and Vitamin K
Hi KC, thanks for your questions. Vitamin K is fat soluble, meaning that it will not be diminished by boiling it in water. Frozen blue berries have a little more water content than fresh, but basically have the same amount of vitamin K. Cooking does not reduce vitamin K content in herbs and greens. See for example the nutrition facts comparison of raw, frozen, and cooked spinach. Here is the nutrition facts comparison for raw and frozen blueberries. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-11-07 06:01:52
Name:Dave
Location:KY
Subject:Doesn't cooking hurt vitamin K content?
HealthAliciousNess wrote: "Cooking does not reduce vitamin K content in herbs and greens. See for example the nutrition facts comparison of raw, frozen, and cooked spinach."

That is FALSE. If you take X amount of herbs and greens then cook them you reduce the weight, so what remains is lower nutrients in total but a denser source.

What you compared instead was 100 grams of each. To have 100g of cooked greens you must start out with more than 100g of fresh.

To put it another way a common way to tell is that if the water changes colors you lost some nutrients and it most definitely does take on a green tint from water soluble nutrients being released into it, though less so if steamed than boiled.

Posted on 2013-11-08 16:49:37
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Doesn't cooking hurt vitamin K content?
Hi Dave, thanks for your comment. While it may seem intuitive that some vitamin K would get lost in cooking, the data does not confirm this.

First, vitamin K is fat (oil) soluble, so is not part of the green color seen when boiling vegetables.

Second, you are right that it is not fair to compare 100 grams of fresh to cooked with food. So take for example this comparison of 1 spear of broccoli raw vs. cooked. You can see the cooked has more vitamin K. The Agricultural Research Service may have used a slightly bigger spear to analyze the cooked broccoli, but the data clearly show a larger portion of vitamin K. If anything, you can not say that the vitamin K content got hampered.

Basically vitamin K is not affected by the heat of cooking. Theoretically you might lose some vitamin K by frying vegetables in fat, but it would not be a significant amount. Hope that helps.

Posted on 2013-11-09 15:12:34
Name:KLG
Location:USA
Subject:Vit K2 and platelet counts
I have ITP and a low platelet count. I found a Vit K supplement which has both K1 and K2. Would it be safe for me to take K2, or would K2 make my low platelet count even lower? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-12-04 21:14:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vit K2 and platelet counts
Hi KLG, thanks for your question. This study found that Vitamin K2 and Vitamin D3 helped with anemia and thrombocytopenia (decreased platelets). This would suggest that vitamin K2 would increase your platelet count. There appears to be no study to suggest the opposite. You should be fine taking the supplement and hopefully it will help your Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP).
Posted on 2013-12-04 22:29:10

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Comments.
Name:Ellyn Landman
Location:Glenview,IL
Subject:Vitamin K Toxicity?
How much vitamin k is thought to be not too much for one day? Do you measure it in mgs? I was surprised to know cranberry juice has it. I had that and a salad the other night with a little celery and now wonder what my blood test will look like tomorrow.
Posted on 2011-12-04 22:58:37
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin K Toxicity
Hi Ellyn, thanks for your question. Vitamin K is measured in micrograms (mcg) and not miligrams (mg). Currently there is no upper limit of vitamin K intake if you are only consuming natural foods. You only need to be cautious if you are taking a vitamin K supplement, or if you are on particular medications, like Warfarin (or Coumadin). Pregnant women may also want to moderate their vitamin K intake.
Posted on 2011-12-05 09:49:58
Name:Samantha
Location:Adelaide South Australia
Subject:Vitamin K and Warfarin
I'm on Warfarin, and would like to know if I can eat strawberries, cherries, and drink orange juice.
Posted on 2011-12-10 17:37:51
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin K and Warfarin
Hi Samantha, thanks for your quesiton. Both strawberries and cherries are low in vitamin K, and orange juice does not appear to contain any, so you should be fine eating all those foods with your Warfarin medication. Click here for the complete nutrition facts on strawberries, cherries, and orange juice. You can also check with your pharmacist in case of any other further interactions.
Posted on 2011-12-13 19:51:22
Name:Gregory Evans
Location:Carrollton , Texas
Subject:Coconut Water
Hi I'm on Warfarin medication is it safe to consume coconut water?
Posted on 2011-12-19 07:29:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coconut Water
Hi Gregory, thanks for your comment. Coconut water does not contain any vitamin K, and the coconut meat has very little. From the perspective of vitamin K you should be fine drinking coconut water with Warfarin. Here are the complete nutrition facts for coconut water and coconut meat.
Posted on 2011-12-19 07:29:35
Name:Anonymous
Subject:What to eat on Warfarin?
I'm on warfarin, and having a tough time trying to eat just the right foods. Most prepared foods have at least something with a lot of vitamin K, and it's difficult to shop for food now. I think I may be better off just eating a regular diet daily, and fitting my dose to my diet. (No Cranberries!)
Posted on 2011-12-23 16:15:10
Name:Bob
Location:San Antonio
Subject:Vit K Effect on Glucose
Is there any data on how much Vit K to take daily in order to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose control?
Posted on 2012-01-03 16:16:05
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vit K Effect on Glucose
Hi Bob, thanks for your question. There have been few studies on the effect of vitamin K and glucose, however a 1999 study on rats found that a 20% vitamin K deficiency, or low levels of vitamin K, correlated with poor regulation of glucose and insulin. Thus a diet with adequate levels of vitamin K could help regulate insulin and glucose, and diets especially rich in vitamin K, or vitamin K supplements, would likely have little effect.
Posted on 2012-01-11 14:24:10
Name:Sunida
Location:Nelson, New Zealand
Subject:I'm on Warfarin
Hi there, I'm on Warfarin now. What about cucumber (not pickled), zucchini and green pepper? Thanks!
Posted on 2012-01-17 03:24:37
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: I'm on Warfarin
Hi Sunida, thanks for your comment. Both a medium sized zucchini and a medium sized green pepper contain around 9μg (11% DV) of vitamin K and so can probably be eaten in moderate amounts. Raw cucumbers, however, contain 49μg (62% DV) of vitamin K and are best limited while you are on Warfarin. Click here for the complete nutrition facts comparison.
Posted on 2012-01-17 04:08:33
Name:JC
Location:India
Subject:My 3yr old on warfarin
Hi there, my 3 yr old child is on Warfarin. Please advise vegetables that are safe for the child. Confused, as a dietitian has asked to avoid tomatoes, soy beans, and cabbage.
Posted on 2012-01-30 13:30:59
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: My 3yr old on Warfarin
Hi JC, thanks for your question. Tomatoes, soy beans, and cabbage are all good sources of vitamin K which can counteract the effect of Warfarin. Using the nutrient ranking tool, vegetables which are low in vitamin K include sweet corn, mushrooms, turnips, beets, onions, pumpkin, squash, potatoes, and sweet potatoes. These vegetables should be safe for your child, but consult with your dietitian to be sure.
Posted on 2012-01-30 23:30:17
Name:TF
Location:CT
Subject:Misperception
It's a common misperception that those taking warfarin must limit certain foods. Not true. What is important is that the level of foods containing vitamin k stays the same week after week so that the clotting time, and the amount of warfarin the patient takes, stays the same.
Posted on 2012-02-05 08:31:47
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Misperception
Hi TF, thanks for making an important point. The National Library of Medicine echos your sentiment to keep vitamin K levels stable, but also endorses limiting foods high in vitamin K. The Office of Dietary Supplements suggests having no more than 1 serving of a vitamin K food with 200%-600% Daily Vaue (DV) of vitamin K, and no more than 3 servings of foods with 60-199% DV.
Posted on 2012-02-05 08:40:07
Name:Gran
Location:NC
Subject:Vitamin K and Warfarin
Please tell me how to keep my intake levels of Vitamin K the same weekly. My INR levels fluctuate enormously from week to week. If I eliminate food with vitamin K it leaves no way to eat a balanced diet that I can see. It basically leaves bread, potatoes, some fruits and meats or seafood. How do you measure what you eat???? I am 79 and never been on a diet.
Posted on 2012-02-23 09:04:13
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin K and Warfarin
Hi Gran, thanks for your comment. Starting a diet low in vitamin K can be a challenge. As stated in a previous post, vegetables low in vitamin K include sweet corn, mushrooms, turnips, beets, onions, pumpkin, squash, potatoes, and sweet potatoes. This hopefully gives you some variety to choose from. Otherwise, you can use an ordinary measuring cup to measure the foods you eat. Avoid all dark leafy greens.
Posted on 2012-02-24 14:34:21
Name:Gideon Swart
Location:Pretoria
Subject:Vitamin K and Heart Disease
Hi. I am now totally confused. Please help. Had a heart attack and double by pass 2.5 years ago. Changed my diet a lot regarding fat and red meat consumption. Second heart attack (mild-according to doctor) on 17 Feb. I started reading about herbs and came to the conclusion that chilli and especially cayenne (3 teaspoonfulls daily) is the answer for heart problems. Being very high in vitamin K is this not producing a thicker blood that is harmfull for the heart?
Posted on 2012-02-25 03:48:10
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin K and Heart Disease
Hi Gideon, thanks for your comment and sorry to hear of your heart problems. You are right that chili peppers and cayenne are thought to promote blood flow and reduce blood pressure. They are also high potassium foods. It is difficult to know with the vitamin K content how much they help or hurt. If you have been consistently taking 3 teaspoons of cayenne a day, perhaps revisit your doctor for a blood test to see if they suggest a revision to your prescription of Warfarin, or other anticoagulant.
Posted on 2012-02-25 14:45:27
Name:Jay
Location:Mumbai, India
Subject:Warfarin Diet
Currently I am on Warfarin. As per my doctor's advice I am avoiding the following: Cabbage, Cauliflower, all leafy vegetables, soybeans, spring onions, and eating the following vegetables: Bitter Gourd, Long Beans, Bottle Gourd, Ivy Gourd, Cluster Beans, Double Beans, French Beans, Snake Gourd, Capsicum, Onions, Spounge Gourd, Brinjals, Lady Fingers, and Ridge Gourd. I want to know, can I eat Green Peas, Corn, Drumsticks, Radish, Beetroot, Sweet Potato, Cucumber, Carrots etc...?
Posted on 2012-02-28 04:11:06
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin Diet
Hi Jay, thanks for your question. Green beans, and likely all the other beans you are eating, are high in vitamin K, so be careful about eating them! Green peas, cucumbers, and carrots are also all high in vitamin K and best limited while you are on Warfarin. Corn, chicken drumsticks, radishes, beet roots, and sweet potatoes are all low in vitamin K and should be fine to eat. If you are curious about the amount of vitmain K in any food, you can use the nutrition facts tool to find the complete nutrition facts for any food, including the amount of vitamin K.
Posted on 2012-02-28 13:25:57
Name:Pam
Location:Greensburg, Indiana
Subject:Vitamin K and warfarin
I started on warfarin about 2 yrs ago. For a while I tried to limit my greens or anything with vitamin k, but I really loved all those green vegetables, so since November I went back to eating them. I havn't got my INR consistent yet, but I'd rather have thick blood than wind up with Alzhemier's. I have a strong history for that since my Mother and Grandmother both had that. Greens are good for the brain!
Posted on 2012-02-28 16:10:52
Name:Lori
Location:Idaho
Subject:Warfarin, vitamin K, and weight
I was put on warfarin because of a stroke 6 weeks ago. I am so confused on what to eat. I was told carrots were ok to eat. But it sounds like I need to give up most veggies and start eating fruits. The problem with fruit is the sugar content. I am not sure what to eat other fish and chicken, red meats are not good for you either. I give up.
Posted on 2012-03-17 21:12:28
Name:Lynette
Location:Alberton, South Africa
Subject:Warfarin
I have just been diagnosed with DVT (Deep Vein Thrombosis). Just started with Warfarin, and the doctor says to stay away from all green leafy vegetables. Will most likely only be on warfarin for about 3 months, but in the meantime I would want to eat properly to get my INR levels right. Could you list a few good fruits and veg that I can eat, as I am confused, some say sweet potatoes are good and other say no for that. I enjoy my fruit and veg, and also enjoy eating curries and spicy foods, is that good???? Please help, I am so ignorant when it comes to this subject.
Posted on 2012-03-18 02:25:22
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin
Hi Lynette, thanks for your question. You can use the nutrition facts tool to look up the nutrient values of different foods.The Office of Dietary Supplements suggests having no more than 1 serving of a vitamin K food with 200%-600% DV of vitamin K, and no more than 3 servings of foods with 60-199% DV.

You can also use the nutrient ranking tool to find foods lowest in vitamin K by food group. Using this tool the following vegetables are very low in vitamin K and are the best foods for you to eat: sweet corn, mushrooms, turnips, beets, onions, pumpkin, squash, potatoes, and sweet potatoes (sweet potatoes should be fine). As for fruits: oranges, watermelon, apples, and bananas are all fine. Thanks to your comment a new section will be made for people on Warfarin, so check back soon.

Posted on 2012-03-19 00:20:20
Name:Lake
Location:San Diego
Subject:Effient and vitamin K
Hi, I have been on Effient (described as super plavix) for 6 weeks. I was told to not take any supplements boosting vitamin k but eating vegetables like spinach, carrots, and others with vitamin k were fine. Do you have any advice regarding "Effient" and vitamin k intake? I believe it is a new drug on the market because there is no generic brands and not too many people have heard of it. Thank you.
Posted on 2012-03-21 00:42:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Effient and vitamin K
Hi Lake, thanks for your question. There are new drugs coming into the market that are intended to be more "user friendly" and easier to manage than Warfarin. Effient helps prevent blod clots by inhibiting the function of platets, and so it works somewhat independently of vitamin K. Therefore, your doctor is right in saying you can have a more normal diet in regards to vitamin K. However, every new pharmaceutical has its own costs and benefits, and people reading this should definitly consult with their doctors since Effient has an increased risk of excessive bleeding.
Posted on 2012-03-22 15:36:23
Name:Debbie
Location:Buffalo NY
Subject:Warfarin and Low fat Diet
Help! I too am very confused. I need to eat lowfat and want to have a few iceburg salads a week. Is that ok?
Posted on 2012-04-04 10:53:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin and Low Fat Diet
Hi Debbie, thanks for your question. Basically you want your intake of vitamin K to be the same from day to day. One cup of shredded ice-berg lettuce contains 17μg (22% DV) for vitamin K. Based on the opinions of The Office of Dietary Supplements this amount of vitamin K is OK and you can eat the salad each day. As always, keep monitoring your INR level.
Posted on 2012-04-04 11:52:22
Name:Gary
Location:Coquitlam BC
Subject:Heart Valve
I have been eating a lot of these foods over the last month or so and now it's playing games with my INR. Over the last 3 weeks, it's been up and down, now it's up to 8.4 and I was told before leaving the hospital, to stay away from just leafy greens.
Posted on 2012-04-08 15:39:19
Name:R.J.
Location:USA
Subject:Leafy greens
If your INR is 8.4 you need to eat more greens. 8.4 means your blood is too thin and Vit K helps to balance it. I eat leafy greens and I make sure I eat vegetables or greens containing the same amount of Vit K each day. It is working for me. My body needs Vit K. My INR levels are pretty balanced.
Posted on 2012-04-12 11:25:33
Name:Joan
Location:Green Bay WI
Subject:Pea Soup/ Warfarin diet
My husband is taking Coumadin, can he eat pea soup with carrots and potatoes?
Posted on 2012-04-18 20:15:13
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Pea Soup/ Warfarin diet
Hi Joan, thanks for your question. The amount of vitamin K your husband can consume depends on his INR and his current dose of Warfarin. It is also important that he keeps his vitamin K intake consistent from day to day. The Office of Dietary Supplements recommends eating foods that provide less than 60% of the Daily Value (DV) for vitamin K.

When you are making the pea soup, are you using split peas or green peas? Green peas provide too much vitamin K and split peas are better.

1 cup of split peas with 1 carrot and 1 potato provide around 24% DV for vitamin K. (Nutrition Facts for Split peas, carrots, and potatoes). If you add 2 more carrots it is 40% DV. A serving of soup with this quantity of ingredients should be good for your husband. Be sure to keep checking INR levels and working with your health care provider.

Posted on 2012-04-18 22:36:32
Name:Margaret Bailey
Location:UK
Subject:ITP
I have CLL and my Doc is wondering if I have mild ITP because my platelets are dropping slightly, although still just in the normal range. I read that foods rich in Vit K can help the platelets - I think that I eat a pretty good varied diet but some things like too much cows milk, carrots, and onions irritate my IBS. What do you think? I'm keen to try and help my platelets increase! Thanks.
Posted on 2012-04-19 09:09:05
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: ITP
Hi Maragret, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your condition. Vitamin K helps platelets coagulate blood and stop bleeding, but does not actually increase the production of platelets. As such, eating vitamin K foods is not likely to help you. The National Library of Medicine recommends some treatments for ITP (none of which are supplements or nutrients), and given your leukemia (CLL), you would want to discuss with your doctor which treatment would be best before taking any supplements or anything of that nature.
Posted on 2012-04-19 13:52:14
Name:L Dixon
Location:Oklahoma City
Subject:Vitamin K Supplement
If my diet is not a healthy one and am having signs of Vitamin K deficiency, how much of a supplement should I take? I do not take any blood thinners at all. Or, if diet was the answer, how much in mcg, should be consumed for a 54 yr female?
Posted on 2012-05-19 12:11:52
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin K Supplement
Hi L, thanks for your quesiton. You should try to get at least 80 micrograms (μg) of vitamin K per day. This is the daily value set by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. If you are not taking blood thinners and are worried about deficiency, then try to eat around 300-500% of the DV (240μg-400μg), or even more. If your deficiency does not go away, you want to see a doctor about the cause. If none of the vitamin K rich foods listed here are appealing to you, there are also many vitmain K supplements available at affordable prices.
Posted on 2012-05-19 12:25:33
Name:Kumowarrior
Location:CA
Subject:Warfarin or Natto?
Why would anyone take Warfarin (Rat Poison) when Natto is safe and more effective because of the Nattokinase? Besides being a dangerous drug, Warfarin promotes the rapid calcification of the arteries by inhibiting vitamin K, the hormone vitamin which dissolves calcium from arteries and organs and transports the calcium to the bones and teeth where it should be. Natto consumes excess fibrin and thus inhibits or if you will "eats" clots and keeps the blood safely flowing. Please, stop the insanity.
Posted on 2012-05-19 21:48:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin or Natto?
Hi Kumowarrior, thanks for your comment. It should be noted that it is the natto extract Nattokinase, which is extracted and concentrated, that has showed some promise in serving to suppress blood clots. This is different from eating natto by itself. It should also be noted that nattokinase has not undergone clincal trials and therefore is classified as a supplement. Further, natto is high in vitamin K, and therefore people taking warfarin should approach natto with caution.
Posted on 2012-05-19 21:55:41
Name:PJ Hampton
Location:Vandalia, OH
Subject:Warfarin and Grapefruit
I need a clarification, having been on warfarin for more than 10 yrs I was ALWAYS told to stay away from grapefruit yet HealthAlicious states it is fine?????
Posted on 2012-05-24 18:56:58
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin and Grapefruit
Hi PJ, thanks for your question. There is some controversy surrounding consumption of grapefruit with Warfarin, even though grapefruit has little to no vitamin K, and this study found that grapefruit juice does not significantly affect PT/INR, grapefruit might as well be avoided when there is such an easy substitute with oranges. The previous comment will be changed to exclude grapefruit. Keep avoiding grapefruit and stick to the diet that works for you while taking Warfarin.
Posted on 2012-05-25 04:18:48
Name:Crystal
Location:Ontario, Canada
Subject:Still unstable at 15mg of Coumadin
Hello, I have been on coumadin and Lovanox for 2 months now and have only once been able to go over an INR reading of 2 to 2.1 that was a week ago and have since been taking lovanox and told to maintain 15 Coumadin and my levels have come down to 1.7 again. My diet stays fairly regular and I am concerned with the potential of the DVT breaking up...is there anyway that I can counteract the vit K foods with others that thin the blood (if so what would those be?)
Posted on 2012-06-09 14:03:43
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Still unstable at 15mg of Coumadin
Hi Crystal, thanks for your question. If your diet is staying constant as well as your dosage of Coumadin, then your INR should be at the level your doctors want. If they want the level to be higher then you are best trying to eat foods low in vitamin K, while limiting your intake of the high vitamin K foods listed here. Foods high in vitamin E can thin the blood, but whether or not eating high vitmain E foods can work with managing your INR is yet unstudied and untested. You are better off slowly reducing your vitamin K intake. Remember, don't make any sudden changes in your diet!
Posted on 2012-06-10 02:53:07
Name:Diana
Location:Ontario, Canada
Subject:Fruits, Chocolate, and Popcorn on Coumadin
Hi I was wondering if chocolate or popcorn contain any vitamin k? Also, are any fruits high in vitamin K? How much vitamin K am I allowed a day? Thanks!
Posted on 2012-06-20 02:02:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fruits, Chocolate, and Popcorn on Coumadin
Hi Diana, thanks for your quesiton. Looking at the nutrition facts for popcorn and chocolate neither are high in vitamin K and should be fine. Here is a list of 200 fruits high in vitamin K as you can see, most fruits are not high in vitamin K and should be fine. To get a basic guide of what to eat on a wafarin diet, see the article on low vitamin K foods for a warfarin diet.
Posted on 2012-06-20 09:34:30
Name:Loretta
Subject:Grapes
I was on Coumadin for 6 months for DVT. I am no longer taking it, but am taking aspirin almost daily. I recently ate a bunch of grapes and the leg which was affected by the DVT started hurting again. Are grapes high in Vitamin K?
Posted on 2012-06-28 13:37:17
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Grapes
Hi Loretta, thanks for your comment. Grapes are moderately high in vitamin K, with 22μg (28% DV) in a cup of grapes. This is probably not enough to cause your leg to start hurting.
Posted on 2012-06-28 20:14:05
Name:Darlene
Location:Georgia, USA
Subject:Avocados
I have had a-fib for almost 4 years and had a stroke 2 years ago. I take 5 mg warfarin on odd days and 6 mg on even days. It has taken 2 years to get my INR levels constantly between 2.5 and 3.5. Recently I discovered avocados. I just love them and have been eating 1-2 a day for about a week. I just found out they are high in vitamin K. I am concerned that this may have put my INR totaly out of wack. Is there anything I can eat to counteract the effect of excess K? Am I doomed to a life without avocados? They are better than chocolate!
Posted on 2012-07-08 03:43:05
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Avocados
Hi Darlene, thanks for your question, you are right that avocados are a great food. An average avocado contains 42mcg (53% DV). This is a moderate amount of vitamin K, but may not be enough to affect your level. Have you had your INR tested since eating avocados? If the avocados are definitely affecting your level then you either have to substitute them for some other vitamin K food in your diet or take even more warfarin. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-07-08 04:20:39
Name:Jessica
Location:Oregon
Subject:Vitamin K and Pregnancy
I am 24 weeks pregnant and lacking in vitamin K. I saw a reference in the thread to being careful about vitamin K intake while pregnant. What is a good amount? I plan to do this using foods rather than any suppliment.
Posted on 2012-07-13 16:01:14
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin K and Pregnancy
Hi Jessica, thanks for your question. Even though Medline Plus warns against too much vitamin K during pregnancy, it is important. This publication in the American Journal of Nutrition suggests increasing your intake of vitamin K by 10μg when pregnant, and by 20μg when lactating. That is 10-20μg over the daily value of 80μg, so aim for 90-100μg. Any of the foods listed in this article can easily provide you with that much vitamin K. As long as you are obtaining vitamin K from foods, and not supplements, your body can regulate your levels of vitamin K. If your levels of vitamin K have not increased in 2-3 weeks then you want to work with your doctor to find out why your vitamin K is low and consider suppelements.
Posted on 2012-07-14 00:24:16
Name:Rachels Mom
Location:Missouri
Subject:Von Willebrandís
My 11yr old AfghanHound female has VW and is due for major surgery at the end of the month. With this bleeding disorder we have to OD her on Vit K to slow down the internal bleeding. By boosting her vit K before hand would this help slow the bleeding process down? She is very good at eating everything in her bowl so adding to her regular diet is no problem.
Posted on 2012-08-10 10:10:04
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Von Willebrandís
Thanks for your question and comment. Vitamin K is used to treat Von Willebrand disease. Your veterinarian is likely to inject your pet with vitamin K to help stop bleeding. Adding extra vitamin K to her diet might cause complications in the amount of vitamin K the vet should use. The safest course is to consult your vet for particular instructions.
Posted on 2012-08-10 11:54:27
Name:Brian
Location:Austin, TX
Subject:Curious About This
I have been on Coumadin for 10 years now for a one time DVT. My doctor never once recommended a diet LOW in vitamin K, an asprin or two a day ,and cod liver oils, or omega 3's. Seems using warafin would be a last resort considering how dangerous the drug is and the therapudic range is so narrow! Any thoughts or is taking Coumadin just the easy way out for the doctors and the pharmacy companies?
Posted on 2012-08-27 16:02:32
Name:P. Walker
Location:Sydney, Australia
Subject:Warfarin advice
I have been on Warfarin for well over 12 months and fluctuates badly. The booklet mentions broccoli, however after researching Vit K, I found fresh coriander higher than that mentioned in the booklet. This makes it extremely difficult for users when the company does not give good examples. I would like to know why could one not eat broccoli with onion in the same meal, that is a blood thinning food to counteract the Vit K. I understand one can consume Vit K foods but this has to be on a regular basis so ensure a good INR reading along with a static dose. So would love to know your thoughts on balancing Vit K foods with those listed as thinning foods. Thank you, Peter.
Posted on 2012-09-02 00:53:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin and a Blood Thinning Diet
Hi Brian and P. Walker, thanks for your questions and comments. Bascially, there has not been a study shown to say that consuming "blood thinning foods" or other blood thinners, like apsirin, can substitute for Warfarin. Not sure if anyone reading this article can comment otherwise, or has succeeded in eliminating Warfarin through some other more natural means. Trying to control your PT/INR by balancing vitamin K foods with blood thinning foods would likely be ineffective, inconsistent, and difficult. Unfortunately there is no study to demonstrate it can be done safely. The best you can do, so far, is manage your vitamin K intake with Warfarin.
Posted on 2012-09-02 08:56:19
Name:William a Senior
Location:Sun City, C.A.
Subject:Natto and Calcification of Blood Vessels
A recent x-ray of my lower back showed possibility of severe vascular calcifications and possibility of a aortic aneurysm. Will Natto and Vit. K help reduce the calcifications? Thanks William
Posted on 2012-10-01 19:29:47
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Natto and Calcification of Blood Vessels
Hi William, thanks for your question and sorry to hear about the calcification. Studies show that adequate vitamin K helps prevent the calcification of blood vessels. One study in rats found that really high levels of vitamin K can reverse or reduce calcification. It should be noted that in this study rats were given Warfarin to induce their calcification. To reduce calcification of blood vessels, you may want to aim for 800μg (1000% DV) of vitamin K or more, and consult with your doctor before doing so, especially if you are on blood thinners like Warfain.

Regarding natto specifically, some studies have shown it can help maintain higher blood levels of vitamin K. Natto also contains vitamin K2 (menaquinone), however, it is uncertain whether this form of vitamin K is more beneficial. One cup of natto provides 40.4μg (51% DV) of vitamin K. So unless you really like eating a lot of natto, you may want to try eating some of the other vitamin K rich foods listed in this article. Hope that helps.

Posted on 2012-10-01 21:00:04
Name:Violet
Location:Lincoln
Subject:Low vitamin K and Osteoporosis - Alzeihmer's
Because I am on warfarin and have to watch my vitamin k intake, does this mean that I am more at risk to suffering from osteoporosis and Alzheimer's?
Posted on 2012-10-22 06:57:10
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low vitamin K and Osteoporosis - Alzeihmer's
Hi Violet, thanks for your question. Yes, because you are eating less vitamin K you are at higher risk for osteoporosis and Alzeihmer's. This affect has not been well studied however, so the extent of the risk is not well understood, and you might not have that much of a higher risk.
Posted on 2012-10-23 19:14:01
Name:EFD
Location:AZ
Subject:Diabetes
How does Vitamin K effect a person on Humulin and Lantus? Will it lower the blood glucose test results and help control diabetes?
Posted on 2012-11-15 15:00:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Diabetes
Hi EFD, thanks for your question. The effect of vitamin K on Humulin and/or Lantus has not been well studied. Studies, however, suggest that vitamin K can help to regulate blood glucose up to half an hour after eating, but not fasting blood glucose. Thus, vitamin K has an effect on glucose tolerance and may help prevent type II diabetes.
Posted on 2012-11-16 03:26:25
Name:George Dakis
Location:New York
Subject:G6PD Deficiency and Vitamin K
I have the absence of enzyme G6PD deficiency and I have been always told that vitamin k is not good for me. I understand that vitamin k is good for you and many herbs, vegetables, and fruits have it so what should I do?
Posted on 2012-12-10 19:54:01
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: G6PD Deficiency and Vitamin K
Hi George, thanks for your question. It appears that only vitamin K3 (menaphthone or menadione) is bad for G6PD deficiency. Vitamin K3 is a form of vitamin K found only in supplements and not in natural foods. You should be fine consuming vitamin K in the natural foods listed here. Consult with your doctor or health care provider to be sure.
Posted on 2012-12-11 07:40:00
Name:LiamIAm
Location:KY
Subject:But these are not the top 10 for K2
I'm at a loss to understand why one would continue to ingest warfarin, a known calcifier in lab animals and humans, while trying to watch the diet (minimizing K1 sources) to avoid antagonizing the K1 antagonist!

Once it is realized that vitamin K2 reverses calcification it seems one would want to cease ingesting warfarin and start ensuring that the K2 status in the body is optimized. Yes, vitamin K1 clots blood but vitamin K2 does so much more that K1 does not!

Also, the list only covers the top sources of phylloquinone (K1). What about the menaquinones (K2)? I see no natto, foie gras, organ meats, or hard cheeses (among others) listed. But since K1 and K2 are not differentiated here, this is not surprising.

If someone asks 'which foods are highest in vitamin K', one has to ask in return, 'which K' to supply an accurate answer.

Posted on 2012-12-11 07:48:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: But these are not the top 10 for K2
Hi Liam, thanks for your comment. The introduction now specifies vitamin K1, which is the form of vitamin K made by plants. Vitamin K1 is then used by humans and other animals to make vitamin K2 in the body. However, since some people may also seek vitamin K2 from dietary sources, a separate article for vitamin K2 will be created. Thanks for your suggestion.
Posted on 2012-12-11 07:58:29
Name:Ann Lester
Location:United States
Subject:Vit K and Osteoporosis
I have been diagnosed as having osteoporosis. I would like to avoid taking pills so how much Vit K would I need to eat daily to help this condition?
Posted on 2012-12-31 15:58:14
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vit K and Osteoporosis
Hi Ann, thanks for your question, and congratulations for trying to solve this problem naturally. The link between vitamin K and osteoporsis is not very strong and requires further study. Vitamin K1 is thought to help through its anti-inflammatory effects, and K2 by activating osteocalcin: a protein which increases absorption of calcium into the body's bones. Vitamin K2 is made by bacteria in your body, and also found in fermented foods like natto, tofu, and miso. Vitamin K1 foods are listed in this article. Eating 2-3 times the DV should be fine. Other natural ways of helping osteoporosis include getting plently of exercise, particularly muscle building, or resistance exercise. Vitamin D can also help, so get more sunshine (at least 20 minutes a day), or eat more vitamin D foods. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-01-01 19:42:48
Name:KS
Location:AZ
Subject:Jantoven (Branded Generic) for coumadin
Just found your website for finding Vit. K values. It does help sort out the values of K and quantity of portions. Been on thinners for 16 years and the hematologist recommended Jantoven, (branded generic) made in conjunction with Coumadin's manufacturers. Much less expensive and consistent INRs as with the brand coumadin. Had more difficulty regulating INRs with generic warfarins.
Posted on 2013-01-25 18:28:26
Name:Aj
Location:Australia
Subject:My Warfarin Experience
Hi, I was on warfarin over a year ago for 3 months because of PE and dvt which led to venous incompetence in my legs. I was told not to eat cranberries and leafy greens. Also, I was told not to change my diet as changing what you eat will make your inr go all over the place. Now recently diagnosed again with more PE, and now on lifelong warfin. I didn't change my diet but tried to stay away from the greens, however, I still eat a little greens and my inr is stable.
Posted on 2013-02-09 21:08:43
Name:Theron
Subject:K2 is more important than K1
Vitamin K1 and K2 are not the same thing. In fact, it is difficult to have a K1 deficiency if you are not on medications. K2, however, is a different story. In our modern society with modern foods, processing, and production, we get very little K2. K2 is needed to place calcium into the bones, remove calcium from the soft tissues (e.g, blood vessels), and protect the neurons in the brain.

Basically, K1 is boring and we really don't need to worry about it. K2 is where we need to focus our attention.

Eat hard cheeses, grass-fed organ meats and butter, and fermented vegetables. Those dark leafy greens are only slightly important for the K1 content, but they pale in significance to K2.

It's 2013... can we please stop referring to Vitamin K as if it's just one vitamin? Can we please stop confusing K1 as "Vitamin K"? Can we please start focusing attention back to sources of K2, which has a stronger and more direct affect on heart, blood, brain, and bone health?

Posted on 2013-03-20 20:48:26
Name:MS
Location:Az
Subject:Jantoven and Warfarin
Agree w/KS, in AZ. Jantoven has identical ingredients as Coumadin. I keep fairly even levels of K by using online lists of values. The Dr. says to eat what I like, watch amounts, test once a month, and he'll adjust the dosages to what I like. Been doing this for 18 yrs. Very regular on Jantoven or Coumadin. Now my brother has also switched from Coumadin to Jantoven with regular results and less cost. Previously on generic warfarins, but extra ingredients vary greatly causing chaos in INR.
Posted on 2013-05-06 04:00:04
Name:Liz
Location:Missouri
Subject:Does green tea have vitamin K?
I recently developed a DVT post surgery and have experienced headaches that occur each evening and last until the following day, late morning. Also slight nausea and lack of appetite . Is this something others have noted? Does green tea have a high level of vitamin K? It is very hard to adjust to the dietary changes of limiting vitamin k. For someone that loves salads!
Posted on 2013-05-30 21:27:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Does green tea have vitamin K?
Hi Liz, thanks for your question. Green tea does have vitamin K and is among a list of things to be avoided if you are on Warfarin (Coumadin).
Posted on 2013-06-05 02:53:50
Name:Tammy
Location:Ohio
Subject:Mrs Dash
Is Mrs Dash high in vitamin K? I started using it to replace salt since I'm on a low salt diet, but then I was reading about the herbs and now I'm worried that it's high in vitamin K. I'm on warfarin for the rest of my life and have been having problems controlling my INR. Thanks!
Posted on 2013-06-09 18:28:37
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Mrs Dash
Hi Tammy, thanks for your question. Mrs Dash contains garlic, which you should avoid, in addition to other dried herbs. The vitamin K content of Mrs Dash is not available, however it seems reasonable that you could use a teaspoon a day. Consistency is important when maintaining your INR and your doctor can adjust your Warfarin dose to meet your vitamin K intake. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2013-06-10 02:29:41
Name:Annie
Location:Whitewater, WI
Subject:Moderation worked for me
I've been on Warfarin for 5 years now and look to be on it for the rest of my life. I still enjoy all the things I love to eat. I have learned that a smaller amount of those items high in vitamin K can be just as satisfying as a larger serving. My PT/INR numbers have been stable for a long time by doing this. It's just like everything else - most everything is ok done in moderation. I hope this helps someone.
Posted on 2013-08-13 14:40:15
Name:Chris
Location:South Africa
Subject:Warfarin and finding natural alternatives
Warfarin - according to Wikipedia: "...It was initially introduced in 1948 as a pesticide against rats and mice and is still used for this purpose, although more potent poisons such as brodifacoum have since been developed..."

3 Adverse effects
3.1 Hemorrhage
3.2 Warfarin necrosis
3.3 Osteoporosis
3.4 Purple toe syndrome
3.5 Calcification of valves and arteries
3.6 Drug interactions
3.7 Reversal of action
(Source)

But don't worry, there are plenty of other drugs they can put you on one day when all these side effects become too much and even more drugs to treat those side effects.

I am reasonably sure that there are foods that can act like warfarin without side effects and drug/food interactions.

Cinnamon for example is great at reducing blood sugar levels naturally for those with diabetes. Potassium rich foods like banana, helps reduce blood pressure - the more you eat the better it works (more the most part I presume).

Please recommend foods that help thin the blood as well, or almost as well as Warfarin.

Please also advise good sources of other forms of Vitamin K as there are quite a few varieties of this Vitamin. Certain cheeses are high in vitamin K3 for example (if I remember correctly).

Another fact about Vitamin K, like Vitamin D and magnesium, it is important in helping send calcium into bones and increasing bones density I believe.

Posted on 2013-10-01 02:16:22
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warfarin and finding natural alternatives
Hi Chris, thanks for your comment and suggestions. Indeed Warfarin is not the best of medicines, and beyond the side effects, the diet restrictions also make it unpleasant. The goal of this site is definitely to prevent or treat any condition in a natural way, however, people need to consult their doctors and follow their advice as well.

Vitamin K does come in many forms and an article for vitamin K2 is forth coming in the next few months. Vitamin K does have a lot of health benefits, including bone strength.

Posted on 2013-10-01 06:20:57
Name:Ellen
Location:Texas
Subject:Brusing on Plavix and Vitamin K
I am on Plavix and bruise very easily. I heard that Vitamin K would reduce bruising. Is this true?
Posted on 2013-10-10 21:08:45
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Brusing on Plavix and Vitamin K
Hi Ellen, thanks for your question. Vitamin K helps blood to coagulate and clot, which would prevent bruises. However, you are on Plavix, a drug designed to thin the blood, regardless of your vitamin K level. An unfortunate side effect of taking Plavix to thin blood and prevent clots is easy bruising. As long as you are on the drug, there may not be anything you can do about bruising.
Posted on 2013-10-11 05:40:21
Name:John
Location:New York
Subject:High Vitamin K levels
Hi! My vitamin K level is 4500. One month ago is was 3700. What causes the Vit. K level to increase? I stay away from all green vegetables, and dairy products. Are high levels of Vit K dangerous?
Posted on 2013-10-17 21:18:14
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: High Vitamin K levels
Hi John, thanks for your question. Not sure why your levels are rising, vitamin K is typically well regulated by the body, and toxicity is rare, further there are no known symptoms from high vitamin k levels. If you are not taking a blood thinner, like warfarin, there should not be need for concern.
Posted on 2013-10-18 07:02:58
Name:Malcolm
Location:UK
Subject:Wafarin and Omega 7 supplements
Hi, I am on wafarin blood thinning medicine daily. Can I take omega 7 at the same time? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-11-01 04:20:20
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Wafarin and Omega 7 supplements
Hi Malcolm, thanks for your question. If you are taking the omega 7 in the form of a pill or two that does not amount to more than a tablespoon, you should be fine. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-11-01 06:40:36
Name:KC
Location:USA
Subject:Freezing, Cooking, and Vitamin K
Is vitamin K destroyed or otherwise diminished by freezing (frozen blueberries), heating (herbs and spices in tea or cooking) and/or water-soluble?
Posted on 2013-11-06 20:26:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Freezing, Cooking, and Vitamin K
Hi KC, thanks for your questions. Vitamin K is fat soluble, meaning that it will not be diminished by boiling it in water. Frozen blue berries have a little more water content than fresh, but basically have the same amount of vitamin K. Cooking does not reduce vitamin K content in herbs and greens. See for example the nutrition facts comparison of raw, frozen, and cooked spinach. Here is the nutrition facts comparison for raw and frozen blueberries. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-11-07 06:01:52
Name:Dave
Location:KY
Subject:Doesn't cooking hurt vitamin K content?
HealthAliciousNess wrote: "Cooking does not reduce vitamin K content in herbs and greens. See for example the nutrition facts comparison of raw, frozen, and cooked spinach."

That is FALSE. If you take X amount of herbs and greens then cook them you reduce the weight, so what remains is lower nutrients in total but a denser source.

What you compared instead was 100 grams of each. To have 100g of cooked greens you must start out with more than 100g of fresh.

To put it another way a common way to tell is that if the water changes colors you lost some nutrients and it most definitely does take on a green tint from water soluble nutrients being released into it, though less so if steamed than boiled.

Posted on 2013-11-08 16:49:37
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Doesn't cooking hurt vitamin K content?
Hi Dave, thanks for your comment. While it may seem intuitive that some vitamin K would get lost in cooking, the data does not confirm this.

First, vitamin K is fat (oil) soluble, so is not part of the green color seen when boiling vegetables.

Second, you are right that it is not fair to compare 100 grams of fresh to cooked with food. So take for example this comparison of 1 spear of broccoli raw vs. cooked. You can see the cooked has more vitamin K. The Agricultural Research Service may have used a slightly bigger spear to analyze the cooked broccoli, but the data clearly show a larger portion of vitamin K. If anything, you can not say that the vitamin K content got hampered.

Basically vitamin K is not affected by the heat of cooking. Theoretically you might lose some vitamin K by frying vegetables in fat, but it would not be a significant amount. Hope that helps.

Posted on 2013-11-09 15:12:34
Name:KLG
Location:USA
Subject:Vit K2 and platelet counts
I have ITP and a low platelet count. I found a Vit K supplement which has both K1 and K2. Would it be safe for me to take K2, or would K2 make my low platelet count even lower? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-12-04 21:14:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vit K2 and platelet counts
Hi KLG, thanks for your question. This study found that Vitamin K2 and Vitamin D3 helped with anemia and thrombocytopenia (decreased platelets). This would suggest that vitamin K2 would increase your platelet count. There appears to be no study to suggest the opposite. You should be fine taking the supplement and hopefully it will help your Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP).
Posted on 2013-12-04 22:29:10

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References

  1. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.
  2. Shearer MJ. The roles of vitamins D and K in bone health and osteoporosis prevention. Proc Nutr Soc. 1997;56(3):915-937.
  3. Booth SL. Skeletal functions of vitamin K-dependent proteins: not just for clotting anymore. Nutr Rev. 1997;55(7):282-284.
  4. Suttie JW. Vitamin K. In: Shils ME, Shike M, Ross AC, Caballero B, Cousins RJ, eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 10th ed. Baltimore: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2006:412-425.
  5. Allison (2001). The possible role of vitamin K deficiency in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and in augmenting brain damage associated with cardiovascular disease. Medical hypotheses 57 (2): 151?5. doi:10.1054/mehy.2001.1307. PMID 11461163.
  6. ODS Fact Sheet on Coumadin - http://ods.od.nih.gov/pubs/factsheets/coumadin1.pdf