Home   Top 10 Lists   Nutrition Facts   Super Foods   Fruits   Vegetables   Recipes   Blog   FAQ   

Top 10 Foods Highest in Vitamin D


Vitamin D is an essential vitamin required by the body for the proper absorption of calcium, bone development, control of cell growth, neuromuscular functioning, proper immune functioning, and alleviation of inflammation. A deficiency in vitamin D can lead to rickets, a disease in which bones fail to properly develop. Further, inadequate levels of vitamin D can lead to a weakened immune system, increased cancer risk, poor hair growth, and osteomalacia, a condition of weakened muscles and bones. Conversely, excess vitamin D can cause the body to absorb too much calcium, leading to increased risk of heart attack and kidney stones. The current U.S. DV for vitamin D is 600 IU (international units) and the toxicity threshold for vitamin D is thought to be 10,000 to 40,000 IU/day.2 Vitamin D is oil soluble, which means you need to eat fat to absorb it. It is naturally found mainly in fish oils, fatty fish, and to a lesser extent in beef liver, cheese, egg yolks, and certain mushrooms. Vitamin D is also naturally made by your body when you expose your skin to the sun, and thus, is called the sun-shine vitamin. In addition, vitamin D is widely added to many foods such as milk and orange juice, and can also simply be consumed as a supplement. Below is a list of high vitamin D foods.

#1: Cod Liver Oil
Cod liver oil has been a popular supplement for many years and naturally contains very high levels of vitamin A and vitamin D. Cod liver oil provides 10001IU (1667% DV) per 100 gram serving, or 1360IU (340% DV) in a single tablespoon.


#2: Fish
Various types of fish are high in vitamin D. Typically raw fish contains more vitamin D than cooked, and fatty cuts will contain more than lean cuts. Further, fish canned in oil will have more vitamin D than those canned in water. Raw fish is typically eaten in the form of sushi. Raw Atlantic Herring provides the most vitamin D with 1628IU (271% DV) per 100 gram serving, 2996IU (499% DV) per fillet, and 456IU (76% DV) per ounce. It is followed by Pickled Herring with 680IU (113% DV) per 100g serving, Canned Salmon (127% DV), Raw Mackerel (60% DV), Oil Packed Sardines (45% DV), Canned Mackerel (42% DV), and oil packed Tuna (39% DV).

#3: Fortified Cereals
A breakfast staple in the Americas, most commercial cereals are fortified with the essential vitamins and nutrients. Exercise caution and check food labels when purchasing cereals, be sure to pick products that have little or no refined sugars, and no partially hydrogenated oils! Fortified cereals can provide up to 342IU (57% DV) per 100 gram serving (~2 cups), and even more if combined with fortified dairy products or fortified soy milk. Products vary widely so be sure to check the nutrition label before buying.

#4: Oysters
In addition to vitamin D, Oysters are a great source of vitamin b12, zinc, iron, manganese, selenium, and copper. Oysters are also high in cholesterol and should be eaten in moderation by people at risk of heart disease or stroke. Raw wild caught Eastern Oysters provide 320IU (80% DV) per 100 gram serving, 269IU (67% DV) in six medium oysters.

#5: Caviar (Black and Red)
Caviar is a common ingredient in sushi and more affordable than people think. Caviar provides 232IU (58% DV) of vitamin D per 100 gram serving, or 37.1IU (9% DV) per teaspoon.



#6: Fortified Soy Products (Tofu and Soy Milk)
Fortified soy products are often fortified with both vitamin D and calcium. Fortified Tofu can provide up to 157IU (39% DV) of vitamin D per 100 gram serving, or 44IU (11% DV) per ounce. Fortified Soy Milk can provide up to 49IU (12% DV) of vitamin D per 100 gram serving, 119IU (30% DV) per cup. Amounts of vitamin D vary widely between products, so be sure to check nutrition facts for vitamin D content.

#7: Salami, Ham, and Sausages
Salami, Ham, and Sausages are a good source of vitamin b12, and copper. Unfortunately, they are also high in cholesterol and sodium, and so should be limited by people at risk of hypertension, heart attack, and stroke. Salami provides 62.0IU (16% DV) of vitamin D per 100 gram serving, or 16.7IU (4% DV) per ounce (3 slices). It is followed by Bologna Pork 56IU (9% DV) per 100 grams, and Bratwurst 44IU (7% DV) per 100 gram serving.

#8: Fortified Dairy Products
Dairy products are already high in calcium, so it makes sense to fortify them with vitamin D. Milk can provide up to 52.0IU (13% DV) of vitamin D per 100 gram serving, 127IU (32% DV) per cup. Cheese can provide up to 6.6IU (2% DV) in a cubic inch, and butter provides 7.8IU (2% DV) in a single tablespoon. Check nutrition labels for exact amounts.

#9: Eggs
In addition to vitamin D, eggs are a good source of vitamin B12, and protein. Eggs provide 37.0IU (9% DV) of vitamin D per 100 gram serving, or 17.0IU (4% DV) in a large fried egg.



#10: Mushrooms
More than just a high vitamin D food, mushrooms also provide Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid) and copper. Lightly cooked white button mushrooms provide the most vitamin D with 27.0IU (7% DV) per 100 gram serving, or 7.6IU (2% DV) per ounce.



Advertisement




Health Benefits of Vitamin D

  • Osteoporosis Protection - Vitamin D is necessary for the proper absorption of Calcium which strengthens bones and helps to prevent osteoporosis. Vitamin D mainly benefits older adults, people who have difficulty exercising, postmenopausal women, and individuals on long term steroid therapy.3,4
  • Decreased Cancer Risk - Vitamin D has been shown to reduce cancer risk, particularly for colon cancer.5-7

People at Risk of a Vitamin D Deficiency

  • Breastfed Infants Who are Not in the Sun - The amount of vitamin D in breast milk depends on the amount of vitamin D in the mother. However, breast-milk typically does not contain adequate amounts of vitamin D. Be sure infants get at least some exposure to the sun (at least 10-20 minutes) to ensure adequate levels of vitamin D.8
  • Older Adults - As skin ages it is less and less able to make vitamin D from the sun, so vitamin D has to be attained from foods or supplements.5
  • People With Little Sun Exposure on the Skin - Wearing sunscreen, or lots of clothing, hampers the creation of vitamin D from the sun.9,10
  • People with Darker Skin - Melanin, a pigment found in skin, reduces the body's ability to manufacture vitamin D from the sun.5
  • People who have Problems Absorbing Fat, or are on Extreme Low Fat Diets - Vitamin D is fat soluble, which means it is found in fats, and your body has to be able to digest fats in order for you to absorb the vitamin D.11
  • People Who are Obese, or People Who have Had Gastric Bypass Surgery - Excess fat in the body absorbs vitamin D, effectively reducing the amount available for body functions. Those who have undergone bypass surgery are missing part of their upper intestine which hampers Vitamin D absorption.5,13,14
  • People Taking Certain Medications
    • Steroid Corticosteroid medications used to alleviate inflammation can reduce calcium absorption and impair vitamin D metabolism.15-17
    • Weight-loss drugs with orlistat (brand names Xenical® and alliTM) and cholesterol-lowering drugs cholestyramine (brand names Questran®, LoCholest®, and Prevalite®) can reduce the absorption of vitamin D and other fat-soluble vitamins.18,19
    • Medicines used to control and stabalize epileptic seizures, particularly phenobarbital and phenytoin (brand name Dilantin®) interferes with Vitamin D and reduces Calcium absorption.20

Warnings

  • Consuming too much vitmain D from food or supplements can lead to anorexia, weight loss, polyuria, heart arrhythmias, kidney stones, and increased risk of heart attacks.5 Vitamin D cannot reach toxic levels if created naturally from sun exposure.21
  • Oysters, Whole Milk, Salami, Cheese, Caviar, and Eggs are high cholesterol foods which should be eaten in moderate amounts and avoided by people at risk of heart disease or stroke.

Buy High Vitamin D Foods from Amazon.com

Cod Liver Oil, Pickled Herring, Caviar




Comments.
Name:Jim Moomaw
Location:Rochester, New York
Subject:Vitamin D Toxicity
Hi, I am concerned that you put 10,000 iu as a toxicity level for Vitamin D. I have been taking 10,000 iu daily for month and my vitamin D levels are only mid range. I weight 165 lbs. My Dr. commented that I am one of the few people who are not Vitamin D deficient in his group of patients.

I believe you should adjust this amount to a much higher number.

I love the website...informative and well done. -Jim

Posted on 2012-04-19 09:11:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin D Toxicity
Hi Jim, thanks for bringing up an important point. The toxicity range of vitamin D (10,000-40,000 IU) is set for most people, however, there are exceptions. As you are working with your doctor who has prescribed the supplements, and you are monitoring your blood levels of vitamin D, it makes sense for you to take such a high level.

However, the toxicity level for vitamin D is set by the Institute of Medicine and is based on analysis of a variety of studies. The Institute of Medicine which set Tolerable Upper Limits states: "Very high levels of vitamin D (above 10,000 IUs per day) are known to cause kidney and tissue damage."Ref

Given these valid health risks, most people should not consume more than 4,000IU (100mcg) of vitamin D, unless under guidance of a doctor or other health care professional.

Posted on 2012-04-19 12:20:35
Name:Kim
Subject:Kidney Stones
If you do not get enough vitamin D will this cause you to get kidney stones due to too much calcium?
Posted on 2012-05-07 20:33:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Kidney Stones
Hi Kim, thanks for your question. Actually too much vitamin D can cause you to increase calcium absorption and increase your risk of kidney stones. One study found that post-menopausal women taking 1,000 mg/day of calcium supplements and 400IU/day of vitamin D supplements experienced a 17% higher chance of developing kidney stones over 7 years.Ref
Posted on 2012-05-07 23:29:06
Name:Joe
Location:New York
Subject:Kidney Failure
My chld has very bad kidneys, could this be from vitamin D?
Posted on 2012-05-16 21:29:04
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Kidney Failure
Hi Joe, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your son's condition. Vitamin D deficiency has not been associated with causing kidney failure, however, having chronic (long term) kidney disease can lead to a vitamin D deficiency.Ref In other words, low vitamin D does not cause kidney disease, but kidney disease can cause low vitamin D. Very high amounts of vitamin D can increase chances of kidney stones, but this does not appear to be an issue with your son. Hope that information helps and your son quickly recovers.
Posted on 2012-05-17 02:55:20
Name:Latoya
Location:Virginia
Subject:Vitamin D Deficiency
I recently had lab work done because I have been having muscle aches and my bones click and pop every time I move. I am only 30 years old but I have a poor diet and I am always covered up because I am cold. My test resluts cam back and my vitamin D level was 7.8 way below the minimal range of 30. I'm always tired and I'm very afraid something else could be going on. I went to a doctor for the first time and all he said was buy some over the counter vitamin d and come back in six months. I guess my questions is how much vitamin d should I be taking? What's the best source for me?
Posted on 2012-07-15 19:22:33
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin D Deficiency
Hi Latoya, thanks for your question. To raise your levels of vitamin D, try to get at least 20 minutes of sunlight a day, and eat the foods high in vitamin D listed here. You can also take a supplement. Start with 1000IU of vitamin D3 a day, and see how your level changes after 6 months. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-07-16 02:37:19
Name:Teresa
Location:Virginia
Subject:Malabsorption
I had gastric bypass 17 years ago and now I'm having major issues with my Vitamin D levels. It seems I'm not having any luck on getting my levels back up. I've tried eating the right kinds of foods, prescription vitamin D and sun light, but nothing seems to be enough. What else is there?
Posted on 2012-07-31 06:28:36
Name:Leslie Gon
Location:Lincoln, CA
Subject:Allergic Reactions to Vitamin D
Having a Vit. D deficiency, my doctor prescribed 50,000 IU Vitamin D 1 pill a week twice. I broke out in a severe case of a rash which was diagnosed originally as scabies and I went through the whole nightmare regiment of that. It took 4 mos. to determine the allergy was to D. Now I am trying to get the D naturally through food intake. I live in "sunny" CA but for whatever reason do not absorb enough D through the sun. I was thinking about getting organic Vit. D pills.
Posted on 2012-08-23 17:19:58
Name:Sue
Location:WI
Subject:Vit D deficiency
Recent lab work indicated I am very Vitamin D deficient + I suffer from muscle, joint aches and pain. I eat salmon, tuna, mushrooms, cheese all good things for me, I was given a 50,000U rx to take only one every other week - my question is how long before I start to feel better?

I work inside 40 hrs a week and try to get out into the sun whenever I can - I am really pushing myself most days just to stay upright and not having any cartwheel days, heck most days I am not even able to accomplish a summersault. I might be able to get down there but can't roll around like a normal person should.

I don't get the dosing logic behind taking 50,000U every other week for a lab result of 7 when I know people with the results of 24 taking the same dose every week. Either???? The only difference is they are much older than I am - does age affect doseage too?

Posted on 2012-08-27 16:05:13
Name:LaDonna
Location:Texas
Subject:Just Wondering
My Dr. just put me on 50000 units of D. 1 CAPSULE A WEEK. Just wondering if this is absorbed into the body slowly? Thank you.
Posted on 2012-11-09 16:19:34
Name:Deb
Location:Central Coast, CA
Subject:Vit D Supplements
I too, like LaDonna of Texas, take 1 pill of 50,000 units of Vit D. I noticed no response to her question of whether or not it can cause potential damage. I am diagnosed with Diabetes 2 due to vitamin D deficiency. Would it be better for me to take a daily dosage of 7,000 units since I drink lots of water (one of the symptoms of Diabetes) and worry that I may be flushing my weekly dosage too soon. Please respond.
Posted on 2012-11-10 15:07:54
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vit D Supplements
Hi Deb, thanks for your question. Taking 50,000 IU once a week should be fine, but after 6 months, may start to cause damage. To be safe, do not take any calcium supplements while taking that much vitamin D. There is no standard way to supplement vitamin D, a doctor is likely to start with a mild dosage and then get more aggressive depending on your levels. 50,000 IU of vitamin D has even been subscribed on a daily basis, but usually this aggressive plan of supplementation will not last more than a month. Taking 7000 IU daily may be better, but it depends. Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin, meaning drinking water will not affect your vitamin D levels. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-11-10 22:38:43
Name:Nicki
Location:San Francisco, CA
Subject:Psoriasis and Oral Vitamin D
Hi, I have a mild case of psoriasis, but it's very unpleasant as it mainly affects my scalp (itchy, painful, and ugly - but treated with steroid shampoo it clears up quickly). When I was first diagnosed, my dermatologist explained that people with psoriasis are unable to absorb vitamin D by ingesting it orally, and can ONLY get D from the sun or topical creams. Anything taken orally will go in and come right out without being absorbed by the body. Now, this week, I went in to get my prescription refilled, and spoke with new doctor who told me to up my oral ingestion of vitamin D (to 4,000-10,000 IU, but that's not important). And of course, I brought up what my previous dermatologist told me. The new doctor basically said that the thinking on that issue has changed due to new research, but I couldn't tell if this was fact or theory. Is that true? Could upping my oral ingestion of D help with my psoriasis?
Posted on 2012-11-29 01:01:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Psoriasis and Oral Vitamin D
Hi Nicki, thanks for your comment. There are studies which suggest that oral vitamin D is a valid treatment for Psoriasis. Vitamin D seems to be more and more prominent in medical thinking and nutrition studies these days. Time will reveal its efficacy and power as a nutrient and supplement for all the current proposed benefits. For now, you probably want the oral supplement to be supplementary to your current treatment.
Posted on 2012-11-29 01:24:36
Name:Ellen
Location:Portland
Subject:Vitamin D Supplements and Constipation
I have struggled for several years with very low vitamin D levels (ranging as low as 20 for several years at a time.) I am 56, so post-menopausal. I have tried daily over-the-counter vitamin D supplements in varying amounts, and they are all uniformly constipating for me -- I can feel my bowel/colon "shutting-down" and I have to use Miralax to get unconstipated! My body does not seem able to adjust. Do you have any suggestion? Should I try a prescription dosage, but once a week? (I am also on alendronate sodium for osteoporosis.)
Posted on 2012-11-29 20:52:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin D Supplements and Constipation
Hi Ellen, thanks for your question. Vitamin D supplements in themsevles should not cause constipation, however, constipation can be a sign of extremely high levels of vitamin D. Do you have any of the other symptoms of vitamin D toxicity like nasea, or poor appetite? It seems unlikely as your levels of vitamin D are consistently low. Constipation can also be a sign that your calcium levels are too high, this would especially be true if you are taking vitamin D, and is a bit dangerous. Have your blood checked and work with your health care provider to determine the source of your constipation. As for a suggestion, have you tried cod liver oil? It can be a good source of vitamin D, hopefully without the consptiation.
Posted on 2012-11-29 23:22:43
Name:Qwerty
Location:EU
Subject:RE: Vitamin D Supplements and Constipation
@Ellen,Portland - constipation could be caused by magnesium deficiency. Your body needs magnesium to make use of the vit.D you're taking so if you're already low/deficient to begin with, taking vit.D will quickly deplete your body of magnesium and cause constipation.
Posted on 2012-11-29 23:25:18
Name:Dee Smith
Location:East London UK
Subject:My 2.5 year old has low Vit D levels that I am told may also be affecting his liver
Hi, I recently have noticed that my 2&1/2 year old seemed to be urinating very frequently 1 after another to the point where I thought he may have a urine infection. I took him to be tested, and they came back negative, a blood test has now been done which has come back with low levels of Vitamin D, and low liver function levels, could this be because of the lack of Vit D? He has been prescribed 1000mg of Baby D, but I don't know if this is sufficient or if there is anything else I can do? Does anybody else have any similar experiences with children?
Posted on 2012-11-29 23:28:58
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: My 2.5 year old has low Vit D levels that I am told may also be affecting his liver
Hi Dee, thanks for your question. Low liver function could lead to your son's vitamin D deficiency, but a vitamin D deficiency does not really affect the liver. During the wintertime, a lack of sunlight can also cause a deficiency of vitamin D. Try make sure your son gets more sun exposure on his skin! How much vitamin D does the Baby Vitamin D that you have provide? The tolerable upper limit of vitamin D for a boy your son's age is 2,500IU (international units) or 63mcg (micrograms). Check the label to be sure he is not getting more vitamin D than that.
Posted on 2012-11-29 23:40:12
Name:Kasia
Location:London, UK
Subject:Low Vitamin D and High Cholesterol
Hi, I just got my blood test results-my cholesterol is too high and my vit d is far too low. I don't know why? I eat healthy,avoid animal fats, eat plenty of friut and veg and huge amount of yogurts. I am confused of what should I eat now. Most of the foods high in vit d are increasing cholesterol levels as well.
Posted on 2012-12-01 08:12:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low Vitamin D and High Cholesterol
Hi Kasia, thanks for your question. Since vitamin D is fat soluble, people taking cholesterol lowering drugs can experience lowered vitamin D levels. High cholesterol can be caused by genetic factors, or a lack of exercise. For tips and ideas see the article on cholesterol lowering foods. Also, be sure you are avoiding all these high cholesterol foods. In regards to getting more vitamin D without eating cholesterol, try supplements. Getting plently of sunshine is also a great natural way to boost your vitamin D levels. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2012-12-01 08:47:20
Name:Kasia
Location:London,UK
Subject:RE: Low Vitamin D and High Cholesterol
Thanks!I just bought some vit d tablets, will try to have them every day. Also planning to buy yogurts and milk with vit d. Hope it helps. I am only 26 so am a bit worried. Have a good weekend everyone!
Posted on 2012-12-01 14:57:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low Vitamin D and High Cholesterol
Hi Kasia, that is great. Just remember to buy milk and yogurt that is low fat, or non-fat, to avoid cholesterol. Full fat milk and/or yogurt is high in cholesterol also! In regard to vitamin D, try not to worry. Vitamin D is something of a nutrition fad right now, and "healthy levels" of vitamin D are still being established. Likely you are ok. At your next blood test, check to make sure you calcium is not too high. Having high calcium, due to the vitamin D supplements, is not healthy either! Hope that helps, and have a good weekend too!
Posted on 2012-12-01 21:02:51
Name:Jeanette
Location:Florida
Subject:Vit D for my child
Hi, I went to the doctor today and he prescribed 10,000 IU of vit. D a day for my 19month old child. Should I be questioning this?
Posted on 2012-12-31 13:20:39
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vit D for my child
Hi Jeanette, thanks for your question. Unless your child has some other condition, like rickets, or is on chronic seizure medication, that dose does seem too high, particularly since the Office of Dietary Supplements states that the tolerable upper intake level of a child 1-3 years old is 2,500 IU. Seek a second opinion and watch for signs of vitamin D toxicity like weight loss and/or heart arrhythmias. Also, at your child's next blood test, check for elevated calcium levels.
Posted on 2012-12-31 13:56:47
Name:Mika
Location:Azerbaijan
Subject:Storage of vitamin D
Could you tell me how long body stores vitamin D? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-01-09 16:54:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:Storage of vitamin D
Hi Mika, thanks for your question. Vitamin D is fat soluble and can be stored in your body fat for months. However, if you do not get enough vitamin D, these stores will be used and can be low. So it does depend somewhat on diet and lifestyle factors. Crieghton University has created this great PDF to answer these and other vitamin D questions.
Posted on 2013-01-09 17:01:55
Name:Emine
Location:UK
Subject:Sun light through window
Is exposure to sun through the window as effetive as direct sunshine?
Posted on 2013-01-15 16:48:29
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Sun light through window
Hi Emine, thanks for your question. According to this study, various factors can reduce the synthesis of vitamin D (cholecalciferol), including sunlight through windows. Environmental factors which harm vitamin D synthesis include increased skin pigmentation, aging, sunscreen, latitude, time of day, season, and ozone pollution. For example, sunlight in the U.S. city of Boston from November to February will not result in any significant vitamin D manufacture.
Posted on 2013-01-15 16:57:25
Name:André
Location:Brasil
Subject:Algae
Hi, I think you should add microalgae oils to the list, as they are the source of vitamin D for FISH (fish cannot produce vitamin D from the sun like we do, so they get it from these microalgae).
Posted on 2013-01-15 20:15:01
Name:Terri
Location:Pittsburgh
Subject:Low Vitamin D levels, but High Calcium Levels
Recently I had to have blood work done and was told that my Vitamin D levels were low and my calcium levels were too high. For the past year I had been taking Vitamin D supplements but since Christmas have stopped taking them. Would this have affected my readings?
Posted on 2013-01-29 12:52:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low Vitamin D Levels, but High Calcium Levels
Hi Terri, it seems unlikely that stopping the supplements would have such an immediate effect. However, given your high calcium levels, stopping supplementation was likely the right thing to do. Too much calcium absorption can really be damaging. Vitamin D seems to be a nutrition fad these days, and what justifies a "normal" level is a matter of debate. However, as your level did not increase on supplements, you may want to take a look at what could be the cause of your low levels.
Posted on 2013-01-29 19:35:52
Name:Chrissie
Location:UK
Subject:Vitamin D and Severe Nausea
Hi there, I have a vitamin d level of 5.7 I have been prescribed Adcal-D3 that's 1500 mg/400 IU. I'm supposed to take these one tablet twice a day, but they make me so nauseous I can do nothing but lie down. I'm aged 64 and have stopped taking them, for that reason. I am trying to find foods to eat instead. Do you think my Vitamin D level is too low at my age to improve with just food and what little sunshine we get here in the UK, I'm very depressed with it, plus I also have Fibrmyalgia. Doctors in this country are only now starting to realize that we have a bid problem with Vit D deficiency. Regards, Chrissie.
Posted on 2013-02-03 17:31:32
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin D and Severe Nausea
Hi Chrissie, thanks for your questions and sorry to hear about the nausea, which is a possible side effect of vitamin D supplements. You might be able to raise your level with diet and sunshine, particularly if you focus on fortified foods like soymilk and cereal. Further, you could try reduce your vitamin D dose, maybe taking just 1 pill a day, or even half a pill. Unfortunately 400IU is about the smallest vitamin D supplement manufactured. Does the Adcal supplement you are taking also contain calcium? You could try another supplement which only provides vitamin D and see if that helps. Hope those thoughts help and good luck with finding a plan that works for you.
Posted on 2013-02-03 17:39:53
Name:Tam
Location:Melbourne, Australia
Subject:Vitamin D and Acne
Hi, Very helpful article. About a year ago, I had a blood test done and found that my vitamin d levels were very low. I was prescribed three vitamin d capsules a day until my levels reached a normal number.

However, I have found that whenever I take vitamin d supplements for more than a couple of days, my skin breaks out very badly. I usually only get hormonal pimples but the breakouts I get from vitamin d supplements are much worse and more painful. As soon as I stop taking the supplements, the breakouts calm down and my skin goes back to normal.

I was instructed to take liquid vitamin d to see if this was any better but unfortunately I am experiencing the same problem. The breakouts are not as bad as when I take the capsules but are still quite painful.

Are there any other ways I can increase my vitamin d levels? I have dark skin and am vegetarian (lacto-ovo) so I suspect this is contributing to my low levels as well. Thank you in advance.

Posted on 2013-03-15 19:38:59
Name:Cynch
Location:Canada
Subject:Low Vitamin D and Kidney Stone Risk
Results of my blood test came in today and my doctor notified me that my Vitamin D is quite low and instructed me to take 2 tablets of any over the counter Vitamin D supplement. Late last year, I had a kidney stone removed. What would my risk be now having to take Vitamin D supplements on having another occurrence of a painful kidney stone?
Posted on 2013-04-03 15:35:00
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low Vitamin D and Kidney Stone Risk
Hi Cynch, thanks for your question. It would depend on what caused your kidney stones before. If your vitamin D is low, it is unlikely vitamin D was the cause. However, taking vitamin D supplements would only increase your risk of kidney stones. Consider calling and consulting your doctor about it, if you haven't already.
Posted on 2013-04-04 00:00:47
Name:Yoshi
Location:Dietetic student UNH
Subject:Kidneys Activate vitamin D, and you need to eat fat to absorb vitamin D
After reading all the comments and answers I have something to add. First of all it is the kidneys that activate Vit D. So if the kidneys are not functioning properly the Vit D from food or supplements can not be used by the body. There is one type of activated Vit D supplement that can be purchased and is often prescribe to people with Chronic Kidney Disease. Also if you eat low fat yogurt you will not absorb the Vit D unless you are eating fat with it. Nuts are a good source of fat without the cholesterol. So adding walnuts or any other type of nuts can increase the body's ability to absorb Vit D.
Posted on 2013-04-10 02:57:12
Name:Jessica Hallam
Location:Chicago
Subject:Low vitamin D and prescribed 50,000 IU
I recently had my blood checked and was told that my vitamin D was 18. My doctor prescribed 50,000 IU per day for 12 days. I am concerned taking this level. Isn't there a more natural way of correcting my level? Also I don't swallow pills well. Is there a liquid alternative?
Posted on 2013-04-10 10:19:42
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low vitamin D and prescribed 50,000 IU
Hi Jessica, thanks for your question. It seems like vitamin D is currently a health fad. Ten years ago, vitamin D was hardly tested and treated, however, due to recent studies, it has come to attention. Not to contradict your doctor, but you probably do not need to take the vitamin D he/she prescribed. Exposure to natural sunshine is the best way to boost your vitamin D level. Winter is ending in Chicago and the days will get longer. This alone should boost your vitamin D level. If you want, you can stop taking the supplements, and talk to your doctor about getting your level checked in summer. You can also just wait till your checkup next year, and go in summer and see if your vitamin D level is better. Frankly 50,000 IU units a day is a very high dose, though it is not uncommon. Side effects of high vitamin D include kidney stones and even heart disease. If you wish you continue the dose, liquid forms are available. Here is one from Amazon.com. However, consult your doctor about lowering your dose, or stopping supplements, till this summer or the next. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-04-11 00:04:33
Name:Suzanne
Location:New York
Subject:Sun Allergy
Hi- I too was recently diagnosed with extreme vitamin D deficiency, and I was prescribed 50,000 IUs 3 times a week for 1 month. I would like to get more D naturally but I have an allergic reaction to sunlight (my mother had the same- hives and swelling alleviated by antihistamine pills). I also have very low calcium intake due to dairy allergies. I'd like to find the way to increase these two which is kindest to my body since the two main methods of getting them naturally are not available to me. Am I just left with taking pills? How can I figure a good dosage from foods (such as salmon, etc)? I am looking for a long term plan to gain healthy levels.
Posted on 2013-04-11 15:13:45
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Sun Allergy
Hi Suzanne, thanks for your questions. Besides cod liver oil, and fish, fortified foods are the best source for boosting your vitamin D levels. This is not exactly a "natural" way to boost your levels, but is still better than pills. Fortified cereal and soy milk may be great options for you. As for calcium, there are many high calcium foods besides dairy foods you can try. They include almonds, green leafy vegetables, and fish. Hope those ideas help you make a good long term plan for healthy vitamin D and calcium levels.
Posted on 2013-04-12 00:23:44
Name:Whisperingsage
Location:N CA
Subject:Vit D and cholesterol
OK, the author hs a lot right but then some very biggies wrong too. Cholesterol is not only high in oysters, it is high in caviar, and high in cold water fish and high in liver, and high in eggs, and high in cod liver oil. The lesson here is that cholesterol is an Essential nutrient, contrary to popular belief. Please read up on this. Cholesterol is an important health giving nutrient.
Posted on 2013-04-17 15:54:27
Name:Kip
Subject:Sun
This is a nice overview of the best sources of Vitamin D though the intake of food, but I do miss the #1 source of Vitamin D, which is sunlight! 90% of the Vitamin D is produced in the skin after sunlight exposure!
Posted on 2013-05-13 07:50:34
Name:LetThemEatCaviar
Subject:6 ounces of caviar
That's how much you would need to eat to get the recommended daily allowance of vitamin D. -- not only would this be expensive but it would be awfully high in salt content. A better recommendation might be sushi grade fish roe, but even so I don't think it would be practical to eat enough to make a substantial dent in your daily Vitamin D requirements. Hopefully people are smart enough to think for themselves & aren't downing large amounts of caviar daily based on your advice.
Posted on 2013-05-17 02:15:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: 6 ounces of caviar
Thanks for your comment. You are right that people should not try to get 100% of their DV from caviar, or fish eggs (roe), alone. (Though there are places in the world where people might eat such a quantity of fish eggs.) However, caviar can be part of a diet to get more vitamin D and guide people in their food choices. You do not need to get 100% of your vitamin D from any one food source, particularly if you get 10-20 minutes of sunlight a day. Thanks again for your comment and clarifying this point.
Posted on 2013-05-17 10:57:44
Name:Anerb
Location:Ireland
Subject:Sunlight and Sunscreen
Many thanks for all your advice. With regard to sunshine, can I assume that you mean sunshine without wearing sunscreen?
Posted on 2013-07-14 17:19:17
Name:Ruby
Location:WI
Subject:Precancerous mole
I just had a precancerous mole removed from my face. My doctor told me to use sunblock every day to prevent myself from getting skin cancer. Now I use sunblock and sunscreen all the time, but I am now afraid of getting no vitamin D from the sun and getting other types of deseases. I do not know what to do.
Posted on 2013-07-14 19:41:39
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Sunlight and Sunscreen
Hi Anerb and Ruby, thanks for your questions. While sunscreen does interfere with vitamin D production from sunlight, it may not interfere enough to matter. This study in Australia found that sun screen did not affect vitmain D levels over the long term. If you are deficient in vitamin D, you would maximize creation of vitamin D by avoiding sun screen, but it would not be worth it if it causes your skin to become burned, or increases your skin cancer risk. The bottom line is: wear sun screen.
Posted on 2013-07-15 11:18:42
Name:Dave Black
Location:New Zealand, Queenstown
Subject:University of Illinois, Chicago 1928 and Vitamin D Toxicity
Just finished reading an article about when the US Government commissioned this University to do research on Vitamin D toxicity. They conducted studies of 773 people and 63 dogs over 7 years with quantities of Vit D at 1 million IU per typical woman weighing 110lbs... they concluded that this Vitamin was no way toxic. In fact over the 7 years no one even died. During the 1920's and 30's everyone was taking this Vit D in huge quantities and the hospitals were virtually empty due to Vit D's amazing effects on fighting disease in the human body. Naturally, the huge Pharmo companies were losing billions of dollars every year as less and less people were getting sick. Needless to say they have been trying to ban it ever since and the pathetic quantities in Vitamin tablets these days is due to their lobbying the politicians. Cancer fighting drugs are mainly Vit D's of around 50,000 IU's plus a filler which tells you how effective Vit D is at fighting the worst of diseases. The only thing with taking high doses of Vit D is to make sure you also take adequate vitamin K2 I think this is to stop the calcification of stones etc... however you will need to look into all this for yourselves. So the only question here is who to trust, the huge money making pharmo companies or a medical university who only care is to be professional and accurate with their findings? Thanks and hope I helped.
Posted on 2013-07-15 11:27:55
Name:Continuous Supply Better
Subject:My opinion on the large dose vitamin D supplement
Just my opinion about taking one huge dose of vitamin D once a week. I think its better to maintain a constant/continuous supply of anything daily, rather than one overdose. Our bodies are incredibly intelligent and resilient, however the unwritten rule is don't consume anything in a quantity you wouldn't get in one meal. As with vitamin C, our bodies take what is needed and passes what it doesn't. As with proteins, our bodies take what it needs right now and lets the rest go. I just think our bodies are programmed to manage what we consume on a meal by meal basis, and if you overdose on something our bodies aren't programmed to know what to do, it'll just pass it through. I think its healthier to take smaller quantities daily and take half hour walks in the sun. I make an elixir/superman drink every night to make sure my body is getting its omega 3's, 6's, vitamins and minerals. Just my opinion, I'm not a doctor but like playing one w my gf. LOL.
Posted on 2013-08-08 00:56:06
Name:Eileen
Location:New Jersey
Subject:Heart Palpitations from D3
I have been taking 1000 IU of vitamin D3 for about six months. For the past several weeks I have been getting disturbing heart palpitations every day. My primary doctor told me to cut out caffeine which I did but after well over a week they still persisted. I was so concerned I made an appt with a cardiologist. Since d3 was the only supplement I was taking I stopped it and within two days the palpitations are completely gone. Is it possible to get enough vitamin D in food since it's not always possible to get sun exposure? Thanks!
Posted on 2013-08-08 01:01:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Heart Palpitations from D3
Hi Eileen, thanks for your question. Theoretically, you can get all the vitamin D you need from foods, if you eat 100% of the daily value (100% DV). However, vitamin D is still little understood, and as the Office of Dietary Supplements states: "Optimal serum (blood) concentrations of 25(OH)D for bone and general health have not been established..." Basically, we don't know how much vitamin D a person should have in their blood. For now, you are probably best not taking the supplement for a while, and trying sunlight and natural foods to keep your vitamin D level where your doctor wants it. You might benefit by having a talk with your doctor about what the best blood level of vitamin D for you is, and go from there.
Posted on 2013-08-08 01:18:55
Name:Eileen
Location:Colonia
Subject:Heart palpitations from D3
Thanks so much for your advice. Have you heard of people getting heart palpitations from D3? Why would this happen? The same thing happened to my brother and he stopped taking it. However, he was taking 2000 IU daily and he was always in the sun.
Posted on 2013-08-09 21:10:59
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Heart palpitations from D3
Hi Eileen, thanks for your comment. The Office of Dietary Supplements confirms that high vitamin D intake (toxicity) can lead to heart arrhythmias and/or palpitations. As a guess, it could be that vitamin D affects calcium absorption, and therefore, the body's electrolyte balance, and control of the heartbeat.
Posted on 2013-08-10 00:58:58
Name:Tina
Subject:Is the vitamin D supplement really a healthy option?
I went to check my bloodwork recently and I found that my levels of vitamin D are low. The doctor advised that I take vitamins and now I am wondering if vitamins are not as healthy as I thought. Vitamins are processed and processed food is unhealthy. Is that true?
Posted on 2013-08-20 12:41:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Is the vitamin D supplement really a healthy option?
Hi Tina, thanks for your question. Vitamin D supplements can be dangerous if taken in excess by causing too much calcium to be absorbed into your body. A vitamin supplement is not really a food per-say, and while it is best to get all your vitamins, and nutrients the natural way, if your doctor prescribes a supplement, you might try it till your vitamin D level gets a bit better. That said, vitamin D supplementation is a relatively new phenomenon and something of a fad. Waiting a few more years to take it could also be an option. The choice is yours, talk more with your doctor about it, and maybe try a lighter dose than what he/she is recommending if you feel the current amount is too high. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-08-20 15:15:14
Name:Ann
Location:North Carolina
Subject:Causes for Vitamin D Deficiency
I have always gotten plenty of sunshine (maybe too much) since I live in the South and enjoy outdoor activities. I eat 2 eggs/day, drink milk, eat fish, take a multi-vitamin and calcium that also contains D-3. I'm also on a seizure medicine so I take extra levels of Calcium.

When 4 spots of basal cell carcinoma appeared in May 2013, my doctor ran several tests and discovered that I was deficient in Vitamin D. Based on my sun exposure and dietary habits, how does one develop Vitamin D deficiencies?

Posted on 2013-10-02 13:11:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Causes for Vitamin D Deficiency
Hi Ann, thanks for your question. In your situation it is likely your seizure medication which is causing your vitamin D deficiency. Check the section of this article under "People at Risk of a Vitamin D Deficiency" to find the referred section "Medicines used to control and stabalize epileptic seizures, particularly phenobarbital and phenytoin (brand name Dilantin®) interferes with Vitamin D and reduces Calcium absorption."

The Office of Dietary Supplements states that vitamin D deficiencies can "occur when usual intake is lower than recommended levels over time, exposure to sunlight is limited, the kidneys cannot convert 25(OH)D to its active form, or absorption of vitamin D from the digestive tract is inadequate. Vitamin D-deficient diets are associated with milk allergy, lactose intolerance, ovo-vegetarianism, and veganism."

Posted on 2013-10-03 02:52:07
Name:Abi
Location:Laurel, MD
Subject:Over the counter vs prescribed high dose Vitamin D suppliment
Over the counter/ prescribed Vitamin D suppliment Message: My primary Dr just prescribed 50,000IU's of vitamin D once weekly due to my low level of vitamin D.My question is should I go ahead and buy an over the counter vitamin D supplement of 1000IU and use it daily together with code liver oil( how long should I take both) or should I get the one prescribed.
Posted on 2013-10-05 16:23:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Over the counter vs prescribed high dose Vitamin D suppliment
Hi Abi, thanks for your question. The problem with vitamin D therapy is that if the dose is too small then vitamin D levels will not improve, but if the dose is too high, then the risk of hypercalcemia (too much blood calcium), kidney stones, etc...comes into play. As a general guideline it is best to start with a low daily dose over the counter and see if your vitamin D levels improve after 3-6 months. If they don't, then you can consider risking a higher dose of vitamin D. Share your plan for a low over the counter daily dose with your doctor. If he/she really insists on the high dose, ask why, and if the reasons are not compelling, get a second opinion from another doctor, before risking the side effects of a high dose. There are some cases when a high dose really needs to be administered, but if you have a vitamin D deficiency with no other symptoms, then starting with a low daily over the counter dose should be fine. Here is an interesting study comparing low and high dose vitamin D therapy. The full study can be downloaded as a pdf by click on "Full Text PDF". Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-06 05:11:38
Name:Sue
Location:NY
Subject:Vegetable Based Vitamin D Supplement?
Does a vitamin D supplement that is vegetable based work as well as the others?
Posted on 2013-10-19 17:46:16
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vegetable Based Vitamin D Supplement?
Hi Sue, thanks for your question. There have not been any studies on the effectiveness of different vitamin D supplements, and the size of the dose is probably the most important factor to absorption. That said, vegetable based vitamin D supplements should be fine.
Posted on 2013-10-20 04:07:01
Name:Farhan Shafi
Location:Pakistan
Subject:What time of day is best for Vitamin D from Sunshine?
Hello, my question is what time of day is best for sun exposure to maximize creation of vitamin D?
Posted on 2013-10-20 14:43:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: What time of day is best for Vitamin D from Sunshine?
Hi Farhan, thanks for your question. This study suggests that mid-day or 12:00 (noon) is the best time to get sunlight, both for manufacture of vitamin D and to minimize the risk of skin cancer. From that, try to get a lot of sun exposure around noon, 20 minutes should be all you need. Be careful of sunburn!
Posted on 2013-10-20 16:47:45
Name:Abi Adebiyi
Location:Laurel, MD
Subject:Vitamin D and Cod liver
Thanks for your response. My question is can I combine a vitamin D supplement of 1000 IU and cod liver oil daily?
Posted on 2013-10-24 11:43:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin D and Cod liver
Hi Abi, thanks for your question. Taking 1000IU of vitamin D with cod liver oil will be fine. Just keep in mind that 1 tablespoon of cod liver oil provides 1360IU of vitamin D, so you would be in effect taking 2360IU of vitamin D daily, or however much more cod liver oil you consume. It is fine to combine them as long as your vitamin D level does not go too high.
Posted on 2013-10-24 16:45:36
Name:Sandi
Location:New York
Subject:Just prescribed 50,000IUs, what to do?
My vitamin D level is 16 my doctor prescribed 50,000IUs. I don't know if I should take it, so many side effects, please tell me if I should...
Posted on 2013-10-30 07:23:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Just prescribed 50,000IUs, what to do?
Hi Sandi, thanks for your question. Do you have osteoporosis or a calcium deficiency? If not, ask your doctor to prescribe a smaller dose of 1000-3000IUs daily. Say you want to start with that and see how your level improves. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-31 07:59:31
Name:Garrett
Location:Canada
Subject:Mushrooms and Vitamin D
I'd like to put in this note. You say that button mushrooms contain the most vitamin D. This is not fully correct. Suncharged Shiitake Mushrooms contain significantly more Vitamin D2 than button mushrooms do.

I quote: "In the summer of 2004, mycologist Paul Stamets discovered that the level of vitamin D in freshly picked, indoor- grown shiitake mushrooms rose from 110 IU (international units) to an astonishing 46,000 IU per 100 grams when the mushrooms were placed outdoors in the sun for just six hours with the gills facing up (when the gills were facing down, the level rose to 10,900 IU)." Source.

Also, in regards to how many IU's of Vitamin D people ought to be taking, it's actually recommended by more and more healthcare professionals, to actually be taking ~1000 IU's per 25 pounds of body weight, since most people are VASTLY deficient in Vitamin D, and it's used in so many of our body's processes. Definitely is something that more people would do well to add more of to their nutritional spectrum.

Also, the RDA DV of 400 IU's of Vit D is extremely low, and is actually rather unhealthy - I'd say it's one of the causes of the lethargy, dis-ease, and depression. Hence why amounts more along the lines of 1000 IU's per 25 lbs of body weight are far more realistic. :)

Posted on 2013-10-31 10:01:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Mushrooms and Vitamin D
Hi Garrett, thanks for sharing the information about the sun charged mushrooms, very interesting. In regards to vitamin D intakes and normal vitamin D levels it is important to note that it is a controversial topic. There have been no studies to confirm high intakes or having a high level is necessarily healthy, or that it won't have bad side effects in the long term. If you would like to share any studies which say the opposite please do so. Not saying you are wrong, you are right that there is growing support for taking more vitamin D, but nutrition fads have come and gone before, and right now, rigorous studies on high vitamin D intakes are lacking.
Posted on 2013-10-31 10:13:49
Name:Kathy Lowenberg
Location:Jersey City
Subject:The source of the best vitamin D
The best source of vitamin D is the SUN. Soak in the sun for an average of 20 minutes every day for 365 days and you will . When your vitamin d will reach the optimum level, the aches and pains will go away.

UV-A and UV- B rays of the sun are NOT harmful. UV- C and UV - D, the harmful rays of the sun DO NOT REACH THE earth.

So embrace the sun and live a good life.

Posted on 2013-11-14 18:19:51
Name:Nick
Location:Brisbane, Australia
Subject:Sun vs Food as Vit D source
Firstly, thank you for this brilliant website!

Here's something my doctor told me: even if you get enough Vit D from food the body still needs some sunshine on bare skin (no sunscreen) to activate it. The trick though is to get enough sunshine to make the D work, without risking skin damage.

It appears the amount of exposure needed is about half what it would take to turn you pink. So in the Australian Summer, 3 minutes a day is enough for Vit D and no sunburn :)

Have also learnt that when the sun is less than 50 degrees above the horizon the part of the UV that we need for Vit D can't get through the atmosphere. Which is why in midwinter, even if the sun is shining, in many places it is too low in the sky and deficiency develops. Sitting by a window is also useless a the glass cuts out the part of the UV that we need (but you can still get sunburnt through the glass).

And you should avoid a shower for some hours after the sun or you wash off the Vit D (or at least, its precursor) before it can be absorbed into the body.

And it also seems Vit K2 and Vit A need to be in the right proportions with the D or it can't work properly.

Posted on 2013-11-29 22:09:38
Name:Pharmacist
Location:BC
Subject:Vitamin D3 and Supplements
A little advice to those taking supplements, make sure your taking Vit D3 and not any other form. D3 is better absorbed (3 times better than D2 for example) and it is the natural form. Also recent data suggests if your taking high doses of d to also take Vit k2 with it as k2 helps your body to make the most of the D.
Posted on 2013-12-07 10:08:27
Name:Kassa
Location:Canada
Subject:Fatty Liver and Vitamin D deficient
I have non-alcoholic fatty liver. I also have a Vitamin D and Calcium deficient. I was told to watch my diet to protect my liver this makes it hard to get Vitamin D from food, I almost don’t eat any fat. And I live in very cold part of the world no sun for most of the year. I start taking supplement but I heard supplement tablets could be harmful for liver. Can you please tell me how I can get vitamin D And calcium?
Posted on 2014-01-12 01:22:02
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fatty Liver and Vitamin D deficient
Hi Kassa, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your situation. It is true that it is going to be tough for you to get vitamin D, however, one thing you can try is a lamp which simulates sunlight and studies show can help your skin to generate vitamin D when exposed. There are various types on the market, or your doctor may recommend one to you. As for calcium there are many low fat high calcium foods such as broccoli, bok choy, and non-fat milk/yogurt.
Posted on 2014-01-12 06:13:28
Name:Quanito
Location:USA
Subject:Deficient in Vit D even though I am out in the sun!
Hi, I am a mail carrier, 59 years old. I work out in sunny day almost 5-hr daily, also I am lactose intolerant. Still, my blood test results still show I am deficient in vit D (39.6 nmol/L which is less than 75.0 nmol/L that the US National Kidney Foundation established). My family doctor prescribed 2000/3000 units of Vit D3 /daily for 3-months.
So do you think it will bring me back to being a normal healthy person? Thanks!
Posted on 2014-01-12 23:36:42
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Deficient in Vit D even though I am out in the sun!
Hi Quanito, thanks for sharing your experience. The supplements should help you, and it would be great if you come back in 3 months and let us all know! Hope it goes well.
Posted on 2014-01-15 15:02:29
Name:Ree
Location:Canada
Subject:Is Vitamin D without Calcium ok?
Thanks for the great info on this site! Is it necessary to take Vitamin D and Calcium together? For example, when taking vitamin D supplements, also take calcium supplements... Or is it okay just to take the vitamin D supplements without taking calcium supplements? Thanks!
Posted on 2014-01-27 14:09:44
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Is Vitamin D without Calcium ok?
Hi Ree, thanks for your question. Whether or not you need to take calcium depends on your condition and goals. Are you trying to boost your calcium absorption, or just your vitamin D level? In either case, taking vitamin D alone is fine and it will increase your vitamin D and calcium levels either way. If you really need a lot of calcium you can take both together, but be careful of absorbing too much calcium which can lead to kidney stones or heart disease.
Posted on 2014-01-28 15:39:16
Name:Maz
Location:United Kingdom
Subject:Vit D3 Important Note
After doing a great deal of reading on the subject of D3 supplementation, I am of the firm belief that the vast majority of people living in the northern hemisphere, will benefit greatly by this. Even in sunnier latitudes many folk cover up due to the fear of sun damage, and our modern diet does not help a great deal in maintaining even low levels of D3. I myself take 5000iu daily, which I believe is a sensible level combined with with a moderately healthy diet. It is however important to understand how D3 works in relation to Calcium absorption when taking supplements. To put it simply the D3 encourages calcium absorption by our tissues/bones, but very importantly Vit K2 is necessary to direct the calcium where it is needed. This prevents build up in arteries and kidneys. So to sum up, yes maintain high levels of D3, preferably by safe sun or tanning machine, or if supplementing, also take vit K2 (100-150 mg day).
Posted on 2014-02-18 07:15:28
Name:Marcia
Location:Pennsylvania
Subject:Vitamin D Supplements and Body Pain
Lab results stated that I was low in vitamin D and bone density test stated that I needed a calcium supplement. I stated taking a combined supplement of 1200 mg of calcium plus 1000 IU of vitamin D. After 1 month I started to get restless leg syndrome. The pain got so bad it was even effecting my walking during the day. I am fairly an active 65 yr old woman. I work out at the gym at least 3 or 4 days a week. Recently I thought I was getting the stomach flu and I stopped taking the supplement for about a week. My pain suddenly left me. Not only in the day but also at night. I hate to start these pills again. What is your suggestion.
Posted on 2014-02-20 11:25:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin D Supplements and Body Pain
Hi Marcia, thanks for your question. It sounds like the supplements are not worth the pain for you. Do you lift weights when you go to the gym? Weight lifting can be an effective method of strengthening bones. Talk to your doctor about trying alternative therapies for bone density. This can include taking only vitamin D, weight lifting exercises, or other medications like bisphosphonates. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2014-02-20 18:46:27

Post a comment.
Name:          
Location:       
Email:(Optional)
Subject:         

Spam Prevention *(REQUIRED):
Enter the last three letters of this sentence.
Comments.
Name:Jim Moomaw
Location:Rochester, New York
Subject:Vitamin D Toxicity
Hi, I am concerned that you put 10,000 iu as a toxicity level for Vitamin D. I have been taking 10,000 iu daily for month and my vitamin D levels are only mid range. I weight 165 lbs. My Dr. commented that I am one of the few people who are not Vitamin D deficient in his group of patients.

I believe you should adjust this amount to a much higher number.

I love the website...informative and well done. -Jim

Posted on 2012-04-19 09:11:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin D Toxicity
Hi Jim, thanks for bringing up an important point. The toxicity range of vitamin D (10,000-40,000 IU) is set for most people, however, there are exceptions. As you are working with your doctor who has prescribed the supplements, and you are monitoring your blood levels of vitamin D, it makes sense for you to take such a high level.

However, the toxicity level for vitamin D is set by the Institute of Medicine and is based on analysis of a variety of studies. The Institute of Medicine which set Tolerable Upper Limits states: "Very high levels of vitamin D (above 10,000 IUs per day) are known to cause kidney and tissue damage."Ref

Given these valid health risks, most people should not consume more than 4,000IU (100mcg) of vitamin D, unless under guidance of a doctor or other health care professional.

Posted on 2012-04-19 12:20:35
Name:Kim
Subject:Kidney Stones
If you do not get enough vitamin D will this cause you to get kidney stones due to too much calcium?
Posted on 2012-05-07 20:33:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Kidney Stones
Hi Kim, thanks for your question. Actually too much vitamin D can cause you to increase calcium absorption and increase your risk of kidney stones. One study found that post-menopausal women taking 1,000 mg/day of calcium supplements and 400IU/day of vitamin D supplements experienced a 17% higher chance of developing kidney stones over 7 years.Ref
Posted on 2012-05-07 23:29:06
Name:Joe
Location:New York
Subject:Kidney Failure
My chld has very bad kidneys, could this be from vitamin D?
Posted on 2012-05-16 21:29:04
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Kidney Failure
Hi Joe, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your son's condition. Vitamin D deficiency has not been associated with causing kidney failure, however, having chronic (long term) kidney disease can lead to a vitamin D deficiency.Ref In other words, low vitamin D does not cause kidney disease, but kidney disease can cause low vitamin D. Very high amounts of vitamin D can increase chances of kidney stones, but this does not appear to be an issue with your son. Hope that information helps and your son quickly recovers.
Posted on 2012-05-17 02:55:20
Name:Latoya
Location:Virginia
Subject:Vitamin D Deficiency
I recently had lab work done because I have been having muscle aches and my bones click and pop every time I move. I am only 30 years old but I have a poor diet and I am always covered up because I am cold. My test resluts cam back and my vitamin D level was 7.8 way below the minimal range of 30. I'm always tired and I'm very afraid something else could be going on. I went to a doctor for the first time and all he said was buy some over the counter vitamin d and come back in six months. I guess my questions is how much vitamin d should I be taking? What's the best source for me?
Posted on 2012-07-15 19:22:33
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin D Deficiency
Hi Latoya, thanks for your question. To raise your levels of vitamin D, try to get at least 20 minutes of sunlight a day, and eat the foods high in vitamin D listed here. You can also take a supplement. Start with 1000IU of vitamin D3 a day, and see how your level changes after 6 months. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-07-16 02:37:19
Name:Teresa
Location:Virginia
Subject:Malabsorption
I had gastric bypass 17 years ago and now I'm having major issues with my Vitamin D levels. It seems I'm not having any luck on getting my levels back up. I've tried eating the right kinds of foods, prescription vitamin D and sun light, but nothing seems to be enough. What else is there?
Posted on 2012-07-31 06:28:36
Name:Leslie Gon
Location:Lincoln, CA
Subject:Allergic Reactions to Vitamin D
Having a Vit. D deficiency, my doctor prescribed 50,000 IU Vitamin D 1 pill a week twice. I broke out in a severe case of a rash which was diagnosed originally as scabies and I went through the whole nightmare regiment of that. It took 4 mos. to determine the allergy was to D. Now I am trying to get the D naturally through food intake. I live in "sunny" CA but for whatever reason do not absorb enough D through the sun. I was thinking about getting organic Vit. D pills.
Posted on 2012-08-23 17:19:58
Name:Sue
Location:WI
Subject:Vit D deficiency
Recent lab work indicated I am very Vitamin D deficient + I suffer from muscle, joint aches and pain. I eat salmon, tuna, mushrooms, cheese all good things for me, I was given a 50,000U rx to take only one every other week - my question is how long before I start to feel better?

I work inside 40 hrs a week and try to get out into the sun whenever I can - I am really pushing myself most days just to stay upright and not having any cartwheel days, heck most days I am not even able to accomplish a summersault. I might be able to get down there but can't roll around like a normal person should.

I don't get the dosing logic behind taking 50,000U every other week for a lab result of 7 when I know people with the results of 24 taking the same dose every week. Either???? The only difference is they are much older than I am - does age affect doseage too?

Posted on 2012-08-27 16:05:13
Name:LaDonna
Location:Texas
Subject:Just Wondering
My Dr. just put me on 50000 units of D. 1 CAPSULE A WEEK. Just wondering if this is absorbed into the body slowly? Thank you.
Posted on 2012-11-09 16:19:34
Name:Deb
Location:Central Coast, CA
Subject:Vit D Supplements
I too, like LaDonna of Texas, take 1 pill of 50,000 units of Vit D. I noticed no response to her question of whether or not it can cause potential damage. I am diagnosed with Diabetes 2 due to vitamin D deficiency. Would it be better for me to take a daily dosage of 7,000 units since I drink lots of water (one of the symptoms of Diabetes) and worry that I may be flushing my weekly dosage too soon. Please respond.
Posted on 2012-11-10 15:07:54
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vit D Supplements
Hi Deb, thanks for your question. Taking 50,000 IU once a week should be fine, but after 6 months, may start to cause damage. To be safe, do not take any calcium supplements while taking that much vitamin D. There is no standard way to supplement vitamin D, a doctor is likely to start with a mild dosage and then get more aggressive depending on your levels. 50,000 IU of vitamin D has even been subscribed on a daily basis, but usually this aggressive plan of supplementation will not last more than a month. Taking 7000 IU daily may be better, but it depends. Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin, meaning drinking water will not affect your vitamin D levels. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-11-10 22:38:43
Name:Nicki
Location:San Francisco, CA
Subject:Psoriasis and Oral Vitamin D
Hi, I have a mild case of psoriasis, but it's very unpleasant as it mainly affects my scalp (itchy, painful, and ugly - but treated with steroid shampoo it clears up quickly). When I was first diagnosed, my dermatologist explained that people with psoriasis are unable to absorb vitamin D by ingesting it orally, and can ONLY get D from the sun or topical creams. Anything taken orally will go in and come right out without being absorbed by the body. Now, this week, I went in to get my prescription refilled, and spoke with new doctor who told me to up my oral ingestion of vitamin D (to 4,000-10,000 IU, but that's not important). And of course, I brought up what my previous dermatologist told me. The new doctor basically said that the thinking on that issue has changed due to new research, but I couldn't tell if this was fact or theory. Is that true? Could upping my oral ingestion of D help with my psoriasis?
Posted on 2012-11-29 01:01:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Psoriasis and Oral Vitamin D
Hi Nicki, thanks for your comment. There are studies which suggest that oral vitamin D is a valid treatment for Psoriasis. Vitamin D seems to be more and more prominent in medical thinking and nutrition studies these days. Time will reveal its efficacy and power as a nutrient and supplement for all the current proposed benefits. For now, you probably want the oral supplement to be supplementary to your current treatment.
Posted on 2012-11-29 01:24:36
Name:Ellen
Location:Portland
Subject:Vitamin D Supplements and Constipation
I have struggled for several years with very low vitamin D levels (ranging as low as 20 for several years at a time.) I am 56, so post-menopausal. I have tried daily over-the-counter vitamin D supplements in varying amounts, and they are all uniformly constipating for me -- I can feel my bowel/colon "shutting-down" and I have to use Miralax to get unconstipated! My body does not seem able to adjust. Do you have any suggestion? Should I try a prescription dosage, but once a week? (I am also on alendronate sodium for osteoporosis.)
Posted on 2012-11-29 20:52:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin D Supplements and Constipation
Hi Ellen, thanks for your question. Vitamin D supplements in themsevles should not cause constipation, however, constipation can be a sign of extremely high levels of vitamin D. Do you have any of the other symptoms of vitamin D toxicity like nasea, or poor appetite? It seems unlikely as your levels of vitamin D are consistently low. Constipation can also be a sign that your calcium levels are too high, this would especially be true if you are taking vitamin D, and is a bit dangerous. Have your blood checked and work with your health care provider to determine the source of your constipation. As for a suggestion, have you tried cod liver oil? It can be a good source of vitamin D, hopefully without the consptiation.
Posted on 2012-11-29 23:22:43
Name:Qwerty
Location:EU
Subject:RE: Vitamin D Supplements and Constipation
@Ellen,Portland - constipation could be caused by magnesium deficiency. Your body needs magnesium to make use of the vit.D you're taking so if you're already low/deficient to begin with, taking vit.D will quickly deplete your body of magnesium and cause constipation.
Posted on 2012-11-29 23:25:18
Name:Dee Smith
Location:East London UK
Subject:My 2.5 year old has low Vit D levels that I am told may also be affecting his liver
Hi, I recently have noticed that my 2&1/2 year old seemed to be urinating very frequently 1 after another to the point where I thought he may have a urine infection. I took him to be tested, and they came back negative, a blood test has now been done which has come back with low levels of Vitamin D, and low liver function levels, could this be because of the lack of Vit D? He has been prescribed 1000mg of Baby D, but I don't know if this is sufficient or if there is anything else I can do? Does anybody else have any similar experiences with children?
Posted on 2012-11-29 23:28:58
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: My 2.5 year old has low Vit D levels that I am told may also be affecting his liver
Hi Dee, thanks for your question. Low liver function could lead to your son's vitamin D deficiency, but a vitamin D deficiency does not really affect the liver. During the wintertime, a lack of sunlight can also cause a deficiency of vitamin D. Try make sure your son gets more sun exposure on his skin! How much vitamin D does the Baby Vitamin D that you have provide? The tolerable upper limit of vitamin D for a boy your son's age is 2,500IU (international units) or 63mcg (micrograms). Check the label to be sure he is not getting more vitamin D than that.
Posted on 2012-11-29 23:40:12
Name:Kasia
Location:London, UK
Subject:Low Vitamin D and High Cholesterol
Hi, I just got my blood test results-my cholesterol is too high and my vit d is far too low. I don't know why? I eat healthy,avoid animal fats, eat plenty of friut and veg and huge amount of yogurts. I am confused of what should I eat now. Most of the foods high in vit d are increasing cholesterol levels as well.
Posted on 2012-12-01 08:12:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low Vitamin D and High Cholesterol
Hi Kasia, thanks for your question. Since vitamin D is fat soluble, people taking cholesterol lowering drugs can experience lowered vitamin D levels. High cholesterol can be caused by genetic factors, or a lack of exercise. For tips and ideas see the article on cholesterol lowering foods. Also, be sure you are avoiding all these high cholesterol foods. In regards to getting more vitamin D without eating cholesterol, try supplements. Getting plently of sunshine is also a great natural way to boost your vitamin D levels. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2012-12-01 08:47:20
Name:Kasia
Location:London,UK
Subject:RE: Low Vitamin D and High Cholesterol
Thanks!I just bought some vit d tablets, will try to have them every day. Also planning to buy yogurts and milk with vit d. Hope it helps. I am only 26 so am a bit worried. Have a good weekend everyone!
Posted on 2012-12-01 14:57:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low Vitamin D and High Cholesterol
Hi Kasia, that is great. Just remember to buy milk and yogurt that is low fat, or non-fat, to avoid cholesterol. Full fat milk and/or yogurt is high in cholesterol also! In regard to vitamin D, try not to worry. Vitamin D is something of a nutrition fad right now, and "healthy levels" of vitamin D are still being established. Likely you are ok. At your next blood test, check to make sure you calcium is not too high. Having high calcium, due to the vitamin D supplements, is not healthy either! Hope that helps, and have a good weekend too!
Posted on 2012-12-01 21:02:51
Name:Jeanette
Location:Florida
Subject:Vit D for my child
Hi, I went to the doctor today and he prescribed 10,000 IU of vit. D a day for my 19month old child. Should I be questioning this?
Posted on 2012-12-31 13:20:39
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vit D for my child
Hi Jeanette, thanks for your question. Unless your child has some other condition, like rickets, or is on chronic seizure medication, that dose does seem too high, particularly since the Office of Dietary Supplements states that the tolerable upper intake level of a child 1-3 years old is 2,500 IU. Seek a second opinion and watch for signs of vitamin D toxicity like weight loss and/or heart arrhythmias. Also, at your child's next blood test, check for elevated calcium levels.
Posted on 2012-12-31 13:56:47
Name:Mika
Location:Azerbaijan
Subject:Storage of vitamin D
Could you tell me how long body stores vitamin D? Thank you.
Posted on 2013-01-09 16:54:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:Storage of vitamin D
Hi Mika, thanks for your question. Vitamin D is fat soluble and can be stored in your body fat for months. However, if you do not get enough vitamin D, these stores will be used and can be low. So it does depend somewhat on diet and lifestyle factors. Crieghton University has created this great PDF to answer these and other vitamin D questions.
Posted on 2013-01-09 17:01:55
Name:Emine
Location:UK
Subject:Sun light through window
Is exposure to sun through the window as effetive as direct sunshine?
Posted on 2013-01-15 16:48:29
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Sun light through window
Hi Emine, thanks for your question. According to this study, various factors can reduce the synthesis of vitamin D (cholecalciferol), including sunlight through windows. Environmental factors which harm vitamin D synthesis include increased skin pigmentation, aging, sunscreen, latitude, time of day, season, and ozone pollution. For example, sunlight in the U.S. city of Boston from November to February will not result in any significant vitamin D manufacture.
Posted on 2013-01-15 16:57:25
Name:André
Location:Brasil
Subject:Algae
Hi, I think you should add microalgae oils to the list, as they are the source of vitamin D for FISH (fish cannot produce vitamin D from the sun like we do, so they get it from these microalgae).
Posted on 2013-01-15 20:15:01
Name:Terri
Location:Pittsburgh
Subject:Low Vitamin D levels, but High Calcium Levels
Recently I had to have blood work done and was told that my Vitamin D levels were low and my calcium levels were too high. For the past year I had been taking Vitamin D supplements but since Christmas have stopped taking them. Would this have affected my readings?
Posted on 2013-01-29 12:52:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low Vitamin D Levels, but High Calcium Levels
Hi Terri, it seems unlikely that stopping the supplements would have such an immediate effect. However, given your high calcium levels, stopping supplementation was likely the right thing to do. Too much calcium absorption can really be damaging. Vitamin D seems to be a nutrition fad these days, and what justifies a "normal" level is a matter of debate. However, as your level did not increase on supplements, you may want to take a look at what could be the cause of your low levels.
Posted on 2013-01-29 19:35:52
Name:Chrissie
Location:UK
Subject:Vitamin D and Severe Nausea
Hi there, I have a vitamin d level of 5.7 I have been prescribed Adcal-D3 that's 1500 mg/400 IU. I'm supposed to take these one tablet twice a day, but they make me so nauseous I can do nothing but lie down. I'm aged 64 and have stopped taking them, for that reason. I am trying to find foods to eat instead. Do you think my Vitamin D level is too low at my age to improve with just food and what little sunshine we get here in the UK, I'm very depressed with it, plus I also have Fibrmyalgia. Doctors in this country are only now starting to realize that we have a bid problem with Vit D deficiency. Regards, Chrissie.
Posted on 2013-02-03 17:31:32
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin D and Severe Nausea
Hi Chrissie, thanks for your questions and sorry to hear about the nausea, which is a possible side effect of vitamin D supplements. You might be able to raise your level with diet and sunshine, particularly if you focus on fortified foods like soymilk and cereal. Further, you could try reduce your vitamin D dose, maybe taking just 1 pill a day, or even half a pill. Unfortunately 400IU is about the smallest vitamin D supplement manufactured. Does the Adcal supplement you are taking also contain calcium? You could try another supplement which only provides vitamin D and see if that helps. Hope those thoughts help and good luck with finding a plan that works for you.
Posted on 2013-02-03 17:39:53
Name:Tam
Location:Melbourne, Australia
Subject:Vitamin D and Acne
Hi, Very helpful article. About a year ago, I had a blood test done and found that my vitamin d levels were very low. I was prescribed three vitamin d capsules a day until my levels reached a normal number.

However, I have found that whenever I take vitamin d supplements for more than a couple of days, my skin breaks out very badly. I usually only get hormonal pimples but the breakouts I get from vitamin d supplements are much worse and more painful. As soon as I stop taking the supplements, the breakouts calm down and my skin goes back to normal.

I was instructed to take liquid vitamin d to see if this was any better but unfortunately I am experiencing the same problem. The breakouts are not as bad as when I take the capsules but are still quite painful.

Are there any other ways I can increase my vitamin d levels? I have dark skin and am vegetarian (lacto-ovo) so I suspect this is contributing to my low levels as well. Thank you in advance.

Posted on 2013-03-15 19:38:59
Name:Cynch
Location:Canada
Subject:Low Vitamin D and Kidney Stone Risk
Results of my blood test came in today and my doctor notified me that my Vitamin D is quite low and instructed me to take 2 tablets of any over the counter Vitamin D supplement. Late last year, I had a kidney stone removed. What would my risk be now having to take Vitamin D supplements on having another occurrence of a painful kidney stone?
Posted on 2013-04-03 15:35:00
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low Vitamin D and Kidney Stone Risk
Hi Cynch, thanks for your question. It would depend on what caused your kidney stones before. If your vitamin D is low, it is unlikely vitamin D was the cause. However, taking vitamin D supplements would only increase your risk of kidney stones. Consider calling and consulting your doctor about it, if you haven't already.
Posted on 2013-04-04 00:00:47
Name:Yoshi
Location:Dietetic student UNH
Subject:Kidneys Activate vitamin D, and you need to eat fat to absorb vitamin D
After reading all the comments and answers I have something to add. First of all it is the kidneys that activate Vit D. So if the kidneys are not functioning properly the Vit D from food or supplements can not be used by the body. There is one type of activated Vit D supplement that can be purchased and is often prescribe to people with Chronic Kidney Disease. Also if you eat low fat yogurt you will not absorb the Vit D unless you are eating fat with it. Nuts are a good source of fat without the cholesterol. So adding walnuts or any other type of nuts can increase the body's ability to absorb Vit D.
Posted on 2013-04-10 02:57:12
Name:Jessica Hallam
Location:Chicago
Subject:Low vitamin D and prescribed 50,000 IU
I recently had my blood checked and was told that my vitamin D was 18. My doctor prescribed 50,000 IU per day for 12 days. I am concerned taking this level. Isn't there a more natural way of correcting my level? Also I don't swallow pills well. Is there a liquid alternative?
Posted on 2013-04-10 10:19:42
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low vitamin D and prescribed 50,000 IU
Hi Jessica, thanks for your question. It seems like vitamin D is currently a health fad. Ten years ago, vitamin D was hardly tested and treated, however, due to recent studies, it has come to attention. Not to contradict your doctor, but you probably do not need to take the vitamin D he/she prescribed. Exposure to natural sunshine is the best way to boost your vitamin D level. Winter is ending in Chicago and the days will get longer. This alone should boost your vitamin D level. If you want, you can stop taking the supplements, and talk to your doctor about getting your level checked in summer. You can also just wait till your checkup next year, and go in summer and see if your vitamin D level is better. Frankly 50,000 IU units a day is a very high dose, though it is not uncommon. Side effects of high vitamin D include kidney stones and even heart disease. If you wish you continue the dose, liquid forms are available. Here is one from Amazon.com. However, consult your doctor about lowering your dose, or stopping supplements, till this summer or the next. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-04-11 00:04:33
Name:Suzanne
Location:New York
Subject:Sun Allergy
Hi- I too was recently diagnosed with extreme vitamin D deficiency, and I was prescribed 50,000 IUs 3 times a week for 1 month. I would like to get more D naturally but I have an allergic reaction to sunlight (my mother had the same- hives and swelling alleviated by antihistamine pills). I also have very low calcium intake due to dairy allergies. I'd like to find the way to increase these two which is kindest to my body since the two main methods of getting them naturally are not available to me. Am I just left with taking pills? How can I figure a good dosage from foods (such as salmon, etc)? I am looking for a long term plan to gain healthy levels.
Posted on 2013-04-11 15:13:45
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Sun Allergy
Hi Suzanne, thanks for your questions. Besides cod liver oil, and fish, fortified foods are the best source for boosting your vitamin D levels. This is not exactly a "natural" way to boost your levels, but is still better than pills. Fortified cereal and soy milk may be great options for you. As for calcium, there are many high calcium foods besides dairy foods you can try. They include almonds, green leafy vegetables, and fish. Hope those ideas help you make a good long term plan for healthy vitamin D and calcium levels.
Posted on 2013-04-12 00:23:44
Name:Whisperingsage
Location:N CA
Subject:Vit D and cholesterol
OK, the author hs a lot right but then some very biggies wrong too. Cholesterol is not only high in oysters, it is high in caviar, and high in cold water fish and high in liver, and high in eggs, and high in cod liver oil. The lesson here is that cholesterol is an Essential nutrient, contrary to popular belief. Please read up on this. Cholesterol is an important health giving nutrient.
Posted on 2013-04-17 15:54:27
Name:Kip
Subject:Sun
This is a nice overview of the best sources of Vitamin D though the intake of food, but I do miss the #1 source of Vitamin D, which is sunlight! 90% of the Vitamin D is produced in the skin after sunlight exposure!
Posted on 2013-05-13 07:50:34
Name:LetThemEatCaviar
Subject:6 ounces of caviar
That's how much you would need to eat to get the recommended daily allowance of vitamin D. -- not only would this be expensive but it would be awfully high in salt content. A better recommendation might be sushi grade fish roe, but even so I don't think it would be practical to eat enough to make a substantial dent in your daily Vitamin D requirements. Hopefully people are smart enough to think for themselves & aren't downing large amounts of caviar daily based on your advice.
Posted on 2013-05-17 02:15:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: 6 ounces of caviar
Thanks for your comment. You are right that people should not try to get 100% of their DV from caviar, or fish eggs (roe), alone. (Though there are places in the world where people might eat such a quantity of fish eggs.) However, caviar can be part of a diet to get more vitamin D and guide people in their food choices. You do not need to get 100% of your vitamin D from any one food source, particularly if you get 10-20 minutes of sunlight a day. Thanks again for your comment and clarifying this point.
Posted on 2013-05-17 10:57:44
Name:Anerb
Location:Ireland
Subject:Sunlight and Sunscreen
Many thanks for all your advice. With regard to sunshine, can I assume that you mean sunshine without wearing sunscreen?
Posted on 2013-07-14 17:19:17
Name:Ruby
Location:WI
Subject:Precancerous mole
I just had a precancerous mole removed from my face. My doctor told me to use sunblock every day to prevent myself from getting skin cancer. Now I use sunblock and sunscreen all the time, but I am now afraid of getting no vitamin D from the sun and getting other types of deseases. I do not know what to do.
Posted on 2013-07-14 19:41:39
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Sunlight and Sunscreen
Hi Anerb and Ruby, thanks for your questions. While sunscreen does interfere with vitamin D production from sunlight, it may not interfere enough to matter. This study in Australia found that sun screen did not affect vitmain D levels over the long term. If you are deficient in vitamin D, you would maximize creation of vitamin D by avoiding sun screen, but it would not be worth it if it causes your skin to become burned, or increases your skin cancer risk. The bottom line is: wear sun screen.
Posted on 2013-07-15 11:18:42
Name:Dave Black
Location:New Zealand, Queenstown
Subject:University of Illinois, Chicago 1928 and Vitamin D Toxicity
Just finished reading an article about when the US Government commissioned this University to do research on Vitamin D toxicity. They conducted studies of 773 people and 63 dogs over 7 years with quantities of Vit D at 1 million IU per typical woman weighing 110lbs... they concluded that this Vitamin was no way toxic. In fact over the 7 years no one even died. During the 1920's and 30's everyone was taking this Vit D in huge quantities and the hospitals were virtually empty due to Vit D's amazing effects on fighting disease in the human body. Naturally, the huge Pharmo companies were losing billions of dollars every year as less and less people were getting sick. Needless to say they have been trying to ban it ever since and the pathetic quantities in Vitamin tablets these days is due to their lobbying the politicians. Cancer fighting drugs are mainly Vit D's of around 50,000 IU's plus a filler which tells you how effective Vit D is at fighting the worst of diseases. The only thing with taking high doses of Vit D is to make sure you also take adequate vitamin K2 I think this is to stop the calcification of stones etc... however you will need to look into all this for yourselves. So the only question here is who to trust, the huge money making pharmo companies or a medical university who only care is to be professional and accurate with their findings? Thanks and hope I helped.
Posted on 2013-07-15 11:27:55
Name:Continuous Supply Better
Subject:My opinion on the large dose vitamin D supplement
Just my opinion about taking one huge dose of vitamin D once a week. I think its better to maintain a constant/continuous supply of anything daily, rather than one overdose. Our bodies are incredibly intelligent and resilient, however the unwritten rule is don't consume anything in a quantity you wouldn't get in one meal. As with vitamin C, our bodies take what is needed and passes what it doesn't. As with proteins, our bodies take what it needs right now and lets the rest go. I just think our bodies are programmed to manage what we consume on a meal by meal basis, and if you overdose on something our bodies aren't programmed to know what to do, it'll just pass it through. I think its healthier to take smaller quantities daily and take half hour walks in the sun. I make an elixir/superman drink every night to make sure my body is getting its omega 3's, 6's, vitamins and minerals. Just my opinion, I'm not a doctor but like playing one w my gf. LOL.
Posted on 2013-08-08 00:56:06
Name:Eileen
Location:New Jersey
Subject:Heart Palpitations from D3
I have been taking 1000 IU of vitamin D3 for about six months. For the past several weeks I have been getting disturbing heart palpitations every day. My primary doctor told me to cut out caffeine which I did but after well over a week they still persisted. I was so concerned I made an appt with a cardiologist. Since d3 was the only supplement I was taking I stopped it and within two days the palpitations are completely gone. Is it possible to get enough vitamin D in food since it's not always possible to get sun exposure? Thanks!
Posted on 2013-08-08 01:01:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Heart Palpitations from D3
Hi Eileen, thanks for your question. Theoretically, you can get all the vitamin D you need from foods, if you eat 100% of the daily value (100% DV). However, vitamin D is still little understood, and as the Office of Dietary Supplements states: "Optimal serum (blood) concentrations of 25(OH)D for bone and general health have not been established..." Basically, we don't know how much vitamin D a person should have in their blood. For now, you are probably best not taking the supplement for a while, and trying sunlight and natural foods to keep your vitamin D level where your doctor wants it. You might benefit by having a talk with your doctor about what the best blood level of vitamin D for you is, and go from there.
Posted on 2013-08-08 01:18:55
Name:Eileen
Location:Colonia
Subject:Heart palpitations from D3
Thanks so much for your advice. Have you heard of people getting heart palpitations from D3? Why would this happen? The same thing happened to my brother and he stopped taking it. However, he was taking 2000 IU daily and he was always in the sun.
Posted on 2013-08-09 21:10:59
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Heart palpitations from D3
Hi Eileen, thanks for your comment. The Office of Dietary Supplements confirms that high vitamin D intake (toxicity) can lead to heart arrhythmias and/or palpitations. As a guess, it could be that vitamin D affects calcium absorption, and therefore, the body's electrolyte balance, and control of the heartbeat.
Posted on 2013-08-10 00:58:58
Name:Tina
Subject:Is the vitamin D supplement really a healthy option?
I went to check my bloodwork recently and I found that my levels of vitamin D are low. The doctor advised that I take vitamins and now I am wondering if vitamins are not as healthy as I thought. Vitamins are processed and processed food is unhealthy. Is that true?
Posted on 2013-08-20 12:41:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Is the vitamin D supplement really a healthy option?
Hi Tina, thanks for your question. Vitamin D supplements can be dangerous if taken in excess by causing too much calcium to be absorbed into your body. A vitamin supplement is not really a food per-say, and while it is best to get all your vitamins, and nutrients the natural way, if your doctor prescribes a supplement, you might try it till your vitamin D level gets a bit better. That said, vitamin D supplementation is a relatively new phenomenon and something of a fad. Waiting a few more years to take it could also be an option. The choice is yours, talk more with your doctor about it, and maybe try a lighter dose than what he/she is recommending if you feel the current amount is too high. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-08-20 15:15:14
Name:Ann
Location:North Carolina
Subject:Causes for Vitamin D Deficiency
I have always gotten plenty of sunshine (maybe too much) since I live in the South and enjoy outdoor activities. I eat 2 eggs/day, drink milk, eat fish, take a multi-vitamin and calcium that also contains D-3. I'm also on a seizure medicine so I take extra levels of Calcium.

When 4 spots of basal cell carcinoma appeared in May 2013, my doctor ran several tests and discovered that I was deficient in Vitamin D. Based on my sun exposure and dietary habits, how does one develop Vitamin D deficiencies?

Posted on 2013-10-02 13:11:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Causes for Vitamin D Deficiency
Hi Ann, thanks for your question. In your situation it is likely your seizure medication which is causing your vitamin D deficiency. Check the section of this article under "People at Risk of a Vitamin D Deficiency" to find the referred section "Medicines used to control and stabalize epileptic seizures, particularly phenobarbital and phenytoin (brand name Dilantin®) interferes with Vitamin D and reduces Calcium absorption."

The Office of Dietary Supplements states that vitamin D deficiencies can "occur when usual intake is lower than recommended levels over time, exposure to sunlight is limited, the kidneys cannot convert 25(OH)D to its active form, or absorption of vitamin D from the digestive tract is inadequate. Vitamin D-deficient diets are associated with milk allergy, lactose intolerance, ovo-vegetarianism, and veganism."

Posted on 2013-10-03 02:52:07
Name:Abi
Location:Laurel, MD
Subject:Over the counter vs prescribed high dose Vitamin D suppliment
Over the counter/ prescribed Vitamin D suppliment Message: My primary Dr just prescribed 50,000IU's of vitamin D once weekly due to my low level of vitamin D.My question is should I go ahead and buy an over the counter vitamin D supplement of 1000IU and use it daily together with code liver oil( how long should I take both) or should I get the one prescribed.
Posted on 2013-10-05 16:23:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Over the counter vs prescribed high dose Vitamin D suppliment
Hi Abi, thanks for your question. The problem with vitamin D therapy is that if the dose is too small then vitamin D levels will not improve, but if the dose is too high, then the risk of hypercalcemia (too much blood calcium), kidney stones, etc...comes into play. As a general guideline it is best to start with a low daily dose over the counter and see if your vitamin D levels improve after 3-6 months. If they don't, then you can consider risking a higher dose of vitamin D. Share your plan for a low over the counter daily dose with your doctor. If he/she really insists on the high dose, ask why, and if the reasons are not compelling, get a second opinion from another doctor, before risking the side effects of a high dose. There are some cases when a high dose really needs to be administered, but if you have a vitamin D deficiency with no other symptoms, then starting with a low daily over the counter dose should be fine. Here is an interesting study comparing low and high dose vitamin D therapy. The full study can be downloaded as a pdf by click on "Full Text PDF". Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-06 05:11:38
Name:Sue
Location:NY
Subject:Vegetable Based Vitamin D Supplement?
Does a vitamin D supplement that is vegetable based work as well as the others?
Posted on 2013-10-19 17:46:16
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vegetable Based Vitamin D Supplement?
Hi Sue, thanks for your question. There have not been any studies on the effectiveness of different vitamin D supplements, and the size of the dose is probably the most important factor to absorption. That said, vegetable based vitamin D supplements should be fine.
Posted on 2013-10-20 04:07:01
Name:Farhan Shafi
Location:Pakistan
Subject:What time of day is best for Vitamin D from Sunshine?
Hello, my question is what time of day is best for sun exposure to maximize creation of vitamin D?
Posted on 2013-10-20 14:43:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: What time of day is best for Vitamin D from Sunshine?
Hi Farhan, thanks for your question. This study suggests that mid-day or 12:00 (noon) is the best time to get sunlight, both for manufacture of vitamin D and to minimize the risk of skin cancer. From that, try to get a lot of sun exposure around noon, 20 minutes should be all you need. Be careful of sunburn!
Posted on 2013-10-20 16:47:45
Name:Abi Adebiyi
Location:Laurel, MD
Subject:Vitamin D and Cod liver
Thanks for your response. My question is can I combine a vitamin D supplement of 1000 IU and cod liver oil daily?
Posted on 2013-10-24 11:43:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin D and Cod liver
Hi Abi, thanks for your question. Taking 1000IU of vitamin D with cod liver oil will be fine. Just keep in mind that 1 tablespoon of cod liver oil provides 1360IU of vitamin D, so you would be in effect taking 2360IU of vitamin D daily, or however much more cod liver oil you consume. It is fine to combine them as long as your vitamin D level does not go too high.
Posted on 2013-10-24 16:45:36
Name:Sandi
Location:New York
Subject:Just prescribed 50,000IUs, what to do?
My vitamin D level is 16 my doctor prescribed 50,000IUs. I don't know if I should take it, so many side effects, please tell me if I should...
Posted on 2013-10-30 07:23:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Just prescribed 50,000IUs, what to do?
Hi Sandi, thanks for your question. Do you have osteoporosis or a calcium deficiency? If not, ask your doctor to prescribe a smaller dose of 1000-3000IUs daily. Say you want to start with that and see how your level improves. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-31 07:59:31
Name:Garrett
Location:Canada
Subject:Mushrooms and Vitamin D
I'd like to put in this note. You say that button mushrooms contain the most vitamin D. This is not fully correct. Suncharged Shiitake Mushrooms contain significantly more Vitamin D2 than button mushrooms do.

I quote: "In the summer of 2004, mycologist Paul Stamets discovered that the level of vitamin D in freshly picked, indoor- grown shiitake mushrooms rose from 110 IU (international units) to an astonishing 46,000 IU per 100 grams when the mushrooms were placed outdoors in the sun for just six hours with the gills facing up (when the gills were facing down, the level rose to 10,900 IU)." Source.

Also, in regards to how many IU's of Vitamin D people ought to be taking, it's actually recommended by more and more healthcare professionals, to actually be taking ~1000 IU's per 25 pounds of body weight, since most people are VASTLY deficient in Vitamin D, and it's used in so many of our body's processes. Definitely is something that more people would do well to add more of to their nutritional spectrum.

Also, the RDA DV of 400 IU's of Vit D is extremely low, and is actually rather unhealthy - I'd say it's one of the causes of the lethargy, dis-ease, and depression. Hence why amounts more along the lines of 1000 IU's per 25 lbs of body weight are far more realistic. :)

Posted on 2013-10-31 10:01:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Mushrooms and Vitamin D
Hi Garrett, thanks for sharing the information about the sun charged mushrooms, very interesting. In regards to vitamin D intakes and normal vitamin D levels it is important to note that it is a controversial topic. There have been no studies to confirm high intakes or having a high level is necessarily healthy, or that it won't have bad side effects in the long term. If you would like to share any studies which say the opposite please do so. Not saying you are wrong, you are right that there is growing support for taking more vitamin D, but nutrition fads have come and gone before, and right now, rigorous studies on high vitamin D intakes are lacking.
Posted on 2013-10-31 10:13:49
Name:Kathy Lowenberg
Location:Jersey City
Subject:The source of the best vitamin D
The best source of vitamin D is the SUN. Soak in the sun for an average of 20 minutes every day for 365 days and you will . When your vitamin d will reach the optimum level, the aches and pains will go away.

UV-A and UV- B rays of the sun are NOT harmful. UV- C and UV - D, the harmful rays of the sun DO NOT REACH THE earth.

So embrace the sun and live a good life.

Posted on 2013-11-14 18:19:51
Name:Nick
Location:Brisbane, Australia
Subject:Sun vs Food as Vit D source
Firstly, thank you for this brilliant website!

Here's something my doctor told me: even if you get enough Vit D from food the body still needs some sunshine on bare skin (no sunscreen) to activate it. The trick though is to get enough sunshine to make the D work, without risking skin damage.

It appears the amount of exposure needed is about half what it would take to turn you pink. So in the Australian Summer, 3 minutes a day is enough for Vit D and no sunburn :)

Have also learnt that when the sun is less than 50 degrees above the horizon the part of the UV that we need for Vit D can't get through the atmosphere. Which is why in midwinter, even if the sun is shining, in many places it is too low in the sky and deficiency develops. Sitting by a window is also useless a the glass cuts out the part of the UV that we need (but you can still get sunburnt through the glass).

And you should avoid a shower for some hours after the sun or you wash off the Vit D (or at least, its precursor) before it can be absorbed into the body.

And it also seems Vit K2 and Vit A need to be in the right proportions with the D or it can't work properly.

Posted on 2013-11-29 22:09:38
Name:Pharmacist
Location:BC
Subject:Vitamin D3 and Supplements
A little advice to those taking supplements, make sure your taking Vit D3 and not any other form. D3 is better absorbed (3 times better than D2 for example) and it is the natural form. Also recent data suggests if your taking high doses of d to also take Vit k2 with it as k2 helps your body to make the most of the D.
Posted on 2013-12-07 10:08:27
Name:Kassa
Location:Canada
Subject:Fatty Liver and Vitamin D deficient
I have non-alcoholic fatty liver. I also have a Vitamin D and Calcium deficient. I was told to watch my diet to protect my liver this makes it hard to get Vitamin D from food, I almost don’t eat any fat. And I live in very cold part of the world no sun for most of the year. I start taking supplement but I heard supplement tablets could be harmful for liver. Can you please tell me how I can get vitamin D And calcium?
Posted on 2014-01-12 01:22:02
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fatty Liver and Vitamin D deficient
Hi Kassa, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your situation. It is true that it is going to be tough for you to get vitamin D, however, one thing you can try is a lamp which simulates sunlight and studies show can help your skin to generate vitamin D when exposed. There are various types on the market, or your doctor may recommend one to you. As for calcium there are many low fat high calcium foods such as broccoli, bok choy, and non-fat milk/yogurt.
Posted on 2014-01-12 06:13:28
Name:Quanito
Location:USA
Subject:Deficient in Vit D even though I am out in the sun!
Hi, I am a mail carrier, 59 years old. I work out in sunny day almost 5-hr daily, also I am lactose intolerant. Still, my blood test results still show I am deficient in vit D (39.6 nmol/L which is less than 75.0 nmol/L that the US National Kidney Foundation established). My family doctor prescribed 2000/3000 units of Vit D3 /daily for 3-months.
So do you think it will bring me back to being a normal healthy person? Thanks!
Posted on 2014-01-12 23:36:42
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Deficient in Vit D even though I am out in the sun!
Hi Quanito, thanks for sharing your experience. The supplements should help you, and it would be great if you come back in 3 months and let us all know! Hope it goes well.
Posted on 2014-01-15 15:02:29
Name:Ree
Location:Canada
Subject:Is Vitamin D without Calcium ok?
Thanks for the great info on this site! Is it necessary to take Vitamin D and Calcium together? For example, when taking vitamin D supplements, also take calcium supplements... Or is it okay just to take the vitamin D supplements without taking calcium supplements? Thanks!
Posted on 2014-01-27 14:09:44
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Is Vitamin D without Calcium ok?
Hi Ree, thanks for your question. Whether or not you need to take calcium depends on your condition and goals. Are you trying to boost your calcium absorption, or just your vitamin D level? In either case, taking vitamin D alone is fine and it will increase your vitamin D and calcium levels either way. If you really need a lot of calcium you can take both together, but be careful of absorbing too much calcium which can lead to kidney stones or heart disease.
Posted on 2014-01-28 15:39:16
Name:Maz
Location:United Kingdom
Subject:Vit D3 Important Note
After doing a great deal of reading on the subject of D3 supplementation, I am of the firm belief that the vast majority of people living in the northern hemisphere, will benefit greatly by this. Even in sunnier latitudes many folk cover up due to the fear of sun damage, and our modern diet does not help a great deal in maintaining even low levels of D3. I myself take 5000iu daily, which I believe is a sensible level combined with with a moderately healthy diet. It is however important to understand how D3 works in relation to Calcium absorption when taking supplements. To put it simply the D3 encourages calcium absorption by our tissues/bones, but very importantly Vit K2 is necessary to direct the calcium where it is needed. This prevents build up in arteries and kidneys. So to sum up, yes maintain high levels of D3, preferably by safe sun or tanning machine, or if supplementing, also take vit K2 (100-150 mg day).
Posted on 2014-02-18 07:15:28
Name:Marcia
Location:Pennsylvania
Subject:Vitamin D Supplements and Body Pain
Lab results stated that I was low in vitamin D and bone density test stated that I needed a calcium supplement. I stated taking a combined supplement of 1200 mg of calcium plus 1000 IU of vitamin D. After 1 month I started to get restless leg syndrome. The pain got so bad it was even effecting my walking during the day. I am fairly an active 65 yr old woman. I work out at the gym at least 3 or 4 days a week. Recently I thought I was getting the stomach flu and I stopped taking the supplement for about a week. My pain suddenly left me. Not only in the day but also at night. I hate to start these pills again. What is your suggestion.
Posted on 2014-02-20 11:25:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vitamin D Supplements and Body Pain
Hi Marcia, thanks for your question. It sounds like the supplements are not worth the pain for you. Do you lift weights when you go to the gym? Weight lifting can be an effective method of strengthening bones. Talk to your doctor about trying alternative therapies for bone density. This can include taking only vitamin D, weight lifting exercises, or other medications like bisphosphonates. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2014-02-20 18:46:27

Post a comment.
Name:          
Location:       
Email:(Optional)
Subject:         

Spam Prevention *(REQUIRED):
Enter the last three letters of this sentence.

References

  1. Nutrition Data.com
  2. Office of Dietary Supplements - Vitamin D
  3. Heaney RP. Long-latency deficiency disease: insights from calcium and vitamin D. Am J Clin Nutr 2003;78:912-9.
  4. LeBoff MS, Kohlmeier L, Hurwitz S, Franklin J, Wright J, Glowacki J. Occult vitamin D deficiency in postmenopausal US women with acute hip fracture. JAMA 1999;251:1505-11.
  5. Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium and Vitamin D. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 2010.
  6. Davis CD. Vitamin D and cancer: current dilemmas and future research needs. Am J Clin Nutr 2008;88:565S-9S.
  7. Davis CD, Hartmuller V, Freedman M, Hartge P, Picciano MF, Swanson CA, Milner JA. Vitamin D and cancer: current dilemmas and future needs. Nutr Rev 2007;65:S71-S74.
  8. Wagner CL, Greer FR; American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Breastfeeding; American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Nutrition. Prevention of rickets and vitamin D deficiency in infants, children, and adolescents. Pediatrics 2008;122:1142-1152.
  9. Webb AR, Kline L, Holick MF. Influence of season and latitude on the cutaneous synthesis of vitamin D3: Exposure to winter sunlight in Boston and Edmonton will not promote vitamin D3 synthesis in human skin. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1988;67:373-8.
  10. Webb AR, Pilbeam C, Hanafin N, Holick MF. An evaluation of the relative contributions of exposure to sunlight and of diet to the circulating concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in an elderly nursing home population in Boston. Am J Clin Nutr 1990;51:1075-81.
  11. Lo CW, Paris PW, Clemens TL, Nolan J, Holick MF. Vitamin D absorption in healthy subjects and in patients with intestinal malabsorption syndromes. Am J Clin Nutr 1985;42:644-49.
  12. Malone M. Recommended nutritional supplements for bariatric surgery patients. Ann Pharmacother 2008;42:1851-8.
  13. Compher CW, Badellino KO, Boullata JI. Vitamin D and the bariatric surgical patient: a review. Obes Surg 2008;18:220-4.
  14. Buckley LM, Leib ES, Cartularo KS, Vacek PM, Cooper SM. Calcium and vitamin D3 supplementation prevents bone loss in the spine secondary to low-dose corticosteroids in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Ann Intern Med 1996;125:961-8.
  15. Lukert BP, Raisz LG. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis: pathogenesis and management. Ann Intern Med 1990;112:352-64.
  16. de Sevaux RGL, Hoitsma AJ, Corstens FHM, Wetzels JFM. Treatment with vitamin D and calcium reduces bone loss after renal transplantation: a randomized study. J Am Soc Nephrol 2002;13:1608-14.
  17. McDuffie JR, Calis KA, Booth SL, Uwaifo GI, Yanovski JA. Effects of orlistat on fat-soluble vitamins in obese adolescents. Pharmacotherapy 2002;22:814-22.
  18. Compston JE, Horton LW. Oral 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in treatment of osteomalacia associated with ileal resection and cholestyramine therapy. Gastroenterology 1978;74:900-2.
  19. Gough H, Goggin T, Bissessar A, Baker M, Crowley M, Callaghan N. A comparative study of the relative influence of different anticonvulsant drugs, UV exposure and diet on vitamin D and calcium metabolism in outpatients with epilepsy. Q J Med 1986;59:569-77.
  20. Jones G. Pharmacokinetics of vitamin D toxicity. Am J Clin Nutr 2008;88:582S-6S.