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How to Cook Buckwheat (Kasha)


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Despite the name, buckwheat is not related to wheat and is often sought as a gluten-free alternative to wheat. While buckwheat is technically a seed, its high carbohydrate nutrient profile makes it more like a grain in the culinary sense. High in iron, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, copper, and zinc, buckwheat is a healthy addition to any soup, or great as a side. The ratio of water to buckwheat is 1 cup buckwheat, to 1.5 cups of water. You can try a 1 to 2 cup ratio, but the buckwheat may be more mushy, or have a longer cooking time. This recipe will use 2 cups of buckwheat.
Total Preparation and/or Cooking Time:
Step 1:
Get 2 cups of buckwheat. Check for any debris which may have entered in packing. If you must, rinse with water, but be aware pre-rinsing the buckwheat can create a mushy texture. If the buckwheat has been roasted (kasha) you are good to go, otherwise consider roasting/toasting the buckwheat in a shallow sauce pan to firm its texture and enhance its flavor.
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Step 2:
Next add 3 cups of water and 1/2 a teaspoon of salt to a pot and set to high heat. You can add olive oil as well if you wish, or more salt to taste.
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Step 3:
Once the water has started boiling, add the 2 cups of buckwheat. Leave the pot without a lid, and the heat on high.
buckwheat-in-boiling-water.jpg
Step 4:
Once the buckwheat has expanded and all the visible "top" water has been absorbed turn the heat down to low and place a lid on the pot. Leave the buckwheat to cook for another 5-15 minutes, till all the bottom water has been absorbed.
buckwheat-before-lid.jpg
Step 5:
The buckwheat is now cooked.
buckwheat-cooked.jpg
Step 6:
You are now done, and have cooked buckwheat, a hearty grain that is great on cold days. It pairs well with dark leafy greens as well as beans and legumes, fried onions, or mushrooms.
Click to see complete nutrition facts for Buckwheat
Buy Buckwheat from Amazon.com

Buckwheat can also be cooked in a shallow sauce pan to have a firmer texture, please refer to this article for more information.

buckwheat.jpg
More recipes...

Comments.
Name:Anon Ymous
Subject:Alternate Suggestion
Try bringing the water to a boil first, then adding the buckwheat, reduce heat to simmer, cover for 15 minutes, then let stand away from heat, but still covered, for 10 minutes. Then fluff with a fork and season to taste with salt. Another recipe is coating the kasha with a (whisked) egg over medium heat in a skillet, then adding the water or broth and following the recipe above.
Posted on 2011-06-30 19:20:58
Name:VB
Location:Russia
Subject:The correct way

HealthAliciousNess Note: The comments by VB below inspired the changes to the recipe and brought it to its current version, which is why VB's comment mirrors the current recipe.

This is how you make buckwheat: DO NOT WASH BUCKWHEAT. Buy roasted buckwheat, it is tastier. Boil three cups of water. Add some salt. Add two cups of buckwheat to the boiling water. Stir, leave on high uncovered. As soon as the grain expands and soaks up the water at the top, cover with the lid and leave it on the lowest setting possible for another five to ten minutes (check that all the water has been absorbed) at the bottom. The buckwheat should be fluffy and the kernels should not stick to each other. You can add other things to your buckwheat before serving - fried onions, mushrooms, vegetables, cold pressed sunflower oil. It SHOULD NOT BE MUSHY AT ALL! Good luck!
Posted on 2011-08-06 18:51:42
Name:VB
Location:Russia
Subject:The correct way
Your recipe is incorrect. This is how you make buckwheat: DO NOT WASH BUCKWHEAT. Buy roasted buckwheat, it is tastier. Boil three cups of water. Add some salt. Add two cups of buckwheat to the boiling water. Stir, leave on high uncovered. As soon as the grain expands and soaks up the water at the top, cover with the lid and leave it on the lowest setting possible for another five to ten minutes (check that all the water has been absorbed) at the bottom. The buckwheat should be fluffy and the kernels should not stick to each other. You can add other things to your buckwheat before serving - fried onions, mushrooms, vegetables, cold pressed sunflower oil. It SHOULD NOT BE MUSHY AT ALL! Good luck!
Posted on 2011-08-06 18:53:02
Name:VB
Location:Russia
Subject:Correction
Sorry, I wrote "leave it on the lowest setting for another five to ten minutes". This is incorrect - it could be longer depending on the pot. Try to use some heavy pots. Also, if you are using ceramic stove top, you can leave it on setting 1 for up to forty minutes, then turn off the heat but do not remove from the stove top. Traditional Russian method of cooking is, when the grain expands and soaks up the water on the top, to leave it on a lowest setting possible for an hour (they used special ovens to keep it warm).
Posted on 2011-09-10 23:22:27
Name:Sam Gifford
Location:Scotland
Subject:Cooking Buckwheat
Here in the UK we have lots of Polish shops where you can buy boil in the bag buckwheat. It's called Kasza and you can buy the brown or lighter-cloured varieties. Had some last night with some Puy Lentils etc. Lovely!
Posted on 2011-12-14 22:05:10
Name:SF
Location:Minneapolis, MN, USA
Subject:The Russian way works!
The method suggested by "VB" above works great! In my pot, it was hard to see whether the buckwheat had consumed all the water on top, due to a large number of bubbles... so I turned the heat down to medium-high until I could see. Then when the water on top was mostly absorbed, I put a lid on and left it for 10 minutes on the lowest setting. The result, perfect tasting buckwheat with a great texture.
Posted on 2012-04-07 23:59:14
Name:Banana
Location:Israel
Subject:I think you should not wash buckwheat.
What was I thinking, washing it???! Don't let it touch water until it hits the pot!
Posted on 2012-04-21 20:35:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:Selecting, Cleaning, and Storing Buckwheat
Thanks to everyone whos comments have made the webpage more useful. Also wanted to point out this site which has good guidelines on selecting, storing, and cleaning buckwheat/kasha. Basically, it endorses rinsing buckwheat but quickly draining the liquid to preserve texture. This is likely best as not all grains can be 100% clean and an extra rinse is a good precaution. The site also points out that it is best to store kasha/buckwheat in the freezer. Hope that helps and thanks again for the comments and suggestions.
Posted on 2012-04-21 21:00:35
Name:VB
Location:Russia
Subject:RE: Selecting, Cleaning, and Storing Buckwheat
@HealthAliciousNess - 150 million people in Russia NEVER EVER washed or rinsed buckwheat for at least 200 years. Some people go through a quick "sorting" - you put a bunch of buckwheat at a time on a big flat plate to find foreign inclusions that you pick out manually. This is only done when the grain is full of small pebbles or there is other grain mixed in together. However, there is no water involved in this process. Nobody stores buckwheat in the freezer. It is like rice. Would you store your rice grains in the freezer?
Posted on 2012-05-15 15:33:59
Name:Garrick Marchena
Location:Island of Curaçao in the Caribbean
Subject:Re-heating cooked buckwheat
I've just started to eat buckwheat (as in today!) I've read that cooked buckwheat can be stored and re-heated the next day. My queastion is: How do you re-heat fridge-stored coocked Buckwheat properly?
Posted on 2012-07-25 19:04:23
Name:Lance Brown
Location:United States
Subject:alt recipe: firm kernels, not mushy
VEGAN RAW BUCKWHEAT RECIPE - rinse and allow to air dry in a strainer for a couple of hours (i.e. in morning to cook in evening). Place damp buckwheat in Le Creuset oven-proof iron pot. place pot in oven, set temp for 450 degrees. When oven is preheated start process of stirring every 10 minutes. When kernels begin to turn golden, then increase stirring frequency to every 3 minutes until *some* kernels start to appear a dark orange color and most others are a degree of golden to orange color. While buckwheat is roasting, heat plenty of water on the stove to the boiling point in a pot that easily pours. When the buckwheat is fully roasted, remove from oven, place on stove top and uncover. measure water in pyrex glass measuring cup (2 cups water / cup of grain) & add to ***HOT*** roasted buckwheat. stand back from pot as VERY HOT steam will be rising from the pot. recover pot, place in oven & turn off oven heat. Cook in hot oven for 20 minutes. Remove from oven & let stand for 10 minutes.
Posted on 2012-09-30 02:15:12
Name:Lance Brown
Location:United States
Subject:Storing Grains
Yes, grains are best stored in the freezer as sometimes weevil eggs accompany the harvested grain. If the grain is stored at room temperature, then SURPRISE hatched bugs eating away your grain at some inopportune point.

I have never heard of this with buckwheat specifically, but have witnessed it occurring first hand with rice & barley over my 20+ years of a grain based diet.

Posted on 2012-09-30 02:21:38
Name:VB
Subject:RE: Storing buckwheat and cooking variations
I suppose you can store buckwheat in the freezer, but only if you eat it infrequently. Since Russians eat it every single week, they go through it pretty quickly (2 lb bag per month) so it does not require storage. If they keep buckwheat in large bags, then of course there are tiny bugs that hatch over the period of 9-10 months, but not always, depending on the grain. One more caveat: most Russians use 3 cups of water to 2 cups of dry buckwheat. Some Russians use 2 cups of water to 1 cup of buckwheat (then you have to keep it longer on the lower setting). I prefer 3:2. Always buy roasted, especially if this is your first time making it - it tastes way better. Also, after it is finished, you can use butter, olive oil, vegetables, any sauce you like. Many Russians eat it hot with cold milk for breakfast (like cereal). Or you can add it to your morning omelet. It is delicious.
Posted on 2012-10-06 03:11:10
Name:RK
Location:Israel
Subject:Roasting and Cooking Buckwheat My Way...
My family is from Russian origin and I would like to tell you how I just made buckwhet (it came out very good fluffly, not sticky at all). I didn't find pre-roasted buckwheat so I bought regular buckwheat, washed it very quickly, about a minute and put it on a dry frying pan to dry out and roast (with a small fire of course). After it's dry, I just put it in a container until I'm ready to cook it. To cook it I added the roasted buckwheat to boiling water, added some salt and cooked covered for 10 minutes and then let it stand covered for another 10 minutes. The water buckwheat ratio I used was 1.5:1, so one and a half cups of water to 1 cup of buckwheat. I hope this helps. The roasting step is very important if you cannot buy already roasted buchwheat.
Posted on 2012-10-10 13:49:35
Name:Pari
Location:L.A.
Subject:Buckwheat as Cereal
Yup, VB is right. I used to just put buckwheat with water in a pot and wait till water evaporated. Too soft/mushy. I did 1.5c water and 1c. kasha and it came out great. I buy it already roasted from Jons and sometime it stays around for months when I'm not in the mood for BW. NO bugs ever! I keep the bag (2lbs) in the pantry or on the counter. As you may know some days can get really hot in L.A. but I never had a problem. I prefer mine on the sweet side instead of salty so I use it like cereals. I add soy milk (lactose intolerant), diet sugar (out of necessity) and slice a banana on top or some other fruit. Maybe jam once in a while.
Posted on 2012-11-09 03:07:08
Name:Looly
Location:Sweden
Subject:Buckwheat
I cook my buckwheat mushy for porridge and grainy for rice. For a porridge I add unrefined sea salt (84 to 92 minerals) and on my plate I mix in tahini and sometimes carob powder and chopped sweet fruit. That is a treat.
Posted on 2012-11-25 05:00:12
Name:Ouiser
Location:Israel
Subject:VB is absolutely right!!
This way buckwheat turns out fluffy and delicious, btw that's how I also cook basmati rice or any other rice for that matter and it tastes just perfect.
Posted on 2012-11-26 09:26:06
Name:OJB
Location:Israel
Subject:Non-sticky buckwheat
Sautee in a pot leeks, grated carrots, and different mushrooms on little oil. Add salt and black pepper. After RINSING buckwheat under faucet water, add 1 cup of buckwheat, and 1.5 cup boiling water to the pot. After it comes to boil, lower the heat to minimum and cook for about 20 minutes. Turn off the heat, leave covered for another 20 minutes, and then fluff it gently with a fork. Does not stick or get mushy, and is super-delicious.
Posted on 2012-12-26 02:49:20
Name:OJB
Location:Israel
Subject:Non-sticky buckwheat
I would like to add a note to my above comment. If you use chicken broth instead of water, it is even tastier. Instead of leeks, you can use onions. Also, you can add to the rest of the ingredients and sauté finely chopped stalk of celery and/or grated zucchini. The possibilities are unending.
Posted on 2012-12-27 01:07:28
Name:Foozle
Location:U.S.
Subject:Coat in Egg for Better Texture
I grew my own buckwheat this year, so was able to experiment with different methods using consistent raw buckwheat to start. Plain roasted buckwheat tended to get fairly mushy, even if using a low amount of water. Less water was better, but still mushy. The best method I found for making it less mushy was roasting the buckwheat in the oven for about 40 minutes on 325 degrees (convection oven), letting cool a bit, coating with beaten egg, then frying in a dry pan for a few minutes to cook the egg into the buckwheat, creating a shiny coating on the groats. Apparently there is a chemical in the egg whites called Albumin, that acts like a binding agent, keeping the groats more whole when cooking. Too much water and/or overcooking can also create a mushy texture.

I suspect that as part of the commercial processing of buckwheat in Russia they might treat the buckwheat with something like Albumin, which might explain why off the shelf Russian buckwheat doesn't require the egg step. I could be wrong, of course, and maybe they just grow a different variety there that doesn't require that step. I plan to research a bit and will post if/when I find out for sure.

Posted on 2013-01-16 16:28:11
Name:Foozle
Location:U.S.
Subject:Further investigation
Ok, I did quite a bit more experimenting this past weekend and also snooped around the internet. Here are my conclusions, so far, with one caveat at the end.

I compared my homegrown buckwheat to some from Eastern Europe that a friend sent me. My buckwheat (and perhaps the other that you get in the U.S.) is very fragile compared to the European. I can crush my buckwheat between my fingers with enough force and it turns to powder. The European buckwheat is more the consistency of a hard dried corn kernel and there is no way I can crush with my fingers.

I read and heard from some people that apparently the Eastern Europeans roast their buckwheat using "super heated steam." My guess is that it has the effect of fusing the otherwise powdery inside of the buckwheat into something more the consistency of hard dried corn. I'm not a biochemist, but the combination of the moisture and high temperatures create this effect.

Unfortunately I can't replicate this at home, so I'm left with other ways to achieve a similar goal, which is to prevent the powdery inside from being released into the pot before it can congeal into a puffy cooked groat.

After several attempts using different methods, I've concluded that, as some others have said, it is critical to put the buckwheat into boiling or near boiling water, rather than cool water to start. The cool water immediately penetrates the outside of the groat and when it starts to heat, it breaks apart most of the groats and turns to mush.

Coating with egg helps somewhat, but not absolutely necessary as the improved result is incrementally smaller than the effect of hot/cool water. The egg coating just helps create a seal around the groat, to allow the inside to absorb water at a slower pace and hold together long enough to create that puffy white cooked groat.

With the Eastern European buckwheat, water temperature and with/without egg probably doesn't matter at all or very much because their groats are so much more durable. The caveat I mentioned is that I'm not absolutely sure that the super heated steam is making the kernel more durable, as I don't have access to the groats they use before roasting. It is also possible that they use a different variety, or that maybe the moisture content of their groats are higher than what I grew, so that in the natural drying process, they are more durable by their nature.

If I'm ever able to successfully contact one of the processors I'll find out and post something. I'm happy, at least, that I can replicate the texture of the finished Eastern European product, albeit with having to use more care. The plus side might be that my more "natural" processing might perhaps preserve more of the nutritional value than the commercial steam roasting process.

Posted on 2013-01-21 17:37:03
Name:Eliyaju
Location:USA
Subject:Buckwheat is not a grain
VK, please resume eating your national dish. Buckwheat is not a grain. It's a seed. Look it up.
Posted on 2013-01-25 11:48:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Buckwheat is not a grain
Hi Eliyaju, thanks for your comment. It is true that Buckwheat is technically a seed, and not a grain. However, its nutritional profile makes it a "grain" in the culinary sense. Look at the nutrition facts comparison for buckwheat, wheat, and flax seeds. You can see that both buckwheat and wheat are 1-3% fat, 70% carb, 15% protein, and 10-13% water etc...Flax seeds by contrast are 42% fat, 27% carb, 18% protein, and 13% water etc...Most people stop eating grains because they are diabetic and have to watch their carbohydrate consumption. From this perspective, VB is right to stop eating buckwheat, even though it is technically a seed, it provides just as many carbs as other grains...
Posted on 2013-01-25 11:56:06
Name:Bo
Location:Australia
Subject:Reheating cooked buckwheat
The method I use to reheat buckwheat, rice, quinoa, etc... is with a steamer. It seems to work OK, 5 mins max, or just long enough to heat through...
Posted on 2013-02-04 06:10:06
Name:Rozy
Location:Buffalo, NY
Subject:Ways to prepare buckwheat
My Polish-Jewish Babcia used it in many ways. Always used roasted buckwheat, and cooked it like rice. Christmas eve: Kasza with mushroom gravy. Easter time: baked pierogi w/buckwheat and onions & seasoning...similar to knish. Buckwheat be used for stuffing cabbage rolls, I mix half rice/half buckwheat with seasoned meat. A staple in our house...once was told it was grown as a herb...
Posted on 2013-02-26 09:54:47
Name:KC
Location:USA
Subject:Buckwheat is a seed and my recipe...
Buckwheat is a grain-like seed of an herbaceous pant of the rhubarb family. Stir the buckwheat groats into boiling water for 1 min. or until the water turns rosy, drain, toast in 2T oil (for 1C if groats), add water cook for 15 min. Let stand for 10. DON'T add salt to your grains while cooking - it makes them tough. Add 1/2 tsp to 1 cup raw grain after cooking. 1 part buckwheat, 1.5 parts water. Perfect!
Posted on 2013-02-28 00:46:01
Name:DKM
Location:US
Subject:Buckwheat with a rice cooker?
The numerous methods here suggest that kasha might cook well in a rice cooker. The appropriate water level may take some time to discover, but as one who used to be a purist about cooking rice, but is now a rice cooker zealot, I'm tempted to try some kasha in the rice cooker. I'd start with a 2:1 ratio of water/kasha.

Any out there use a rice cooker for buckwheat?

Posted on 2013-03-01 14:55:39
Name:Dvorah Leah
Location:USA
Subject:Buckwheat Kasha cooked the Russian Jewish Way
I cook it the way my Russian Jewish Bubbie always did. You need a stove with at least 3 burners.

First, set a pot with 2 cups of water on high to boil on the first burner. Measure out your 1 cup of buckwheat into a bowl. In another bowl, whisk an egg.

On the second burner, saute some sliced mushrooms with chopped garlic & onion in a scant tsp of butter mixed with a tsp of schmaltz (chicken fat).

Then on the third burner, place a heavy pan on medium heat. When a drop of water sizzles and spits back at you, pour the buckwheat into the pan and stir around with a fork. Pour in the whisked egg and quickly, continuously, mix the buckwheat with the egg. Stir it around until the egg completely dries out (cooks onto the buckwheat).

At that point the water should be boiled, so pour it into the pan with the buckwheat. Add the mushrooms, onion & garlic, then stir to mix with the buckwheat. Put the lid on the pan and lower the heat to just barely above the "low" setting. Leave it alone for 15-20 minutes. Don't peek! Leave the lid on the pan.

After the 15-20 minutes, remove the lid. If all the water is absorbed, fluff with a fork and leave in the pan for another 5 minutes before serving.

After it is on the plate, then you can add your salt, black pepper, crushed red pepper flakes and any other seasoning you like, to your taste.

Posted on 2013-03-23 14:00:32
Name:Rashida
Location:Pakistan
Subject:The Russian Method
I can confirm the Russian method of cooking kasza suggested by VB results in a perfect, fluffy dish. My Polish husband and I have been trying for years to perfect non-boil-in-the bag kasza. This method was great. Thanks VB.
Posted on 2013-06-13 07:04:24
Name:Kasha Lover
Location:Israel
Subject:Easy and Delicious, non mushy Method
Here's an easy way to make delicious non-mushy kasha. Comes out perfect every time.

Take 500 gms dry kasha and mix with one beaten egg until everything is coated. Place in an lightly oiled (pammed) foil pan.

Place in a 300 F oven until all dry. Mix frequently to separate. Its okay if they get stuck together just break them apart.

When they are all dry pour 4 cups of boiling water over them. cover tightly with foil.

Bake for 45 mins on 375 F.

Remove from oven, mix and fluff. add 1 Tbsp of oil, 2 tsps salt, pepper and garlic to taste. Even better if you add lots of fried onions at this point. Good Luck!
Posted on 2013-07-15 11:06:36
Name:Russ
Location:Paris
Subject:Stop boiling it
Really tasty and simple way to cook it, put buckwheat in the pan cover it with boiling water for two fingers on top, cover, and leave it for one hour, that's it, all vitamins inside, and don't need to watch it...easy peasy.
Posted on 2013-09-27 13:19:18
Name:Adriana
Location:Airdrie
Subject:Slow cooler works excellent!
Try it in the slow cooker, mine has a whole grain setting which works just perfectly. 1 cup buckwheat, 2 cups water, no pre-washing. Drop it in, close lid and walk away until the ready beep. It's so easy and can be finished hot or cold, many recipes online.
Posted on 2013-10-01 02:17:40
Name:Wings
Location:USA
Subject:Thanks for the buckwheat info
I have enjoyed all the info about buckwheat. I just received a 5 gallon tub and am trying to learn how to use this seed/grain.
Posted on 2013-10-11 18:04:39
Name:Willyohyum
Location:California, USA
Subject:Thanks Kasha Experts
It's wonderful seeing all the recipes and suggestions for this wonderful grain. I thank my grandparents and relatives who brought me up on it. Sure wish I knew where to purchase it in bulk (roasted) in the San Francisco Bay Area...
Posted on 2013-11-17 05:38:07
Name:DavidM
Location:Morgan Hill, CA
Subject:Where I buy
I live near San Jose, and order mine from Bobsredmill.com ("organic buckwheat toasted kasha") in 25 pound bags. We make it every Sunday (using 2 cups dry), so have to reorder about every six months.

I am surprised at the number of negative reviews, on Amazon.com and elsewhere, for in my experience this is a consistently excellent product. I think the problem is that many people don't know how to prepare it correctly.

I put the two cups of cereal into a wire strainer to shake out as much of the chaff as possible and to find and remove the occasional bit of what looks like scale from hard water. I never wash the kasha.

I mix the dry kasha with one whole egg in a large saucepan, then cook it over high heat, stirring and chopping until the egg dries and the coated kasha separates into individual grains.

I pour 2-1/2 cups of boiling water into the dried kasha/egg mixture, stir quickly to mix, then cover the pan and cook it over low heat for 15 minutes. The only time this failed to produce perfect results was when I inadvertently added only 2 cups of water instead of 2-1/2.

The ratio of 2-1/2 cups of water to 2 cups of kasha works perfectly for me. 2:1 is way too much water.

We eat it with butter - nothing else added.

Note that Bob's has another similar product called wholegrain buckwheat groats, which is not toasted. I tried those once and was extremely disappointed.

Posted on 2013-11-19 04:24:28
Name:JB
Location:Chicago
Subject:Anyone make a kasha cake?
I want to update the kasha I serve for the holidays - our tradition is kasha with prune syrup. But I'd like to create a kasha cake like the risotto cakes restaurants serve. Anyone done this successfully?
Posted on 2013-11-25 22:07:07
Name:Skip
Location:USA
Subject:The best and easiest way
The best and easiest way is to cook buckwheat in a rice cooker. One part BW to 1.75 water. Don't peek until it's done :) Open lid, fluff, wait 5min. Add butter and/or olive oil, and salt...enjoy

You may adjust the water to suit your taste for firmness.

Posted on 2013-12-11 10:45:00
Name:Sheila
Location:Brantford
Subject:Kasha with onions and bacon
The very best way to eat Kasha is boiled with onions, some black pepper and at the end throw in 1/2 lb of bacon bits. Soooooo yummy!
Posted on 2014-01-16 11:17:46
Name:Tatyana
Location:Florida
Subject:Where to buy Buckwheat
The best grains you can buy are only in the Russian market, all others from the USA are just over processed way more than they should be. To have roasted buckwheat you don't have to go to store, just roast it in dry heavy wok until it gets dark...again it is a secret to buy in a Russian store, or other, but a local one.
Posted on 2014-01-17 20:37:11
Name:MB
Location:United States
Subject:Heating buckwheat to make cereal
I am just starting to use more grains. To heat I just use a little water to moisten the bottom of a sauce pan. Heat and when bubbling the buckwheat is hot. It wasn't long enough to change the texture but hot. Sieve. I used as a cereal with Agave Nectar and Almond Milk.
Posted on 2014-01-28 14:56:39
Name:Lawrence Waxman
Location:St. Louis, MO
Subject:Buckwheat a complete protein?
With brown rice I add beans or peas and maybe some seeds to complete the protein content of the rice.

Does this work with Buckwheat? Or is the protein already complete?

Posted on 2014-02-09 18:07:33
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Buckwheat a complete protein?
Hi Lawrence, thanks for your question. According to the Agricultural Marketing Resource Center buckwheat contains all 8 essential amino acids, so there is no need to add more proteins unless you want to. Amino acid data will be added to this website soon.
Posted on 2014-02-18 02:04:44
Name:Alex Adams
Location:San Francisco
Subject:I was making kasha wrong!
I was making kasha the way poster named Anon Ymous does, and it was coming out mushy. I thought it was supposed to be like that so I still ate it, but my friends didn't like it. Well, I just tried VB's method from your website and I feel like I've never tasted kasha before. It's so much better and completely delicious! I burned my tongue eating it too fast, but so glad I found your method. Thanks!
Posted on 2014-02-28 17:37:33
Name:Gene Callahan
Location:United States
Subject:Grains are seeds
@Eliyaju: "Buckwheat is not a grain. It's a seed. Look it up."

Eliyaju, grains ARE seeds: Look it up.

Posted on 2014-04-08 06:36:08

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Comments.
Name:Anon Ymous
Subject:Alternate Suggestion
Try bringing the water to a boil first, then adding the buckwheat, reduce heat to simmer, cover for 15 minutes, then let stand away from heat, but still covered, for 10 minutes. Then fluff with a fork and season to taste with salt. Another recipe is coating the kasha with a (whisked) egg over medium heat in a skillet, then adding the water or broth and following the recipe above.
Posted on 2011-06-30 19:20:58
Name:VB
Location:Russia
Subject:The correct way

HealthAliciousNess Note: The comments by VB below inspired the changes to the recipe and brought it to its current version, which is why VB's comment mirrors the current recipe.

This is how you make buckwheat: DO NOT WASH BUCKWHEAT. Buy roasted buckwheat, it is tastier. Boil three cups of water. Add some salt. Add two cups of buckwheat to the boiling water. Stir, leave on high uncovered. As soon as the grain expands and soaks up the water at the top, cover with the lid and leave it on the lowest setting possible for another five to ten minutes (check that all the water has been absorbed) at the bottom. The buckwheat should be fluffy and the kernels should not stick to each other. You can add other things to your buckwheat before serving - fried onions, mushrooms, vegetables, cold pressed sunflower oil. It SHOULD NOT BE MUSHY AT ALL! Good luck!
Posted on 2011-08-06 18:51:42
Name:VB
Location:Russia
Subject:The correct way
Your recipe is incorrect. This is how you make buckwheat: DO NOT WASH BUCKWHEAT. Buy roasted buckwheat, it is tastier. Boil three cups of water. Add some salt. Add two cups of buckwheat to the boiling water. Stir, leave on high uncovered. As soon as the grain expands and soaks up the water at the top, cover with the lid and leave it on the lowest setting possible for another five to ten minutes (check that all the water has been absorbed) at the bottom. The buckwheat should be fluffy and the kernels should not stick to each other. You can add other things to your buckwheat before serving - fried onions, mushrooms, vegetables, cold pressed sunflower oil. It SHOULD NOT BE MUSHY AT ALL! Good luck!
Posted on 2011-08-06 18:53:02
Name:VB
Location:Russia
Subject:Correction
Sorry, I wrote "leave it on the lowest setting for another five to ten minutes". This is incorrect - it could be longer depending on the pot. Try to use some heavy pots. Also, if you are using ceramic stove top, you can leave it on setting 1 for up to forty minutes, then turn off the heat but do not remove from the stove top. Traditional Russian method of cooking is, when the grain expands and soaks up the water on the top, to leave it on a lowest setting possible for an hour (they used special ovens to keep it warm).
Posted on 2011-09-10 23:22:27
Name:Sam Gifford
Location:Scotland
Subject:Cooking Buckwheat
Here in the UK we have lots of Polish shops where you can buy boil in the bag buckwheat. It's called Kasza and you can buy the brown or lighter-cloured varieties. Had some last night with some Puy Lentils etc. Lovely!
Posted on 2011-12-14 22:05:10
Name:SF
Location:Minneapolis, MN, USA
Subject:The Russian way works!
The method suggested by "VB" above works great! In my pot, it was hard to see whether the buckwheat had consumed all the water on top, due to a large number of bubbles... so I turned the heat down to medium-high until I could see. Then when the water on top was mostly absorbed, I put a lid on and left it for 10 minutes on the lowest setting. The result, perfect tasting buckwheat with a great texture.
Posted on 2012-04-07 23:59:14
Name:Banana
Location:Israel
Subject:I think you should not wash buckwheat.
What was I thinking, washing it???! Don't let it touch water until it hits the pot!
Posted on 2012-04-21 20:35:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:Selecting, Cleaning, and Storing Buckwheat
Thanks to everyone whos comments have made the webpage more useful. Also wanted to point out this site which has good guidelines on selecting, storing, and cleaning buckwheat/kasha. Basically, it endorses rinsing buckwheat but quickly draining the liquid to preserve texture. This is likely best as not all grains can be 100% clean and an extra rinse is a good precaution. The site also points out that it is best to store kasha/buckwheat in the freezer. Hope that helps and thanks again for the comments and suggestions.
Posted on 2012-04-21 21:00:35
Name:VB
Location:Russia
Subject:RE: Selecting, Cleaning, and Storing Buckwheat
@HealthAliciousNess - 150 million people in Russia NEVER EVER washed or rinsed buckwheat for at least 200 years. Some people go through a quick "sorting" - you put a bunch of buckwheat at a time on a big flat plate to find foreign inclusions that you pick out manually. This is only done when the grain is full of small pebbles or there is other grain mixed in together. However, there is no water involved in this process. Nobody stores buckwheat in the freezer. It is like rice. Would you store your rice grains in the freezer?
Posted on 2012-05-15 15:33:59
Name:Garrick Marchena
Location:Island of Curaçao in the Caribbean
Subject:Re-heating cooked buckwheat
I've just started to eat buckwheat (as in today!) I've read that cooked buckwheat can be stored and re-heated the next day. My queastion is: How do you re-heat fridge-stored coocked Buckwheat properly?
Posted on 2012-07-25 19:04:23
Name:Lance Brown
Location:United States
Subject:alt recipe: firm kernels, not mushy
VEGAN RAW BUCKWHEAT RECIPE - rinse and allow to air dry in a strainer for a couple of hours (i.e. in morning to cook in evening). Place damp buckwheat in Le Creuset oven-proof iron pot. place pot in oven, set temp for 450 degrees. When oven is preheated start process of stirring every 10 minutes. When kernels begin to turn golden, then increase stirring frequency to every 3 minutes until *some* kernels start to appear a dark orange color and most others are a degree of golden to orange color. While buckwheat is roasting, heat plenty of water on the stove to the boiling point in a pot that easily pours. When the buckwheat is fully roasted, remove from oven, place on stove top and uncover. measure water in pyrex glass measuring cup (2 cups water / cup of grain) & add to ***HOT*** roasted buckwheat. stand back from pot as VERY HOT steam will be rising from the pot. recover pot, place in oven & turn off oven heat. Cook in hot oven for 20 minutes. Remove from oven & let stand for 10 minutes.
Posted on 2012-09-30 02:15:12
Name:Lance Brown
Location:United States
Subject:Storing Grains
Yes, grains are best stored in the freezer as sometimes weevil eggs accompany the harvested grain. If the grain is stored at room temperature, then SURPRISE hatched bugs eating away your grain at some inopportune point.

I have never heard of this with buckwheat specifically, but have witnessed it occurring first hand with rice & barley over my 20+ years of a grain based diet.

Posted on 2012-09-30 02:21:38
Name:VB
Subject:RE: Storing buckwheat and cooking variations
I suppose you can store buckwheat in the freezer, but only if you eat it infrequently. Since Russians eat it every single week, they go through it pretty quickly (2 lb bag per month) so it does not require storage. If they keep buckwheat in large bags, then of course there are tiny bugs that hatch over the period of 9-10 months, but not always, depending on the grain. One more caveat: most Russians use 3 cups of water to 2 cups of dry buckwheat. Some Russians use 2 cups of water to 1 cup of buckwheat (then you have to keep it longer on the lower setting). I prefer 3:2. Always buy roasted, especially if this is your first time making it - it tastes way better. Also, after it is finished, you can use butter, olive oil, vegetables, any sauce you like. Many Russians eat it hot with cold milk for breakfast (like cereal). Or you can add it to your morning omelet. It is delicious.
Posted on 2012-10-06 03:11:10
Name:RK
Location:Israel
Subject:Roasting and Cooking Buckwheat My Way...
My family is from Russian origin and I would like to tell you how I just made buckwhet (it came out very good fluffly, not sticky at all). I didn't find pre-roasted buckwheat so I bought regular buckwheat, washed it very quickly, about a minute and put it on a dry frying pan to dry out and roast (with a small fire of course). After it's dry, I just put it in a container until I'm ready to cook it. To cook it I added the roasted buckwheat to boiling water, added some salt and cooked covered for 10 minutes and then let it stand covered for another 10 minutes. The water buckwheat ratio I used was 1.5:1, so one and a half cups of water to 1 cup of buckwheat. I hope this helps. The roasting step is very important if you cannot buy already roasted buchwheat.
Posted on 2012-10-10 13:49:35
Name:Pari
Location:L.A.
Subject:Buckwheat as Cereal
Yup, VB is right. I used to just put buckwheat with water in a pot and wait till water evaporated. Too soft/mushy. I did 1.5c water and 1c. kasha and it came out great. I buy it already roasted from Jons and sometime it stays around for months when I'm not in the mood for BW. NO bugs ever! I keep the bag (2lbs) in the pantry or on the counter. As you may know some days can get really hot in L.A. but I never had a problem. I prefer mine on the sweet side instead of salty so I use it like cereals. I add soy milk (lactose intolerant), diet sugar (out of necessity) and slice a banana on top or some other fruit. Maybe jam once in a while.
Posted on 2012-11-09 03:07:08
Name:Looly
Location:Sweden
Subject:Buckwheat
I cook my buckwheat mushy for porridge and grainy for rice. For a porridge I add unrefined sea salt (84 to 92 minerals) and on my plate I mix in tahini and sometimes carob powder and chopped sweet fruit. That is a treat.
Posted on 2012-11-25 05:00:12
Name:Ouiser
Location:Israel
Subject:VB is absolutely right!!
This way buckwheat turns out fluffy and delicious, btw that's how I also cook basmati rice or any other rice for that matter and it tastes just perfect.
Posted on 2012-11-26 09:26:06
Name:OJB
Location:Israel
Subject:Non-sticky buckwheat
Sautee in a pot leeks, grated carrots, and different mushrooms on little oil. Add salt and black pepper. After RINSING buckwheat under faucet water, add 1 cup of buckwheat, and 1.5 cup boiling water to the pot. After it comes to boil, lower the heat to minimum and cook for about 20 minutes. Turn off the heat, leave covered for another 20 minutes, and then fluff it gently with a fork. Does not stick or get mushy, and is super-delicious.
Posted on 2012-12-26 02:49:20
Name:OJB
Location:Israel
Subject:Non-sticky buckwheat
I would like to add a note to my above comment. If you use chicken broth instead of water, it is even tastier. Instead of leeks, you can use onions. Also, you can add to the rest of the ingredients and sauté finely chopped stalk of celery and/or grated zucchini. The possibilities are unending.
Posted on 2012-12-27 01:07:28
Name:Foozle
Location:U.S.
Subject:Coat in Egg for Better Texture
I grew my own buckwheat this year, so was able to experiment with different methods using consistent raw buckwheat to start. Plain roasted buckwheat tended to get fairly mushy, even if using a low amount of water. Less water was better, but still mushy. The best method I found for making it less mushy was roasting the buckwheat in the oven for about 40 minutes on 325 degrees (convection oven), letting cool a bit, coating with beaten egg, then frying in a dry pan for a few minutes to cook the egg into the buckwheat, creating a shiny coating on the groats. Apparently there is a chemical in the egg whites called Albumin, that acts like a binding agent, keeping the groats more whole when cooking. Too much water and/or overcooking can also create a mushy texture.

I suspect that as part of the commercial processing of buckwheat in Russia they might treat the buckwheat with something like Albumin, which might explain why off the shelf Russian buckwheat doesn't require the egg step. I could be wrong, of course, and maybe they just grow a different variety there that doesn't require that step. I plan to research a bit and will post if/when I find out for sure.

Posted on 2013-01-16 16:28:11
Name:Foozle
Location:U.S.
Subject:Further investigation
Ok, I did quite a bit more experimenting this past weekend and also snooped around the internet. Here are my conclusions, so far, with one caveat at the end.

I compared my homegrown buckwheat to some from Eastern Europe that a friend sent me. My buckwheat (and perhaps the other that you get in the U.S.) is very fragile compared to the European. I can crush my buckwheat between my fingers with enough force and it turns to powder. The European buckwheat is more the consistency of a hard dried corn kernel and there is no way I can crush with my fingers.

I read and heard from some people that apparently the Eastern Europeans roast their buckwheat using "super heated steam." My guess is that it has the effect of fusing the otherwise powdery inside of the buckwheat into something more the consistency of hard dried corn. I'm not a biochemist, but the combination of the moisture and high temperatures create this effect.

Unfortunately I can't replicate this at home, so I'm left with other ways to achieve a similar goal, which is to prevent the powdery inside from being released into the pot before it can congeal into a puffy cooked groat.

After several attempts using different methods, I've concluded that, as some others have said, it is critical to put the buckwheat into boiling or near boiling water, rather than cool water to start. The cool water immediately penetrates the outside of the groat and when it starts to heat, it breaks apart most of the groats and turns to mush.

Coating with egg helps somewhat, but not absolutely necessary as the improved result is incrementally smaller than the effect of hot/cool water. The egg coating just helps create a seal around the groat, to allow the inside to absorb water at a slower pace and hold together long enough to create that puffy white cooked groat.

With the Eastern European buckwheat, water temperature and with/without egg probably doesn't matter at all or very much because their groats are so much more durable. The caveat I mentioned is that I'm not absolutely sure that the super heated steam is making the kernel more durable, as I don't have access to the groats they use before roasting. It is also possible that they use a different variety, or that maybe the moisture content of their groats are higher than what I grew, so that in the natural drying process, they are more durable by their nature.

If I'm ever able to successfully contact one of the processors I'll find out and post something. I'm happy, at least, that I can replicate the texture of the finished Eastern European product, albeit with having to use more care. The plus side might be that my more "natural" processing might perhaps preserve more of the nutritional value than the commercial steam roasting process.

Posted on 2013-01-21 17:37:03
Name:Eliyaju
Location:USA
Subject:Buckwheat is not a grain
VK, please resume eating your national dish. Buckwheat is not a grain. It's a seed. Look it up.
Posted on 2013-01-25 11:48:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Buckwheat is not a grain
Hi Eliyaju, thanks for your comment. It is true that Buckwheat is technically a seed, and not a grain. However, its nutritional profile makes it a "grain" in the culinary sense. Look at the nutrition facts comparison for buckwheat, wheat, and flax seeds. You can see that both buckwheat and wheat are 1-3% fat, 70% carb, 15% protein, and 10-13% water etc...Flax seeds by contrast are 42% fat, 27% carb, 18% protein, and 13% water etc...Most people stop eating grains because they are diabetic and have to watch their carbohydrate consumption. From this perspective, VB is right to stop eating buckwheat, even though it is technically a seed, it provides just as many carbs as other grains...
Posted on 2013-01-25 11:56:06
Name:Bo
Location:Australia
Subject:Reheating cooked buckwheat
The method I use to reheat buckwheat, rice, quinoa, etc... is with a steamer. It seems to work OK, 5 mins max, or just long enough to heat through...
Posted on 2013-02-04 06:10:06
Name:Rozy
Location:Buffalo, NY
Subject:Ways to prepare buckwheat
My Polish-Jewish Babcia used it in many ways. Always used roasted buckwheat, and cooked it like rice. Christmas eve: Kasza with mushroom gravy. Easter time: baked pierogi w/buckwheat and onions & seasoning...similar to knish. Buckwheat be used for stuffing cabbage rolls, I mix half rice/half buckwheat with seasoned meat. A staple in our house...once was told it was grown as a herb...
Posted on 2013-02-26 09:54:47
Name:KC
Location:USA
Subject:Buckwheat is a seed and my recipe...
Buckwheat is a grain-like seed of an herbaceous pant of the rhubarb family. Stir the buckwheat groats into boiling water for 1 min. or until the water turns rosy, drain, toast in 2T oil (for 1C if groats), add water cook for 15 min. Let stand for 10. DON'T add salt to your grains while cooking - it makes them tough. Add 1/2 tsp to 1 cup raw grain after cooking. 1 part buckwheat, 1.5 parts water. Perfect!
Posted on 2013-02-28 00:46:01
Name:DKM
Location:US
Subject:Buckwheat with a rice cooker?
The numerous methods here suggest that kasha might cook well in a rice cooker. The appropriate water level may take some time to discover, but as one who used to be a purist about cooking rice, but is now a rice cooker zealot, I'm tempted to try some kasha in the rice cooker. I'd start with a 2:1 ratio of water/kasha.

Any out there use a rice cooker for buckwheat?

Posted on 2013-03-01 14:55:39
Name:Dvorah Leah
Location:USA
Subject:Buckwheat Kasha cooked the Russian Jewish Way
I cook it the way my Russian Jewish Bubbie always did. You need a stove with at least 3 burners.

First, set a pot with 2 cups of water on high to boil on the first burner. Measure out your 1 cup of buckwheat into a bowl. In another bowl, whisk an egg.

On the second burner, saute some sliced mushrooms with chopped garlic & onion in a scant tsp of butter mixed with a tsp of schmaltz (chicken fat).

Then on the third burner, place a heavy pan on medium heat. When a drop of water sizzles and spits back at you, pour the buckwheat into the pan and stir around with a fork. Pour in the whisked egg and quickly, continuously, mix the buckwheat with the egg. Stir it around until the egg completely dries out (cooks onto the buckwheat).

At that point the water should be boiled, so pour it into the pan with the buckwheat. Add the mushrooms, onion & garlic, then stir to mix with the buckwheat. Put the lid on the pan and lower the heat to just barely above the "low" setting. Leave it alone for 15-20 minutes. Don't peek! Leave the lid on the pan.

After the 15-20 minutes, remove the lid. If all the water is absorbed, fluff with a fork and leave in the pan for another 5 minutes before serving.

After it is on the plate, then you can add your salt, black pepper, crushed red pepper flakes and any other seasoning you like, to your taste.

Posted on 2013-03-23 14:00:32
Name:Rashida
Location:Pakistan
Subject:The Russian Method
I can confirm the Russian method of cooking kasza suggested by VB results in a perfect, fluffy dish. My Polish husband and I have been trying for years to perfect non-boil-in-the bag kasza. This method was great. Thanks VB.
Posted on 2013-06-13 07:04:24
Name:Kasha Lover
Location:Israel
Subject:Easy and Delicious, non mushy Method
Here's an easy way to make delicious non-mushy kasha. Comes out perfect every time.

Take 500 gms dry kasha and mix with one beaten egg until everything is coated. Place in an lightly oiled (pammed) foil pan.

Place in a 300 F oven until all dry. Mix frequently to separate. Its okay if they get stuck together just break them apart.

When they are all dry pour 4 cups of boiling water over them. cover tightly with foil.

Bake for 45 mins on 375 F.

Remove from oven, mix and fluff. add 1 Tbsp of oil, 2 tsps salt, pepper and garlic to taste. Even better if you add lots of fried onions at this point. Good Luck!
Posted on 2013-07-15 11:06:36
Name:Russ
Location:Paris
Subject:Stop boiling it
Really tasty and simple way to cook it, put buckwheat in the pan cover it with boiling water for two fingers on top, cover, and leave it for one hour, that's it, all vitamins inside, and don't need to watch it...easy peasy.
Posted on 2013-09-27 13:19:18
Name:Adriana
Location:Airdrie
Subject:Slow cooler works excellent!
Try it in the slow cooker, mine has a whole grain setting which works just perfectly. 1 cup buckwheat, 2 cups water, no pre-washing. Drop it in, close lid and walk away until the ready beep. It's so easy and can be finished hot or cold, many recipes online.
Posted on 2013-10-01 02:17:40
Name:Wings
Location:USA
Subject:Thanks for the buckwheat info
I have enjoyed all the info about buckwheat. I just received a 5 gallon tub and am trying to learn how to use this seed/grain.
Posted on 2013-10-11 18:04:39
Name:Willyohyum
Location:California, USA
Subject:Thanks Kasha Experts
It's wonderful seeing all the recipes and suggestions for this wonderful grain. I thank my grandparents and relatives who brought me up on it. Sure wish I knew where to purchase it in bulk (roasted) in the San Francisco Bay Area...
Posted on 2013-11-17 05:38:07
Name:DavidM
Location:Morgan Hill, CA
Subject:Where I buy
I live near San Jose, and order mine from Bobsredmill.com ("organic buckwheat toasted kasha") in 25 pound bags. We make it every Sunday (using 2 cups dry), so have to reorder about every six months.

I am surprised at the number of negative reviews, on Amazon.com and elsewhere, for in my experience this is a consistently excellent product. I think the problem is that many people don't know how to prepare it correctly.

I put the two cups of cereal into a wire strainer to shake out as much of the chaff as possible and to find and remove the occasional bit of what looks like scale from hard water. I never wash the kasha.

I mix the dry kasha with one whole egg in a large saucepan, then cook it over high heat, stirring and chopping until the egg dries and the coated kasha separates into individual grains.

I pour 2-1/2 cups of boiling water into the dried kasha/egg mixture, stir quickly to mix, then cover the pan and cook it over low heat for 15 minutes. The only time this failed to produce perfect results was when I inadvertently added only 2 cups of water instead of 2-1/2.

The ratio of 2-1/2 cups of water to 2 cups of kasha works perfectly for me. 2:1 is way too much water.

We eat it with butter - nothing else added.

Note that Bob's has another similar product called wholegrain buckwheat groats, which is not toasted. I tried those once and was extremely disappointed.

Posted on 2013-11-19 04:24:28
Name:JB
Location:Chicago
Subject:Anyone make a kasha cake?
I want to update the kasha I serve for the holidays - our tradition is kasha with prune syrup. But I'd like to create a kasha cake like the risotto cakes restaurants serve. Anyone done this successfully?
Posted on 2013-11-25 22:07:07
Name:Skip
Location:USA
Subject:The best and easiest way
The best and easiest way is to cook buckwheat in a rice cooker. One part BW to 1.75 water. Don't peek until it's done :) Open lid, fluff, wait 5min. Add butter and/or olive oil, and salt...enjoy

You may adjust the water to suit your taste for firmness.

Posted on 2013-12-11 10:45:00
Name:Sheila
Location:Brantford
Subject:Kasha with onions and bacon
The very best way to eat Kasha is boiled with onions, some black pepper and at the end throw in 1/2 lb of bacon bits. Soooooo yummy!
Posted on 2014-01-16 11:17:46
Name:Tatyana
Location:Florida
Subject:Where to buy Buckwheat
The best grains you can buy are only in the Russian market, all others from the USA are just over processed way more than they should be. To have roasted buckwheat you don't have to go to store, just roast it in dry heavy wok until it gets dark...again it is a secret to buy in a Russian store, or other, but a local one.
Posted on 2014-01-17 20:37:11
Name:MB
Location:United States
Subject:Heating buckwheat to make cereal
I am just starting to use more grains. To heat I just use a little water to moisten the bottom of a sauce pan. Heat and when bubbling the buckwheat is hot. It wasn't long enough to change the texture but hot. Sieve. I used as a cereal with Agave Nectar and Almond Milk.
Posted on 2014-01-28 14:56:39
Name:Lawrence Waxman
Location:St. Louis, MO
Subject:Buckwheat a complete protein?
With brown rice I add beans or peas and maybe some seeds to complete the protein content of the rice.

Does this work with Buckwheat? Or is the protein already complete?

Posted on 2014-02-09 18:07:33
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Buckwheat a complete protein?
Hi Lawrence, thanks for your question. According to the Agricultural Marketing Resource Center buckwheat contains all 8 essential amino acids, so there is no need to add more proteins unless you want to. Amino acid data will be added to this website soon.
Posted on 2014-02-18 02:04:44
Name:Alex Adams
Location:San Francisco
Subject:I was making kasha wrong!
I was making kasha the way poster named Anon Ymous does, and it was coming out mushy. I thought it was supposed to be like that so I still ate it, but my friends didn't like it. Well, I just tried VB's method from your website and I feel like I've never tasted kasha before. It's so much better and completely delicious! I burned my tongue eating it too fast, but so glad I found your method. Thanks!
Posted on 2014-02-28 17:37:33
Name:Gene Callahan
Location:United States
Subject:Grains are seeds
@Eliyaju: "Buckwheat is not a grain. It's a seed. Look it up."

Eliyaju, grains ARE seeds: Look it up.

Posted on 2014-04-08 06:36:08

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