Home   Top 10 Lists   Nutrition Facts   Super Foods   Fruits   Vegetables   Recipes   Blog   FAQ   

Top 10 Foods Highest in Fiber


Dietary fiber (dietary fibre, roughage) is an essential nutrient required for proper digestion of foods, proper functioning of the digestive tract at large, and for helping you feel full. A deficiency of fiber can lead to constipation, hemorrhoids, and elevated levels of cholesterol and sugar in the blood. Conversely, an excess of fiber can lead to a bowel obstruction, diarrhea, or even dehydration. Individuals who increase their intake of fiber, should in turn, also increase their intake for water. The current DV for dietary fiber is 25 grams. Below is a list of high fiber foods, for more, see the extended lists of high fiber foods by nutrient density, fiber rich foods, fruits high in fiber, and grains high in fiber.

#1: Bran (Corn)
Fiber in 100g (Crude)1 Cup (76g)1/2 Cup (38g)
79g (316% DV)60g (240% DV)30g (120% DV)
Other types of bran high in fiber (%DV per cup crude): Wheat Bran (99%), Rice Bran (99%) and Oat Bran (58%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#2: Cauliflower & Broccoli (Raw Cauliflower)
Fiber in 100g1 Cup Chopped (107g)1 Cup Cooked (124g)
2g (8% DV)2g (8% DV)3g (12% DV)
Broccoli contains 2.4g fiber (10% DV) per cup raw, chopped and 5g (20% DV) per cup cooked:. Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#3: Cabbage (Raw Savoy)
Fiber in 100g1 Cup Shredded (70g)1 Cup Cooked (145g)
3g (12% DV)2g (9% DV)4g (16% DV)
Other Cabbages High in Fiber (%DV per cup shredded and cooked): Red Cabbage (16%), Common Cabbage (12%) and Chinese Cabbage (8%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#4: Berries (Raspberries)
Fiber in 100g1 Cup (123g)Per 10 Raspberries (19g)
7g (26% DV)8g (32% DV)1g (5% DV)
Other Berries High in Fiber (%DV per cup): Elderberries (41%), Blackberries (30%), Gooseberries (26%), Cranberries (18%) and Strawberries (12%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#5: Leafy Greens (Cos or Romaine Lettuce)
Fiber in 100g1 Cup Shredded (47g)Per 3oz Serving (85g)
2g (8% DV)1g (4% DV)2g (7% DV)
Other Greens High in Fiber (%DV per cup shredded): Turnip Greens (7%), Beet Greens (6%) and Spinach (3%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#6: Celery
Fiber in 100g1 Cup Chopped (101g)1 Medium Stalk (40g)
2g (6% DV)2g (6% DV)0.6g (2% DV)
Celery contains just 16 calories per 100g and 6 calories per medium stalk. Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#7: Squash (Baked Winter Hubbard)
Fiber in 100g1 Cup Cubed (205g)
5g (10% DV)10g (40% DV)
Other Squash High in Fiber (%DV per cup cooked): Acorn (36%), Butternut (26%), Winter, all varieties (23%), Pumpkin (11%) and Summer, all varieties (10%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#8: Beans (Kidney)
Fiber in 100g1 Cup (177g)Per Tblsp (11g)
6g (26% DV)11g (45% DV)1g (3% DV)
Other Beans High in Fiber (%DV per cup cooked): Navy (76%), French (66%), Pinto (62%), Black (60%) and Chickpeas (50%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#9: Mushrooms (Cooked White Mushrooms)
Fiber in 100g1 Cup Pieces (156g)Per Mushroom (12g)
2g (9% DV)3g (14% DV)0.3g (1% DV)
Other Mushrooms High in Fiber (%DV per cup cooked pieces): Shitake (12%) and Portabella (11%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#10: Oranges (All Varieties)
Fiber in 100g1 Cup Sections (180g)Per Fruit (131g)
2g (10% DV)4g (17% DV)3g (12% DV)
An average orange provides 62 calories. Click to see complete nutrition facts.




Advertisement


The Top 10 High Fiber Foods by Nutrient Density (Fiber per Gram)

#1: Bran (Corn, Wheat, Rice, Oat) 79g (316% DV) per 100 grams60g (240% DV) per cup (76 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Bran
#2: Dried Herbs & Spices (Cinnamon, Oregano, Rosemary, Coriander, Basil)) 53g (212% DV) per 100 grams2g (6% DV) per tsp (3 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Herbs & Spices
#3: Seeds (Flaxseeds, Sesame, Sunflower, Pumpkin) 27g (109% DV) per 100 grams3g (11% DV) per tbsp (10 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Seeds
#4: Cocoa Powder & Dark Chocolate 33g (133% DV) per 100 grams2g (7% DV) per tbsp (5 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cocoa & Dark Chocolate
#5: Soybeans Roasted 18g (71% DV) per 100 grams30g (122% DV) per cup (172 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Roasted Soybeans
#6: Rye foods (Rye crackers, Rye Flour, Rye) 23g (92% DV) per 100 grams3g (10% DV) per cracker (11 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Rye Foods
#7: Nuts (Almonds, Hazelnuts, Pine nuts, Pistachios, Pecans) 12g (49% DV) per 100 grams3g (14% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Nuts
#8: Beans (Navy, White, French, Kidney) 11g (42% DV) per 100 grams cooked19g (76% DV) per cup cooked (182 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Beans
#9: Passion Fruit 10g (42% DV) per 100 grams2g (8% DV) per fruit (18 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Passion Fruit
#10: Sun Dried Tomatoes 12g (49% DV) per 100 grams7g (26% DV) per cup (54 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sun Dried Tomatoes

Extended list of Fiber Rich Foods

Fortified Cereals*50g (200% DV) per 100 gram serving52g (208% DV) in an average bowl (2 cups) (104 grams)26g (104% DV) per cup (52 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fortified Cereals
Toasted Wheat Germ15g (60% DV) per 100 gram serving17g (68% DV) per cup (113 grams)1.1g (4% DV) per tablespoon (7 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Toasted Wheat Germ
Popcorn 15g (58% DV) per 100 grams 1g (5% DV) per cup (8 grams) 4g (16% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Popcorn
Chia Seeds37.7g (151% DV) per 100 gram serving10.6g (42% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Chia Seeds
Baked Potato 2g (9% DV) per 100 grams 4g (15% DV) per medium potato (173 grams) 3g (12% DV) per small potato (138 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Baked Potatoes
Artichokes (Globe) 9g (34% DV) per 100 gram cooked 10g (41% DV) per medium artichoke (cooked - 120 grams) 7g (29% DV) Per 1/2 cup hearts (cooked - 84 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Globe Artichokes
Rosemary & Thyme (Fresh) 14g (56% DV) per 100 grams 0.3g (1% DV) per tablespoon (2 grams) 0.1mg (0% DV) per teaspoon (1 gram) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Rosemary & Thyme
Adzuki Beans (Azuki, Aduki)7.3g (29% DV) per 100 gram serving16.8g (67% DV) per cup (230 grams)1g (4.2% DV) per tablespoon (14 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Adzuki Beans
Great Northern Beans7g (28% DV) per 100 gram serving12.4g (50% DV) per cup (177 grams)0.78g (3.1% DV) per tablespoon (11 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Great Northern Beans
Lima Beans7g (28% DV) per 100 gram serving13.2g (53% DV) per cup (188 grams)0.8g (3% DV) per tablespoon (11 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Lima Beans
Lentils7.9g (32% DV) per 100 gram serving15.6g (62% DV) per cup cooked (198 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Lima Beans

High Fiber Fruits

Figs (Dried)9.8g (39% DV) per 100 gram serving14.6g (58% DV) per cup (149 grams)0.8g (3% DV) per fig (8 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Figs
Apricots (Dried)7.3g (29% DV) per 100 gram serving9.5g (38% DV) per cup (130 grams)0.3g (1% DV) per half (4 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Apricots
Prunes7.1g (28% DV) per 100 gram serving12.4g (50% DV) per cup (174 grams)0.7g (3% DV) in a single prune (10 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Prunes
Coconut(Dried)16.3g (65% DV) per 100 gram serving36.8g (144% DV) per cup (224 grams)4.6g (18% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Unsweetened Coconut
Avocados 7g (27% DV) per 100 grams 15g (62% DV) per cup pureed (230 grams) 13.5g (54% DV) per avocado (201 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Avocado
Dates6.7g (27% DV) per 100 gram serving12.8g (48% DV) per cup (192 grams)1.6g (6% DV) in a single date (24 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Medjool Dates
Kumquats6.5g (26% DV) per 100 gram serving6g (25% DV) in 5 kumquats (95 grams)1.2g (5% DV) in a single kumquat (19 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Kumquats
Guavas 5.4g (22% DV) per 100 grams 8.9g (36% DV) per cup (165 grams) 3g (12% DV) per fruit (55 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Guavas
Pomegranates 4g (16% DV) per 100 gram serving 7g (28% DV) per cup seeds and juice (174 grams) 11.3g (45% DV) per fruit (282 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pomegranates
Pears 3.1g (12% DV) per 100 grams 5g (20% DV) per cup cubes (161 grams) 5.5g (22% DV) per medium pear (178 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pears
Kiwi Fruit 3g (12% DV) per 100 grams 5.4g (22% DV) per cup slices (180 grams) 2.1g (8% DV) per fruit (69 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Kiwi Fruit
Apples 2.4g (10% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.6g (10% DV) per cup slices (109 grams) 4.4g (18% DV) per medium apple (182 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Apples
Apricots 2g (8% DV) per 100 gram serving 3.3g (13% DV) per cup slices (165 grams) 0.7g (3% DV) per apricot (35 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Apricots
Strawberries 2g (8% DV) per 100 grams 3g (12% DV) per cup halves (152 grams) 0.2g (1% DV) per medium strawberry (12 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Strawberries
Papaya 1.7g (7% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.5g (10% DV) per cup pieces (145 grams) 2.7g (11% DV) per small papaya (157 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Papaya
Nectarines 1.7g (7% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.4g (10% DV) per cup slices (143 grams) 2.4g (10% DV) per medium fruit (142 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Nectarines
Peaches 1.5g (6% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.3g (9% DV) per cup slices (154 grams) 2.3g (9% DV) per medium fruit (150 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Peaches

High Fiber Grains

Bulgur (Cooked) 4.5g (18% DV) per 100 gram serving 8.2g (33% DV) per cup (182 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Bulgur
Whole Wheat Spaghetti (Cooked) 4.5g (18% DV) per 100 gram serving 6.3g (25% DV) per cup (140 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Whole wheat Spaghetti
Spelt (Cooked) 3.9g (16% DV) per 100 gram serving 7.6g (30% DV) per cup (194 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Spelt
Kamut (Cooked) 3.9g (16% DV) per 100 gram serving 6.7g (27% DV) per cup (172 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Kamut
Pearl Barley (Cooked) 3.8g (15% DV) per 100 gram serving 6g (24% DV) per cup (157 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pearl Barley
Teff (Cooked) 2.8g (11% DV) per 100 gram serving 7.1g (28% DV) per cup (252 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Teff
Quinoa (Cooked) 2.8g (11% DV) per 100 gram serving 5.2g (21% DV) per cup (185 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Quinoa
Buckwheat (Cooked) 2.7g (11% DV) per 100 gram serving 4.5g (18% DV) per cup (168 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Buckwheat
Amaranth (Cooked) 2.1g (8% DV) per 100 gram serving 5.2g (21% DV) per cup (246 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Amaranth
Oatmeal (Cooked) 2g (7% DV) per 100 grams 4g (16% DV) per cup (234 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Oatmeal
Wild Rice (Cooked) 1.8g (7% DV) per 100 gram serving 3g (12% DV) per cup (164 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Wild Rice
Brown Rice (Cooked) 1.8g (7% DV) per 100 gram serving 3.5g (14% DV) per cup (195 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Brown Rice
Couscous (Cooked) 1.4g (6% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.2g (9% DV) per cup (157 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Couscous
Millet (Cooked) 1.3g (5% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.3g (9% DV) per cup (174 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Millet

To find more high fiber foods, check the nutrient ranking tool.

Warnings




Comments.
Name:Frank
Subject:Edamame
Edamame are not "dry roasted soybeans." They are boiled green soybeans -- a big difference.
Posted on 2011-11-11 18:29:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Edamame
Hi Frank, thanks for your comment. Although you are right that edamame is typically served boiled, currently edamame is being packed, labeled, and sold as dry roasted soybeans. Take for example this product.
Posted on 2011-11-13 05:22:33
Name:Pam
Subject:RE: Edamame
Edamame are simply green (immature) soybeans regardless if they are raw, frozen, boiled, steamed, roasted, in the pod or out of the pod. I wish they were easier to find in my local stores.
Posted on 2011-11-26 13:59:26
Name:Michael
Location:Herndon
Subject:Everything
Great list. I'm going to try to blend these foods into my family's diet.
Posted on 2012-01-16 08:50:35
Name:Jenny Fletcher
Location:United Kingdom
Subject:Oatmeal (not instant)
I think you should check the values for oatmeal in your list because just about every other source I have checked today, gives a much higher value for 100g. What I eat every day is a serving of porridge made from about 50g dry oatmeal and semi-skimmed milk. The only thing I can think is that your measure is for 100g of cooked oatmeal.
Posted on 2012-02-22 09:20:06
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Oatmeal (not instant)
Hi Jenny, thanks for your comment. You are right, the nutrition facts stated here are for cooked oatmeal, which accounts for the lower concentration of fiber compared to uncooked oatmeal. The distinction of cooked oatmeal has now been added to the table thanks to your comment!
Posted on 2012-02-22 15:31:29
Name:Polly
Subject:Everything
I found that really cool to know all of that and I will try to eat more high in fibre foods.
Posted on 2012-04-02 12:48:58
Name:Sujit Mukund
Location:Bangalore
Subject:Fenugreek Dietary Fibers
Debitterized defatted fenugreek seed powder has both soluble and insoluble dietary fibers to the extent of 50% per 100gms and essential amino acids.
Posted on 2012-04-18 09:19:22
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fenugreek Dietary Fibers
Hi Sujit, thanks for your comment and pointing out that Fenugreek seeds are a great source of fiber. The nutrition facts show that fenugreek seeds provide 24.6g (98% DV) of fiber per 100 grams, and 2.7g (11% DV) per tablespoon.
Posted on 2012-04-18 11:54:34
Name:Kooki
Location:Kuwait
Subject:Oranges
What about oranges? Do they have high a percent of dietary fiber?
Posted on 2012-08-05 00:33:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Oranges
Hi Kooki, thanks for your question. Oranges are a good source of dietary fiber, providing 2.4g (10% DV) per 100 gram serving, 4.4g (18% DV) in a large orange, and 4.3g (17% DV) in 1 cup of orange sections. Thanks to your suggestion oranges will now be added to the extended list of fiber rich foods.
Posted on 2012-08-05 04:50:00
Name:Lisa
Location:U.S.
Subject:Pears
I read that pears are a good source of fiber but pears did not make this list. Can you tell me where they line up with other fruits that are fiber rich?
Posted on 2012-08-26 06:17:39
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Pears
Hi Lisa, thanks for your question. Fresh pears provide 3.1g (12% DV) of fiber per 100 grams, or 7.1g (28% DV) in a large pear, and 4.3g (17% DV) in a cup of slices. This means that pears have slightly more fiber than oranges, but less fiber than avocados. Refer to this extensive list of fruits high in fiber for more information. You can also check the complete nutrition facts for pears.
Posted on 2012-08-26 06:43:55
Name:Daniel
Location:Canada
Subject:Black beans and Dal
I always thought that Dal and Black Beans were the highest (or at least among the highest) of the bean family. Am I wrong?
Posted on 2013-01-02 16:42:10
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Black beans and Dal
Hi Daniel, thanks for your question. Raw lentils (Dal) are definitely high in fiber, but have considerably less (gram per gram) after being cooked. Black beans are similar. Still both are indeed high in fiber and could be included in the extended list of fiber rich foods. Thanks for the suggestion. Here is a complete list 700 of legumes and pulses high in fiber.
Posted on 2013-01-02 22:14:31
Name:Nate Patterson
Location:Washington State
Subject:Chia Seeds?
I'm curious why Chia Seeds, the most fiber rich food available, is left off this list?
Posted on 2013-01-14 14:55:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Chia Seeds?
Hi Nate, thanks for your questions. Chia seeds have now been added to the extended list of fiber rich foods.
Posted on 2013-01-14 17:23:01
Name:Julie
Location:Palo Alto
Subject:Cooking removes fiber?
I've read that cooking removes/reduces the fiber content of vegetables. Isn't it the same for Oatmeal and beans?
Posted on 2013-01-14 17:38:28
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cooking removes fiber?
Hi Julie, thanks for your question. It does depend to some extent if you cook vegetables till they become mushy, but in general, cooking does not harm the fiber content much. This is especially true if you keep the water from cooking. Some fiber is water soluble and lost in this way. If you look at the comparison of 1 cup of raw kidney beans vs 1 cup cooked, you will see that the cooked beans have less fiber in total, but much more fiber per calorie.
Posted on 2013-01-14 17:53:09
Name:Jean
Location:U.K.
Subject:Navy Beans U.K. Name
You refer to Navy beans in your high fibre list. Can you tell me what we would call these in Britain, please?
Posted on 2013-01-18 15:23:56
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Navy Beans U.K. Name
Hi Jean, thanks for your question. Navy beans should be called haricot beans in the U.K. It is also called pea bean in the U.S. It is a kind of small white bean, varieties include: Great Northern, Rainy River, Robust, Michelite, Sanilac. If all else fails, all beans are basically high in fiber, and the nutrition labels can guide you. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-01-18 17:55:31
Name:Jane
Subject:Bananas
Are bananas a good source of dietary fibre?
Posted on 2013-01-19 03:53:59
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Bananas
Hi Jane, thanks for your question. Bananas are a good source of fiber. An average large banana (136g) provides 3.5g (14%DV) of fiber.
Posted on 2013-01-19 16:50:29
Name:Rachel
Location:Philippines
Subject:Pineapple, Apple, and Jackfruit
As I read all of your list, I didn't see pineapple, apple, and jackfruit. Are these fruits not rich in fiber? Thank you!
Posted on 2013-01-24 16:57:42
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Pineapple, Apple, and Jackfruit
Hi Rachel, thanks for your question. Pineapples, apples, and jackfruit each provide about 10% DV of fiber in a cup sliced. While this is a good amount of fiber, it is less than the foods listed in this article. For example, raspberries provide 32% DV per cup. Here are the nutrition facts for pineapples, apples, and jackfruit. You can use this page to look up the fiber content of other foods.
Posted on 2013-01-24 17:09:12
Name:Sharon
Location:Moreno Valley, CA
Subject:High Fiber Diet
I was instructed by my doctor to eat a high fiier diet - Does this mean MORE than the average of 25 grams daily for women? I already eat lots of fruits and vegetables. If I eat more, can too much fiber harm your body? What high fiber foods should I stick to?
Posted on 2013-02-22 00:01:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: High Fiber Diet
Hi Sharon, thanks for your question. You should be fine eating 2-3 times more than the 25g daily value. Symptoms of too much fiber include bloating, bowel obstruction, and diarrhea. If you experience any of those symptoms you may be getting too much fiber. This article has a lot of suggestions on what to eat to boost your fiber. The best foods depend on your goals and what works for you. If you are looking to loose weight, then eating more fruits, vegetables, and bran should all be fine.
Posted on 2013-02-22 18:39:08
Name:Sheela
Location:UK
Subject:Low carb high protein diet
What source of fiber is best when on a low carb, high protein diet? I noticed a lot is based on fruit, which I am not able to eat whilst on my program.
Posted on 2013-02-27 10:31:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low carb high protein diet
Hi Sheela, thanks for your question. You want to focus on leafy green vegetables. Kale, mustard greens, and collards are all low in carbohydrates, but high in fiber.
Posted on 2013-02-27 18:52:03
Name:Lisa
Location:Mississauga
Subject:Fibre from 2 prunes and celery?
My doctor said to eat 2 prunes and celery everyday, is that true?
Posted on 2013-02-27 19:02:52
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:Fibre from 2 prunes and celery?
Hi Lisa, thanks for your quesiton. 1 prune provides around 3% of the daily value (DV) for fiber, and 1 medium stalk of celery provides 2% of the DV. As such 2 prunes and celery will provide around 10% of the DV. Eating them every day will help, but is not enough to meet your daily requirement. Consider eating bran, beans, nuts, and seeds to increase your fiber intake even more. Complete nutrition facts for prunes and celery.
Posted on 2013-02-27 19:11:51
Name:Ken
Location:California
Subject:Fiber in fruit smoothies
Can you please tell me if blending fruit and vegetables into a smoothie removes fiber. Thank you.
Posted on 2013-03-08 18:09:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fiber in fruit smoothies
Hi Ken, thanks for your question. As long as you do not "filter" the juice, you will not loose much, if any fiber. Basically, smoothies with "no pulp" will have less dietary fiber. So not straining the juice will keep 98% of the fiber. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-03-09 23:11:36
Name:Jane
Location:CA
Subject:Artichokes
Every other list I've seen has included 11 grams per medium artichoke. Surprised not to see it here.
Posted on 2013-03-12 15:22:47
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Artichokes
Hi Jane, thanks for the suggestion. Artichokes have now been added to the extended list of fiber rich foods. One medium artichoke provides 10.3 grams (41% DV) of fiber.
Posted on 2013-03-12 19:56:53
Name:Nina
Location:CA
Subject:100g servings

I can see how you thought listing everything in 100g servings would be fair for comparison, but who eats 100g of chia seeds? That's over 6.5 servings, and would equal 33g of fat as well!

I think chia seeds are great, but that's not realistic. You should compare with recommended servings. Calories should be considered when choosing high fiber foods as well. OH Fiber/calories would be a good way to compare. Lets see.. Chia seeds would score .09 and raspberries would score .125. WOW!! Rapberries would dominate chia seeds in high fiber low calorie!The fat in chia seeds is good fat though =)

Posted on 2013-05-19 08:12:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: 100g servings
Thanks for your comment. All these articles are currently being revised to rank by nutrient/calorie and serving size. Please check back later. Thanks again.
Posted on 2013-05-20 02:57:49
Name:Angie
Location:Virginia
Subject:Juicing fruits and veggies
If I juice the following in a a juicer can it lose it's fiber values? Apples, celery, beets, kale, carrots, and ginger. Thanks!
Posted on 2013-07-04 09:22:26
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Juicing fruits and veggies
Hi Angie, thanks for your question. When you juice, some fiber will be lost. The amount depends on how much you strain the juice. If you don't strain the pulp or fiber of the juice at all, then most of the fiber content will be retained. If you remove the pulp of the the juice though, most of the fiber will be lost. Many juicers do strain away most of the fiber, so you should be sure to eat high fiber foods to get enough fiber. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-07-04 10:30:18
Name:Joy
Location:Iowa
Subject:Low roughage diet
I have an endoscopy capsule camera in a stricture in my small intestine. My GI doc said to stay on a low roughage diet until some test results are back. She said low roughage and no raw fruits or veggies , but everything else in moderation should be fine. So that confuses me that she isn't concerned about other fiber foods.
Posted on 2013-09-16 19:18:26
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low roughage diet
Hi Joy, fiber is divided into two categories: soluble and insoluble. The foods presented here are ranked by the combination of the two. Insoluble fiber is not absorbed by your body, and so is often termed as roughage. It is true that fruits and vegetables are the highest foods in roughage. However, also limit or avoid other plant foods like beans, whole grains, nuts, and seeds while on a low roughage diet.
Posted on 2013-09-17 02:13:12

Post a comment.
Name:          
Location:       
Email:(Optional)
Subject:         

Spam Prevention *(REQUIRED):
Enter the last three letters of this sentence.
Comments.
Name:Frank
Subject:Edamame
Edamame are not "dry roasted soybeans." They are boiled green soybeans -- a big difference.
Posted on 2011-11-11 18:29:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Edamame
Hi Frank, thanks for your comment. Although you are right that edamame is typically served boiled, currently edamame is being packed, labeled, and sold as dry roasted soybeans. Take for example this product.
Posted on 2011-11-13 05:22:33
Name:Pam
Subject:RE: Edamame
Edamame are simply green (immature) soybeans regardless if they are raw, frozen, boiled, steamed, roasted, in the pod or out of the pod. I wish they were easier to find in my local stores.
Posted on 2011-11-26 13:59:26
Name:Michael
Location:Herndon
Subject:Everything
Great list. I'm going to try to blend these foods into my family's diet.
Posted on 2012-01-16 08:50:35
Name:Jenny Fletcher
Location:United Kingdom
Subject:Oatmeal (not instant)
I think you should check the values for oatmeal in your list because just about every other source I have checked today, gives a much higher value for 100g. What I eat every day is a serving of porridge made from about 50g dry oatmeal and semi-skimmed milk. The only thing I can think is that your measure is for 100g of cooked oatmeal.
Posted on 2012-02-22 09:20:06
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Oatmeal (not instant)
Hi Jenny, thanks for your comment. You are right, the nutrition facts stated here are for cooked oatmeal, which accounts for the lower concentration of fiber compared to uncooked oatmeal. The distinction of cooked oatmeal has now been added to the table thanks to your comment!
Posted on 2012-02-22 15:31:29
Name:Polly
Subject:Everything
I found that really cool to know all of that and I will try to eat more high in fibre foods.
Posted on 2012-04-02 12:48:58
Name:Sujit Mukund
Location:Bangalore
Subject:Fenugreek Dietary Fibers
Debitterized defatted fenugreek seed powder has both soluble and insoluble dietary fibers to the extent of 50% per 100gms and essential amino acids.
Posted on 2012-04-18 09:19:22
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fenugreek Dietary Fibers
Hi Sujit, thanks for your comment and pointing out that Fenugreek seeds are a great source of fiber. The nutrition facts show that fenugreek seeds provide 24.6g (98% DV) of fiber per 100 grams, and 2.7g (11% DV) per tablespoon.
Posted on 2012-04-18 11:54:34
Name:Kooki
Location:Kuwait
Subject:Oranges
What about oranges? Do they have high a percent of dietary fiber?
Posted on 2012-08-05 00:33:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Oranges
Hi Kooki, thanks for your question. Oranges are a good source of dietary fiber, providing 2.4g (10% DV) per 100 gram serving, 4.4g (18% DV) in a large orange, and 4.3g (17% DV) in 1 cup of orange sections. Thanks to your suggestion oranges will now be added to the extended list of fiber rich foods.
Posted on 2012-08-05 04:50:00
Name:Lisa
Location:U.S.
Subject:Pears
I read that pears are a good source of fiber but pears did not make this list. Can you tell me where they line up with other fruits that are fiber rich?
Posted on 2012-08-26 06:17:39
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Pears
Hi Lisa, thanks for your question. Fresh pears provide 3.1g (12% DV) of fiber per 100 grams, or 7.1g (28% DV) in a large pear, and 4.3g (17% DV) in a cup of slices. This means that pears have slightly more fiber than oranges, but less fiber than avocados. Refer to this extensive list of fruits high in fiber for more information. You can also check the complete nutrition facts for pears.
Posted on 2012-08-26 06:43:55
Name:Daniel
Location:Canada
Subject:Black beans and Dal
I always thought that Dal and Black Beans were the highest (or at least among the highest) of the bean family. Am I wrong?
Posted on 2013-01-02 16:42:10
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Black beans and Dal
Hi Daniel, thanks for your question. Raw lentils (Dal) are definitely high in fiber, but have considerably less (gram per gram) after being cooked. Black beans are similar. Still both are indeed high in fiber and could be included in the extended list of fiber rich foods. Thanks for the suggestion. Here is a complete list 700 of legumes and pulses high in fiber.
Posted on 2013-01-02 22:14:31
Name:Nate Patterson
Location:Washington State
Subject:Chia Seeds?
I'm curious why Chia Seeds, the most fiber rich food available, is left off this list?
Posted on 2013-01-14 14:55:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Chia Seeds?
Hi Nate, thanks for your questions. Chia seeds have now been added to the extended list of fiber rich foods.
Posted on 2013-01-14 17:23:01
Name:Julie
Location:Palo Alto
Subject:Cooking removes fiber?
I've read that cooking removes/reduces the fiber content of vegetables. Isn't it the same for Oatmeal and beans?
Posted on 2013-01-14 17:38:28
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cooking removes fiber?
Hi Julie, thanks for your question. It does depend to some extent if you cook vegetables till they become mushy, but in general, cooking does not harm the fiber content much. This is especially true if you keep the water from cooking. Some fiber is water soluble and lost in this way. If you look at the comparison of 1 cup of raw kidney beans vs 1 cup cooked, you will see that the cooked beans have less fiber in total, but much more fiber per calorie.
Posted on 2013-01-14 17:53:09
Name:Jean
Location:U.K.
Subject:Navy Beans U.K. Name
You refer to Navy beans in your high fibre list. Can you tell me what we would call these in Britain, please?
Posted on 2013-01-18 15:23:56
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Navy Beans U.K. Name
Hi Jean, thanks for your question. Navy beans should be called haricot beans in the U.K. It is also called pea bean in the U.S. It is a kind of small white bean, varieties include: Great Northern, Rainy River, Robust, Michelite, Sanilac. If all else fails, all beans are basically high in fiber, and the nutrition labels can guide you. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-01-18 17:55:31
Name:Jane
Subject:Bananas
Are bananas a good source of dietary fibre?
Posted on 2013-01-19 03:53:59
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Bananas
Hi Jane, thanks for your question. Bananas are a good source of fiber. An average large banana (136g) provides 3.5g (14%DV) of fiber.
Posted on 2013-01-19 16:50:29
Name:Rachel
Location:Philippines
Subject:Pineapple, Apple, and Jackfruit
As I read all of your list, I didn't see pineapple, apple, and jackfruit. Are these fruits not rich in fiber? Thank you!
Posted on 2013-01-24 16:57:42
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Pineapple, Apple, and Jackfruit
Hi Rachel, thanks for your question. Pineapples, apples, and jackfruit each provide about 10% DV of fiber in a cup sliced. While this is a good amount of fiber, it is less than the foods listed in this article. For example, raspberries provide 32% DV per cup. Here are the nutrition facts for pineapples, apples, and jackfruit. You can use this page to look up the fiber content of other foods.
Posted on 2013-01-24 17:09:12
Name:Sharon
Location:Moreno Valley, CA
Subject:High Fiber Diet
I was instructed by my doctor to eat a high fiier diet - Does this mean MORE than the average of 25 grams daily for women? I already eat lots of fruits and vegetables. If I eat more, can too much fiber harm your body? What high fiber foods should I stick to?
Posted on 2013-02-22 00:01:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: High Fiber Diet
Hi Sharon, thanks for your question. You should be fine eating 2-3 times more than the 25g daily value. Symptoms of too much fiber include bloating, bowel obstruction, and diarrhea. If you experience any of those symptoms you may be getting too much fiber. This article has a lot of suggestions on what to eat to boost your fiber. The best foods depend on your goals and what works for you. If you are looking to loose weight, then eating more fruits, vegetables, and bran should all be fine.
Posted on 2013-02-22 18:39:08
Name:Sheela
Location:UK
Subject:Low carb high protein diet
What source of fiber is best when on a low carb, high protein diet? I noticed a lot is based on fruit, which I am not able to eat whilst on my program.
Posted on 2013-02-27 10:31:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low carb high protein diet
Hi Sheela, thanks for your question. You want to focus on leafy green vegetables. Kale, mustard greens, and collards are all low in carbohydrates, but high in fiber.
Posted on 2013-02-27 18:52:03
Name:Lisa
Location:Mississauga
Subject:Fibre from 2 prunes and celery?
My doctor said to eat 2 prunes and celery everyday, is that true?
Posted on 2013-02-27 19:02:52
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:Fibre from 2 prunes and celery?
Hi Lisa, thanks for your quesiton. 1 prune provides around 3% of the daily value (DV) for fiber, and 1 medium stalk of celery provides 2% of the DV. As such 2 prunes and celery will provide around 10% of the DV. Eating them every day will help, but is not enough to meet your daily requirement. Consider eating bran, beans, nuts, and seeds to increase your fiber intake even more. Complete nutrition facts for prunes and celery.
Posted on 2013-02-27 19:11:51
Name:Ken
Location:California
Subject:Fiber in fruit smoothies
Can you please tell me if blending fruit and vegetables into a smoothie removes fiber. Thank you.
Posted on 2013-03-08 18:09:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fiber in fruit smoothies
Hi Ken, thanks for your question. As long as you do not "filter" the juice, you will not loose much, if any fiber. Basically, smoothies with "no pulp" will have less dietary fiber. So not straining the juice will keep 98% of the fiber. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-03-09 23:11:36
Name:Jane
Location:CA
Subject:Artichokes
Every other list I've seen has included 11 grams per medium artichoke. Surprised not to see it here.
Posted on 2013-03-12 15:22:47
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Artichokes
Hi Jane, thanks for the suggestion. Artichokes have now been added to the extended list of fiber rich foods. One medium artichoke provides 10.3 grams (41% DV) of fiber.
Posted on 2013-03-12 19:56:53
Name:Nina
Location:CA
Subject:100g servings

I can see how you thought listing everything in 100g servings would be fair for comparison, but who eats 100g of chia seeds? That's over 6.5 servings, and would equal 33g of fat as well!

I think chia seeds are great, but that's not realistic. You should compare with recommended servings. Calories should be considered when choosing high fiber foods as well. OH Fiber/calories would be a good way to compare. Lets see.. Chia seeds would score .09 and raspberries would score .125. WOW!! Rapberries would dominate chia seeds in high fiber low calorie!The fat in chia seeds is good fat though =)

Posted on 2013-05-19 08:12:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: 100g servings
Thanks for your comment. All these articles are currently being revised to rank by nutrient/calorie and serving size. Please check back later. Thanks again.
Posted on 2013-05-20 02:57:49
Name:Angie
Location:Virginia
Subject:Juicing fruits and veggies
If I juice the following in a a juicer can it lose it's fiber values? Apples, celery, beets, kale, carrots, and ginger. Thanks!
Posted on 2013-07-04 09:22:26
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Juicing fruits and veggies
Hi Angie, thanks for your question. When you juice, some fiber will be lost. The amount depends on how much you strain the juice. If you don't strain the pulp or fiber of the juice at all, then most of the fiber content will be retained. If you remove the pulp of the the juice though, most of the fiber will be lost. Many juicers do strain away most of the fiber, so you should be sure to eat high fiber foods to get enough fiber. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-07-04 10:30:18
Name:Joy
Location:Iowa
Subject:Low roughage diet
I have an endoscopy capsule camera in a stricture in my small intestine. My GI doc said to stay on a low roughage diet until some test results are back. She said low roughage and no raw fruits or veggies , but everything else in moderation should be fine. So that confuses me that she isn't concerned about other fiber foods.
Posted on 2013-09-16 19:18:26
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low roughage diet
Hi Joy, fiber is divided into two categories: soluble and insoluble. The foods presented here are ranked by the combination of the two. Insoluble fiber is not absorbed by your body, and so is often termed as roughage. It is true that fruits and vegetables are the highest foods in roughage. However, also limit or avoid other plant foods like beans, whole grains, nuts, and seeds while on a low roughage diet.
Posted on 2013-09-17 02:13:12

Post a comment.
Name:          
Location:       
Email:(Optional)
Subject:         

Spam Prevention *(REQUIRED):
Enter the last three letters of this sentence.

References

    1. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.