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Top 10 Foods Highest in Carbohydrates (To Limit or Avoid)


Carbohydrates are found in almost all living things and play a critical role in the proper functioning of the immune system, fertilization, pathogenesis, blood clotting, and human development. A deficiency of carbohydrates can lead impaired functioning of all these systems, however, in the Western world, deficiency is rare. Excessive consumption of carbohydrates, especially refined carbohydrates like sugar or corn syrup, can lead to obesity, type II diabetes, and cancer. Below is a list of foods highest in carbohydrates, almost all these foods should be avoided.

#1: Fructose and Granulated Sugar
Fructose and granulated sugar represent a pure refined carbohydrate and are indeed 99.999% carbohydrate with practically no fats, proteins, minerals or vitamins to speak of. As such these refined sugars should be avoided as empty calories.
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#2: Drink Powders, Hard Candies, and Gummies
The large majority of hard candies are simple derivatives of the refined granulated sugars and should be avoided. Gummie candy is also mostly starch and should be avoided as well. These foods tend to be 98-99% carbs with little nutritional value otherwise.
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#3: Sugary Cereals
Most ready to eat cereals which come in a box are packed with sugar, this is even true for those that claim to be "whole grain". Read the label on the back of the box, some of these foods are 90-93% carbohydrate. In contrast, hot cereals which you prepare at home like oatmeal and rye can contain 10-12% carbohydrate, with far more vitamins and complex carbohydrates that are better for your body.
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#4: Dried Fruits (Apples, Prunes, Dates)
Dried fruits like apples, prunes(plums), bananas, and dates are all high in carbohydrates. These foods are high in dietary fiber and several vitamins and therefore can be used in moderation to help satisfy a sugar craving. For the long term, however, it would be best to limit these foods. Dehydrated apple, prunes, and bananas are 88-90% carbs, dried peaches and apricots are 83%, raisins are 79%, and dates are around 75% carbohydrate. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#5: Low fat Crackers, Rice Cakes, and Potato Chips
The large majority of low fat products and snacks on the market have high carb levels to keep items tasty. Low fat crackers, rice cakes, and potato chips are 81-83% carbohydrate. For purposes of comparison honey is 82% carbs. Be sure to consult labels on any low fat products before consuming.
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#6: Flour, Cakes, and Cookies
Flour and it is derivative products, usually cakes, cookies, and breads are all high carb foods (depending on the recipe, again, low fat tends to denote higher carb). Cookies and cakes can get up to 84% carbohydrate, and most flours will be 70-78% carbohydrate.
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#7: Jams And Preserves
These sweet spreads can be 64-68% carbs, often depending on how "gelled" or dry they are. The less water and the more dry, the more carbs.
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#8: Potatoes (Hash Browns and French Fries)
Of all potato products hash browns have the highest percentage of carbs with 35%, french fries contain about 27% carbs, and a baked potato (with the skin) is 21% carbs, or about 36 grams of carbs in a medium sized potato.
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#9: Sweet Pickles, Sauces, and Salad Dressings
Sweet relish can be as much as 35% carbs, and low fat dressings are often sweetened to 32% carbs or more.
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#10: Pizzas
The amount of carbohydrate in pizza depends on the thickness of the crust, and people often create ultra-thin-crust pizzas in order to cut back on the carbs. Depending on the toppings and thickness of the crust, pizzas tend to be 22-30% carbs.
Click to see complete nutrition facts. Pizzas lowest in Calories.



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▼ References
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    • USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.