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Foods High in Iodine


Iodine is a chemical element essential for the production of thyroid hormones that regulate growth and metabolism. Diets deficient in iodine increase risk of retarded brain development in children (cretinism), mental slowness, high cholesterol, lethargy, fatigue, depression, weight gain, and goiter: a swelling of the thyroid gland in the neck. Please note that both too much and too little iodine can cause hypothyroidism, for more information, see the section on hypothyroidism.

Photo of a Sushi Roll wrapped in Dried Seaweed (Nori)
Photo of sushi nori. The outer seaweed wrap is an excellent natural source of iodine.

What foods are naturally high in iodine? Iodine is a component of almost every living plant and animal. No standard measurements of iodine in food exist because iodine concentrations vary across the world. In general, foods from the sea contain the most iodine, followed by animal foods, and then plant foods. Of all foods seaweed, like kelp, is the most famous and reliable source of natural iodine, however egg and dairy products can also be good sources.

Select Food Samples for Iodine Content
Please note that other than dried seaweed and fortified salt the concentrations of iodine in these foods can vary widely and this table should be taken as a rough guide.

FoodServing SizeIodine
Dried Seaweed
(Buy from Amazon.com)
1/4 ounce >4,500µg (4.5 mg) (3000% DV)
Cod3 ounces*99µg (66% DV)
Iodized Salt (Fortified)1 gram77µg (51% DV)
Baked Potato with peel1 medium60µg (40% DV)
Milk1 cup (8 fluid ounces)56µg (37% DV)
Shrimp3 ounces35µg (23% DV)
Fish sticks2 fish sticks35µg (23% DV)
Turkey breast, baked3 ounces34µg (23% DV)
Navy beans, cooked1/2 cup32µg (21% DV)
Tuna, canned in oil3 ounces (1/2 can)17µg (11% DV)
Egg, boiled1 large12µg (8% DV)
*A three-ounce serving of meat is about the size of a deck of cards.
Source: Linus Pauling Institute Article on Iodine

How much iodine do I need? In your entire lifetime you will need less than a teaspoon of iodine to ensure good health, however, your body cannot store iodine so you have to eat a little bit every day. You only need 150 micrograms (mcg, µg), or 20,000th of a teaspoon, to meet your daily requirement.

If iodine is in most plant and animal foods how can anyone be deficient? According to the World Health Organization iodine deficiencies exist in 54 countries as of 2003. Map provided by the World Health Organization

There is no exact answer as to why iodine deficiencies occur, however, two theories exist:

  1. People live in a part of the world with low levels of iodine in the soil or sea.
  2. People eat high amounts of refined foods that lose their iodine content during refinement. Refined sugar, for example, has no iodine.
Some countries, like the U.S., show risk from excess iodine intake which suggests over consumption of foods fortified in iodine, like salt.

Is too much iodine good or bad? The tolerable upper intake for iodine is set at 1.1mg (1,100µg) for adults 19 years and older. Risks of high iodine intake include both hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and goiter. Really acute iodine poisoning can lead to burning of the mouth, throat, and stomach; fever, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, weak pulse, and even coma.5 With that said, some studies suggest that Japanese intake of iodine is up to 1.2mg (1,200µg) a day, and can confer health benefits, including cancer protection. Japanese people get most of their iodine from kelp seaweed. Please consult your doctor before taking high doses of iodine, do so with caution, and for limited time periods.

Is there Iodine in Breast Milk? New mothers should be aware that their breast milk contains iodine for their new born children. The amount of iodine in breast milk will depend on the mother's diet. A 1984 sample of women from the United States found the average concentration of iodine excreted in breast milk to be 114µg per day.4 This more than meets the adequate intake requirement of 110µg per day for infants ranging 0-6 months, but falls a little short of the 130µg per day requirement for infants ranging 7 months to 1 year. This should not necessarily be taken as a cause to eat a lot more iodine on the part of lactating women, as too much iodine can also be harmful.

I don't eat salt, meat, or seaweed, where can I get iodine? Your options are to consider supplements, buy foods enriched in iodine, or ensure that the plant foods you consume come from parts of the world where the soil is rich in iodine.

I have hypothyroidism, can I consume iodine foods, or take iodine supplements? Worldwide, iodine deficiency is the number one cause of hypothyroidism, however, iodine deficiency rarely causes hypothyroidism in the U.S. The only time you should consume iodine is if the cause of your hypothyroidism is from iodine deficiency, and even then, only consume moderate amounts. Note: Too little or too much iodine can cause hypothyroidism. Other causes of hypothyroidism include: Hashimoto’s disease, thyroiditis (inflammation of the thyroid), congenital hypothyroidism, surgical removal of part or all of the thyroid, radiation treatment of the thyroid, and some medications. If you have hypothyroidism from these causes, the U.S. National Institute of Health cautions that: "...taking iodine drops or eating foods containing large amounts of iodine—such as seaweed, dulse, or kelp—may cause or worsen hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism." As such, only consume iodine in moderate amounts to maintain a proper level.


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Comments.
Name:Annie
Location:Kansas
Subject:Iodine Content of Various Foods
How much iodine is in chocolate, sea kelp, eggs, yogurt, cheese, seafood,and sauerkraut?
Posted on 2011-03-16 11:17:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Location:San Francisco, CA
Subject:RE: how much iodine
Hi Annie, The amount would depend very much on the location the food was grown as iodine levels in the earth and oceans vary. Seaweed and kelp can have as much as 4,500 mcg (micrograms) of Iodine, that is equal to 4.5 milligrams! One cup of milk can have up to 56 mcg in comparison, and one egg can provide 12 mcg. So seaweed/kelp really is a rich source, but it is important to remember that these numbers can really vary. The Linus Pauling website has a table with some more estimates of iodine in foods.
You can also buy Iodine Supplements from places like Amazon.com
If you are worried about the effects of radiation from the troubles in Japan, then you want to buy Potassium Iodide tablets. However, the effects of the radiation, and the necessity of the tablets is still uncertain. Be sure not to consume too much iodine!
Posted on 2011-03-16 11:39:58
Name:Chris J. Slater
Location:Lqadysmith, B.C., Canada
Subject:Natural sources
Thanks for your article. I like natural sources, like those used in the macrobiotic diet as used by the Japanese for centuries. Miso, saeveggies, whole grain brown rice, Hokkaido squash, etc. Suggest Googling macrobiotics+radioactivity.
Posted on 2011-03-17 23:05:37
Name:Joshua Sutton
Location:Indianapolis
Subject:Sea Salt
Thank you for your informative article. I have a question about sea salt vs. iodized table salt. Is the latter the only one that contains iodine? Does it occur naturally in sea salt? I do take CVS Spectravite daily multi-vitamin which contains 150 mcg (DV%).
Posted on 2011-03-31 14:38:56
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Sea Salt
Hi Joshua, Thanks for your question. Sea salt would certainly contain some iodine. The exact amount would depend on the concentration of iodine in the water from where the salt came. This varies widely across the world, however, it is generally thought that sea salt will contain less iodine than fortified commercial salts. In any case, the 150mcg in your supplement is enough to meet your daily requirement.
Posted on 2011-03-31 15:33:03
Name:Lindsey C
Location:Seattle
Subject:Stomach ache
I love eating seaweed and have increased my consumption of those yummy roasted, salted seaweed snacks. On average I probably eat 1/2 to 1 sheet (you know the size of a nori sheet of sushi) 5 times a week. However, I have developed bad stomach cramps and nausea on a daily basis. The only thing I changed in my diet was the increase of seaweed. Your article is the only place I found that stated over consumption can cause a stomach ache. Do you have any more information on that? Does it seem like I'm eating too much?
Posted on 2011-03-31 22:28:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Stomach ache
Hi Lindsey, It does not seem like too much seaweed, however, the increase in iodine could be causing your stomach ache. Try a different brand of seaweed, which may have lower iodine levels, and see if you feel better. Another possibility is that you are not drinking enough liquid and the dry snack is making you feel uncomfortable as it hydrates in your stomach. Try consuming more liquids when you snack and see if you feel better. As always, see a doctor if your condition does not improve in the next day or two.
Posted on 2011-03-31 22:33:51
Name:Adrianne
Location:Ohio
Subject:Hypothyroidism
I actually suffer from hypothyroidism, I take medication for it. I don't generally use a lot of salt with foods I cook, I don't like the taste of it so I usually end up using other herbs to flavor. I have had a couple of friends suggest that I buy kelp pills to help. Is this a good idea and if so, how much would be alright before it is too much?
Posted on 2011-04-04 19:11:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hypothyroidism
Hi Adrianne, thanks for your question. Hypothyroidism can be caused by both high and low iodine levels. You only want to take a supplement if you are sure your iodine level is low. Otherwise, too much iodine can be harmful. The key is maintaining a balance. I you are not sure, then just maintain a normal diet and stick to your medication. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2011-04-04 19:19:30
Name:Ojaswee Sharma
Location:Chandigarh
Subject:Is Iodine the key?
I have been feeling very weak since the last 4 weeks. I had consulted a doctor for it. He prescribed me with multi-vitamins. the prescription hasn't worked well. I suspect a good dip with my thyroid. My muscles are weak, i feel sleepy throughout, lazy, and lethargic. How could I get help from here?
Posted on 2011-04-07 11:11:01
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Is Iodine the key?
Hi Ojaswee, Thanks for your comment. What vitamins did your doctor prescribe exactly? Do they contain iodine? If you suspect you have a low thyroid then you can try taking some kelp iodine supplements to see if your condition improves. Also, your weakness, or anemia can be caused by a variety of vitamin deficiencies. Be sure you are eating enough high iron foods, food high in vitamin B12, folate (B9), and phosphorus.
Posted on 2011-04-07 11:11:50
Name:Terr
Location:Tucson, AZ
Subject:Iodine Allergy
I am allergic to or have low tolerance to Iodine. This is confirmed. It is nearly impossible to get a well rounded diet since I am also diabetic. I have done a great deal of research but could use some help. Any ideas on sites, books, etc
Posted on 2011-04-12 15:03:47
Name:Carole
Location:Buffalo,NY
Subject:lowsalt diet
I live in a low iodine area and recently I have been put on a low-salt, low fat diet due to heart problems (retaining fluid causing overexertion to my heart). I am doing well on it and using no table salt, just an artifical salt called NuSalt. Problem is someone told me I should watch it that I could be lowering my iodine in my body and inviting a goiter. What natural foods can I eat that would supply natural iodine to me. I would rather not take a pill. thank you.(I must also take water pills)
Posted on 2011-04-28 12:17:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: lowsalt diet
Hi Carole, thanks for your question. Given your heart problems you want to focus on eating more seafood, and if you like it, sushi. The outer wrap of sushi is a dried seaweed called nori, and it is very high in iodine. Other seafood like fish and crab are not only high in iodine, but can also promote heart health. Even though you are opposed to taking any kind of pill, natural kelp tablets can be a good supplement, and are just the natural extract of dried seaweed. Your friend's caution is wise, but you also don't want to worry too much. Have your doctor test your thyroid on your next visit, alternatively, there are also a few home thyroid test kits available.
Posted on 2011-04-28 19:08:36
Name:Kristi Dotson
Location:Illinois
Subject:Hashimoto's Disease
Would taking an iodine supplement help w/ the side effects of Hashimoto's Disease? How would you know when to back off of the supplement during the hyperthyroid part of the disease? I found out I have Hashimoto Disease about a month ago & I have days where I'm rearing to go & the next I have no energy at all. Is there anything to do about the bulging of the eyes (eye drops)? It feels like they're going to pop out of my head, I've tried heat & cold and neither seem to have an effect on them, they hurt and trigger a migraine. If there's anything new you can tell me about the disease that I haven't read on the net already, that would be great. Thanks.
Posted on 2011-05-14 08:04:00
Name:Cinthia
Location:NC
Subject:Thyroid, Iodine Deficiency
Hi, I was wondering about my low metabolism rate when I read an article about how low metabolism could potentially be caused by something called Hypothyroidism, or a sluggish thyroid. I looked this up and it was linked to lack of iodine, or even iodine deficiencies. I doubt I have this, but there could still be that slight possibility. So, I guess my question is, what do you know about this? Are there any specific foods that contain a lot of Iodine? I wouldn't typically know where the foods are from; just where they're bought (haha). Is it possible to take Iodine supplements or pills without a prescription (do they sell them at common places) or should I talk to my doctor about this? I just wanted to get your opinion before I go waltzing into the Dr.'s office asking for Iodine pills and claiming that I'm Iodine deficient and have Hypothyroidism when I just learned about it 5 minutes ago:) Thank you so much!
Posted on 2011-05-14 23:05:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Thyroid, Iodine Deficiency
Hi Cinthia, Thanks for your question. The first thing to do would be to ask your doctor to test for hypothyroidism, however, hypothyroidism often goes undiagnosed. You can buy natural iodine supplements over the counter to be sure you are reaching your daily value. The simplest (and maybe even cheapest) thing to do would be to buy a bottle and see if it helps your metabolism after 30 days. In terms of specific foods high in iodine seaweed and kelp can have as much as 4,500 mcg (micrograms) of Iodine, that is equal to 4.5 milligrams! One cup of milk can have up to 56 mcg in comparison, and one egg can provide 12 mcg. So seaweed/kelp really is a rich source, but it is important to remember that these numbers can really vary. The Linus Pauling website has a table with some more estimates of iodine in foods. Hope that helps!
Posted on 2011-05-14 23:18:27
Name:Darlene
Location:TX
Subject:Hyperthroidism
I had a lab test with TSH of 40.29 which was supposed to be low thyroid. I was given levothyroxine 50mcg. 3 weeks after I had 112 pulse and irregular heartrate. Another blood test then TSH was 0.173 which means over active thyroid. Dr. said not to take any more levothroxine. 2 weeks later still have time of high pulse and irregular heartrate sometimes lasting 8 or more hrs. Then sometimes everything is normal. Is there some foods that trigger that high pulse and irregular heartrate? I never had anything like this before that first lab report and then taking that levothyroxine. I had none of the symptoms of low thyroid either. I believe it was a wrong lab report the first time.I am just wondering when I get back normal.
Posted on 2011-05-19 17:42:10
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: hyperthroidism
Hi Darlene, thanks for your question. It appears that the levothroxine has led to your hyperthyroidism and resulting increase in heart rate and heart palpitations (irregular heart rhythm). Although it is the levothroxine and hyperthyroidism that brought on these palpitations, other things like caffeine (tea and coffee), alcohol, nicotine (cigarettes), stress, and lack of sleep can also cause palpitations. Try reduce or eliminate caffeine, alcohol, and nicotine from your lifestyle. Try consuming less iodine for a few days, by switching to kosher salt, or other unfortified salt. If after 2-3 more weeks you do not get better, you might want to get tested for hyperthyroidism again.
Posted on 2011-05-19 19:45:55
Name:Chandrika
Location:Kadapa, India
Subject:Hypothyroidism
I heard that using salt is not good for health, so I absolutely stoped including salt in cooking food. After 3 months, my son got hypothyroidism and now he is on thyroxine 50 microgram tablets. Should I give lot of iodised salt or required quantity? Can you tell me what is the ideal requirement of iodine per day? And what are the natural vegetables containing iodine? Thank You.
Posted on 2011-06-06 05:29:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hypothyroidism
Hi Chandrika, sorry to hear of your son's hypothyroidism. It is OK to start giving him salt again. Definitely do not give him more than the recommended amount, as too much salt and too much iodine can be harmful! You only need 150 micrograms of iodine a day to meet your requirement, which is very little. As for vegetables the amount of iodine varies depending on the soil in which the vegetables were grown. Seaweed, and other vegetable foods from the sea tend to be the highest in iodine. If you are lacto-ovo vegetarian you can expect milk and eggs to have more iodine than ordinary vegetables. As always remember not to give too much iodine and your son will improve with time. Alternatively, you can also use natural kelp iodine supplements.
Posted on 2011-06-07 02:00:59
Name:Dee
Location:New York
Subject:Hypothyroid & Iodine Allergy
Hi I noticed you did not answer the person who has confirmed iodine allergy. I am quite confused because I have hypothyroid and have severe allergic reactions to all iodine supplements and shellfish. I would like to take an iodine supplement that is NOT from a sea/ocean source. Do you have any suggestions?
Posted on 2011-07-03 05:33:37
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hypothyroid & Iodine Allergy
Hi Dee, thanks for your comment. As anyone who has an allergy it is important to find out the source and in what form the iodine causes a reaction. You have found that seafood is the main reason for your allergy and that is important. As for supplements to try, have your tried potassium iodide tablets? These are the same pills people took to counter radiation. Use caution and consult your health care provider before taking these supplements. If you find something that works, please come back and comment for the benefit of other readers.
Posted on 2011-07-03 18:29:20
Name:Shonn
Subject:RE: Hyperthyroidism for Darlene in TX
Maybe hyperthyroidism, but it sounds like a heart condition called WPW (Wolff/Parkinson/White Syndrome). Ask your doctor about it, if that person does not know of WPW then you may be talking to the wrong person. I've lived with WPW my whole life. My suggestion is good nutrition, rest, activity, and stess management.
Posted on 2011-07-15 09:53:18
Name:Lindsey
Location:Texas
Subject:Hyperthyroid?
I just returned from China . I have never had thyroid problems. I went for a checkup on return and was diagnosed with hyperthyroid. Despite the fact I have no symptoms. During the iodine uptake test they said my thyroid was enlarged...like a small goiter. Could this be caused by too much iodine while in China? Does too much or too little iodine cause a goiter?
Posted on 2011-08-05 06:05:29
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hyperthyroid
Hi Lindsey, thanks for your question. How long were you travelling in China? If it was less than a month, it is unlikely your change in diet had too much affect. Also, if you look a the World Health Organization map referenced in this article you will see that the U.S. and China have about the same risk of hyperthyroidism. Both too much and too little iodine can result in goiter, but the cause of your thyroid being enlarged can be due to a variety of causes. The problem may also be genetic, ask relatives if they have had any similar problems and also consider getting a second opinion on your diagnosis.
Posted on 2011-08-06 10:03:48
Name:Lani
Location:Hawaii
Subject:Iodine Allergy
I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism a couple of years ago. I am allergic to iodine and seaweed but was still given Kelp supplements to help treat my illness. I had a severe reaction soon after taking one pill. Is there anything else I could get iodine? Milk? Yogurt?
Posted on 2011-09-05 03:08:12
Name:JJ
Location:Michigan
Subject:Be Careful with Kelp
I have been taking kelp (325 micrograms) 1 pill a day and I am afraid that this quantiy is too much iodine. I am feeling something strange in my throat and maybe I have caused the thyroid to be hyper. Please be careful! I would not worry about being deficient in iodine if you are eating healthy. America does not have a problem with iodine deficiency.
Posted on 2011-09-07 19:18:07
Name:Nato
Location:Nigeria
Subject:Iodine Deficiency
I have been noticing growth at the upper part of my neck. The doctor has told me that I have iodine deficiency in my body and that I should be taking salt that contains Iodine. What other things can I do to correct this? Can be pls make suggestion on Iodine supplement and possibly any other foods that contain iodine? Thanks very much.
Posted on 2011-09-11 11:36:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Iodine Deficiency
Hi Nato, sorry to hear of your diagnosis and thanks for your question. Your best bet is to focus on eating foods from the sea if there are any available. Eating sea-fish and sea-weed, particularly kelp, should help. In terms of a supplement there are many on the market. Try get a natural iodine kelp supplement. You are probably best trying to find this at a local pharmacy, however, iodine supplements can also be ordered online here.
Posted on 2011-09-12 05:35:35
Name:Ana
Location:Los Angeles
Subject:Too much iodine
I have been taking Iodine supplements and it seems like I have been having more hair growth in different areas of my body - could this be caused by the iodine?
Posted on 2011-09-15 23:52:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Too much iodine
Hi Ana, Thanks for your question. Iodine is important in regulation of thyroid hormones. While thyroid hormones are involved in growth and metabolism it is unlikely that excess iodine is leading to your hair growth. Excess iodine will more likely be expressed as changes in metabolism and energy levels, as well as swelling in the neck known as goiter.
Posted on 2011-09-16 09:38:41
Name:Anonymous
Subject:RE: Hair growth and kelp
Re-extra hair growth while taking kelp tablets. I think that the kelp could be responsible for this.
Posted on 2011-09-16 11:12:55
Name:Katy
Location:UK
Subject:Kelp and Sea Vegetables
I was considering taking iodine in the form of rockweed or kelp but I am worried about the radiation levels in the sea. I am allergic to deep sea fish as well but am able to eat some fish such as tuna, trout, and pilchards without any reaction, are these enough to boost my iodine levels prior to radiotherapy and isotope treatments?
Posted on 2011-09-17 19:43:56
Name:Susan
Location:US
Subject:Reaction to Iodoral
Hi, I have hypothyroidism and did a patch test for iodine deficiency. It seems I am very deficient. I started taking 1/2 a Iodoral 12mg. a day and had terrible headaches that only went away if I drank salt water. Oddly, when I didn't have the headache, I felt awesome. Should I try kelp instead?
Posted on 2011-10-07 15:08:22
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Reaction to Iodoral
Hi Susan, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your symptoms. It seems like every medication has a side effect. Given that kelp iodine supplements are natural, you might have better luck with them. Some people have reported being allergic to kelp, but if you are not, there is likely no reason not to try them. Consult with your health provider to be sure about making the switch. Even a phone consultation should suffice. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2011-10-07 15:16:09
Name:Patricia
Location:Canada
Subject:Hypothyroid & Pregnant
Hi, I have just been told I have hypothyroidism and I am 9 weeks pregnant. What can I take naturally instead of medication?
Posted on 2011-10-12 15:08:54
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hypothyroid & Pregnant
Hi Patricia, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your condition. There can be many causes of your hypothyroidism and if it is not caused by a dietary deficiency (lack of iodine) then you may have to take medication in lieu of natural options. However, if you have an iodine deficiency then you can consider eating more dried seaweed (Nori), or taking natural iodine kelp supplements. Proper levels of iodine and thyroid hormone are essential for your baby's development, and even though no one likes taking medications, it might be your only option to ensure proper health. Talk to your health care provider about trying iodine supplements first to see if your condition improves before trying medications. You can find more information about hypothyroidism and pregnancy here.
Posted on 2011-10-13 10:14:25
Name:Jennifer
Location:Toronto
Subject:Graves' Disease and Low Iodine
I was just diagnosed with Graves' Disease, which is a Hyperactive Thyroid condition, last week. The doctor told me to avoid iodine, like Seafood and Iodized Salt. Which is all good as I read your article above and it has answered so many of my curious questions about where Iodine is found in foods. However, now I'm concerned about the supplements that I take... I'm taking Folic Acid, Calcium Magnesium, Vitamin D, Iron, and vegan protein powder. Any chance you would know if there is any iodine in those? If a bread had iodine salt in it, would they list it as salt or iodized salt? Any bottled waters have iodine in them? I appreciate any advice you can give me. A little freaked out right now. Thanks.
Posted on 2011-10-22 14:39:23
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Graves' Disease and Low Iodine
Hi Jennifer, thanks for your comments and question. In regards to your supplements, check the labels to see if iodine is listed. If it is not listed, then it is unlikely they contain iodine. As for foods, try stick to plant foods as opposed to animal foods, since animal foods can more efficiently store iodine. If a loaf of bread contains salt, it is likely iodized salt. Check the sodium levels of the foods you eat, and to play it safe, avoid high sodium foods, try only eat natural foods with no added salt or preservatives.
Posted on 2011-10-22 14:48:04
Name:Sophie
Subject:Too much iodine?
Hi, I've recently included a multi vitamin for my 4 year old son which contains iodine (only 60 mcg) for about a month. He is now showing symptoms of hypothyroid such as puffy face, dark circles and adrenal fatigue. I've since removed the multi vitamins 2 days ago. Will thyroid gland readjust itself and resolve the problem? We do eat Japanese food once a while. Thanks.
Posted on 2011-11-07 03:23:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Too much iodine?
Hi Sophie, thanks for your question. It is important to remember that when it comes to most nutrients, children actually need less that adults, this is because their body size is typically smaller. Therefore the 60 mcg of Iodine could still be quite a lot, especially if you eat a lot of seafood, or live in an area with a lot of iodine. It would be best that you stop eating Seafood and Japanese foods until your son's symptoms disapear. If they are not gone after 1-2 weeks then consult your health care provider.
Posted on 2011-11-07 03:29:18
Name:Shona
Location:Britain
Subject:Hyperthyroidism
Hi, I've just been diagnosed with an overactive thyroid gland. Some pages on the internet are telling me I should be cutting down on iodine, but others don't mention it. I really don't know much about it at all, is there any information you could give me on my diet please? Also, do I have grave's disease? My doctor didn't mention it, but most people who have hyperthyroidism seem to mention that they have it aswell? Thankyou!
Posted on 2011-11-11 18:10:31
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hyperthyroidism
Hi Shona, sorry to hear of your condition. You should probably be cutting back on iodine to see if your condition improves. This would involve cutting out iodized salt, seafood, and most animal foods. Try eat a diet which consists of natural plant foods with no additives to be sure you are not getting iodine without knowing it. Your suspicions about Grave's disease are warranted, as Grave's disease is the leading cause of Hyperthyroidism. Grave's disease can be hereditary, so ask your relatives if any of them have Grave's disease and what their advice is. Also, talk to your doctor about further tests to diagnose Grave's disease. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2011-11-11 18:10:31
Name:Ev
Location:USA
Subject:Too much or too little?
Hi! How do I know if I have too much iodine or too little iodine? I think I have goiter and I'm really scared that it's going to get worse. I'm also nervous about going to the doctor. Is goiter caused more by too much or little iodine? How can I tell myself? Please help, thank you!
Posted on 2011-11-17 00:51:55
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Too much or too little?
Hi Ev, thanks for your question. Goiter occurs when there is improper regulation of the thyroid hormones. The cause of this can be too much or too little iodine, as well as several diseases such as Hasimoto's Thyroiditis, and Grave's Disease. Due to this complexity it can be quite difficult to tell if you have too much or too little iodine. Do you eat a lot of iodized salt? Are you vegetarian? Do you eat a lot of seafood including sushi? If you don't eat much iodized salt, seafoods, and are vegetarian, then it is likely you have an iodine deficiency. If the opposite is true, you could have too much iodine. You could also have some other condition. If you really want to avoid the doctor there are home thyroid test kits available, but given their high cost, you might be best with a visit to your health care provider.
Posted on 2011-11-17 00:51:55
Name:Ev
Location:USA
Subject:RE: Too much or too little?
Thank you, this has helped. I think I may have a deficiency because I almost never have seafood because of the expense. I have iodized salt at home, but that isn't something I specifically look for. I also really watch my salt intake because I always thought that salt is bad. Thank you for you help!
Posted on 2011-11-17 21:07:27
Name:Judy
Location:USA
Subject:Salt
I have hypo-thyroidism and my everytime I go to the doctor, she asks me if I am cutting down on my salt because she says I need to eat more. HELP.
Posted on 2011-11-30 12:02:13
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Salt
Hi Judy, thanks for your question. It does seem odd that your doctor only asks you to focus on salt. It can be assumed that your doctor wants you to get more iodine in your diet, and there are other ways of getting iodine than just fortified salt. Try eating more seafood, and if you like it, dry seaweed snacks, or sushi nori. You can also talk to your doctor about taking natural kelp iodine supplements. Does your doctor want you to eat more salt for any other reason? Do you have low blood pressure? You may also want to check that the salt you are currently using is fortified with iodine, since not all salt provides iodine. Hope that helps!
Posted on 2011-11-30 12:28:57
Name:Maddison
Location:Australia
Subject:Low thyroid
Hi, I have been told that I have a low thyroid but need to be mindful of how much Iodine I eat. Most articles I have read say that someone with a low thyroid should try to eat Iodine. Why would I be different?
Posted on 2011-11-30 18:04:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low thyroid
Hi Maddison, thanks for your question. There could be several reasons why you have been told not to eat too much iodine. The first is that your low thyroid (hypothyroidism) is not caused by a lack of iodine, but instead by Hashimoto’s disease, or even stress, as well as some other possible causes. Another reason you may have been warned not to eat too much iodine is that too much iodine can also be harmful to health, and it can be easy to get too much iodine. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2011-11-30 20:33:34
Name:Cristina
Location:New York
Subject:SEA SALT
Hello there, I have chosen to use sea salt in my cooking, trying to stay away from processed foods like table salt. The sea salt I use clearly says "not a source of Iodine". I have a 3 yr. old son, is he at risk of having low amounts of iodine in his diet?
Posted on 2011-12-05 19:01:10
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: SEA SALT
Hi Cristina, thanks for your question. Unless you are sure your son is getting another source of iodine, it would be a good idea to feed him food with some iodized salt every day to ensure that he has adequate levels of iodine for his proper growth and development. In regards to refined foods there is likely little difference between Sea salt and Iodized salt. Both salts are "refined" products in the same sense. Iodized salt tends to be mined from the earth and refined into salt crystals, sea salt is harvested from the oceans, but is still "refined" into crystals. Refined foods to avoid are ones that include excess sugars, trans-fats, and so on. Think candy bars, ready-to-eat cereals, and drink powders.
Posted on 2011-12-05 21:20:21
Name:R. Crompton
Location:Vancouver , BC
Subject:Top Ten Foods with Iodine
There is ample information on this website concerning the top 10 foods with magnesium, selenium etc. but I don't see the top 10 foods containing iodine. Knowing about seaweed is good but what about other options?
Posted on 2011-12-29 15:14:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Top Ten Foods with Iodine
Thanks for your comment. The reason why there is no top 10 list for iodine is that there are no standard measures for iodine. The amounts vary too widly from region to region. Other than dried seaweed and fortified salt, little can be relied upon. However, prompted by your comment a table with sample values for iodine has now been added to the article. This table can be used as a guide for which foods more effectively concentrate iodine in regions with iodine rich soil or water. Hope that helps and please feel free to submit further questions or suggestions.
Posted on 2011-12-30 19:18:58
Name:Dee
Location:NY
Subject:Acne
Thank you for your wealth of info. Is the iodine found in seafood likely to aggravate cystic acne like iodine found in table salt?
Posted on 2012-01-29 06:23:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Acne
Hi Dee, thanks for your question. To the extent that the iodine in salt aggravates acne, you can expect the iodine in foods to act the same way. However, there is a lack of solid evidence for the iodine-acne connection. To reduce acne you might be better limiting your intake of high sugar foods, which have more evidence of aggravating acne.
Posted on 2012-01-29 23:44:10
Name:LdyBug
Location:Riverside,CA
Subject:Iodine Allergy And Acne
Hi..to comment on the link between iodine and acne..I stumbled upon my allergy to iodine when I was 19 (now 35)..at the time I was a lacto-ovo vegetarian. Eating mostly dairy products for protein and pretty uneducated nontheless. I was having cystic acne..also paired with itchyness and just acne in general. I stopped all dairy products and dairy proteins.. even in bread or anything else. My acne improved immensely. I also cannot have kelp or any sea vegetables, fish, wheat germ. I am a nearly sugar free vegan so its for sure NOT the sugar for myself..I do not eat packaged food at all. Be it canned or in a bag etc. I cook fresh food only except for the occasional restaurant visit but even then its a reputable place that serves organic etc. I still struggle with acne.. I recently learned that brown rice contains iodine and that gluten may be a culprit. Soooo.. I'm now experimenting with a no rice and gluten free diet. I grind my own grains so wasn't avoiding wheat germ which didn't occur to me until the past few weeks! Silly me. I am concerned for myself..avoiding as much iodine as I can.. I saw you mention a possible allergy to different forms..I've never been diagnosed by an MD. My aunt is allergic to iodine to the anaphalactic degree. I'm afraid to try ANY form of iodine but am also afraid of what comes from not having enough iodine..I'm sure I'm getting trace amounts but is it enough? I am cold sensitive.. VERY! Some days I cannot get warm..and I live in sunny Southern California..even when its 72 in my house I'm freezing! I struggle with fatigue..even though fitness is my life! My thyroid comes back fine anytime I have blood work done. I dream of having a completely clear complexion..and would probably die trying to attain that.. only those who deal with the pain of acne can relate. What do you say to those who have an allergy like mine? I need to live in a bubble and be fed through a tube I think!! I'm so sensitive to everything! Thanks.
Posted on 2012-02-02 19:59:20
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Iodine Allergy And Acne
Hi LdyBug, thanks for sharing your thoughts and experiences. Iodine allergies occur from different forms of iodine (non-dietary and dietary) and it is unlikely that your acne is caused by an iodine allergy. Your experiments with a gluten free diet, etc...might better uncover the cause of your acne. Be careful with trying to avoid iodine so you do not develop hypothyroidism. Iodine allergies are very rare, but if you feel like you may have an iodine allergy, then visit your health care provider to get tested and confirm.
Posted on 2012-02-02 23:33:48
Name:Jacob
Location:US
Subject:Deathly Allergic
When I was about 5 months old, I had a double hernia operation. The doctors used iodine and I nearly died. Then in kindergarten, I accidentally ate a fish sandwich and got very sick. Then, about seven years later, I ate my first pineapple, which i was allergic to due to its iodine content. I've always been able to eat soy and walnuts, both of which are rather high in Iodine. I'm 18 now, and I haven't tried shellfish or medical iodine due to the fact that I was deathly allergic to it when i was younger. So, my question is, will I ever be unallergic to iodine?
Posted on 2012-03-22 01:24:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Deathly Allergic
Hi Jacob, thanks for your question. It sounds like you have various allergies, the first step is to visit your health care provider to get tested and have your iodine allergy confirmed. Allergies can go away with time, unfortunately, iodine allergies are so rare there have not been any studies or cases to confirm that an iodine allergy can cease.
Posted on 2012-03-22 16:14:12
Name:Ana
Location:LA
Subject:Nu-Salt
Hello! Do you know if the Salt Substitue 'Nu-Salt' has more or less Iodine than natural Sea Salt? (which I know has only trace elements). Thanks a lot for your help! :)
Posted on 2012-05-21 22:29:04
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Nu-Salt
Hi Ana, thanks for your question. According to the ingredients listed on the Nu-Salt website, it would not contain any added iodine, and would only contain very trace amounts from their own added natural flavorings. You are better off with sea salt in regards to increasing iodine consumption.
Posted on 2012-05-22 01:16:32
Name:Ana
Location:LA
Subject:RE: Nu-Salt
Thanks for your reply--just to avoid confusion though--you mean to say Sea Salt has more iodine than Nu-Salt? (As I was trying to actually decrease my iodine intake). Cheers :)
Posted on 2012-05-24 00:15:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Nu-Salt
Hi Ana, yes, Sea Salt would have more iodine than Nu-Salt. Check the product label of Nu-Salt to be sure in case they start adding iodine. If they do start adding iodine, you will see it on the label. For now, Nu-Salt has little to no iodine! Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-05-24 02:18:26
Name:Denise
Location:Miami
Subject:Owl Eyes
Hi, I don't know if I'm iodine deficient or not, but I'm wondering could iodine deficiency cause dark circles around eyes? Because around 5 years ago I got dark circles around both eyes, and remembering back, I was diagnosed with high b/p and I stopped using salt. I started getting these ark circles out of nowhere. I've seen a dermatologist,and the first thing she asked is did it ever itch. NO never itched. Not until now, I know to ask my doctor to check my iodine level. Or maybe I'll just go buy myself some natural kelp 150mcg to see if these dark circles will disappear, cause I've tried bleaching around my eyes, even used finacea, a cream my dermatologist prescribed, not working. Do you know if iodine deficiency is my problem?
Posted on 2012-05-25 23:07:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Owl Eyes
Hi Denise, thanks for your question. The dark circles around your eyes may be due to a lack of iodine and hypothyroidism. You can try the iodine supplements to see if they help after some weeks.
Posted on 2012-05-25 23:20:07
Name:Tito
Location:Phoenix
Subject:Iodine is receiving too much attention
Your thyroid condition has way more to contend with than just iodine. Most hyperthyroid is caused by copper deficiency and too much iodine, zinc, and selenium. These are good for hypos bad for hypers. Hypers need copper, and iron and none of the other three until they are efficient in copper. Then slowly add the other three little by little because you will later need that balance or else you will swing to the opposite extreme or develop hashitoxicosis. Watch out for vitamin bs and manganese if you are hyper. Get a hair test done. This will tell you what you are short in and what you have too much of. Then you will know how to treat the problem because you will know exactly what the problem is. Also test free t3, free t4, reverse t3 and reverse t4. A simple t3, t4, or tsh test will reveal nothing.
Posted on 2012-10-18 03:33:51
Name:T. Hannibal
Location:Texas
Subject:Iodine Deficiency is a Public Health Crisis
America might have a lot of iodine in the soil, but in 1970 an anti-iodine campaign began and by the late 70's all flour ceased being processed with iodine and instead began being processed with bromine. The source of this was not due to any negative research and is now presumed to have come from bromine producers. Bromine fits the same receptors in the thyroid the body's master gland, as well as female breasts and ovaries and every gland and cells in their bodies. In males its the thyroid and the prostate gland and every other gland and cells in their bodies.

Soy products including fermented soy also fits those receptors and also blocks out iodine absorption just as bromine does. Fluorine does the same. The leading cause of mental retardation in the world is a major iodine deficiency in prenatal pregnancies. Women store 45% of the iodine they intake in their breasts and thats how babies get the iodine during breast feeding. Moderate deficiency in the mother will result in their child with a 20 point reduction in IQ. A more severe deficiency causes vital brain development in the important first three years of life to be defective and our current autism epidemic studies are zeroing in on iodine deficiency.

All the autoimmune diseases, lupus, diabetes and Alzheimer's are also now being linked to iodine deficiency. So are cancers like thyroid, breast, prostate and pancreatic cancers as well as some others. The trick is eating your iodine rich food before you eat any flour or oat products or foods high in bromine such as pineapple, and any soy products including soy based margarine. Dried seaweed is the champ and you only need a few ounces to get all of your daily iodine. Wait at least a half hour after ingestion before eating any toast or cereal.

By the way, not taking any iodine because of hyperthyroidism is criminally wrong. If the hyperthyroidism is really bad, doctors have several means of inactivating part of the thyroid with lasers or radiation beam to reduce the thyroid volume to normal output levels.

Posted on 2013-03-23 22:27:30
Name:Kelly Jones
Location:Indiana
Subject:Iodine and Swollen throat
I have had normal and abnormal blood tests for thyroid. I think I could be iodine deficient however I was taking tri-iodine with 12.5 MG iodine. I felt out of control and irritable. Could that have been too high? Also, I have read much about the swelling of the thyroid and am not able to externally tell if it is swollen however I frequently feel like I have something stuck in my throat in the area of the thyroid. Could this be a swollen thyroid?
Posted on 2013-04-03 00:40:23
Name:Maria
Location:Canada
Subject:Iodine in veggies?
There hasn't been much told of what kind of vegetable contains a significant amount of iodine. I am vegan and don't use any animal products. Nor I eat fish. How else would I get enough iodine other than by using iodine salt?
Posted on 2013-04-20 17:23:31
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Iodine in veggies?
Hi Maria, thanks for your question. The iodine in vegetables varies by what soil it is grown in. Vegetables from the ocean will have more iodine than those from land. Thus kelp (dried seaweed) can be a great source of iodine for you. Have you tried any dried seaweed snacks? They are popular in East Asia, and available from Asian grocery stores or Amazon.com. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-04-21 03:23:14
Name:Angela
Location:Singapore
Subject:Seaweed for hypothyroidism
I am 50 this year. I had hyperthyroidism 14 years ago and had medication. After a procedure with oral liquid to bring level down, it was considered lower than normal, I think that's hypothyroidism. Doctor prescribed Euthyrox, levothyroxine sodium of 50mcg, to be taken daily. Recently dosage for weekends been increased from 50mcg to 100mcg each Saturday and Sunday. The Doctor says can eat seaweed, mom says better not, as it has iodine. But I believe with hypothyroidism, one should eat foods with iodine, eg seaweed or kelp, besides medication. I need true fact. After going on your site, I find it very informative and helpful. I hope you can help me with my query. Thank you!
Posted on 2013-05-13 16:18:40
Name:Salsa
Location:Hong Kong
Subject:Can I eat seaweed?
Can I eat seaweed or kelp? I have level lower than normal (HYPOthyroidism) after taking the oral therapy to bring down HYPERthyroidism, which started 14 years ago. I am taking prescription of Euthyrox (levothyroxine sodium) 50mcg every weekdays and 100mcg every weekend.
Posted on 2013-05-14 22:11:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Seaweed and Iodine after Hypothyroidism
Hi Angela and Salsa, thanks for your questions. Basically, you can eat seaweed (or high iodine foods) if you have a low iodine level. If your iodine level is normal, then it is best you limit your iodine intake, as too much iodine, as well as too little iodine can both cause hypothyroidism. It does seem strange, but it is true since iodine regulates the thyroid hormone, and both too much and too little iodine throws this regulation off. The U.S. National Institute of health cautions that "Taking iodine drops or eating foods containing large amounts of iodine—such as seaweed, dulse, or kelp—may cause or worsen hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism." Read more here. As such, Angela you can eat seaweed as long as your iodine is low, and Salsa, you should probably avoid seaweed completely. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-05-15 03:58:33
Name:Jon Anthony
Location:Dallas, Tx
Subject:Iodine Decifiency Potentially Linked to Autism
Pregnant women with an iodine deficiency can potentially cause autism in the unborn child. It is very important to take a multivitamin, or iodine supplement, to be sure you are getting the adequate amount of iodine in your diet.
Posted on 2013-07-11 13:18:22
Name:Patricia Imanyi
Location:Calabar
Subject:Cod liver oil and iodine
Thanks for all the comments. They are educative but there is some thing I want to find out from you. Do cod liver oil capsules contain iodine?
Posted on 2013-08-08 09:06:36
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cod liver oil and iodine
Hi Patricia, cod liver oil capsules (supplements) should contain some iodine. The amount can vary greatly though, so don't only rely on the capsules. Eating fish from the sea/ocean can also be a good source of iodine in your diet.
Posted on 2013-08-08 10:38:34
Name:Troy
Location:Canada
Subject:Asthma & Kelp
Hi, I am asthmatic and had problems when taking 600mg of kelp pills daily. How else can I increase my iodine levels given I cannot take kelp? Please help me with this. Thank you.
Posted on 2013-10-02 12:12:55
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Asthma & Kelp
Hi Troy, not sure about your particular situation, but would a different iodine supplement without kelp help? You can try this iodine supplement by Pure Encapsulations and see if it works for you. Consult with your doctor if you are not sure.
Posted on 2013-10-03 02:30:54
Name:Troy
Location:Canada
Subject:RE: Asthma & Kelp
Thank you very much for your response. In starting out trying with iodine, what is your recommendation of a low dose?
Posted on 2013-10-03 08:55:34
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Asthma & Kelp
Hi Troy, thanks for your question. The amount of iodine you need depends on your situation, have you been tested as low in iodine? If not, a low dose would simply be the recommended daily allowance of 150 micrograms (mcg) a day. The supplement recommended above provides 225mcg per pill. This dose per day would also be a good start. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-04 03:28:43
Name:Troy
Location:Canada
Subject:Asthma & Kelp
I checked on Pure from the link you provided, however, Pure is derived from kelp, unfortunately.
Posted on 2013-10-04 16:34:40
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE :Asthma and Kelp
Hi Troy, thanks for your comments, and sorry to hear that supplement doesn't work. Should you find a kelp free iodine supplement, please come back to let other readers know about it!
Posted on 2013-10-05 04:53:25
Name:Subrina
Location:New Jersey
Subject:Thyroid, Goiter, and best next steps
This website has a lot of information. I think I have a goiter, I am havng some pain in the front of my neck where I have thyroid. If I eat seaweed daily, do you think I will be able to get rid of my goiter? Also if I have go to a doctor, should go to an endocrinologist or some other specialist? Thanks in advance.
Posted on 2013-10-05 22:26:51
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Thyroid, Goiter, and best next steps
Hi Sabrina, thanks for your question. Remember that goiter can be caused from both too little and too much iodine, so eating more iodine via kelp may make your situation worse, as opposed to helping it. Since pain in the front of your neck has many causes you might consult a general doctor before an endocrinologist. Though an endocrinologist is the correct specialty regarding hormones, the thyroid, and goiter.
Posted on 2013-10-06 04:49:45
Name:Cris
Location:Katy
Subject:Nodules in Thyroid and Low Iodine Diet?
Hello! Thanks for such informative site. I have several nodules in my thyroid and they are making my thyroid to be hyper. The symptoms are awful (palpitations, weakness, anxiety, depression, headaches, etc). My doctor recommended to avoid iodine, since it can make my thyroid to overreact. I'm in a gluten free diet, however I eat eggs, dairy and lots of vegetables including potatoes. What do I really need to avoid to give my thyroid a break while the doctor decides what is the best route to fix this problem? Thanks a lot in advance.
Posted on 2013-10-09 05:31:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Nodules in Thyroid and Low Iodine Diet?
Hi Cris, Thanks for your question. Switch from iodized salt to a non-iodized form if you haven't already. Also, avoid any sea food, baked potato with skin, eggs, and try to limit meat/animal food consumption. As meats concentrate nutrients. Hope that helps and you get better soon.
Posted on 2013-10-10 06:46:16
Name:Cris
Location:Katy
Subject:RE: Nodules in Thyroid and Low Iodine Diet?
Thanks a lot for your quick answer! I got kosher salt and I'm avoiding seafood. However, I wanted to ask you if fish from sweet waters have also high amounts of iodine. If not, can you recommend some options regarding fish? I eat very little meet and some chicken, and I'm not that ready to go fully raw. Hopefully one day I will. Thanks a lot!
Posted on 2013-10-12 19:12:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Nodules in Thyroid and Low Iodine Diet?
Hi Cris, glad to have helped, and thanks for your questions. Freshwater fish should be fine. Fresh water trout and talapia are good choices, but any freshwater fish should be fine. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-13 15:30:21
Name:Bill Remple
Location:Philadelphia, PA
Subject:Amounts of Iodine and Health Risks
Article says, "Risks of high iodine intake include both hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and goiter."

1. How can two opposites (hypo & hyper) both be caused by the same thing - too much Iodine? This makes no sense. Does the Thyroid flip a coin?

2. Goiter is cause by too little Iodine, so how can too much Iodine cause goiter?

Posted on 2013-11-03 00:07:54
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Amounts of Iodine and Health Risks
Hi Bill, thanks for your questions. To answer your first and second question, here is a quote direct from The Office of Dietary Supplements page on iodine:
"High intakes of iodine can cause some of the same symptoms as iodine deficiency—including goiter, elevated TSH levels, and hypothyroidism—because excess iodine in susceptible individuals inhibits thyroid hormone synthesis and thereby increases TSH stimulation, which can produce goiter. Iodine-induced hyperthyroidism can also result from high iodine intakes, usually when iodine is administered to treat iodine deficiency." There are references there if you want further info.

It should be noted that iodine deficiency does account as the cause for 90% of goiters. However, goiters can appear without any iodine imbalance, and later lead to hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism.

Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-11-03 06:22:12
Name:Peggy
Location:Arizona
Subject:Mercury & contaminants in Kelp &/or Seaweed
Since I have hypothyroidism (not Hashimoto's)treated w/prescription porcine thyroid, am wondering if it is caused by low iodine in my diet. I eat a healthy diet which is low salt (so no iodine there), little meat, little to no dairy, low refined carbs (breads) & try to limit fish secondary to concerns re: mercury & contaminants in the oceans.

2 Questions:

1) Is there a way to get a kelp supplement that has little to no mercury or other seawater contaminants or a good supplement manufacturer that checks for them?

2) Is there a reliable,accurate lab test to check for low iodine levels?

I had read that bromine added to bread, citrus drinks & other processed foods, causes bromine overload & saps iodine levels. Apparently, food processors previously used iodine, but bromine is cheaper.

Any thoughts,suggestions or recommendations?

Posted on 2013-11-06 13:12:44
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Mercury & contaminants in Kelp &/or Seaweed
Hi Peggy, thanks for your questions. First, you do not need to worry about mercury or contaminants in kelp. That worry extends to predatory fish high in the food chain who concentrate those contaminants in a process called biomagnification. Plants, like kelp, are the lowest on the food chain and are safe.

I cannot recommend any lab for iodine testing. Sorry.

There are not any studies to confirm bromine reduces iodine levels. As most in the U.S. have high iodine levels, it seems unlikely. Hope those thoughts help.

Posted on 2013-11-07 04:24:41
Name:Ellie Ragsdale
Location:Mtn. View, CA
Subject:Hypothyroidism and all the too-much-iodine diseases
I'm wondering, if you eat one 0.01%DV too much iodine, is it possible that you'll get hypothyroidism?
Posted on 2013-12-31 13:15:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hypothyroidism and all the too-much-iodine diseases
Hi Ellie, thanks for your question. The daily value or (%DV) is meant as a guideline for the amount of iodine to eat each day. Eating a bit more or a bit less each day should be fine. What is not good is eating a consistently high amount each day. Though results can differ between individuals. The tolerable upper intake for iodine is 1,100mcg per day.
Posted on 2014-01-02 17:17:33
Name:Sara
Location:USA
Subject:Iodine RDA not true
Hello, please google Dr.Sircus and his medical veritas website, to discover that the RDA on iodine is a joke, and average woman in japan via eating seaweed, gets 13,000 mcg, not 150-- lack of proper iodine is found in 94% OF ALL TESTED (universal), damages the thyroid (any studies saying it hurts, are recording selenium deficiency which iodine needs together to work properly), and it CAUSES cancers to be low. the entire body needs iodine, every cell inside you, to work properly. The iodine in SALT, evaporates almost immediately, leaving YOU with zero intake if you're relying on that.
Posted on 2014-01-15 08:35:26

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Name:Annie
Location:Kansas
Subject:Iodine Content of Various Foods
How much iodine is in chocolate, sea kelp, eggs, yogurt, cheese, seafood,and sauerkraut?
Posted on 2011-03-16 11:17:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Location:San Francisco, CA
Subject:RE: how much iodine
Hi Annie, The amount would depend very much on the location the food was grown as iodine levels in the earth and oceans vary. Seaweed and kelp can have as much as 4,500 mcg (micrograms) of Iodine, that is equal to 4.5 milligrams! One cup of milk can have up to 56 mcg in comparison, and one egg can provide 12 mcg. So seaweed/kelp really is a rich source, but it is important to remember that these numbers can really vary. The Linus Pauling website has a table with some more estimates of iodine in foods.
You can also buy Iodine Supplements from places like Amazon.com
If you are worried about the effects of radiation from the troubles in Japan, then you want to buy Potassium Iodide tablets. However, the effects of the radiation, and the necessity of the tablets is still uncertain. Be sure not to consume too much iodine!
Posted on 2011-03-16 11:39:58
Name:Chris J. Slater
Location:Lqadysmith, B.C., Canada
Subject:Natural sources
Thanks for your article. I like natural sources, like those used in the macrobiotic diet as used by the Japanese for centuries. Miso, saeveggies, whole grain brown rice, Hokkaido squash, etc. Suggest Googling macrobiotics+radioactivity.
Posted on 2011-03-17 23:05:37
Name:Joshua Sutton
Location:Indianapolis
Subject:Sea Salt
Thank you for your informative article. I have a question about sea salt vs. iodized table salt. Is the latter the only one that contains iodine? Does it occur naturally in sea salt? I do take CVS Spectravite daily multi-vitamin which contains 150 mcg (DV%).
Posted on 2011-03-31 14:38:56
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Sea Salt
Hi Joshua, Thanks for your question. Sea salt would certainly contain some iodine. The exact amount would depend on the concentration of iodine in the water from where the salt came. This varies widely across the world, however, it is generally thought that sea salt will contain less iodine than fortified commercial salts. In any case, the 150mcg in your supplement is enough to meet your daily requirement.
Posted on 2011-03-31 15:33:03
Name:Lindsey C
Location:Seattle
Subject:Stomach ache
I love eating seaweed and have increased my consumption of those yummy roasted, salted seaweed snacks. On average I probably eat 1/2 to 1 sheet (you know the size of a nori sheet of sushi) 5 times a week. However, I have developed bad stomach cramps and nausea on a daily basis. The only thing I changed in my diet was the increase of seaweed. Your article is the only place I found that stated over consumption can cause a stomach ache. Do you have any more information on that? Does it seem like I'm eating too much?
Posted on 2011-03-31 22:28:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Stomach ache
Hi Lindsey, It does not seem like too much seaweed, however, the increase in iodine could be causing your stomach ache. Try a different brand of seaweed, which may have lower iodine levels, and see if you feel better. Another possibility is that you are not drinking enough liquid and the dry snack is making you feel uncomfortable as it hydrates in your stomach. Try consuming more liquids when you snack and see if you feel better. As always, see a doctor if your condition does not improve in the next day or two.
Posted on 2011-03-31 22:33:51
Name:Adrianne
Location:Ohio
Subject:Hypothyroidism
I actually suffer from hypothyroidism, I take medication for it. I don't generally use a lot of salt with foods I cook, I don't like the taste of it so I usually end up using other herbs to flavor. I have had a couple of friends suggest that I buy kelp pills to help. Is this a good idea and if so, how much would be alright before it is too much?
Posted on 2011-04-04 19:11:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hypothyroidism
Hi Adrianne, thanks for your question. Hypothyroidism can be caused by both high and low iodine levels. You only want to take a supplement if you are sure your iodine level is low. Otherwise, too much iodine can be harmful. The key is maintaining a balance. I you are not sure, then just maintain a normal diet and stick to your medication. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2011-04-04 19:19:30
Name:Ojaswee Sharma
Location:Chandigarh
Subject:Is Iodine the key?
I have been feeling very weak since the last 4 weeks. I had consulted a doctor for it. He prescribed me with multi-vitamins. the prescription hasn't worked well. I suspect a good dip with my thyroid. My muscles are weak, i feel sleepy throughout, lazy, and lethargic. How could I get help from here?
Posted on 2011-04-07 11:11:01
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Is Iodine the key?
Hi Ojaswee, Thanks for your comment. What vitamins did your doctor prescribe exactly? Do they contain iodine? If you suspect you have a low thyroid then you can try taking some kelp iodine supplements to see if your condition improves. Also, your weakness, or anemia can be caused by a variety of vitamin deficiencies. Be sure you are eating enough high iron foods, food high in vitamin B12, folate (B9), and phosphorus.
Posted on 2011-04-07 11:11:50
Name:Terr
Location:Tucson, AZ
Subject:Iodine Allergy
I am allergic to or have low tolerance to Iodine. This is confirmed. It is nearly impossible to get a well rounded diet since I am also diabetic. I have done a great deal of research but could use some help. Any ideas on sites, books, etc
Posted on 2011-04-12 15:03:47
Name:Carole
Location:Buffalo,NY
Subject:lowsalt diet
I live in a low iodine area and recently I have been put on a low-salt, low fat diet due to heart problems (retaining fluid causing overexertion to my heart). I am doing well on it and using no table salt, just an artifical salt called NuSalt. Problem is someone told me I should watch it that I could be lowering my iodine in my body and inviting a goiter. What natural foods can I eat that would supply natural iodine to me. I would rather not take a pill. thank you.(I must also take water pills)
Posted on 2011-04-28 12:17:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: lowsalt diet
Hi Carole, thanks for your question. Given your heart problems you want to focus on eating more seafood, and if you like it, sushi. The outer wrap of sushi is a dried seaweed called nori, and it is very high in iodine. Other seafood like fish and crab are not only high in iodine, but can also promote heart health. Even though you are opposed to taking any kind of pill, natural kelp tablets can be a good supplement, and are just the natural extract of dried seaweed. Your friend's caution is wise, but you also don't want to worry too much. Have your doctor test your thyroid on your next visit, alternatively, there are also a few home thyroid test kits available.
Posted on 2011-04-28 19:08:36
Name:Kristi Dotson
Location:Illinois
Subject:Hashimoto's Disease
Would taking an iodine supplement help w/ the side effects of Hashimoto's Disease? How would you know when to back off of the supplement during the hyperthyroid part of the disease? I found out I have Hashimoto Disease about a month ago & I have days where I'm rearing to go & the next I have no energy at all. Is there anything to do about the bulging of the eyes (eye drops)? It feels like they're going to pop out of my head, I've tried heat & cold and neither seem to have an effect on them, they hurt and trigger a migraine. If there's anything new you can tell me about the disease that I haven't read on the net already, that would be great. Thanks.
Posted on 2011-05-14 08:04:00
Name:Cinthia
Location:NC
Subject:Thyroid, Iodine Deficiency
Hi, I was wondering about my low metabolism rate when I read an article about how low metabolism could potentially be caused by something called Hypothyroidism, or a sluggish thyroid. I looked this up and it was linked to lack of iodine, or even iodine deficiencies. I doubt I have this, but there could still be that slight possibility. So, I guess my question is, what do you know about this? Are there any specific foods that contain a lot of Iodine? I wouldn't typically know where the foods are from; just where they're bought (haha). Is it possible to take Iodine supplements or pills without a prescription (do they sell them at common places) or should I talk to my doctor about this? I just wanted to get your opinion before I go waltzing into the Dr.'s office asking for Iodine pills and claiming that I'm Iodine deficient and have Hypothyroidism when I just learned about it 5 minutes ago:) Thank you so much!
Posted on 2011-05-14 23:05:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Thyroid, Iodine Deficiency
Hi Cinthia, Thanks for your question. The first thing to do would be to ask your doctor to test for hypothyroidism, however, hypothyroidism often goes undiagnosed. You can buy natural iodine supplements over the counter to be sure you are reaching your daily value. The simplest (and maybe even cheapest) thing to do would be to buy a bottle and see if it helps your metabolism after 30 days. In terms of specific foods high in iodine seaweed and kelp can have as much as 4,500 mcg (micrograms) of Iodine, that is equal to 4.5 milligrams! One cup of milk can have up to 56 mcg in comparison, and one egg can provide 12 mcg. So seaweed/kelp really is a rich source, but it is important to remember that these numbers can really vary. The Linus Pauling website has a table with some more estimates of iodine in foods. Hope that helps!
Posted on 2011-05-14 23:18:27
Name:Darlene
Location:TX
Subject:Hyperthroidism
I had a lab test with TSH of 40.29 which was supposed to be low thyroid. I was given levothyroxine 50mcg. 3 weeks after I had 112 pulse and irregular heartrate. Another blood test then TSH was 0.173 which means over active thyroid. Dr. said not to take any more levothroxine. 2 weeks later still have time of high pulse and irregular heartrate sometimes lasting 8 or more hrs. Then sometimes everything is normal. Is there some foods that trigger that high pulse and irregular heartrate? I never had anything like this before that first lab report and then taking that levothyroxine. I had none of the symptoms of low thyroid either. I believe it was a wrong lab report the first time.I am just wondering when I get back normal.
Posted on 2011-05-19 17:42:10
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: hyperthroidism
Hi Darlene, thanks for your question. It appears that the levothroxine has led to your hyperthyroidism and resulting increase in heart rate and heart palpitations (irregular heart rhythm). Although it is the levothroxine and hyperthyroidism that brought on these palpitations, other things like caffeine (tea and coffee), alcohol, nicotine (cigarettes), stress, and lack of sleep can also cause palpitations. Try reduce or eliminate caffeine, alcohol, and nicotine from your lifestyle. Try consuming less iodine for a few days, by switching to kosher salt, or other unfortified salt. If after 2-3 more weeks you do not get better, you might want to get tested for hyperthyroidism again.
Posted on 2011-05-19 19:45:55
Name:Chandrika
Location:Kadapa, India
Subject:Hypothyroidism
I heard that using salt is not good for health, so I absolutely stoped including salt in cooking food. After 3 months, my son got hypothyroidism and now he is on thyroxine 50 microgram tablets. Should I give lot of iodised salt or required quantity? Can you tell me what is the ideal requirement of iodine per day? And what are the natural vegetables containing iodine? Thank You.
Posted on 2011-06-06 05:29:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hypothyroidism
Hi Chandrika, sorry to hear of your son's hypothyroidism. It is OK to start giving him salt again. Definitely do not give him more than the recommended amount, as too much salt and too much iodine can be harmful! You only need 150 micrograms of iodine a day to meet your requirement, which is very little. As for vegetables the amount of iodine varies depending on the soil in which the vegetables were grown. Seaweed, and other vegetable foods from the sea tend to be the highest in iodine. If you are lacto-ovo vegetarian you can expect milk and eggs to have more iodine than ordinary vegetables. As always remember not to give too much iodine and your son will improve with time. Alternatively, you can also use natural kelp iodine supplements.
Posted on 2011-06-07 02:00:59
Name:Dee
Location:New York
Subject:Hypothyroid & Iodine Allergy
Hi I noticed you did not answer the person who has confirmed iodine allergy. I am quite confused because I have hypothyroid and have severe allergic reactions to all iodine supplements and shellfish. I would like to take an iodine supplement that is NOT from a sea/ocean source. Do you have any suggestions?
Posted on 2011-07-03 05:33:37
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hypothyroid & Iodine Allergy
Hi Dee, thanks for your comment. As anyone who has an allergy it is important to find out the source and in what form the iodine causes a reaction. You have found that seafood is the main reason for your allergy and that is important. As for supplements to try, have your tried potassium iodide tablets? These are the same pills people took to counter radiation. Use caution and consult your health care provider before taking these supplements. If you find something that works, please come back and comment for the benefit of other readers.
Posted on 2011-07-03 18:29:20
Name:Shonn
Subject:RE: Hyperthyroidism for Darlene in TX
Maybe hyperthyroidism, but it sounds like a heart condition called WPW (Wolff/Parkinson/White Syndrome). Ask your doctor about it, if that person does not know of WPW then you may be talking to the wrong person. I've lived with WPW my whole life. My suggestion is good nutrition, rest, activity, and stess management.
Posted on 2011-07-15 09:53:18
Name:Lindsey
Location:Texas
Subject:Hyperthyroid?
I just returned from China . I have never had thyroid problems. I went for a checkup on return and was diagnosed with hyperthyroid. Despite the fact I have no symptoms. During the iodine uptake test they said my thyroid was enlarged...like a small goiter. Could this be caused by too much iodine while in China? Does too much or too little iodine cause a goiter?
Posted on 2011-08-05 06:05:29
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hyperthyroid
Hi Lindsey, thanks for your question. How long were you travelling in China? If it was less than a month, it is unlikely your change in diet had too much affect. Also, if you look a the World Health Organization map referenced in this article you will see that the U.S. and China have about the same risk of hyperthyroidism. Both too much and too little iodine can result in goiter, but the cause of your thyroid being enlarged can be due to a variety of causes. The problem may also be genetic, ask relatives if they have had any similar problems and also consider getting a second opinion on your diagnosis.
Posted on 2011-08-06 10:03:48
Name:Lani
Location:Hawaii
Subject:Iodine Allergy
I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism a couple of years ago. I am allergic to iodine and seaweed but was still given Kelp supplements to help treat my illness. I had a severe reaction soon after taking one pill. Is there anything else I could get iodine? Milk? Yogurt?
Posted on 2011-09-05 03:08:12
Name:JJ
Location:Michigan
Subject:Be Careful with Kelp
I have been taking kelp (325 micrograms) 1 pill a day and I am afraid that this quantiy is too much iodine. I am feeling something strange in my throat and maybe I have caused the thyroid to be hyper. Please be careful! I would not worry about being deficient in iodine if you are eating healthy. America does not have a problem with iodine deficiency.
Posted on 2011-09-07 19:18:07
Name:Nato
Location:Nigeria
Subject:Iodine Deficiency
I have been noticing growth at the upper part of my neck. The doctor has told me that I have iodine deficiency in my body and that I should be taking salt that contains Iodine. What other things can I do to correct this? Can be pls make suggestion on Iodine supplement and possibly any other foods that contain iodine? Thanks very much.
Posted on 2011-09-11 11:36:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Iodine Deficiency
Hi Nato, sorry to hear of your diagnosis and thanks for your question. Your best bet is to focus on eating foods from the sea if there are any available. Eating sea-fish and sea-weed, particularly kelp, should help. In terms of a supplement there are many on the market. Try get a natural iodine kelp supplement. You are probably best trying to find this at a local pharmacy, however, iodine supplements can also be ordered online here.
Posted on 2011-09-12 05:35:35
Name:Ana
Location:Los Angeles
Subject:Too much iodine
I have been taking Iodine supplements and it seems like I have been having more hair growth in different areas of my body - could this be caused by the iodine?
Posted on 2011-09-15 23:52:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Too much iodine
Hi Ana, Thanks for your question. Iodine is important in regulation of thyroid hormones. While thyroid hormones are involved in growth and metabolism it is unlikely that excess iodine is leading to your hair growth. Excess iodine will more likely be expressed as changes in metabolism and energy levels, as well as swelling in the neck known as goiter.
Posted on 2011-09-16 09:38:41
Name:Anonymous
Subject:RE: Hair growth and kelp
Re-extra hair growth while taking kelp tablets. I think that the kelp could be responsible for this.
Posted on 2011-09-16 11:12:55
Name:Katy
Location:UK
Subject:Kelp and Sea Vegetables
I was considering taking iodine in the form of rockweed or kelp but I am worried about the radiation levels in the sea. I am allergic to deep sea fish as well but am able to eat some fish such as tuna, trout, and pilchards without any reaction, are these enough to boost my iodine levels prior to radiotherapy and isotope treatments?
Posted on 2011-09-17 19:43:56
Name:Susan
Location:US
Subject:Reaction to Iodoral
Hi, I have hypothyroidism and did a patch test for iodine deficiency. It seems I am very deficient. I started taking 1/2 a Iodoral 12mg. a day and had terrible headaches that only went away if I drank salt water. Oddly, when I didn't have the headache, I felt awesome. Should I try kelp instead?
Posted on 2011-10-07 15:08:22
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Reaction to Iodoral
Hi Susan, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your symptoms. It seems like every medication has a side effect. Given that kelp iodine supplements are natural, you might have better luck with them. Some people have reported being allergic to kelp, but if you are not, there is likely no reason not to try them. Consult with your health provider to be sure about making the switch. Even a phone consultation should suffice. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2011-10-07 15:16:09
Name:Patricia
Location:Canada
Subject:Hypothyroid & Pregnant
Hi, I have just been told I have hypothyroidism and I am 9 weeks pregnant. What can I take naturally instead of medication?
Posted on 2011-10-12 15:08:54
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hypothyroid & Pregnant
Hi Patricia, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your condition. There can be many causes of your hypothyroidism and if it is not caused by a dietary deficiency (lack of iodine) then you may have to take medication in lieu of natural options. However, if you have an iodine deficiency then you can consider eating more dried seaweed (Nori), or taking natural iodine kelp supplements. Proper levels of iodine and thyroid hormone are essential for your baby's development, and even though no one likes taking medications, it might be your only option to ensure proper health. Talk to your health care provider about trying iodine supplements first to see if your condition improves before trying medications. You can find more information about hypothyroidism and pregnancy here.
Posted on 2011-10-13 10:14:25
Name:Jennifer
Location:Toronto
Subject:Graves' Disease and Low Iodine
I was just diagnosed with Graves' Disease, which is a Hyperactive Thyroid condition, last week. The doctor told me to avoid iodine, like Seafood and Iodized Salt. Which is all good as I read your article above and it has answered so many of my curious questions about where Iodine is found in foods. However, now I'm concerned about the supplements that I take... I'm taking Folic Acid, Calcium Magnesium, Vitamin D, Iron, and vegan protein powder. Any chance you would know if there is any iodine in those? If a bread had iodine salt in it, would they list it as salt or iodized salt? Any bottled waters have iodine in them? I appreciate any advice you can give me. A little freaked out right now. Thanks.
Posted on 2011-10-22 14:39:23
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Graves' Disease and Low Iodine
Hi Jennifer, thanks for your comments and question. In regards to your supplements, check the labels to see if iodine is listed. If it is not listed, then it is unlikely they contain iodine. As for foods, try stick to plant foods as opposed to animal foods, since animal foods can more efficiently store iodine. If a loaf of bread contains salt, it is likely iodized salt. Check the sodium levels of the foods you eat, and to play it safe, avoid high sodium foods, try only eat natural foods with no added salt or preservatives.
Posted on 2011-10-22 14:48:04
Name:Sophie
Subject:Too much iodine?
Hi, I've recently included a multi vitamin for my 4 year old son which contains iodine (only 60 mcg) for about a month. He is now showing symptoms of hypothyroid such as puffy face, dark circles and adrenal fatigue. I've since removed the multi vitamins 2 days ago. Will thyroid gland readjust itself and resolve the problem? We do eat Japanese food once a while. Thanks.
Posted on 2011-11-07 03:23:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Too much iodine?
Hi Sophie, thanks for your question. It is important to remember that when it comes to most nutrients, children actually need less that adults, this is because their body size is typically smaller. Therefore the 60 mcg of Iodine could still be quite a lot, especially if you eat a lot of seafood, or live in an area with a lot of iodine. It would be best that you stop eating Seafood and Japanese foods until your son's symptoms disapear. If they are not gone after 1-2 weeks then consult your health care provider.
Posted on 2011-11-07 03:29:18
Name:Shona
Location:Britain
Subject:Hyperthyroidism
Hi, I've just been diagnosed with an overactive thyroid gland. Some pages on the internet are telling me I should be cutting down on iodine, but others don't mention it. I really don't know much about it at all, is there any information you could give me on my diet please? Also, do I have grave's disease? My doctor didn't mention it, but most people who have hyperthyroidism seem to mention that they have it aswell? Thankyou!
Posted on 2011-11-11 18:10:31
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hyperthyroidism
Hi Shona, sorry to hear of your condition. You should probably be cutting back on iodine to see if your condition improves. This would involve cutting out iodized salt, seafood, and most animal foods. Try eat a diet which consists of natural plant foods with no additives to be sure you are not getting iodine without knowing it. Your suspicions about Grave's disease are warranted, as Grave's disease is the leading cause of Hyperthyroidism. Grave's disease can be hereditary, so ask your relatives if any of them have Grave's disease and what their advice is. Also, talk to your doctor about further tests to diagnose Grave's disease. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2011-11-11 18:10:31
Name:Ev
Location:USA
Subject:Too much or too little?
Hi! How do I know if I have too much iodine or too little iodine? I think I have goiter and I'm really scared that it's going to get worse. I'm also nervous about going to the doctor. Is goiter caused more by too much or little iodine? How can I tell myself? Please help, thank you!
Posted on 2011-11-17 00:51:55
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Too much or too little?
Hi Ev, thanks for your question. Goiter occurs when there is improper regulation of the thyroid hormones. The cause of this can be too much or too little iodine, as well as several diseases such as Hasimoto's Thyroiditis, and Grave's Disease. Due to this complexity it can be quite difficult to tell if you have too much or too little iodine. Do you eat a lot of iodized salt? Are you vegetarian? Do you eat a lot of seafood including sushi? If you don't eat much iodized salt, seafoods, and are vegetarian, then it is likely you have an iodine deficiency. If the opposite is true, you could have too much iodine. You could also have some other condition. If you really want to avoid the doctor there are home thyroid test kits available, but given their high cost, you might be best with a visit to your health care provider.
Posted on 2011-11-17 00:51:55
Name:Ev
Location:USA
Subject:RE: Too much or too little?
Thank you, this has helped. I think I may have a deficiency because I almost never have seafood because of the expense. I have iodized salt at home, but that isn't something I specifically look for. I also really watch my salt intake because I always thought that salt is bad. Thank you for you help!
Posted on 2011-11-17 21:07:27
Name:Judy
Location:USA
Subject:Salt
I have hypo-thyroidism and my everytime I go to the doctor, she asks me if I am cutting down on my salt because she says I need to eat more. HELP.
Posted on 2011-11-30 12:02:13
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Salt
Hi Judy, thanks for your question. It does seem odd that your doctor only asks you to focus on salt. It can be assumed that your doctor wants you to get more iodine in your diet, and there are other ways of getting iodine than just fortified salt. Try eating more seafood, and if you like it, dry seaweed snacks, or sushi nori. You can also talk to your doctor about taking natural kelp iodine supplements. Does your doctor want you to eat more salt for any other reason? Do you have low blood pressure? You may also want to check that the salt you are currently using is fortified with iodine, since not all salt provides iodine. Hope that helps!
Posted on 2011-11-30 12:28:57
Name:Maddison
Location:Australia
Subject:Low thyroid
Hi, I have been told that I have a low thyroid but need to be mindful of how much Iodine I eat. Most articles I have read say that someone with a low thyroid should try to eat Iodine. Why would I be different?
Posted on 2011-11-30 18:04:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low thyroid
Hi Maddison, thanks for your question. There could be several reasons why you have been told not to eat too much iodine. The first is that your low thyroid (hypothyroidism) is not caused by a lack of iodine, but instead by Hashimoto’s disease, or even stress, as well as some other possible causes. Another reason you may have been warned not to eat too much iodine is that too much iodine can also be harmful to health, and it can be easy to get too much iodine. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2011-11-30 20:33:34
Name:Cristina
Location:New York
Subject:SEA SALT
Hello there, I have chosen to use sea salt in my cooking, trying to stay away from processed foods like table salt. The sea salt I use clearly says "not a source of Iodine". I have a 3 yr. old son, is he at risk of having low amounts of iodine in his diet?
Posted on 2011-12-05 19:01:10
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: SEA SALT
Hi Cristina, thanks for your question. Unless you are sure your son is getting another source of iodine, it would be a good idea to feed him food with some iodized salt every day to ensure that he has adequate levels of iodine for his proper growth and development. In regards to refined foods there is likely little difference between Sea salt and Iodized salt. Both salts are "refined" products in the same sense. Iodized salt tends to be mined from the earth and refined into salt crystals, sea salt is harvested from the oceans, but is still "refined" into crystals. Refined foods to avoid are ones that include excess sugars, trans-fats, and so on. Think candy bars, ready-to-eat cereals, and drink powders.
Posted on 2011-12-05 21:20:21
Name:R. Crompton
Location:Vancouver , BC
Subject:Top Ten Foods with Iodine
There is ample information on this website concerning the top 10 foods with magnesium, selenium etc. but I don't see the top 10 foods containing iodine. Knowing about seaweed is good but what about other options?
Posted on 2011-12-29 15:14:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Top Ten Foods with Iodine
Thanks for your comment. The reason why there is no top 10 list for iodine is that there are no standard measures for iodine. The amounts vary too widly from region to region. Other than dried seaweed and fortified salt, little can be relied upon. However, prompted by your comment a table with sample values for iodine has now been added to the article. This table can be used as a guide for which foods more effectively concentrate iodine in regions with iodine rich soil or water. Hope that helps and please feel free to submit further questions or suggestions.
Posted on 2011-12-30 19:18:58
Name:Dee
Location:NY
Subject:Acne
Thank you for your wealth of info. Is the iodine found in seafood likely to aggravate cystic acne like iodine found in table salt?
Posted on 2012-01-29 06:23:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Acne
Hi Dee, thanks for your question. To the extent that the iodine in salt aggravates acne, you can expect the iodine in foods to act the same way. However, there is a lack of solid evidence for the iodine-acne connection. To reduce acne you might be better limiting your intake of high sugar foods, which have more evidence of aggravating acne.
Posted on 2012-01-29 23:44:10
Name:LdyBug
Location:Riverside,CA
Subject:Iodine Allergy And Acne
Hi..to comment on the link between iodine and acne..I stumbled upon my allergy to iodine when I was 19 (now 35)..at the time I was a lacto-ovo vegetarian. Eating mostly dairy products for protein and pretty uneducated nontheless. I was having cystic acne..also paired with itchyness and just acne in general. I stopped all dairy products and dairy proteins.. even in bread or anything else. My acne improved immensely. I also cannot have kelp or any sea vegetables, fish, wheat germ. I am a nearly sugar free vegan so its for sure NOT the sugar for myself..I do not eat packaged food at all. Be it canned or in a bag etc. I cook fresh food only except for the occasional restaurant visit but even then its a reputable place that serves organic etc. I still struggle with acne.. I recently learned that brown rice contains iodine and that gluten may be a culprit. Soooo.. I'm now experimenting with a no rice and gluten free diet. I grind my own grains so wasn't avoiding wheat germ which didn't occur to me until the past few weeks! Silly me. I am concerned for myself..avoiding as much iodine as I can.. I saw you mention a possible allergy to different forms..I've never been diagnosed by an MD. My aunt is allergic to iodine to the anaphalactic degree. I'm afraid to try ANY form of iodine but am also afraid of what comes from not having enough iodine..I'm sure I'm getting trace amounts but is it enough? I am cold sensitive.. VERY! Some days I cannot get warm..and I live in sunny Southern California..even when its 72 in my house I'm freezing! I struggle with fatigue..even though fitness is my life! My thyroid comes back fine anytime I have blood work done. I dream of having a completely clear complexion..and would probably die trying to attain that.. only those who deal with the pain of acne can relate. What do you say to those who have an allergy like mine? I need to live in a bubble and be fed through a tube I think!! I'm so sensitive to everything! Thanks.
Posted on 2012-02-02 19:59:20
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Iodine Allergy And Acne
Hi LdyBug, thanks for sharing your thoughts and experiences. Iodine allergies occur from different forms of iodine (non-dietary and dietary) and it is unlikely that your acne is caused by an iodine allergy. Your experiments with a gluten free diet, etc...might better uncover the cause of your acne. Be careful with trying to avoid iodine so you do not develop hypothyroidism. Iodine allergies are very rare, but if you feel like you may have an iodine allergy, then visit your health care provider to get tested and confirm.
Posted on 2012-02-02 23:33:48
Name:Jacob
Location:US
Subject:Deathly Allergic
When I was about 5 months old, I had a double hernia operation. The doctors used iodine and I nearly died. Then in kindergarten, I accidentally ate a fish sandwich and got very sick. Then, about seven years later, I ate my first pineapple, which i was allergic to due to its iodine content. I've always been able to eat soy and walnuts, both of which are rather high in Iodine. I'm 18 now, and I haven't tried shellfish or medical iodine due to the fact that I was deathly allergic to it when i was younger. So, my question is, will I ever be unallergic to iodine?
Posted on 2012-03-22 01:24:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Deathly Allergic
Hi Jacob, thanks for your question. It sounds like you have various allergies, the first step is to visit your health care provider to get tested and have your iodine allergy confirmed. Allergies can go away with time, unfortunately, iodine allergies are so rare there have not been any studies or cases to confirm that an iodine allergy can cease.
Posted on 2012-03-22 16:14:12
Name:Ana
Location:LA
Subject:Nu-Salt
Hello! Do you know if the Salt Substitue 'Nu-Salt' has more or less Iodine than natural Sea Salt? (which I know has only trace elements). Thanks a lot for your help! :)
Posted on 2012-05-21 22:29:04
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Nu-Salt
Hi Ana, thanks for your question. According to the ingredients listed on the Nu-Salt website, it would not contain any added iodine, and would only contain very trace amounts from their own added natural flavorings. You are better off with sea salt in regards to increasing iodine consumption.
Posted on 2012-05-22 01:16:32
Name:Ana
Location:LA
Subject:RE: Nu-Salt
Thanks for your reply--just to avoid confusion though--you mean to say Sea Salt has more iodine than Nu-Salt? (As I was trying to actually decrease my iodine intake). Cheers :)
Posted on 2012-05-24 00:15:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Nu-Salt
Hi Ana, yes, Sea Salt would have more iodine than Nu-Salt. Check the product label of Nu-Salt to be sure in case they start adding iodine. If they do start adding iodine, you will see it on the label. For now, Nu-Salt has little to no iodine! Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-05-24 02:18:26
Name:Denise
Location:Miami
Subject:Owl Eyes
Hi, I don't know if I'm iodine deficient or not, but I'm wondering could iodine deficiency cause dark circles around eyes? Because around 5 years ago I got dark circles around both eyes, and remembering back, I was diagnosed with high b/p and I stopped using salt. I started getting these ark circles out of nowhere. I've seen a dermatologist,and the first thing she asked is did it ever itch. NO never itched. Not until now, I know to ask my doctor to check my iodine level. Or maybe I'll just go buy myself some natural kelp 150mcg to see if these dark circles will disappear, cause I've tried bleaching around my eyes, even used finacea, a cream my dermatologist prescribed, not working. Do you know if iodine deficiency is my problem?
Posted on 2012-05-25 23:07:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Owl Eyes
Hi Denise, thanks for your question. The dark circles around your eyes may be due to a lack of iodine and hypothyroidism. You can try the iodine supplements to see if they help after some weeks.
Posted on 2012-05-25 23:20:07
Name:Tito
Location:Phoenix
Subject:Iodine is receiving too much attention
Your thyroid condition has way more to contend with than just iodine. Most hyperthyroid is caused by copper deficiency and too much iodine, zinc, and selenium. These are good for hypos bad for hypers. Hypers need copper, and iron and none of the other three until they are efficient in copper. Then slowly add the other three little by little because you will later need that balance or else you will swing to the opposite extreme or develop hashitoxicosis. Watch out for vitamin bs and manganese if you are hyper. Get a hair test done. This will tell you what you are short in and what you have too much of. Then you will know how to treat the problem because you will know exactly what the problem is. Also test free t3, free t4, reverse t3 and reverse t4. A simple t3, t4, or tsh test will reveal nothing.
Posted on 2012-10-18 03:33:51
Name:T. Hannibal
Location:Texas
Subject:Iodine Deficiency is a Public Health Crisis
America might have a lot of iodine in the soil, but in 1970 an anti-iodine campaign began and by the late 70's all flour ceased being processed with iodine and instead began being processed with bromine. The source of this was not due to any negative research and is now presumed to have come from bromine producers. Bromine fits the same receptors in the thyroid the body's master gland, as well as female breasts and ovaries and every gland and cells in their bodies. In males its the thyroid and the prostate gland and every other gland and cells in their bodies.

Soy products including fermented soy also fits those receptors and also blocks out iodine absorption just as bromine does. Fluorine does the same. The leading cause of mental retardation in the world is a major iodine deficiency in prenatal pregnancies. Women store 45% of the iodine they intake in their breasts and thats how babies get the iodine during breast feeding. Moderate deficiency in the mother will result in their child with a 20 point reduction in IQ. A more severe deficiency causes vital brain development in the important first three years of life to be defective and our current autism epidemic studies are zeroing in on iodine deficiency.

All the autoimmune diseases, lupus, diabetes and Alzheimer's are also now being linked to iodine deficiency. So are cancers like thyroid, breast, prostate and pancreatic cancers as well as some others. The trick is eating your iodine rich food before you eat any flour or oat products or foods high in bromine such as pineapple, and any soy products including soy based margarine. Dried seaweed is the champ and you only need a few ounces to get all of your daily iodine. Wait at least a half hour after ingestion before eating any toast or cereal.

By the way, not taking any iodine because of hyperthyroidism is criminally wrong. If the hyperthyroidism is really bad, doctors have several means of inactivating part of the thyroid with lasers or radiation beam to reduce the thyroid volume to normal output levels.

Posted on 2013-03-23 22:27:30
Name:Kelly Jones
Location:Indiana
Subject:Iodine and Swollen throat
I have had normal and abnormal blood tests for thyroid. I think I could be iodine deficient however I was taking tri-iodine with 12.5 MG iodine. I felt out of control and irritable. Could that have been too high? Also, I have read much about the swelling of the thyroid and am not able to externally tell if it is swollen however I frequently feel like I have something stuck in my throat in the area of the thyroid. Could this be a swollen thyroid?
Posted on 2013-04-03 00:40:23
Name:Maria
Location:Canada
Subject:Iodine in veggies?
There hasn't been much told of what kind of vegetable contains a significant amount of iodine. I am vegan and don't use any animal products. Nor I eat fish. How else would I get enough iodine other than by using iodine salt?
Posted on 2013-04-20 17:23:31
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Iodine in veggies?
Hi Maria, thanks for your question. The iodine in vegetables varies by what soil it is grown in. Vegetables from the ocean will have more iodine than those from land. Thus kelp (dried seaweed) can be a great source of iodine for you. Have you tried any dried seaweed snacks? They are popular in East Asia, and available from Asian grocery stores or Amazon.com. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-04-21 03:23:14
Name:Angela
Location:Singapore
Subject:Seaweed for hypothyroidism
I am 50 this year. I had hyperthyroidism 14 years ago and had medication. After a procedure with oral liquid to bring level down, it was considered lower than normal, I think that's hypothyroidism. Doctor prescribed Euthyrox, levothyroxine sodium of 50mcg, to be taken daily. Recently dosage for weekends been increased from 50mcg to 100mcg each Saturday and Sunday. The Doctor says can eat seaweed, mom says better not, as it has iodine. But I believe with hypothyroidism, one should eat foods with iodine, eg seaweed or kelp, besides medication. I need true fact. After going on your site, I find it very informative and helpful. I hope you can help me with my query. Thank you!
Posted on 2013-05-13 16:18:40
Name:Salsa
Location:Hong Kong
Subject:Can I eat seaweed?
Can I eat seaweed or kelp? I have level lower than normal (HYPOthyroidism) after taking the oral therapy to bring down HYPERthyroidism, which started 14 years ago. I am taking prescription of Euthyrox (levothyroxine sodium) 50mcg every weekdays and 100mcg every weekend.
Posted on 2013-05-14 22:11:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Seaweed and Iodine after Hypothyroidism
Hi Angela and Salsa, thanks for your questions. Basically, you can eat seaweed (or high iodine foods) if you have a low iodine level. If your iodine level is normal, then it is best you limit your iodine intake, as too much iodine, as well as too little iodine can both cause hypothyroidism. It does seem strange, but it is true since iodine regulates the thyroid hormone, and both too much and too little iodine throws this regulation off. The U.S. National Institute of health cautions that "Taking iodine drops or eating foods containing large amounts of iodine—such as seaweed, dulse, or kelp—may cause or worsen hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism." Read more here. As such, Angela you can eat seaweed as long as your iodine is low, and Salsa, you should probably avoid seaweed completely. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-05-15 03:58:33
Name:Jon Anthony
Location:Dallas, Tx
Subject:Iodine Decifiency Potentially Linked to Autism
Pregnant women with an iodine deficiency can potentially cause autism in the unborn child. It is very important to take a multivitamin, or iodine supplement, to be sure you are getting the adequate amount of iodine in your diet.
Posted on 2013-07-11 13:18:22
Name:Patricia Imanyi
Location:Calabar
Subject:Cod liver oil and iodine
Thanks for all the comments. They are educative but there is some thing I want to find out from you. Do cod liver oil capsules contain iodine?
Posted on 2013-08-08 09:06:36
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cod liver oil and iodine
Hi Patricia, cod liver oil capsules (supplements) should contain some iodine. The amount can vary greatly though, so don't only rely on the capsules. Eating fish from the sea/ocean can also be a good source of iodine in your diet.
Posted on 2013-08-08 10:38:34
Name:Troy
Location:Canada
Subject:Asthma & Kelp
Hi, I am asthmatic and had problems when taking 600mg of kelp pills daily. How else can I increase my iodine levels given I cannot take kelp? Please help me with this. Thank you.
Posted on 2013-10-02 12:12:55
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Asthma & Kelp
Hi Troy, not sure about your particular situation, but would a different iodine supplement without kelp help? You can try this iodine supplement by Pure Encapsulations and see if it works for you. Consult with your doctor if you are not sure.
Posted on 2013-10-03 02:30:54
Name:Troy
Location:Canada
Subject:RE: Asthma & Kelp
Thank you very much for your response. In starting out trying with iodine, what is your recommendation of a low dose?
Posted on 2013-10-03 08:55:34
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Asthma & Kelp
Hi Troy, thanks for your question. The amount of iodine you need depends on your situation, have you been tested as low in iodine? If not, a low dose would simply be the recommended daily allowance of 150 micrograms (mcg) a day. The supplement recommended above provides 225mcg per pill. This dose per day would also be a good start. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-04 03:28:43
Name:Troy
Location:Canada
Subject:Asthma & Kelp
I checked on Pure from the link you provided, however, Pure is derived from kelp, unfortunately.
Posted on 2013-10-04 16:34:40
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE :Asthma and Kelp
Hi Troy, thanks for your comments, and sorry to hear that supplement doesn't work. Should you find a kelp free iodine supplement, please come back to let other readers know about it!
Posted on 2013-10-05 04:53:25
Name:Subrina
Location:New Jersey
Subject:Thyroid, Goiter, and best next steps
This website has a lot of information. I think I have a goiter, I am havng some pain in the front of my neck where I have thyroid. If I eat seaweed daily, do you think I will be able to get rid of my goiter? Also if I have go to a doctor, should go to an endocrinologist or some other specialist? Thanks in advance.
Posted on 2013-10-05 22:26:51
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Thyroid, Goiter, and best next steps
Hi Sabrina, thanks for your question. Remember that goiter can be caused from both too little and too much iodine, so eating more iodine via kelp may make your situation worse, as opposed to helping it. Since pain in the front of your neck has many causes you might consult a general doctor before an endocrinologist. Though an endocrinologist is the correct specialty regarding hormones, the thyroid, and goiter.
Posted on 2013-10-06 04:49:45
Name:Cris
Location:Katy
Subject:Nodules in Thyroid and Low Iodine Diet?
Hello! Thanks for such informative site. I have several nodules in my thyroid and they are making my thyroid to be hyper. The symptoms are awful (palpitations, weakness, anxiety, depression, headaches, etc). My doctor recommended to avoid iodine, since it can make my thyroid to overreact. I'm in a gluten free diet, however I eat eggs, dairy and lots of vegetables including potatoes. What do I really need to avoid to give my thyroid a break while the doctor decides what is the best route to fix this problem? Thanks a lot in advance.
Posted on 2013-10-09 05:31:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Nodules in Thyroid and Low Iodine Diet?
Hi Cris, Thanks for your question. Switch from iodized salt to a non-iodized form if you haven't already. Also, avoid any sea food, baked potato with skin, eggs, and try to limit meat/animal food consumption. As meats concentrate nutrients. Hope that helps and you get better soon.
Posted on 2013-10-10 06:46:16
Name:Cris
Location:Katy
Subject:RE: Nodules in Thyroid and Low Iodine Diet?
Thanks a lot for your quick answer! I got kosher salt and I'm avoiding seafood. However, I wanted to ask you if fish from sweet waters have also high amounts of iodine. If not, can you recommend some options regarding fish? I eat very little meet and some chicken, and I'm not that ready to go fully raw. Hopefully one day I will. Thanks a lot!
Posted on 2013-10-12 19:12:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Nodules in Thyroid and Low Iodine Diet?
Hi Cris, glad to have helped, and thanks for your questions. Freshwater fish should be fine. Fresh water trout and talapia are good choices, but any freshwater fish should be fine. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-13 15:30:21
Name:Bill Remple
Location:Philadelphia, PA
Subject:Amounts of Iodine and Health Risks
Article says, "Risks of high iodine intake include both hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and goiter."

1. How can two opposites (hypo & hyper) both be caused by the same thing - too much Iodine? This makes no sense. Does the Thyroid flip a coin?

2. Goiter is cause by too little Iodine, so how can too much Iodine cause goiter?

Posted on 2013-11-03 00:07:54
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Amounts of Iodine and Health Risks
Hi Bill, thanks for your questions. To answer your first and second question, here is a quote direct from The Office of Dietary Supplements page on iodine:
"High intakes of iodine can cause some of the same symptoms as iodine deficiency—including goiter, elevated TSH levels, and hypothyroidism—because excess iodine in susceptible individuals inhibits thyroid hormone synthesis and thereby increases TSH stimulation, which can produce goiter. Iodine-induced hyperthyroidism can also result from high iodine intakes, usually when iodine is administered to treat iodine deficiency." There are references there if you want further info.

It should be noted that iodine deficiency does account as the cause for 90% of goiters. However, goiters can appear without any iodine imbalance, and later lead to hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism.

Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-11-03 06:22:12
Name:Peggy
Location:Arizona
Subject:Mercury & contaminants in Kelp &/or Seaweed
Since I have hypothyroidism (not Hashimoto's)treated w/prescription porcine thyroid, am wondering if it is caused by low iodine in my diet. I eat a healthy diet which is low salt (so no iodine there), little meat, little to no dairy, low refined carbs (breads) & try to limit fish secondary to concerns re: mercury & contaminants in the oceans.

2 Questions:

1) Is there a way to get a kelp supplement that has little to no mercury or other seawater contaminants or a good supplement manufacturer that checks for them?

2) Is there a reliable,accurate lab test to check for low iodine levels?

I had read that bromine added to bread, citrus drinks & other processed foods, causes bromine overload & saps iodine levels. Apparently, food processors previously used iodine, but bromine is cheaper.

Any thoughts,suggestions or recommendations?

Posted on 2013-11-06 13:12:44
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Mercury & contaminants in Kelp &/or Seaweed
Hi Peggy, thanks for your questions. First, you do not need to worry about mercury or contaminants in kelp. That worry extends to predatory fish high in the food chain who concentrate those contaminants in a process called biomagnification. Plants, like kelp, are the lowest on the food chain and are safe.

I cannot recommend any lab for iodine testing. Sorry.

There are not any studies to confirm bromine reduces iodine levels. As most in the U.S. have high iodine levels, it seems unlikely. Hope those thoughts help.

Posted on 2013-11-07 04:24:41
Name:Ellie Ragsdale
Location:Mtn. View, CA
Subject:Hypothyroidism and all the too-much-iodine diseases
I'm wondering, if you eat one 0.01%DV too much iodine, is it possible that you'll get hypothyroidism?
Posted on 2013-12-31 13:15:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hypothyroidism and all the too-much-iodine diseases
Hi Ellie, thanks for your question. The daily value or (%DV) is meant as a guideline for the amount of iodine to eat each day. Eating a bit more or a bit less each day should be fine. What is not good is eating a consistently high amount each day. Though results can differ between individuals. The tolerable upper intake for iodine is 1,100mcg per day.
Posted on 2014-01-02 17:17:33
Name:Sara
Location:USA
Subject:Iodine RDA not true
Hello, please google Dr.Sircus and his medical veritas website, to discover that the RDA on iodine is a joke, and average woman in japan via eating seaweed, gets 13,000 mcg, not 150-- lack of proper iodine is found in 94% OF ALL TESTED (universal), damages the thyroid (any studies saying it hurts, are recording selenium deficiency which iodine needs together to work properly), and it CAUSES cancers to be low. the entire body needs iodine, every cell inside you, to work properly. The iodine in SALT, evaporates almost immediately, leaving YOU with zero intake if you're relying on that.
Posted on 2014-01-15 08:35:26

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References

  1. Eliminating iodine deficiency worldwide is within reach ? World Health Organization http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2004/pr93/en/
  2. What is Iodine? Nutrition Australia http://www.nutritionaustralia.org/Food_Facts/FAQ/what_is_iodine_faq.asp
  3. Iodine World's Healthiest Foods - http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=nutrient&dbid=69
  4. The National Academies Press: Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc (2001).
  5. Office of Dietary Supplements Page on Iodine