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Top 10 Foods Highest in Zinc


Zinc is an essential mineral required by the body for maintaining a sense of smell, keeping a healthy immune system, building proteins, triggering enzymes, and creating DNA. Zinc also helps the cells in your body communicate by functioning as a neurotransmitter. A deficiency in zinc can lead to stunted growth, diarrhea, impotence, hair loss, eye and skin lesions, impaired appetite, and depressed immunity. Conversely, consuming too much zinc can lead to nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, and headaches in the short term, and can disrupt absorption of copper and iron in the long term. If you have a zinc deficiency, then animal foods are better sources of zinc than plant foods. The current percent daily value (%DV) for Zinc is 15mg. Below is a list of the top ten foods highest in Zinc by common serving size, for more, see the list of high zinc foods by nutrient density, and the extended list of zinc rich foods.

#1: Seafood (Cooked Oysters)
Zinc in 100gPer 3oz (85g)Per 6 Oysters (42g)
78.6mg (524% DV)66.8mg (445% DV)33.0mg (220% DV)
Other Seafood High in Zinc (%DV per 3oz cooked): Crab (43%), and Lobster (41%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#2: Beef and Lamb (Cooked Lean Beef Shortribs)
Zinc in 100g1 Rack of Ribs (315g)1 Lean Ribeye Fillet (129g)
12.3mg (82% DV)38.7mg (258% DV)14.2mg (95% DV)
Lamb is also a good source of Zinc (%DV per 3oz cooked): Lean Foreshank (49%), Lean Shoulder (46%) and Lean Cubed Lamb for Stewing (37%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#3: Wheat Germ (Toasted)
Zinc in 100gPer Cup (113g)Per Ounce (28g)
16.7mg (111% DV)18.8mg (126% DV)4.7mg (31% DV)
Crude or Untoasted Wheat Germ is also a good source of Zinc providing 94% DV per cup:. Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#4: Spinach
Zinc in 100g (Cooked)Per Cup (Cooked - 180g)100g (Raw)
0.8mg (5% DV)1.4mg (9% DV)0.5mg (4% DV)
Other Green Leafy Vegetables High in Zinc (%DV per cup): Amaranth Leaves, cooked (8%), and Endive and Radiccio, raw (2%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#5: Pumpkin and Squash Seeds
Zinc in 100gPer Cup (64g)Per Ounce (28g)
10.3mg (69% DV)6.6mg (44% DV)2.9mg (19% DV)
Other Seeds High in Zinc (%DV per ounce): Sunflower (10%), Chia (9%), and Flaxseeds (8%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#6: Nuts (Cashews)
Zinc in 100g (Roasted)Per Cup (137g)Per Ounce (28g)
5.6mg (37% DV)7.7mg (51% DV)1.6mg (10% DV)
Other Nuts High in Zinc (%DV per ounce): Pine nuts (12%), Pecans (9%), Almonds (6%), Walnuts (6%), Peanuts (6%), and Hazelnuts (5%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#7: Cocoa and Chocolate (Cocoa Powder)
Zinc in 100gPer Cup (86g)Per Tablespoon (5g)
6.8mg (45% DV)5.9mg (39% DV)0.3mg (2% DV)
Dark baking Chocolate is also high in Zinc providing 85% DV per cup grated and 19% DV per 29g square. Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#8: Pork & Chicken (Cooked Lean Pork Shoulder)
Zinc in 100gPer Steak (147g)Per 3oz (85g)
5.0mg (33% DV)7.4mg (49% DV)4.3mg (28% DV)
Chicken is also High in Zinc providing 15% DV per cooked drumstick. Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#9: Beans (Cooked Mung Beans)
Zinc in 100gPer Cup (124g)Per 3oz (85g)
0.5mg (3% DV)0.6mg (4% DV)0.4mg (2.5% DV)
Other Beans High in Zinc (%DV per cup cooked): Baked Beans (39%), Adzuki (27%), Chickpeas (17%) and Kidney Beans (12%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#10: Mushrooms (Cooked White Mushrooms)
Zinc in 100gPer Cup Pieces (156g)Per Mushroom (12g)
0.9mg (6% DV)1.4mg (9% DV)0.1mg (1% DV)
Other Mushrooms High in Zinc (%DV per Cup Pieces): Morel, raw (9%), Brown, raw and Portabella, grilled (5%), Oyster, raw (4%), and White, raw (2%). Four Dried Shitake mushrooms contain 8% DV and 4 raw shitake contain 4% DV. Click to see complete nutrition facts.




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Top 10 High Zinc Foods by Nutrient Density

#1: Oysters (Cooked) 78.6mg (524% DV) per 100 grams66.8mg (445% DV) per 3oz (85 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Oysters
#2: Wheat Germ (Toasted) 16.7mg (111% DV) per 100 grams4.7mg (31% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Wheat Germ
#3: Beef (Lean, Cooked) 12.3mg (82% DV) per 100 grams38.7mg (258% DV) per piece (315 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Beef
#4: Veal Liver (Cooked) 11.9mg (79% DV) per 100 grams8.0mg (53% DV) per slice (67 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Veal Liver
#5: Pumpkin & Squash Seeds (Roasted) 10.3mg (69% DV) per 100 grams2.9mg (19% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pumpkin & Squash Seeds
#6: Sesame Seeds 10.2mg (68% DV) per 100 grams2.9mg (19% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sesame Seeds
#7:Dark Chocolate 3.3mg (22% DV) per 100 grams0.9mg (6% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dark Chocolate
#8: Dried Herbs & Spices (Chervil) 8.8mg (59% DV) per 100 grams0.2mg (1% DV) per Tablespoon (2 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Herbs & Spices
#9: Lamb (Lean, Cooked) 8.7mg (58% DV) per 100 grams7.4mg (49% DV) per 3oz (85 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Lamb
#10: Peanuts (Roasted) 3.3mg (22% DV) per 100 grams0.9mg (6% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Peanuts

Other Zinc Rich Foods

Fortified Cereals (List of High Zinc Cereals)52mg (345% DV) per 100 gram serving15.5mg (103% DV) per cupClick to compare nutrition facts for various cereals
Low Fat Yogurt with Fruit0.7mg (4% DV) per 100 gram serving1.6mg (11% DV) per cup (245 grams)0.8mg (5% DV) per 1/2 cup (113 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Low Fat Yogurt with Fruit
Milk0.4mg (3% DV) per 100 gram serving1mg (7% DV) per cup (244 grams)3.9mg (26% DV) per 1 quart serving (976 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Milk
Chicken Breast1mg (7% DV) per 100 gram serving1.4mg (9% DV) per cup (140 grams)0.9mg (6% DV) for half a chicken breast (86 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Chicken Breast
Cheddar Cheese3.1mg (21% DV) per 100 gram serving3.5mg (23% DV) per cup (113 grams)0.9mg (6% DV) per ounce(oz) (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cheddar Cheese
Mozzarella2.9mg (19% DV) per 100 gram serving3.3mg (22% DV) per cup (112 grams)0.8mg (5% DV) per ounce(oz) (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Mozzarella
Watermelon Seeds 10.2mg (68% DV) per 100 gram serving 11.1mg (74% DV) per cup (180 grams) 2.9mg (19% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Watermelon Seeds
Venison (Cooked) 8.6mg (58% DV) per 100 gram serving 7.3mg (49% DV) per 3oz (85 grams) 25.3mg (169% DV) per roast (293 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Venison
Veal 7.4mg (49% DV) per 100 gram serving 6.3mg (42% DV) per 3oz (85 grams) 12.9mg (86% DV) per piece (174 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Veal
Fortified Peanut Butter 15.1mg (101% DV) per 100 gram serving 39.0mg (260% DV) per cup (258 grams) 4.8mg (32% DV) per 2 Tablespoons (32 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fortified Peanut Butter
Alfalfa Sprouts 0.9mg (6% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.3mg (2% DV) per cup (33 grams) 0.1mg (1% DV) per 2 Tablespoons (6 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Alfalfa Sprouts
Asparagus (Cooked) 0.6mg (4% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.1mg (8% DV) per cup (180 grams) 0.4mg (2% DV) per 4 Spears (60 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Asparagus
Rice Bran 6.0mg (40% DV) per 100 gram serving 7.1mg (48% DV) per cup (118 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Rice Bran
Hearts of Palm 3.7mg (25% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.1mg (14% DV) per 2 oz (54grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Hearts of Palm
Seaweed (Kelp) 1.2mg (8% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.1mg (1% DV) per 2 Tablespoons (10 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Kelp Seaweed
Napa Cabbage (Cooked) 0.1mg (1% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.2mg (1% DV) per cup (109 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Napa Cabbage
Green Peas1.2mg (8% DV) per 100 gram serving1.9mg (13% DV) per cup (160 grams)1.5mg (6% DV) per half cup (80 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Green Peas
Sesame Seeds (Tahini)10.5mg (70% DV) per 100 gram serving1.5mg (10% DV) per tablespoon (14 grams)2.9mg (20% DV) per 1 ounce serving (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sesame Seeds (Tahini)
Flat Fish (Flounder or Sole)0.6mg (4% DV) per 100 gram serving0.8mg (5% DV) per fillet (127 grams)0.5mg (4% DV) per 3 ounce serving (85 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Flat Fish (Flounder or Sole)


Health Benefits of Zinc

  • Healthy Immune Function - Even mild to moderate zinc deficiency can depress the immune system through impaired macrophage and neutrophil functions, and associated effects.3 Zinc is also essential for creation and activation of T-lymphocytes.4,5 Further, low levels of zinc have been associated with increased susceptibility to pneumonia and other infections in children and the elderly.6-9
  • Alleviation of the Common Cold (*Controversial) - There are conflicting studies as to weather or not zinc supplements can alleviate symptoms of the common cold and shorten its duration. At least one study confirms decreased duration of cold symptoms compared to a control,10 however, other studies report no effect.11,12 Since no harm is reported, increasing zinc intake could only help.
  • Healing of Cuts and Wounds - Zinc is essential for healthy skin and maintenance of mucosal membranes. Adequate levels of zinc is necessary for proper wound healing.13
  • Reduced Severity and Duration of Diarrhea - Studies show that increased intake of zinc can reduce duration and severity of diarrhea in undernourished children with infections.14-17
  • Prevention and Reduction of Age-Related Eye Damage - High dietary intake of zinc, as well as vitamins C, E, and beta-carotene, has been associated with reduced age-related macular deneration in the edlerly.18

High Risk Groups for a Zinc Deficiency

  • Alcoholics - 30-50% of alcoholics have low levels of zinc because alcohol decreases zinc absorption and increases urinary secretion of zinc.
  • Vegetarians - The bio-availability of zinc is higher in meats and thus more easily absorbed. Further legumes and whole grains contain phylates which bind zinc and inhibit absorption. (See lists of fruits and vegetables high in zinc.)
  • Pregnant and Lactating Women - A developing fetus requires a high amount of zinc, likewise, there is a high amount of zinc lost through breast milk after birth.
  • Older Infants who are Exclusively Breastfed - Infants older than 6 months should eat age-appropriate foods which provide zinc as the amount in breast milk is no longer ample.
  • People with Sickle Cell Disease - For unknown reasons 44% of children, and 60-70% of adults with sickle cell disease have low levels of zinc.
  • People with Gastrointestinal and Other Diseases - Gastrointestinal surgery, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, short bowel syndrome, and other digestive diseases can all decrease zinc absorption and increase zinc loss from the body.
  • People consuming high doses of Iron Supplements - Iron can interfere with zinc absorption, to reduce this effect, iron suppliments should be taken between meals to allow time for zinc to be absorbed properly.
  • People taking Diuretics - Thiazide diuretics such as chlorthalidone (Hygroton®) and hydrochlorothiazide (Esidrix® and HydroDIURIL®) can increase zinc excretion by 60%, and over the long term, deplete body tissues of zinc stores. Be sure to consult your doctor or clinician to monitor your zinc level if you are taking these diuretics for a sustained period of time, and be sure to eat more zinc rich foods.



Warnings

  • Oysters, liver, lamb, and cheese are high cholesterol foods which should be eaten in moderate amounts and avoided by people at risk of heart disease or stroke.
  • Sesame Seeds, Pumpkin Seeds, Squash Seeds, and Peanuts are high calorie foods and should be eaten in moderate amounts by people with a high body mass index.
  • Zinc suppliments have adverse reactions with the following medications:
    • Antibiotics - Certain antibiotics like quinolone antibiotics (such as Cipro®) and tetracycline antibiotics (such as Achromycin® and Sumycin®) inhibit the absorption of zinc in the digestive tract.
    • Penicillamine - Zinc reduces the absorption of Penicillamine, which is used by people suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. Taking zinc suppliments two hours before or after intake of Penicillamine solves this problem.





Comments.
Name:Priya Singh
Location:South America
Subject:Hair Loss
Hi, I was just wondering what vitamin is essential to prevent my hair from falling/dropping? I was told to wash my hair with egg however that did not work. Its still dropping and alot.
Posted on 2011-07-31 18:28:29
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hair Loss
Hi Priya, thanks for your question. A deficiency in zinc, or selenium, can lead to hair loss. Be sure you eat enough high zinc foods, and high selenium foods. If you are not deficient in any of these nutrients, you hair loss could be due to other factors.
Posted on 2011-08-02 01:08:30
Name:Jag Ram
Location:Los Angeles
Subject:Hair loss and reasons
Hi Priya, Tips for preventing Hair loss and regrowing the lost hair or its thinness being re-engineered to the old coarseness:
A) Stop using SHAMPOO everyday, use it sparingly. If the hair smells, clean it with water, now is your Water pure? Can't say. So, avoid both VERY cold and VERY hot baths or showers.
B) ALWAYS apply Coconut oil AT least once a month, deep into the roots, leave it for about 45 minutes or an hour, and DO NOT rub the "Palms" across your SCALP, but use only finger tips to rub the OIL into each pore of your SCALP. (Use a specially made HERBAL hair oil like Navaratna, Amla or even Mandara Thailam from South India. Much betetr than all Dabur Amla Kesh Tels and such fakes)
C) Always make sure you eat a lot of ZINC based food items, if you are a meat eater, then no worries, you get a lot of Zinc in various types of meat/animal food. If vegetarian like me, then eat a lot of CASHEWS, Sesame Seeds, Pumpkin seeds, Almonds, Watermelon Seeds and Apricots. Keep your stomach as clean as possible, most of the HAIR fall issues starts from "Constipation" or "Gastric issues" -- meaning, eat less and less of CARBS, eat more and more of fibres.

AVOID "SOAPS" on your hair, never use them.
Posted on 2011-09-06 13:21:24
Name:Bodybuilding Misc
Location:Michigan
Subject:Zinc and Testosterone
Zinc deficiency can lead to decrease in testosterone levels, which is very bad, especially in men.
Posted on 2011-10-28 05:09:55
Name:Nick
Location:London
Subject:Pregnancy
It is important to also note that low levels of zinc lead to a low amount of intake of folic acid, which is vital to the health of unborn babies - just one of the many Zinc Vitamin Benefits.
Posted on 2011-12-07 14:19:34
Name:Puhutes
Location:Canada
Subject:Hair Loss
To the person who asked about hair loss... hair loss is often caused by thyroid dysfunction. You can get your thyroid function tested by your heath practitioner.
Posted on 2011-12-22 08:57:10
Name:Krishna
Location:Bahrain
Subject:Skin eruption and eye pain!!!
I'm having eye pain or splinters in the eyelids frequently. Hot fermentation keeps it a little better. Also few rashes on cheeks comes every now & then! Please advise. Is it because of zinc deficiency?
Posted on 2012-01-27 02:22:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Skin eruption and eye pain!!!
Hi Krishna, thanks for your quesiton. A severe zinc deficiency can cause pain in the eyes and irritation of the skin.Ref However, irritation of the eyes and skin can be caused by a variety of factors and you should see your doctor to conduct tests and be sure of a zinc deficiency.
Posted on 2012-01-27 04:34:57
Name:Jess
Location:Bristol
Subject:Acne on Body
Could zinc possibly help with acne as well? Could you please advise me which vitamins I should take?
Posted on 2012-02-10 16:53:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Acne on Body
Hi Jess, thanks for your question. According to this and this study, consuming zinc will help clear acne. In addition to eating more high zinc foods, avoiding foods high in sugar should also help with acne.
Posted on 2012-02-15 20:06:44
Name:Cheska
Location:Mount Morris, WV
Subject:Zinc Supplement?
If I don't have access to the foods you have listed, would it be good to supplement instead?
Posted on 2012-03-01 16:05:56
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Zinc Supplement
Hi Cheska, thanks for your question. Zinc is an important nutrient. Chances are you are meeting your DV in zinc, but can supplement if you feel you have a deficiency or want more zinc. Zinc is good for your immune system and has been shown to reduce risk of some cancers. In general, nutrients are better absorbed from natural foods, and it is easier to overdose from supplements. So be sure to take only the recommended dose of zinc, and possibly even take only half the supplement to be sure you don't absorb too much. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-03-01 16:14:19
Name:Kaleem
Location:Asia
Subject:Zinc Deficiency
How to restore a zinc deficiency?
Posted on 2012-03-04 10:42:48
Name:Kaleem
Subject:RE: Zinc deficiency
Hi Kaleem, thanks for your question. First you need to find out why you have a zinc deficiency. Check the section of this article that covers risk factors for a zinc deficiency, do you have any of them? If so, try to make changes that allow you to properly absorb zinc. A more simple question is to ask if you are eating zinc rich foods, if not, eat more. If you can't find these foods, consider a zinc supplement.
Posted on 2012-03-04 18:01:03
Name:Diane
Location:Australia
Subject:Zinc Deficiency with HRT
I was prescribed HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy) 20 years ago, I am a vegetarian & was recently diagnosed with breast cancer. I recently discovered zinc deficiency causes testosterone to be converted to oestrogene & my breast cancer was oestrogene fed, at no time was I asked either by my doctor or gynaecologist if I ate red meat, I am now concluding that I may be zinc deficient. I have also been suffering sleep deprivation since 2009 which concluded in a diagnosis of depression, at no time was lack of melatonin mentioned. I have since discovered lack of melatonin leads to sleep deprivation & may be linked to breast cancer. When patients present to doctors with symptoms as I described why aren't blood tests testing (1) zinc levels (2) melatonin conducted?
Posted on 2012-04-12 17:47:54
Name:Jane Mun
Location:KL, Malaysia
Subject:Supplement for Hair Growth
I would like to know what kind of supplement I should take for my hair to grow? Would zinc help?
Posted on 2012-04-29 03:33:58
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Supplement for Hair Growth
Hi Jane, thanks for your question. A deficiency in zinc can lead to hair loss, however, if you already have adequate levels of zinc, then taking extra zinc is unlikely to boost your hair growth.
Posted on 2012-05-07 03:42:34
Name:Joy
Location:Sydney
Subject:Double Normal Zinc Level
Hi, I haven't taken zinc tablets but a recent blood test indicated a high zinc level. Could this be from my amalgam fillings and what can I do?
Posted on 2012-05-07 03:49:27
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Double Normal Zinc Level
Hi Joy, thanks for your question. Given the Daily Value (DV) of zinc is 15 milligrams (mg) and that amalgam fillings are rarely larger than a gram, it appears unlikely that the increase of your zinc levels could be from an amalgam filling unless you just got a filling, or feel that a filling recently cracked in your teeth before your test. You should verify that you indeed have zinc in your fillings, as not all fillings use zinc. If you really feel that the amalgams are increasing your zinc level you could replace them with composites. Before doing that however, try eat fewer zinc foods, and get retested. You will probably also want to explore other causes. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-05-07 07:12:56
Name:Jimmy
Location:Uganda
Subject:ED
I was told that lack of zinc in the body can cause less man power, is it true? If true which foods should some one take and in what quantity? Can zinc supplements help? Thanks.
Posted on 2012-06-19 07:06:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: ED
Hi Jimmy, thanks for your question. There is some evidence that a zinc deficiency can lead to impotence (erectile dysfunction).Ref You can try eating more of these high zinc foods, and you can also try taking supplements. If you take supplements do not take more than the recommended amount as too much zinc can be harmful. E.D. can have many causes, so if you do not see an improvement in 2 weeks, likely something else is the cause. Hope that helps, and good luck.
Posted on 2012-06-19 10:43:38
Name:Amstran Gladen
Location:Chennai
Subject:How to increase zinc levels in the body?
I`m suffering from premature andropause and looking for tablets, tonics and supplements to increase zinc levels in the body. What is the daily requirement of zinc per RDA? Please let me know.
Posted on 2012-06-23 13:02:03
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How to increase zinc levels in the body?
Hi Amstran, thanks for your question. You can increase zinc levels in the body by eating more of these high zinc foods, or by taking zinc supplements. The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for zinc is 11mg for adult males over 19 years old, and the tolerable upper intake level (UL) for males over 19 years old is 40mg.Ref This means do not take more than 40mg of zinc per day. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-06-23 21:54:16
Name:Vinny
Location:Nigeria
Subject:Zinc Deficiency and Restoration
My dietician recently gave me some zinc supplement and gave me a dosage value. However, she told me that there would not be any risk of taking over dose of it as they are food supplements and do not have any danger to me. I see that excess of zinc can hinder normal iron function leading to anaemia. What do I do?
Posted on 2012-07-20 00:24:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Zinc Deficiency and Restoration
Hi Vinny, thanks for your question. It is true that too much zinc can be harmful. Excess zinc hinders absorption of copper and iron. Do not take more than the recommended dosage from your dietician and you will likely be fine. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-07-20 00:40:38
Name:Dan B.
Location:USA
Subject:Warning on Sesame and Tahini
This is with regard to foods rich in zinc mentioned above, while it is true about sesame and tahini being a source of zinc, the effect of consuming sesame and tahini will create the total opposite of what is intended to prevent. Consuming 100 grams of Tahini or sesame will give you 5mg of zinc but the same 100 grams of sesame will release 5000mg of phaytic acid that will deplete your body of all earth minerals , yes all, including calcium, iron ,zinc, magnesium and even uranium, plutonium and polonium. Tahini and sesame consumed on irregular bases is fine but to consume it as a source of zinc as listed is literally a grave mistake and if someone is having these symptoms they should avoid tahini and sesame no matter what.
Posted on 2012-08-01 17:34:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warning on Sesame and Tahini
Hi Dan, thanks for your comment. The office of dietary supplements states: "... the bioavailability of zinc from grains and plant foods is lower than that from animal foods, although many grain- and plant-based foods are still good sources of zinc". Basically, while the phytates in tahini limit absorption of zinc, they do not eliminate it, nor do they deplete the body of minerals. Do you have a study or reference which suggests otherwise? Further, phytates in foods can be reduced by cooking or other processing. Most of the phytates in seeds are in their hulls, eating de-hulled sesame seeds would result in a much lower phytate intake. Thanks for your comment, a note will be added in the introduction suggestion animal sources of zinc for people with deficiencies, further, sesame seeds will be substituted with crab in the top 10 list, and sesame seeds will be moved down to the extended list.
Posted on 2012-08-03 11:40:05
Name:Lucy
Location:Kenya
Subject:Zinc Deficieny
Being pregnant and having low immunity is it advisable to take excess zinc than the amount required per day?
Posted on 2012-08-17 05:34:00
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Zinc Deficiency
Hi Lucy, thanks for your question. It is advisable to take extra zinc while you are pregnant and breast feeding your baby. The Office of Dietary Supplements suggests you consume 11-12mg of zinc per day, and do not exceed 40mg of zinc in any given day. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-08-17 08:11:02
Name:Daniel
Location:Nigeria
Subject:Combination of zinc and multivitamin supplements
Is it right for one to take zinc supplements with multivitamin supplements? If not, what are the implications?
Posted on 2012-08-27 01:13:53
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Combination of zinc and multivitamin supplements
Hi Daniel, thanks for your question. Iron supplements can interfere and reduce zinc absorption, and vice versa. If your multivitamin contains iron, it can harm your absorption of zinc. However, if your multivitamin does not contain iron, then you are fine taking zinc along with it. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-08-27 06:03:05
Name:Torsten Pihl
Location:Corvallis, Oregon, USA
Subject:Why toasted, roasted, or dried?
Hi, why include toasted, roasted, or dried in the food description? It doesn't increase zinc content, but does it alter the zinc compound so that it absorbs better? Thanks.
Posted on 2012-10-02 13:41:17
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Why toasted, roasted, or dried?
Hi Torsten, thanks for your question. These nutrition facts are ranked by weight. So when things are toasted, roasted, or dried, they lose water weight, and thus increase their content of zinc gram per gram. Basically, you get more zinc per gram in something that is dried. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-10-02 19:50:16
Name:Margaret
Location:Colorado
Subject:Diuretics cause zinc deficiency?
I have had to take two different diuretics to try to get the swelling in my feet and legs down. I supplement with potassium and also with some magnesium. Can diuretics pull other vital minerals from your body? Specifically, zinc. I have a wound on my leg that doesn't want to heal. (I am going to wound care through my insurance.) I am also getting cracks in the skin of my thumbs. Could this be due to using diuretics?
Posted on 2012-10-17 08:55:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Diuretics cause zinc deficiency?
Hi Margaret, thanks for your question. Thiazide diuretics, such as chlorthalidone (Hygroton®) and hydrochlorothiazide (Esidrix® and HydroDIURIL®), can increase zinc excretion by 60%, and over the long term, deplete body tissues of zinc stores. Consider eating more high zinc foods or taking a zinc supplement.
Posted on 2012-10-17 18:11:49
Name:Vimala
Location:Chennai
Subject:Test for zinc
What is the test done for zinc?
Posted on 2012-11-23 08:26:33
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Test for zinc
Hi Vimala, thanks for your question. There are several different tests done for zinc. The most common is a serum blood test, where if the amount of zinc is less than 10.7 micromols/L (70 micrograms/dL) it is considered abnormally low.Ref A range of 13.8 - 22.9µmol/L is considered normal. 95% of zinc is found inside cells and not in the blood, making these kind of tests somewhat unreliable. New tests which look for zinc inside cells, or even use hair, are being refined and developed. Further there is also a rough taste test which can be used. See this site on zinc tests for more information.
Posted on 2012-11-26 04:07:06
Name:David
Location:Asia
Subject:Calcium and Zinc interfere with each other?
I've heard many reports warning people not to take Calcium and Zinc supplements at the same time for their possible interference effect. Is that real? Is there any authentic study supporting it or denying it?
Posted on 2012-11-26 05:18:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Calcium and Zinc interfere with each other?
Hi David, thanks for your question. As stated on the Office of Dietary Supplements Fact Sheet on Calcium, there is some suspicion that calcium may interfere with the absorption of iron and zinc, but this effect is not well established. Further, this study states that taking calcium increases absorption of zinc. While this study found that calcium reduces zinc absorption. Despite this finding, the same study goes on to say that by taking zinc supplements the effect of calcium is neutralized. You are likely ok taking zinc and calcium supplements at the same time. However, if you are worried, you could try to take one suppelement 2-6 hours after the other.
Posted on 2012-11-26 05:22:32
Name:Jasmin
Location:Pakistan
Subject:Melasma
I had Melasma all over the face how can I get rid of it?
Posted on 2013-01-14 06:33:03
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Melasma
Hi Jasmin, thanks for your question. This study suggests that using a topical zinc cream (10% zinc sulfate) can help with melasma.
Posted on 2013-01-14 17:58:57
Name:Tom
Location:Virginia
Subject:Zinc overdose and hairloss
I have experienced substantial hair loss and after looking into causes, I believe it was due to excessive Zinc levels. I was supplementing with a combined total of 55mg Zinc, coming from a multi vitamin and a Zinc-Magnesium supplement (called ZMA that is promoted as a natural muscle builder). My normal diet is extremely healthy and includes large amounts of grass-fed red meat and dairy, whole grains, nuts, and veggies, etc. Based on my daily diet, I would assume my intake of Zinc was ~100mg/day for quite a while. I believe the hairloss started showing up when I added in the ZMA several months ago (an extra 30-40mg of Zinc daily). My question is, now that I have dropped ZMA, and cut my multi-vitamin dose in half, can I expect to see hair re-growth?? I am hoping my body will now be able to adequately absorb the trace minerals it was missing, like copper, etc. And I should grow the hair back? I have been off ZMA for 2 months now still seeing the thinnest hair yet, hoping to see reversal signs soon, as I'm guessing it takes a little time! Thank you so much in advance for any input!! I know this question is kind of "out there" Thanks!!
Posted on 2013-05-26 21:37:22
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Zinc overdose and hairloss
Hi Tom, thanks for your question and sharing your experience. If you hair is still thinning after 2 months, it seems unlikely that zinc was the cause, but you could give it 6 months and see. Do you have any maternal uncles with hairloss? Does it run in your family? Genetics could be another cause. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2013-05-27 03:21:16
Name:Eric
Location:Oceanside
Subject:Tinnitus related to zinc deficiency?
Hi I have often have tinnitus and its a real pain. I read it could be related to zinc deficiency. Is this true or a false rumor?
Posted on 2013-05-29 06:07:45
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Tinnitus related to zinc deficiency?
Hi Eric, thanks for your question. Zinc is found in high concentration in certain parts of the body, such as hair and nails. One place where zinc is highly concentrated is the cochlea of the inner ear. It has been found that patients with zinc deficiency are more likely to develop tinnitus, particularly elderly patients. While some small studies suggest that zinc supplements may help with tinnitus, no formal study has confirmed it.
Posted on 2013-05-30 00:12:23
Name:Laura W
Subject:Breastmilk & zinc
Just a quick clarification, breastmilk does not magically become less sufficient or lower in zinc (or any other nutrient) when the baby turns 6 months (or 1 year or 2 years, etc). The baby is born with zinc stores built up in utero and so maintains adequate zinc levels through the small, but hugely bio-available, amount of zinc in breastmilk. As with iron, many babies deplete their zinc stores by around 6 months and begin to need higher levels of zinc than breastmilk alone can provide.
Posted on 2013-06-30 00:13:30
Name:Teresa
Location:U.S.
Subject:Zinc for foot odor
Many years ago, my mom had terrible foot odor. She heard that taking zinc would help so she got some supplements. After taking them for just a little while, I can't remember exactly how long, but it seems like it was a few weeks or a few months, the foot odor was totally gone. I don't know how it worked but we were all very happy it did. :)
Posted on 2013-07-23 11:42:41
Name:John
Location:Cyprus
Subject:RE: Breastmilk & zinc
I disagree with Laura, breastmilk contains everything required and if the levels are lower then you still need to account for 2 things NO ONE mentions here:

1.Symbioses: A Carrot may contain 10 carotene and a supplement 100, BUT the Carrot reacts with other chemicals to become 100 Carotene WHILST the supplement with 100 drops to 10 because 90% is not absorbed.

2. Biological transmutation: A Chicken that has 0 Calcium available to it in feed and environment STILL makes eggs even though scientifically IT SHOULD NOT !

SO you need to account for the symbioses of minerals, chemicals, and flow of energy as well as the potential that exists in all people, animals, and plants of biological transmutation (also cold fusion) shown in multiple experiments world wide based much on Kervran Louis's work..

Posted on 2013-10-26 02:28:44
Name:Sandra
Location:Australia
Subject:Absorption of Zinc
I have been reading about the different absorb-ability of Zinc and most other minerals whether they are from plant derived sources and elemental sources. Elemental minerals are not able to be absorbed by the body but are stored in body and can reach toxic levels and you are still deficient in those minerals because you cant use them. Most mineral supplements are using elemental minerals so you aren't getting the best results. Try finding a plant source of all minerals and you will solve most of these conditions. Good luck and congratulations for trying something.
Posted on 2014-02-28 17:31:01

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Comments.
Name:Priya Singh
Location:South America
Subject:Hair Loss
Hi, I was just wondering what vitamin is essential to prevent my hair from falling/dropping? I was told to wash my hair with egg however that did not work. Its still dropping and alot.
Posted on 2011-07-31 18:28:29
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hair Loss
Hi Priya, thanks for your question. A deficiency in zinc, or selenium, can lead to hair loss. Be sure you eat enough high zinc foods, and high selenium foods. If you are not deficient in any of these nutrients, you hair loss could be due to other factors.
Posted on 2011-08-02 01:08:30
Name:Jag Ram
Location:Los Angeles
Subject:Hair loss and reasons
Hi Priya, Tips for preventing Hair loss and regrowing the lost hair or its thinness being re-engineered to the old coarseness:
A) Stop using SHAMPOO everyday, use it sparingly. If the hair smells, clean it with water, now is your Water pure? Can't say. So, avoid both VERY cold and VERY hot baths or showers.
B) ALWAYS apply Coconut oil AT least once a month, deep into the roots, leave it for about 45 minutes or an hour, and DO NOT rub the "Palms" across your SCALP, but use only finger tips to rub the OIL into each pore of your SCALP. (Use a specially made HERBAL hair oil like Navaratna, Amla or even Mandara Thailam from South India. Much betetr than all Dabur Amla Kesh Tels and such fakes)
C) Always make sure you eat a lot of ZINC based food items, if you are a meat eater, then no worries, you get a lot of Zinc in various types of meat/animal food. If vegetarian like me, then eat a lot of CASHEWS, Sesame Seeds, Pumpkin seeds, Almonds, Watermelon Seeds and Apricots. Keep your stomach as clean as possible, most of the HAIR fall issues starts from "Constipation" or "Gastric issues" -- meaning, eat less and less of CARBS, eat more and more of fibres.

AVOID "SOAPS" on your hair, never use them.
Posted on 2011-09-06 13:21:24
Name:Bodybuilding Misc
Location:Michigan
Subject:Zinc and Testosterone
Zinc deficiency can lead to decrease in testosterone levels, which is very bad, especially in men.
Posted on 2011-10-28 05:09:55
Name:Nick
Location:London
Subject:Pregnancy
It is important to also note that low levels of zinc lead to a low amount of intake of folic acid, which is vital to the health of unborn babies - just one of the many Zinc Vitamin Benefits.
Posted on 2011-12-07 14:19:34
Name:Puhutes
Location:Canada
Subject:Hair Loss
To the person who asked about hair loss... hair loss is often caused by thyroid dysfunction. You can get your thyroid function tested by your heath practitioner.
Posted on 2011-12-22 08:57:10
Name:Krishna
Location:Bahrain
Subject:Skin eruption and eye pain!!!
I'm having eye pain or splinters in the eyelids frequently. Hot fermentation keeps it a little better. Also few rashes on cheeks comes every now & then! Please advise. Is it because of zinc deficiency?
Posted on 2012-01-27 02:22:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Skin eruption and eye pain!!!
Hi Krishna, thanks for your quesiton. A severe zinc deficiency can cause pain in the eyes and irritation of the skin.Ref However, irritation of the eyes and skin can be caused by a variety of factors and you should see your doctor to conduct tests and be sure of a zinc deficiency.
Posted on 2012-01-27 04:34:57
Name:Jess
Location:Bristol
Subject:Acne on Body
Could zinc possibly help with acne as well? Could you please advise me which vitamins I should take?
Posted on 2012-02-10 16:53:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Acne on Body
Hi Jess, thanks for your question. According to this and this study, consuming zinc will help clear acne. In addition to eating more high zinc foods, avoiding foods high in sugar should also help with acne.
Posted on 2012-02-15 20:06:44
Name:Cheska
Location:Mount Morris, WV
Subject:Zinc Supplement?
If I don't have access to the foods you have listed, would it be good to supplement instead?
Posted on 2012-03-01 16:05:56
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Zinc Supplement
Hi Cheska, thanks for your question. Zinc is an important nutrient. Chances are you are meeting your DV in zinc, but can supplement if you feel you have a deficiency or want more zinc. Zinc is good for your immune system and has been shown to reduce risk of some cancers. In general, nutrients are better absorbed from natural foods, and it is easier to overdose from supplements. So be sure to take only the recommended dose of zinc, and possibly even take only half the supplement to be sure you don't absorb too much. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-03-01 16:14:19
Name:Kaleem
Location:Asia
Subject:Zinc Deficiency
How to restore a zinc deficiency?
Posted on 2012-03-04 10:42:48
Name:Kaleem
Subject:RE: Zinc deficiency
Hi Kaleem, thanks for your question. First you need to find out why you have a zinc deficiency. Check the section of this article that covers risk factors for a zinc deficiency, do you have any of them? If so, try to make changes that allow you to properly absorb zinc. A more simple question is to ask if you are eating zinc rich foods, if not, eat more. If you can't find these foods, consider a zinc supplement.
Posted on 2012-03-04 18:01:03
Name:Diane
Location:Australia
Subject:Zinc Deficiency with HRT
I was prescribed HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy) 20 years ago, I am a vegetarian & was recently diagnosed with breast cancer. I recently discovered zinc deficiency causes testosterone to be converted to oestrogene & my breast cancer was oestrogene fed, at no time was I asked either by my doctor or gynaecologist if I ate red meat, I am now concluding that I may be zinc deficient. I have also been suffering sleep deprivation since 2009 which concluded in a diagnosis of depression, at no time was lack of melatonin mentioned. I have since discovered lack of melatonin leads to sleep deprivation & may be linked to breast cancer. When patients present to doctors with symptoms as I described why aren't blood tests testing (1) zinc levels (2) melatonin conducted?
Posted on 2012-04-12 17:47:54
Name:Jane Mun
Location:KL, Malaysia
Subject:Supplement for Hair Growth
I would like to know what kind of supplement I should take for my hair to grow? Would zinc help?
Posted on 2012-04-29 03:33:58
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Supplement for Hair Growth
Hi Jane, thanks for your question. A deficiency in zinc can lead to hair loss, however, if you already have adequate levels of zinc, then taking extra zinc is unlikely to boost your hair growth.
Posted on 2012-05-07 03:42:34
Name:Joy
Location:Sydney
Subject:Double Normal Zinc Level
Hi, I haven't taken zinc tablets but a recent blood test indicated a high zinc level. Could this be from my amalgam fillings and what can I do?
Posted on 2012-05-07 03:49:27
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Double Normal Zinc Level
Hi Joy, thanks for your question. Given the Daily Value (DV) of zinc is 15 milligrams (mg) and that amalgam fillings are rarely larger than a gram, it appears unlikely that the increase of your zinc levels could be from an amalgam filling unless you just got a filling, or feel that a filling recently cracked in your teeth before your test. You should verify that you indeed have zinc in your fillings, as not all fillings use zinc. If you really feel that the amalgams are increasing your zinc level you could replace them with composites. Before doing that however, try eat fewer zinc foods, and get retested. You will probably also want to explore other causes. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-05-07 07:12:56
Name:Jimmy
Location:Uganda
Subject:ED
I was told that lack of zinc in the body can cause less man power, is it true? If true which foods should some one take and in what quantity? Can zinc supplements help? Thanks.
Posted on 2012-06-19 07:06:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: ED
Hi Jimmy, thanks for your question. There is some evidence that a zinc deficiency can lead to impotence (erectile dysfunction).Ref You can try eating more of these high zinc foods, and you can also try taking supplements. If you take supplements do not take more than the recommended amount as too much zinc can be harmful. E.D. can have many causes, so if you do not see an improvement in 2 weeks, likely something else is the cause. Hope that helps, and good luck.
Posted on 2012-06-19 10:43:38
Name:Amstran Gladen
Location:Chennai
Subject:How to increase zinc levels in the body?
I`m suffering from premature andropause and looking for tablets, tonics and supplements to increase zinc levels in the body. What is the daily requirement of zinc per RDA? Please let me know.
Posted on 2012-06-23 13:02:03
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How to increase zinc levels in the body?
Hi Amstran, thanks for your question. You can increase zinc levels in the body by eating more of these high zinc foods, or by taking zinc supplements. The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for zinc is 11mg for adult males over 19 years old, and the tolerable upper intake level (UL) for males over 19 years old is 40mg.Ref This means do not take more than 40mg of zinc per day. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-06-23 21:54:16
Name:Vinny
Location:Nigeria
Subject:Zinc Deficiency and Restoration
My dietician recently gave me some zinc supplement and gave me a dosage value. However, she told me that there would not be any risk of taking over dose of it as they are food supplements and do not have any danger to me. I see that excess of zinc can hinder normal iron function leading to anaemia. What do I do?
Posted on 2012-07-20 00:24:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Zinc Deficiency and Restoration
Hi Vinny, thanks for your question. It is true that too much zinc can be harmful. Excess zinc hinders absorption of copper and iron. Do not take more than the recommended dosage from your dietician and you will likely be fine. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-07-20 00:40:38
Name:Dan B.
Location:USA
Subject:Warning on Sesame and Tahini
This is with regard to foods rich in zinc mentioned above, while it is true about sesame and tahini being a source of zinc, the effect of consuming sesame and tahini will create the total opposite of what is intended to prevent. Consuming 100 grams of Tahini or sesame will give you 5mg of zinc but the same 100 grams of sesame will release 5000mg of phaytic acid that will deplete your body of all earth minerals , yes all, including calcium, iron ,zinc, magnesium and even uranium, plutonium and polonium. Tahini and sesame consumed on irregular bases is fine but to consume it as a source of zinc as listed is literally a grave mistake and if someone is having these symptoms they should avoid tahini and sesame no matter what.
Posted on 2012-08-01 17:34:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Warning on Sesame and Tahini
Hi Dan, thanks for your comment. The office of dietary supplements states: "... the bioavailability of zinc from grains and plant foods is lower than that from animal foods, although many grain- and plant-based foods are still good sources of zinc". Basically, while the phytates in tahini limit absorption of zinc, they do not eliminate it, nor do they deplete the body of minerals. Do you have a study or reference which suggests otherwise? Further, phytates in foods can be reduced by cooking or other processing. Most of the phytates in seeds are in their hulls, eating de-hulled sesame seeds would result in a much lower phytate intake. Thanks for your comment, a note will be added in the introduction suggestion animal sources of zinc for people with deficiencies, further, sesame seeds will be substituted with crab in the top 10 list, and sesame seeds will be moved down to the extended list.
Posted on 2012-08-03 11:40:05
Name:Lucy
Location:Kenya
Subject:Zinc Deficieny
Being pregnant and having low immunity is it advisable to take excess zinc than the amount required per day?
Posted on 2012-08-17 05:34:00
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Zinc Deficiency
Hi Lucy, thanks for your question. It is advisable to take extra zinc while you are pregnant and breast feeding your baby. The Office of Dietary Supplements suggests you consume 11-12mg of zinc per day, and do not exceed 40mg of zinc in any given day. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-08-17 08:11:02
Name:Daniel
Location:Nigeria
Subject:Combination of zinc and multivitamin supplements
Is it right for one to take zinc supplements with multivitamin supplements? If not, what are the implications?
Posted on 2012-08-27 01:13:53
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Combination of zinc and multivitamin supplements
Hi Daniel, thanks for your question. Iron supplements can interfere and reduce zinc absorption, and vice versa. If your multivitamin contains iron, it can harm your absorption of zinc. However, if your multivitamin does not contain iron, then you are fine taking zinc along with it. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-08-27 06:03:05
Name:Torsten Pihl
Location:Corvallis, Oregon, USA
Subject:Why toasted, roasted, or dried?
Hi, why include toasted, roasted, or dried in the food description? It doesn't increase zinc content, but does it alter the zinc compound so that it absorbs better? Thanks.
Posted on 2012-10-02 13:41:17
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Why toasted, roasted, or dried?
Hi Torsten, thanks for your question. These nutrition facts are ranked by weight. So when things are toasted, roasted, or dried, they lose water weight, and thus increase their content of zinc gram per gram. Basically, you get more zinc per gram in something that is dried. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-10-02 19:50:16
Name:Margaret
Location:Colorado
Subject:Diuretics cause zinc deficiency?
I have had to take two different diuretics to try to get the swelling in my feet and legs down. I supplement with potassium and also with some magnesium. Can diuretics pull other vital minerals from your body? Specifically, zinc. I have a wound on my leg that doesn't want to heal. (I am going to wound care through my insurance.) I am also getting cracks in the skin of my thumbs. Could this be due to using diuretics?
Posted on 2012-10-17 08:55:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Diuretics cause zinc deficiency?
Hi Margaret, thanks for your question. Thiazide diuretics, such as chlorthalidone (Hygroton®) and hydrochlorothiazide (Esidrix® and HydroDIURIL®), can increase zinc excretion by 60%, and over the long term, deplete body tissues of zinc stores. Consider eating more high zinc foods or taking a zinc supplement.
Posted on 2012-10-17 18:11:49
Name:Vimala
Location:Chennai
Subject:Test for zinc
What is the test done for zinc?
Posted on 2012-11-23 08:26:33
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Test for zinc
Hi Vimala, thanks for your question. There are several different tests done for zinc. The most common is a serum blood test, where if the amount of zinc is less than 10.7 micromols/L (70 micrograms/dL) it is considered abnormally low.Ref A range of 13.8 - 22.9µmol/L is considered normal. 95% of zinc is found inside cells and not in the blood, making these kind of tests somewhat unreliable. New tests which look for zinc inside cells, or even use hair, are being refined and developed. Further there is also a rough taste test which can be used. See this site on zinc tests for more information.
Posted on 2012-11-26 04:07:06
Name:David
Location:Asia
Subject:Calcium and Zinc interfere with each other?
I've heard many reports warning people not to take Calcium and Zinc supplements at the same time for their possible interference effect. Is that real? Is there any authentic study supporting it or denying it?
Posted on 2012-11-26 05:18:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Calcium and Zinc interfere with each other?
Hi David, thanks for your question. As stated on the Office of Dietary Supplements Fact Sheet on Calcium, there is some suspicion that calcium may interfere with the absorption of iron and zinc, but this effect is not well established. Further, this study states that taking calcium increases absorption of zinc. While this study found that calcium reduces zinc absorption. Despite this finding, the same study goes on to say that by taking zinc supplements the effect of calcium is neutralized. You are likely ok taking zinc and calcium supplements at the same time. However, if you are worried, you could try to take one suppelement 2-6 hours after the other.
Posted on 2012-11-26 05:22:32
Name:Jasmin
Location:Pakistan
Subject:Melasma
I had Melasma all over the face how can I get rid of it?
Posted on 2013-01-14 06:33:03
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Melasma
Hi Jasmin, thanks for your question. This study suggests that using a topical zinc cream (10% zinc sulfate) can help with melasma.
Posted on 2013-01-14 17:58:57
Name:Tom
Location:Virginia
Subject:Zinc overdose and hairloss
I have experienced substantial hair loss and after looking into causes, I believe it was due to excessive Zinc levels. I was supplementing with a combined total of 55mg Zinc, coming from a multi vitamin and a Zinc-Magnesium supplement (called ZMA that is promoted as a natural muscle builder). My normal diet is extremely healthy and includes large amounts of grass-fed red meat and dairy, whole grains, nuts, and veggies, etc. Based on my daily diet, I would assume my intake of Zinc was ~100mg/day for quite a while. I believe the hairloss started showing up when I added in the ZMA several months ago (an extra 30-40mg of Zinc daily). My question is, now that I have dropped ZMA, and cut my multi-vitamin dose in half, can I expect to see hair re-growth?? I am hoping my body will now be able to adequately absorb the trace minerals it was missing, like copper, etc. And I should grow the hair back? I have been off ZMA for 2 months now still seeing the thinnest hair yet, hoping to see reversal signs soon, as I'm guessing it takes a little time! Thank you so much in advance for any input!! I know this question is kind of "out there" Thanks!!
Posted on 2013-05-26 21:37:22
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Zinc overdose and hairloss
Hi Tom, thanks for your question and sharing your experience. If you hair is still thinning after 2 months, it seems unlikely that zinc was the cause, but you could give it 6 months and see. Do you have any maternal uncles with hairloss? Does it run in your family? Genetics could be another cause. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2013-05-27 03:21:16
Name:Eric
Location:Oceanside
Subject:Tinnitus related to zinc deficiency?
Hi I have often have tinnitus and its a real pain. I read it could be related to zinc deficiency. Is this true or a false rumor?
Posted on 2013-05-29 06:07:45
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Tinnitus related to zinc deficiency?
Hi Eric, thanks for your question. Zinc is found in high concentration in certain parts of the body, such as hair and nails. One place where zinc is highly concentrated is the cochlea of the inner ear. It has been found that patients with zinc deficiency are more likely to develop tinnitus, particularly elderly patients. While some small studies suggest that zinc supplements may help with tinnitus, no formal study has confirmed it.
Posted on 2013-05-30 00:12:23
Name:Laura W
Subject:Breastmilk & zinc
Just a quick clarification, breastmilk does not magically become less sufficient or lower in zinc (or any other nutrient) when the baby turns 6 months (or 1 year or 2 years, etc). The baby is born with zinc stores built up in utero and so maintains adequate zinc levels through the small, but hugely bio-available, amount of zinc in breastmilk. As with iron, many babies deplete their zinc stores by around 6 months and begin to need higher levels of zinc than breastmilk alone can provide.
Posted on 2013-06-30 00:13:30
Name:Teresa
Location:U.S.
Subject:Zinc for foot odor
Many years ago, my mom had terrible foot odor. She heard that taking zinc would help so she got some supplements. After taking them for just a little while, I can't remember exactly how long, but it seems like it was a few weeks or a few months, the foot odor was totally gone. I don't know how it worked but we were all very happy it did. :)
Posted on 2013-07-23 11:42:41
Name:John
Location:Cyprus
Subject:RE: Breastmilk & zinc
I disagree with Laura, breastmilk contains everything required and if the levels are lower then you still need to account for 2 things NO ONE mentions here:

1.Symbioses: A Carrot may contain 10 carotene and a supplement 100, BUT the Carrot reacts with other chemicals to become 100 Carotene WHILST the supplement with 100 drops to 10 because 90% is not absorbed.

2. Biological transmutation: A Chicken that has 0 Calcium available to it in feed and environment STILL makes eggs even though scientifically IT SHOULD NOT !

SO you need to account for the symbioses of minerals, chemicals, and flow of energy as well as the potential that exists in all people, animals, and plants of biological transmutation (also cold fusion) shown in multiple experiments world wide based much on Kervran Louis's work..

Posted on 2013-10-26 02:28:44
Name:Sandra
Location:Australia
Subject:Absorption of Zinc
I have been reading about the different absorb-ability of Zinc and most other minerals whether they are from plant derived sources and elemental sources. Elemental minerals are not able to be absorbed by the body but are stored in body and can reach toxic levels and you are still deficient in those minerals because you cant use them. Most mineral supplements are using elemental minerals so you aren't getting the best results. Try finding a plant source of all minerals and you will solve most of these conditions. Good luck and congratulations for trying something.
Posted on 2014-02-28 17:31:01

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References

  1. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.
  2. Office Of Dietary Supplements Fact Sheet
  3. Wintergerst ES, Maggini S, Hornig DH. Contribution of selected vitamins and trace elements to immune function. Ann Nutr Metab 2007;51:301-23.
  4. Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 2001.
  5. Beck FW, Prasad AS, Kaplan J, Fitzgerald JT, Brewer GJ. Changes in cytokine production and T cell subpopulations in experimentally induced zinc-deficient humans. Am J Physiol 1997;272:E1002-7.
  6. Bahl R, Bhandari N, Hambidge KM, Bhan MK. Plasma zinc as a predictor of diarrheal and respiratory morbidity in children in an urban slum setting. Am J Clin Nutr 1998;68 (2 Suppl):414S-7S.
  7. Brooks WA, Santosham M, Naheed A, Goswami D, Wahed MA, Diener-West M, et al. Effect of weekly zinc supplements on incidence of pneumonia and diarrhoea in children younger than 2 years in an urban, low-income population in Bangladesh: randomised controlled trial. Lancet 2005;366:999-1004.
  8. Meydani SN, Barnett JB, Dallal GE, Fine BC, Jacques PF, Leka LS, et al. Serum zinc and pneumonia in nursing home elderly. Am J Clin Nutr 2007;86:1167-73.
  9. Black RE. Zinc deficiency, infectious disease and mortality in the developing world. J Nutr 2003;133:1485S-9S.
  10. Prasad AS, Beck FW, Bao B, Snell D, Fitzgerald JT. Duration and severity of symptoms and levels of plasma interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor, and adhesion molecules in patients with common cold treated with zinc acetate. J Infect Dis 2008 ;197:795-802.
  11. Turner RB, Cetnarowski WE. Effect of treatment with zinc gluconate or zinc acetate on experimental and natural colds. Clin Infect Dis 2000;31:1202-8.
  12. Eby GA, Halcomb WW. Ineffectiveness of zinc gluconate nasal spray and zinc orotate lozenges in common-cold treatment: a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Altern Ther Health Med 2006;12:34-8.
  13. Wintergerst ES, Maggini S, Hornig DH. Contribution of selected vitamins and trace elements to immune function. Ann Nutr Metab 2007;51:301-23.
  14. Black RE. Therapeutic and preventive effects of zinc on serious childhood infectious diseases in developing countries. Am J Clin Nutr 1998;68:476S-9S.
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