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Top 10 Foods Highest in Vitamin K


Vitamin K is an essential vitamin required for protein modification and blood clotting. Recent studies suggest that vitamin K may play a role in treating osteoporosis and Alzheimer's, and that consuming increased levels of vitamin K can help protect against cancer and heart disease. Unless you are taking medication to prevent blood clots, like Warfarin or Coumadin, there is no known risk of vitamin K toxicity, and no reason not to eat a lot of it. If you are on Warfarin (Coumadin), please check the article on low vitamin K foods for a Warfarin diet. Below is a list of foods high in vitamin K1. For more, see the extended list of vitamin K1 rich foods, and Vitamin K2 (Menaquinone-4) rich foods. The current daily value for Vitamin K is 80 micrograms (μg). Dihydrophylloquinone is an unhealthy form of Vitamin K1 found in trans-fats. Check the list of vitamin K1 (Dihydrophylloquinone) foods to avoid.

#1: Herbs (Dried Basil)
Vitamin K 100g Per tablespoon (5g)Per teaspoon (1g)
1714.5g (2143% DV) 85.7g (107% DV) 17.2g (21% DV)
Other Herbs High in Vitamin K (%DV per tablespoon): Dried Sage & Dried Thyme (107%), Fresh Parsley (82%), Dried Coriander (Cilantro) & Dried Parsley (34%), Dried Marjoram (16%), Fresh Basil (13%), and Fresh Chives (8%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#2: Green Leafy Vegetables (Kale, cooked)
Vitamin K 100g Per cup (130g)Per 1/2 cup (65g)
817g (1021% DV) 1062.1g (1328% DV) 531.1g (664% DV)
Other Green Leafy Vegetables High in Vitamin K (%DV per cup, cooked): Frozen Kale (1433%), Frozen Spinach (1284%), Mustard Greens (1037%), Spinach (1111%), Collards (966%), Beet Greens (871%), Swiss Chard (716%), Turnip Greens (662%), Dandelion Greens (471%), and Broccoli Raab (272%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#3: Salad Vegetables (Spring Onions/Scallions)
Vitamin K 100g Per cup (100g)Per onion (15g)
207g (259% DV) 207g (259% DV) 31.1g (39% DV)
Other Salad Vegetables High in Vitamin K (%DV per cup): Garden Cress (339%), Endive (144%), Radicchio (128%), Chicory Greens (108%), Watercress (106%), Cos (Romaine) Lettuce (60%), Green Lettuce (57%), Red Lettuce (49%), Celery (37%), Arugula (Rocket) (25%), Iceberg Lettuce & Cucumber (22%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#4: Brassica Vegetables (Brussels Sprouts, cooked)
Vitamin K 100g Per cup (156g)Per sprout (21g)
140.3g (175% DV) 218.9g (274% DV) 29.5g (37% DV)
Other Brassica Vegetables High in Vitamin K (%DV per cup, cooked): Broccoli (276%), Cabbage (204%), Frozen Broccoli (203%), Chinese Broccoli (93%), Red Cabbage (90%), Pak Choi (72%), Savoy Cabbage, raw (60%), and Cauliflower (22%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#5: Chili Powder & Hot Spices (Chili Powder)
Vitamin K 100g Per tablespoon (8g)Per teaspoon (3g)
105.7g (132% DV) 8.5g (11% DV) 3.2g (4% DV)
Other Spices High in Vitamin K (%DV per tablespoon): Curry Powder & Paprika (7%), and Cayenne Pepper (5%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#6: Asparagus, Fennel, Leeks & Okra (Asparagus, cooked)
Vitamin K 100g Per cup (180g)Per 4 spears (60g)
50.6g (63% DV) 91.1g (114% DV) 30.4g (38% DV)
Other Vegetables High in Vitamin K (%DV per cup): Frozen Asparagus, cooked (180%), Leeks, cooked (152%), Okra, cooked (80%) and Fennel, raw (68%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#7: Pickles (Cucumber, Sweet)
Vitamin K 100g Per cup (170g)Per pickle (35g)
76.7g (96% DV) 130.4g (163% DV) 26.9g (34% DV)
Other Pickles High in Vitamin K (%DV per pickle): Dill Pickle (54%), Sour Pickle (38%) and Sweet Pickle Relish (16%) per tablespoon. Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#8: Soybeans (Cooked)
Vitamin K 100g Per cup (94g)Per 1/2 cup (47g)
70.6g (88% DV) 66.4g (83% DV) 33.2g (42% DV)
Other Soybeans High in Vitamin K (%DV per cup): Raw Soybeans (109%), and Roasted Soybeans (Edamame)(108%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#9: Olive Oil
Vitamin K 100g Per tablespoon (14g)Per teaspoon (5g)
60.2g (75% DV) 8.4g (11% DV) 3.0g (4% DV)
Other Vegetable Oils High in Vitamin K (%DV per tablespoon): Soybean (32%), Canola (Rapeseed) (12%), and Sesame Oil (2%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#10: Dried Fruit (Prunes)
Vitamin K 100g Per cup (174g)Per prune (10g)
59.5g (74% DV) 103.5g (129% DV) 6g (7% DV)
Other Dried Fruit High in Vitamin K (%DV per cup): Blueberries (120%), Pears (46%), Peaches (31%), Figs (29%), and Currants (15%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.






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More Vitamin K Rich Foods
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More Vitamin K1 Rich Foods

Sun-Dried Tomatoes43μg (54% DV) per 100 gram serving23μg (29% DV) per cup (87 grams)1μg (1% DV) per piece (2 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sun-Dried Tomatoes
Carrots13μg (17% DV) per 100 gram serving14.5μg (18% DV) per cup grated (110 grams)8μg (10% DV) in a medium sized carrot (61 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Carrots
Celery29μg (37% DV) per 100 gram serving29.6μg (37% DV) per cup (101 grams)12μg (15% DV) in a medium stalk (40 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Celery
Jute (Meloukhia)108μg (135% DV) per 100 gram serving94μg (117% DV) per cup (87 grams)47μg (59% DV) per half-cup (2 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Jute (Meloukhia)
Cloves (Ground)142μg (177% DV) per 100 gram serving9.9μg (12% DV) per tablespoon (7 grams)3μg (4% DV) per teaspoon (2 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Ground Cloves
Dry-Roasted Cashews35μg (43% DV) per 100 gram serving47.5μg (59% DV) per cup (137 grams)3μg (4% DV) per tablespoon (9 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dry-Roasted Cashews
Blackberries20μg (25% DV) per 100 gram serving28.5μg (36% DV) per cup (144 grams)14μg (18% DV) in half a cup (72 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Blackberries
Blueberries19μg (24% DV) per 100 gram serving28.5μg (36% DV) per cup (148 grams)13μg (16% DV) in 50 blueberries ~half a cup (68 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Blueberries
Mulberries8μg (10% DV) per 100 gram serving11μg (14% DV) per cup (140 grams)1.2μg (1% DV) in 10 mulberries (15 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Mulberries
Raspberries8μg (10% DV) per 100 gram serving10μg (12% DV) per cup (123 grams)1.5μg (2% DV) in 10 raspberries (19 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Raspberries
Figs4.7μg (6% DV) per 100 gram serving3μg (4% DV) in a large fig (64 grams)2μg (2% DV) in a small fig (40 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Figs
Pears4.5μg (6% DV) per 100 gram serving6μg (8% DV) in one cup sliced (140 grams)8μg (10% DV) in a medium pear (178 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Pears

Foods High in Vitamin K2 (Menaquinone-4)
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Pepperoni 41.7g per 100 gram serving 11.7g per ounce (28 grams) 0.8g per slice (2 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pepperoni
Rotisserie Chicken (Drumsticks) 35.7g per 100 gram serving 30.4g per 3oz (85 grams) 18.9g per drumstick (53 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Rotisserie Chicken
Cream Cheese 19.7g per 100 gram serving 5.5g per ounce (28 grams) 3.0g per tablespoon (15 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cream Cheese
Processed Cheese 14.1g per 100 gram serving 4g per ounce (28 grams) 3g per slice (21 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Processed Cheese
Luncheon Meat 11.5g per 100 gram serving 95.5g per can (830 grams) 5.2g per slice (45 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Luncheon Meat
Ham (Roasted, Lean) 9.6g per 100 gram serving 256.6g per rump (2673 grams) 8.2g per 3oz (85 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Ham
Corn Dogs (Frozen) 8.8g per 100 gram serving 6.9g per dog (78 grams) 1.5g per mini dog (17 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Corn Dogs
Oysters (Cooked) 5g per 100 gram serving 4.3g per 3oz (85 grams) 2.1g per 6 oysters (42 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Oysters
Fried Chicken 10.3g per 100 gram serving 4.8g per strip (47 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fried Chicken
Salami (Beef & Pork) 28g per 100 gram serving 3.4g per slice (12 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Salami

Unhealthy Vitamin K1 (Dihydrophylloquinone) Foods to Avoid
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Margarines & Shortenings (Vegetable Shortening) 164.9g per 100 gram serving 338.1g per cup (205 grams) 21.4g per tablespoon (13 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Margarines & Shortenings
Microwave Popcorn (Made with Partially Hydrogenated Oil) 70g per 100 gram serving 5.6g per cup (8 grams) 60.9g per bag (87 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Microwave Popcorn
Sandwich Crackers (Cheese Filled) (Made with Partially Hydrogenated Fats) 64.3g per 100 gram serving 25.1g per 6 crackers (39 grams) 4.5g per cracker (7 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sandwich Crackers
Fried Chicken (KFC Popcorn Chicken) (Made with Partially Hydrogenated Fats) 62.3g per 100 gram serving 34.9g per 10 pieces (56 grams) 3.7g per piece (6 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fried Chicken
French Fries (Burger King) (Made with Partially Hydrogenated Fats) 58.4g per 100 gram serving 99.4g per large serving (160 grams) 43.2g per small serving (74 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for French Fries
Tortilla Chips (Made with Partially Hydrogenated Fats) 43.7g per 100 gram serving 12.2g per bag (28 grams) 7.9g per 10 chips (18 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Tortilla Chips
Hash Browns (Made with Partially Hydrogenated Fats) 36g per 100 gram serving 51.8g per cup (144 grams) 25.9g per 1/2 cup (72 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Hash Browns
Waffles (Made with Partially Hydrogenated Fats) 35.5g per 100 gram serving 11.7g per waffle (33 grams) 9.9g per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Waffles
Cakes (Yellow Cake) (Made with Partially Hydrogenated Fats) 12.8g per 100 gram serving 8.2g per slice (64 grams) 3.6g per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cakes
Pizza (Thin Crust, Cheese) (Made with Partially Hydrogenated Fats) 11.4g per 100 gram serving 77.3g per pizza (678 grams) 9.9g per slice (87 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pizza
Nachos (Taco Bell) (Made with Partially Hydrogenated Fats) 56.4g per 100 gram serving 45.1g per serving (80 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Nachos
Pie Crusts (Frozen, baked) (Made with Partially Hydrogenated Fats) 51.7g per 100 gram serving 116.3g per crust (225 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pie Crusts
Fast Food Biscuits (Sausage) (Made with Partially Hydrogenated Fats) 28.9g per 100 gram serving 32.1g per biscuit (111 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fast Food Biscuits

▼ Health Benefits of Vitamin K
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  • Bone Health and Osteoporosis - Vitamin K is necessary for creation of the protein: S. Osteocalcin, which in turn synthesizes osteoblasts: bone forming cells. In short, vitamin K is necessary for the strength and maintenance of bones.2-4
  • Alzheimer's Protection (*Controversial) - Vitamin K has been shown to inhibit nerve cell death due to oxidative stress, the degree to which supplementation prevents Alzheimer's still needs to be researched.5

▼ Vitamin K Guidelines when taking Warfarin (Coumadin)
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  • A low INR means you have increased risk of clotting
  • A high INR means you have an increased risk of bleeding
  • Warfarin increases INR. Vitamin K decreases it
  • Most doctors aim to keep INR around 2-3, but can range to 2.5-3.5 for heart valves or other extreme cases
  • Regularly check your PT/INR levels
  • Take the same amount of Warfarin at the same time each day
  • Keep your intake of vitamin K consistent from day to day
  • When a doctor prescribes Warfarin, they are trying to balance it with how much vitamin K you eat
The amount of vitamin K you can eat depends on your dosage of Warfarin, but in general...
  • Eat no more than 1 serving of food that contains 200%-600% DV of vitamin K
  • Eat no more than 3 servings of foods that contain 60-200% DV of vitamin K
  • Eliminate alcohol if you can, or limit yourself to no more than 3 drinks a day
  • Take no more than 800IU of vitamin E supplements
  • Avoid cranberries and cranberry juice as they can raise INR and risk of bleeding
  • Limit or avoid grapefruit and grapefruit juice
  • Avoid drinking green tea as it antagonizes Warfarin and lowers INR
  • Work with your doctor when taking CoQ10 as it can hamper the effectiveness of Warfarin
  • Many natural supplements affect PT/INR levels, so it is best to avoid them unless your doctor advises otherwise. The following supplements definitely affect PT/INR levels: arnica, bilberry, butchers broom, cat's claw, dong quai, feverfew, forskolin, garlic, ginger, gingko, horse chestnut, insositol hexaphosphate, licorice, melilot(sweet clover), pau d'arco, red clover, St. John's wort, sweet woodruff, turmeric, willow bark, and wheat grass.
  • To find foods low in vitamin K, see the article on low vitamin K foods, check the nutrition facts for a particular food, or use the nutrient ranking tool to find low vitamin K foods in a particular food group.
Source: Office of Dietary Supplements Fact Sheet on Warfarin and Vitamin K

▼ Recipes High in Vitamin K
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▼ Warnings
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  • Soybean Oil, Dry Roasted Soybeans, and Cashews are high calorie foods and should be eaten in moderate amounts by people with a high body mass index.
  • People taking Warfarin (or Coumadin) in an attempt to reduce their risk of harmful blood clots should keep their intake vitamin K the same from day to day, and limit their intake of vitamin K in accordance with their dosage and doctor's instructions.6 See the article on Low Vitamin K Foods for more info.

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▼ References
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  1. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20, 26.
  2. Shearer MJ. The roles of vitamins D and K in bone health and osteoporosis prevention. Proc Nutr Soc. 1997;56(3):915-937.
  3. Booth SL. Skeletal functions of vitamin K-dependent proteins: not just for clotting anymore. Nutr Rev. 1997;55(7):282-284.
  4. Suttie JW. Vitamin K. In: Shils ME, Shike M, Ross AC, Caballero B, Cousins RJ, eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 10th ed. Baltimore: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2006:412-425.
  5. Allison (2001). The possible role of vitamin K deficiency in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and in augmenting brain damage associated with cardiovascular disease. Medical hypotheses 57 (2): 151?5. doi:10.1054/mehy.2001.1307. PMID 11461163.
  6. ODS Fact Sheet on Coumadin - http://ods.od.nih.gov/pubs/factsheets/coumadin1.pdf