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Top 10 Foods Highest in Carbohydrates (To Limit or Avoid)


Carbohydrates are found in almost all living things and play a critical role in the proper functioning of the immune system, fertilization, pathogenesis, blood clotting, and human development. A deficiency of carbohydrates can lead impaired functioning of all these systems, however, in the Western world, deficiency is rare. Excessive consumption of carbohydrates, especially refined carbohydrates like sugar or corn syrup, can lead to obesity, type II diabetes, and cancer. Below is a list of foods highest in carbohydrates, almost all these foods should be avoided.

#1: Fructose and Granulated Sugar
Fructose and granulated sugar represent a pure refined carbohydrate and are indeed 99.999% carbohydrate with practically no fats, proteins, minerals or vitamins to speak of. As such these refined sugars should be avoided as empty calories.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#2: Drink Powders, Hard Candies, and Gummies
The large majority of hard candies are simple derivatives of the refined granulated sugars and should be avoided. Gummie candy is also mostly starch and should be avoided as well. These foods tend to be 98-99% carbs with little nutritional value otherwise.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#3: Sugary Cereals
Most ready to eat cereals which come in a box are packed with sugar, this is even true for those that claim to be "whole grain". Read the label on the back of the box, some of these foods are 90-93% carbohydrate. In contrast, hot cereals which you prepare at home like oatmeal and rye can contain 10-12% carbohydrate, with far more vitamins and complex carbohydrates that are better for your body.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#4: Dried Fruits (Apples, Prunes, Dates)
Dried fruits like apples, prunes(plums), bananas, and dates are all high in carbohydrates. These foods are high in dietary fiber and several vitamins and therefore can be used in moderation to help satisfy a sugar craving. For the long term, however, it would be best to limit these foods. Dehydrated apple, prunes, and bananas are 88-90% carbs, dried peaches and apricots are 83%, raisins are 79%, and dates are around 75% carbohydrate. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#5: Low fat Crackers, Rice Cakes, and Potato Chips
The large majority of low fat products and snacks on the market have high carb levels to keep items tasty. Low fat crackers, rice cakes, and potato chips are 81-83% carbohydrate. For purposes of comparison honey is 82% carbs. Be sure to consult labels on any low fat products before consuming.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#6: Flour, Cakes, and Cookies
Flour and it is derivative products, usually cakes, cookies, and breads are all high carb foods (depending on the recipe, again, low fat tends to denote higher carb). Cookies and cakes can get up to 84% carbohydrate, and most flours will be 70-78% carbohydrate.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#7: Jams And Preserves
These sweet spreads can be 64-68% carbs, often depending on how "gelled" or dry they are. The less water and the more dry, the more carbs.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#8: Potatoes (Hash Browns and French Fries)
Of all potato products hash browns have the highest percentage of carbs with 35%, french fries contain about 27% carbs, and a baked potato (with the skin) is 21% carbs, or about 36 grams of carbs in a medium sized potato.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#9: Sweet Pickles, Sauces, and Salad Dressings
Sweet relish can be as much as 35% carbs, and low fat dressings are often sweetened to 32% carbs or more.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#10: Pizzas
The amount of carbohydrate in pizza depends on the thickness of the crust, and people often create ultra-thin-crust pizzas in order to cut back on the carbs. Depending on the toppings and thickness of the crust, pizzas tend to be 22-30% carbs.
Click to see complete nutrition facts. Pizzas lowest in Calories.



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Comments.
Name:Mary Campbell
Location:United States
Subject:10 Foods High in Carbs
Of course, I have to like everything on the list!
Posted on 2012-02-12 21:36:12
Name:Tom Lupul
Location:Canada
Subject:Fruit
Please do not avoid fructose. Fresh or dried fruit is healthy, eat as much of it as you want. Just avoid the refined non naturally occurring sugars, like in soda or sugary cereal.
Posted on 2013-02-01 14:34:42
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fruit
Hi Tom, thanks for your comment. You are right that fructose naturally found in fresh fruits is fine for you, and to some extent, the same can be said for dried fruits. However, fructose is also isolated from fruits and then added into foods. It is this added (refined) form of fructose that is best avoided, particularly high fructose corn syrup. While isolated (refined) fructose has a relatively low glycemic index, studies suggest it can lead to detrimental health consequences, such as increased blood lipid (fat) levels, and obesity. As you have stated though, fructose from fresh fruits is fine.
Posted on 2013-02-01 16:49:31
Name:Karen
Location:Birmingham
Subject:What is a healthy carbohydrate?
I amm wondering why perfectly decent healthy foods are being mixed in with a list of crap? In my honest opinion avoiding fructose, refined sugar, and fatty or fried foods is common sense. Not necessarily wise to discourage people from eating dried fruits, and fruit jams (100% fruit of course). I also don't see the issue with low fat crackers and rice cakes and why they are listed along side potato chips. I do not understand. As far as pizza is concerned I do agree thick doughy crust is not ideal but feel that toppings are more important - avoiding high salt, high fat items like meats and extra cheese or cheese filled crust. sorry to disagree with some things on here, but common sense says avoid refined sugars, fried rubbish and grease more than fruit or baked potato with skin.
Posted on 2013-02-18 14:26:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: What is a healthy carbohydrate?
Hi Karen, thanks for your comments. The main factor discouraging consumption of all these high carbohydrate foods is their glycemic load, or how much insulin they cause the body to release and how fast sugar is absorbed into the blood stream. There is a big difference in glycemic load between dry and fresh fruits. This is why eating dry fruits is discouraged. A high glycemic load has a wide range of bad health consequences, most prominently, an increased risk of type II diabetes, and heart disease. Interestingly, eating carbohydrates with fat, protein, and fiber can actually mediate the glycemic load, making high carbohydrate foods more healthy. Of course, you would want to choose healthy fats and proteins, such as nuts. Hope those comments help explain the recommendations on this article.
Posted on 2013-02-18 19:08:41
Name:Hannah
Location:Virginia
Subject:Low Carb Food List
Could you by any chance provide a list of the top 10 lowest carb filled foods?
Posted on 2013-02-21 17:07:55
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low Carb Food List
Hi Hannah, thanks for your suggestion. What kind of low carb foods would you be looking for? You can use the nutrient ranking tool to list low carb foods, you can also filter by food group. Here is a list of 1000 foods that have no carbs. A curated article of low carb foods will be created to capture common foods. Thanks again for the suggestion.
Posted on 2013-02-21 20:12:52
Name:Carbs
Subject:List of good carbs
In Australia and surely in other countries carbohydrates (including cereals, breads, pastas, rices etc.) are the recommended majority of our diet, so this list is slightly misleading. The carb type listed here are complex and sugary; though they do contain vast amounts of carbohydrates, it would be better to list the healthier carbs and the ones people should be eating, for example cereals (not breakfast cereals), breads, pastas, rices etc. rather than portraying carbs as a bad food type
Posted on 2013-03-24 01:52:33
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: List of good carbs
Thanks for your comment and suggestion. There are indeed many good high carb foods, and an extended list of healthy carbs will be created and added to this article. There are plenty of good carbohydrates found in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, beans, lentils, and nuts. You can find some how to recipes for healthy whole grains here.
Posted on 2013-03-24 11:18:18
Name:Ahyela
Location:Middle East
Subject:High Carbs to Avoid for an Acne Free Diet
I am researching an acne free diet and high carbohydrates is listed among the foods should be avoided. I find your article very helpful, thank you. Maybe you can add to your introduction: "obesity,type II diabetes,skin disorders(acne), and cancer." Just a suggestion...
Posted on 2013-03-28 06:34:46
Name:Christina
Location:Strathroy, ON Canada
Subject:Carb craving when tired?
Hi there..... I'm curious if there is a reason for craving carbs when tired. I've noticed this to be a regular correlation for me.. When I go to bed, read for a bit and get tired, I crave carby foods. Other people in a group I belong to are the same way... So I wondered if there is a reason for this. For me, it only happens at night. I can be tired and about to nap during the day, but not have the cravings then. It's bizarre that way. Thank you for any input and I have to say: I love this site, lots of info, love the lists, etc and I especially like reading the comments and seeing that someone actually responds to the questions. Thank you for that.
Posted on 2013-04-09 04:49:03
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Carb craving when tired?
Hi Christina, thanks for your question. There are many reasons why people get food cravings, particularly for carbohydrates. First of all, carbs give you an energy boost, or "sugar rush", which people become addicted to and crave. Further, carbs are the main source of energy for your brain. So when you read, your brain will work harder and your body may crave carbs. Further, sugary foods also release opiods in the brain, giving you a good feeling that becomes addictive. People get accustomed to certain ques with addictions. It can be getting home from work, studying, or just before you sleep. In your case, you may have become addicted to sugary foods before you sleep. Try drinking soda water, or lemon water, before bed to train yourself to expect something different. Good luck with beating your cravings. Wikipedia also has a good article on the topic of food cravings.
Posted on 2013-04-09 05:46:06
Name:Christina
Location:Armed Forces Europe
Subject:Best Carbs Post Workout?
So for someone who is new at fitness, and beginning a new work out routine, would there be a list of foods that are good to eat after a work out? I keep seeing articles about drinking whey protein shakes along with foods high in carbohydrates after working out...now I'm confused. What healthy, carb packed food should I pair my whey protein with post workout? TIA!
Posted on 2013-05-12 18:16:51
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Best Carbs Post Workout
Hi Christina, thanks for your question. What is best to eat after a workout depends on your goals: do you want to lose weight, or build muscle, or both? There is a wide variety of advice on the topic, and for weight loss, it is likely many people would advise you to avoid carbs altogether. However, it is best to have some kind of complex carbohydrate after a workout, especially to build muscle. Try adding fruit, like bananas, to your whey protein shake. Further, nuts can be a great source of both carbs and protein. Consider adding almonds, or peanut butter. If peanut butter is not so common in Europe, then Hazelnut spread should be OK, just watch the sugar content. In the end you are going to have to experiment with different things and find what works for you. Just be sure you are drinking plenty of water, and try to choose whole-unrefined foods. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2013-05-14 03:04:44
Name:Chris
Location:London
Subject:High carb diet for the win
From reading this article, I get a sense of why the western world has the highest levels of obesity, heart disease and diabetes on the planet. Carbohydrate is GOOD and is the body's preferred nutrient. The brain runs exclusively on glucose so it makes sense to eat a high carb diet. Foods such as fruits, rice, pasta, potatoes, bread, wholegrain cereal should be eaten in abundance. They provide the body with adequates amounts of complex carbohydrates for prolonged energy aswell as vital vitamins and minerals for healthy bodily function. In the list above I quote, "french fries 27% carbs...pizzas 22-30% carbs...hash browns 35% carbs". These percentages are not high at all for carbohydrate based foods which means that one could only suggest that these are high fat foods that promote obesity and heart disease from all the fat from how they are prepared e.g fried. This article is misleading. Any body who is on a high carbohydrate diet will be leaner and slimmer than people on a high fat or high protein diet, period. Look at the professional sprinters and distance runners, the former being mesomorphs and the latter ectomorphs but the commonality that these athletes share is that they have high levels of fitness and low levels of fat and are extremely healthy. If one was to eat unlimited amounts of fruit, bread, rice, pasta, cereal and potatoes for a year in contrast to someone who eats unlimited amounts of cooked mince beef, fish, cheese, chips for a year it doesn't take a smart person to know which person would be healthier. ps I got my blood tested a few weeks ago and all results came back excellent for everything. DONT GET SCAMMED PEOPLE!
Posted on 2013-05-16 00:50:42
Name:Tim
Location:Australia
Subject:Re: High carb diet for the win

Chris, You are not fully informed about carbs, or how your body works. Try reading Why we get fat, and what to do about it by Gary Taubes. The science of adiposity (how our fat stores are controlled - otherwise known as endocrinology), has been known for many years, but largely ignored by the people that dish out nutritional and lifestyle advice.

In a nutshell, the presence of insulun controls what goes in and out of a fat cell. Fat goes in, no fat comes out, until the carb load, and the insulun, goes away. Our body releases insulun in response to the foods we eat - by a huge margin, it releases it for sugar and other carbs. Eating fat does not cause us to release insulun, so by that logic, you can't get fat eating fat alone. (practically we almost never do).If you eat carbs and fat, the fat is stored for later use, while the body burns the carbs off. If you are consistently eating sufficient carbs, the fat never gets a chance to get used. If you're lucky you might burn some before breakfast (in or out of bed), after an all-night fast. (remember folks - this is the nutshell version, the details are quite, well, detaily). For people consistently releasing insulun, their cells can become insulun-resistant, so the body produces more - vicious circle.

Certain people are genetically disposed to store fat rather than burn it - these are the ones that get obese over time. Also why fat parents often have fat kids. its not ONLY that the eating habits rub off, to a certain extent they can't help it. Anyone doubting that excess insulun makes you fat should look at the photo of a diabetic woman that consistently injected insulun into the same spot on each thigh, and over a peroid of 40 yrs developed camel-like mounds of fat in each location. He debunks the relatively recent myth that obesity is caused by overeating and under-exercising (so-called gluttony & sloth).

Adiposity 101: the amount of fat we store is precisely and directly regulated by our hormones. Gettting obese is a fault in the regulation system, not a moral or psychological failing. People overeat because they are fat, not the other way around. If the reason we get fat is an imbalance in calories in/out, then if we over or undereat by 20 calories/day, that would make us chronically obese/thin respectively within very few years. The fact is that the average person simply does not (and cannot) quantify how much energy they are consuming or expending, let alone get it spot on over vast periods of time, yet they can maintain a healthy weight. The accuracy required (if that theory were true) is beyond most machinery - a mathematical impossibility.

The brain does not run 'exclusively' on glucose. Sure it does, if there is plenty of glucose available, but if it couldnt run on anything else, a carb and sugar free diet would be debilitating or fatal, but its not. In fact we can survive fine without them. The reason is that in the absence of glucose, the liver produces ketones from fat, and the brain burns them instead. This is the so-called 'ketogenic' state you get in when deprived of carbs. Off-smelling breath in the morning? you are ketogenic. or you ate a lot of garlic for dinner :-)

You cannot point to a runner eating lots of carbs to prove that a high carb diet will make you slim. That is putting the cart before the horse. The fact is that the runner body type can eat carbs with impunity, as they are not genetically predisposed to store the energy as fat. they have plenty of 'spare energy' and tend to lead active lifestyles. An obese person has the opposite problem - their body preferentially stores fat. That this happens has been shown unquestionably using lab rats & other animals. Rats bred to have the predisposition will fatten on any amount of calories short of starvation, and will be lethargic, as they dont have any spare energy. Their body is 'hogging' it all to push it into fat cells. Once fat, you can starve it, and it will die fat, as its body refuses to release the fat once its in. Hibernating animals do not get fat before winter because they overeat, but because their hormones kick in to make them fat. In experiments, researchers have been unable to prevent hibernating animals from getting fat by controlling their calorie intake, short of starvation, but then the body consumes itself to create and store fat. Beef, fish and cheese are all healthy. Fats in whole foods are all healthy. Only hydrogenated and industrially processed fats are unhealthy (eg hard fats made from oils, & bulk vegetable oils). Fats from whole foods, even (gasp) saturated fats, do not cause heart disease. This is the truth, made plain by the likes of Dr Mary Enig, Dr Malcolm Kendrick, Dr Uffe Ravnskov, & many others. Given the above knowledge, if potatoes (healthy enough in themselves) are cooked in a fat that does not denature and form toxic compounds at higher temperatures (eg a saturated fat), reason says there is nothing wrong with eating chips in moderation. Chips always used to be fried in tallow, which mainly consists of fats such as stearic acid and other saturated fats that have been shown to be beneficial to health. Nowadays they are fried in vegetable oil, which was unhealthy before it came out of the can, and then gets totally denatured in the fryer. Lard - a word that strikes fear into the heart of the modern health nut. Well would you believe, its major constituent is the monounsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid - as you have probably guessed, the same as found in olive oil. Healthy? you betcha. The food our great grandparents ate was healthy after all - no heart disease or obesity epidemics back then. The problem with todays carbs (wheat) is its unnaturally (genetically bred) high gluten content. The number of true celiacs and those with a gluten sensitivity has hugely increased in recent years. Besides the fact that now its in virtually everything, even where you wouldnt expect it. I know this - my Uncle was a celiac from teen, my mother acquired it later in life, and my daughter is sensitive to it. Cue lots of label reading and gluten free cooking. In summary, an average person that is not predisposed to store a lot of fat can eat carbs as part of a normal balanced diet. People with a very low predisposition to store (your runners) can eat plenty if they so desire. People with the predisposition to store, cannot eat much or any carbs/sugar, if they want to get and/or remain lean.

Posted on 2013-05-20 01:30:18
Name:Bull
Location:Australia
Subject:Honey ginger garlic (Is honey a good carb?)
I had to go on a low carb diet to have a operation. I use honey ginger and garlic on and in most meats I cook. I also use honey instead of sugar where its required. Could you give me the run down on these please? I noticed you had honey as a high carb...I was under the belief it was good for me.
Posted on 2013-05-27 21:53:13
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Honey ginger garlic (Is honey a good carb?)
Hi Bull, thanks for your question. While honey does have some health benefits, it is not a low carb food, and has no place in a low carb diet. See the nutrition facts comparison for honey and sugar. Honey has 82 grams of sugar per 100 grams, and sugar has 99.9grams per 100 grams. Basically, honey is 82% sugar while sugar is 100%. Thus while honey is a good substitute for sugar, it is not low carb. Try go without honey while you are being low carb.
Posted on 2013-05-28 03:19:41
Name:Wendy Parks
Location:Charlotte NC
Subject:Good carbs for losing belly fat?
Can someone tell me what I can have with lots of carbs that is healthy for you? I eat a salad and fruits for lunch and dinner, but I have slowed down on drinking water. What can I do next to get back on drinking my water? I m trying to loose my belly fat! Thanks, Wendy.
Posted on 2013-07-18 13:22:17
Name:LeeAnne
Location:South Africa
Subject:Good list of foods to avoid if you have diabetes
I agree fully with this list. I have diabetes and have encountered some health problems. As I just visited my endocrinologist yesterday I was advised strictly against foods high in carbs and sugar and foods high in starch. So yes some of these foods are healthy, but I have to avoid them. I can't eat potatoes, rice, pasta, bread (besides low gi health). Starchy vegetables, foods high in carbs, and sugar. And even fresh fruit such as bananas because of the carb and sugar load.
Posted on 2013-07-19 09:34:25
Name:Sue
Location:Virginia
Subject:Wheat
Hi, I've recently eliminated wheat from my diet in an effort to get better control over my weight. I have noticed a number of positive effects and some (not so positive)I'm wondering if they're related to my new diet. By noon I often feel bone tired which sometimes lasts all afternoon - obviously making it difficult to work. I eat breakfast, lunch and dinner and often have snacks (nuts, p'nut butter, etc.). If this is related, is there a recommended amount of wheat I should be eating? Thanks, Sue.
Posted on 2013-07-24 07:25:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Wheat
Hi Sue, thanks for your question. A diet change can lead to a lack of energy, or just a general bad feeling. If you still feel bad after 2-3 weeks you probably want to bring wheat back into your diet. There is a lot of bad press on wheat these days, but everyone is different and some people probably should eat wheat. It is a great source of energy, and should not be overlooked if it helps keep you feeling good. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-07-25 23:27:48
Name:Dana
Location:Canada
Subject:A low carb diet has worked for me...
Your article is fantastic on its own, and I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. What I enjoyed even more though, was the response to "high carb for the win". Excellent advise and information provided. I myself have been low carb high fat for 2 years now. I am one of those people you referred to as being pre-disposed to storing fat. I was a yo-yo dieter, struggling with weight fluctuations my whole adult life. Never really very overweight, simply unhappy with the excess weight I could not get rid of. I ate low fat, high "healthy" carbs, as was the recommendation of every doctor, nutritionist and diet book out there. I turned to High Fat Low Carb (I follow the Paleo lifestyle) 2 years ago, and have NEVER been healthier. Not only did the stubborn 20 lbs fall away, my LDL cholesterol levels decreased, and my HDL increased. I have fantastic energy, no mid-afternoon sugar crashes so I have been more efficient at work, have time and energy for the gym afterwards, and am an all around a happier person. A happy person who eats bacon, full fat coconut milk, red meat, and full eggs on a daily basis. Which by any normal medical standards would be shunned and strictly advised against. My lifestyle is almost always met with the same response - "thats terrible! your going to die from all that red meat! your killing your kids with all the fat!". I am constantly defending the foods my family eats, but society has drilled high fat = bad into our heads for so long, it is often met with nothing but amazement. Your article will be one i will be recommending to people from now on. Thank you!
Posted on 2013-07-29 16:00:11
Name:Stuart Meigh
Location:Cornwall
Subject:I like a low carb diet too!
I dont usually write into things like this, but after reading the article and every word of the questions and answers afterwards, I feel I want to! I agree wholeheartedly with the article, and also Dana from Canada. Rock on protein and fats, hiss boo to carbs and sugar! If you live your life like that, you will get a lot more out of it I promise you...and after 3 weeks or so of ditching the carbs and sugar, you will miss them less and less.
Posted on 2013-08-17 16:58:16
Name:Vianna
Location:UK
Subject:Natural foods are best
The main problem is that we have way to much to choose in the supermarket and all of us should know that all natural unprocessed foods are good for us. Our bodies do not need so much food at all if each of us has 3 small portions a day, no snacks and junk, then we will always stay slim.
Posted on 2013-08-22 21:51:49
Name:Jess
Location:NZ
Subject:Carbs/Fats
As mentioned, the body deals with one primary fuel at a time - carbs, then stores the fats to deal with afterwards. If you eat another meal, same thing happens and body never gets around to burning the fat. So would separating fats and (healthy carbs - veges,quinoa,oats etc) be beneficial? Like eat a meal where primary source is healthy fats and then a few hours later eat a meal with a primary fuel source of healthy carbs? Switching it up so your body has one fuel source to deal with at a time. Is there any truth to that in your opinion?
Posted on 2013-09-17 17:25:54
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Carbs/Fats
Hi Jess thanks for your question. While you could eat a high fat meal, and then a high carb meal, it is unlikely that your body would have burned away all the fat in a few hours. It might take half a day or more, depending on your levels of activity. The kind of "low carb diets" try to get your body to burn fat but keeping your level of carbs low for several days. That kind of diet may work for some people, but a balanced diet of vegetables and whole grains can work well too.
Posted on 2013-09-18 23:36:10
Name:James C
Location:South Africa
Subject:Carb Intolerant
My wife is a type II diabetic and was eventually placed on insulin in an attempt to control her blood sugar. She read Tim Noakes' article on carb intolerance and said that's me. We followed a carb reduced diet and within a few months she no longer uses insulin injections. Her blood sugar is controlled with one tablet. My wife loved fruit and fruit juice. We now avoid the whole fruits and juice and eat mainly berries instead. We say that we spend our carbohydrates and try and limit them to 100 grams per day. Read the labels. All the best.
Posted on 2013-09-27 05:23:12
Name:Heather
Location:Gloucestershire
Subject:Taking the sensible approach
This extensive list of Carbohydrates is informative but you should not cut out all the list. We all need Carbohydrates and there are good ones and bad ones plus even the bad ones can be eaten occasionally surely. I would use this list as information. Common sense should tell you what to eat every day and what you can eat occasionally.
Posted on 2013-10-10 06:33:19
Name:Emily
Location:Australia
Subject:Fruit
Whoever said eat as much fruit as you want is completly off. Fruit is ok, but you should only be having 1-2 servings of fruit a day if you really need it. A serving being like an apple etc... Even for me, I am paleo and only eat 1 serving of fruit per week! I feel great now and can see a difference in my body straight away.
Posted on 2013-10-14 20:22:57
Name:Vijaya
Location:USA
Subject:Confused about cause of high cholesterol
I don't smoke or drink, never had a can/bottle of soda or coffe/tea...I am vegetarian & stay away from fried foods too. So what I eat is basically rice, mostly green/orange vegetables, bananas, apples, oats, 1%milk, lentils, coconut and an occasional sweet treat. Yet I have very high cholesterol. Any ideas why?
Posted on 2013-10-23 11:09:43
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Confused about cause of high cholesterol
Hi Vijaya, thanks for your question. High cholesterol has many causes including eating foods high in cholesterol like butter and milk, and also eating saturated fats. This is in addition to problems like genetics or a lack of exercise. See the article on high cholesterol foods to make sure you are avoiding all high cholesterol foods, the article on cholesterol lowering foods could also give you some good ideas going forward.
Posted on 2013-10-24 07:05:54
Name:Debbi
Location:South Africa
Subject:Honey
Is honey a healthier option to fructose or other sweetening choices?
Posted on 2013-10-30 14:16:50
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Honey
Hi Debbi, thanks for your question. Honey is a better sweetener due to the fact it has a lower percentage of pure sugars, and as such, would take more time to enter your blood stream. Along those lines, molasses and sorghum syrup would be even better. Here is the nutrition facts comparison of honey, molasses, and sorghum syrup.
Posted on 2013-10-31 07:15:55
Name:Flying Pig
Location:Canada
Subject:RE: Honey
Debbie, honey has essentially the same sugar content as table sugar (sucrose) which is about 50% glucose and 50% fructose, which is also about the same as high fructose corn syrup. So- called nutritionists always like portray honey as healthy, in spite of the horrendous data on the nutrition table. Honey is SUGAR, period. Don't eat it.
Posted on 2013-11-04 07:30:16
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Honey
Hi and thanks for adding more to this. It is true that honey is not the healthiest food, however, gram per gram, it does have less sugar than table sugar, mainly due to the water content. Molasses has even less sugar per gram with a greater concentration of minerals. Here is the complete nutrition facts comparison. You could argue that honey is water-downed sugar, however, this would also make it "better than sugar" for someone looking to limit their sugar intake. Of course, all sweeteners are best limited or avoided, however, if someone is looking for a sweetener, what would your recommend?

Artificial sweeteners have their own health problems, and even alternatives, like stevia, are not without fault. The best may simply be using small amounts of natural sweeteners, in which case, honey and molasses are the lesser evil to table sugar and high fructose corn syrup. People can make up their own mind based on their own diet preferences/requirements from this.

Posted on 2013-11-05 01:52:02
Name:Peter
Location:World Traveller
Subject:Carbs
Well what types of carbs depends on your activity levels. While I agree that if you live a sedentary lifestyle then you should limit the foods above, however if you are active you don't need to. In other societies where their intake of carbs is even higher than the US, they are slimmer. For example Michael Phelps gulps down 12 thousand calories a day, including things like pizzas. So what are carbohydrates? They are the fuel source of our body and if you are active you will need a lot of fuel.
Posted on 2013-12-09 20:58:59
Name:Bill
Location:Canada
Subject:How about Alcohol?
Am I correct in assuming alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine, and whisky are high in carbohydrates?

How significant is the carb content in these drinks?

Posted on 2014-01-05 15:53:23
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How about Alcohol?
Hi Bill, thanks for your question. Typically alcohol is created by converting the carbohydrates in a liquid to alcohol. Thus the more alcohol a beverage contains, the less carbs it provides. With this is mind, beer is the highest carb beverage providing 12.6 grams in a 12 ounce serving, then wine with 4 grams in a 5 ounce serving (10 grams per 12 ounces), and then whiskey and other strong 80 proof drinks with almost no carbs at all. Here are the complete nutrition facts for beer, wine, and whiskey. Please note that alcohol provides 7 calories per gram, while carbohydrates typically provide 4 calories per gram. So while a drink may be low in carbohydrates it can still be high in calories, leading to weight gain.
Posted on 2014-01-13 17:31:45
Name:Geo
Location:Beirut
Subject:A Question About Sugar
Hi and thank you for your article. I have a question concerning sugar. I know that refined sugar is bad for health, but what about sugar in beets or in avocados (which BTW are both considered super foods)? Can a cancer patient eat them? Cause as you probably know, cancer thrives on sugar. Thanks again!
Posted on 2014-02-03 11:39:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: A Question About Sugar
Hi Geo, thanks for your question. In regards to cancer, yes sugar is bad, but antioxidants and other micro nutrients in fruits are considered good, and that is what a "super food" typically denotes. How this balances out is questionable. You are best going for low sugar fruits and vegetables like lettuce, avocados, and olives. Avocados are actually very low in sugar with 0.7 grams in an average avocado. Beets are high in sugar though, with one beet providing 4 grams of sugar. Still that is not bad compared to an ice-cream sandwich which contains 18 grams of sugar. Here are the complete nutrition facts for beets, avocados, and ice cream sandwiches. Here is a list of low sugar fruits, and low sugar vegetables.
Posted on 2014-02-04 19:08:08
Name:Pelvaniia
Subject:Best low carb foods
Hi there, well as I am reading all of these comments and questions, I am really impressed! I like this site. It has a lot of information that I am looking for. So could any one be so kind and tell me the best low carb foods to eat?
Posted on 2014-02-06 03:51:30
Name:Todd McNaughton
Location:CA
Subject:Add milk?
I think that milk should be added to the list.... there is 12 grams of carbs per serving and who only drinks one serving of milk.. so there is more carbs is a 16 oz glass of milk than in a baked potato...any thoughts?
Posted on 2014-02-07 10:34:06
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Add milk?
Hi Todd, thanks for the suggestion. This article will be revised in the next few weeks and milk will be added. Further, while milk is sweet and high in carbs, it also provides protein and fat which can help smooth the glycemic load of the sugars in milk.
Posted on 2014-02-08 01:09:30
Name:Mark
Location:Norfolk, England
Subject:NSNG Diet
Tim in Australia is spot on! Chris in London has bought the advice that has led to the Western World's addiction to foods that are killing us. For any doubt read "Wheat Belly" by William Davis MD then read "Grain Brain" by David Perlmutter MD.

Look on the shelves of your local supermarket to find foods not containing wheat - a modern cross bred, genetically modified product manufactured on mass, supported by subsidies and with non tested glutens that has seen a rapidly increasing number of Coeliac diagnosis in recent years.

How much money and lobbying is focused on pushing this product into the food chain? Well the answer is unfortunately "enough to fool the masses into buying it".

I've always been fairly slim and never had a problem with weight gain(although supported a bit of a beer belly at times)but as a teenager my Doctor diagnosed "IBS" and told me to eat more fiber & wholewheat. Throughout my 40+ years my IBS has always been there but never gotten to the stage where I have sought further medical advice. My joints have slowly become a little stiffer to get going in the morning and nagging pains have become the norm - until I gave up sugar, wheat & grains.

After a relatively short time I now spring out of bed and walk down the stairs without grimacing. my energy is constant throughout the days (I sometimes had to pull over whilst driving mid afternoon for a power nap). I have no cravings mid morning for a pastie, sausage roll or doughnut - or a slice of cake mid afternoon. My weight has kept constant and my sense of taste and smell has increased.

For the record both my Daughter and my Sister have Coeliac disease. My mother in Law died from the potentially fatal knock on effects of the disease because it was not diagnosed until too late - and yes, her Doctor told her to eat more brown bread!

NSNG rules!

Posted on 2014-02-11 10:37:06
Name:Rae
Location:USA
Subject:Need to gain weight and eat more carbs
I am trying to gain weight and I need more carbs in my diet. What are some foods that are high in carbs and are healthy? I keep searching the internet for food high in carbs (that are healthy), but I keep getting things like cake, pizza, and french fries. I need to gain the weight, but I also need food that is going to help restore the inner parts of my body.
Posted on 2014-02-24 19:20:14
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Need to gain weight and eat more carbs
Hi Rae, thanks for your question and suggestion. A list of healthy carbs will be added to this article soon. In the meantime, the article on high calorie foods can provide you with suggestions on healthy foods for weight gain. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2014-02-25 13:20:17

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Name:Mary Campbell
Location:United States
Subject:10 Foods High in Carbs
Of course, I have to like everything on the list!
Posted on 2012-02-12 21:36:12
Name:Tom Lupul
Location:Canada
Subject:Fruit
Please do not avoid fructose. Fresh or dried fruit is healthy, eat as much of it as you want. Just avoid the refined non naturally occurring sugars, like in soda or sugary cereal.
Posted on 2013-02-01 14:34:42
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Fruit
Hi Tom, thanks for your comment. You are right that fructose naturally found in fresh fruits is fine for you, and to some extent, the same can be said for dried fruits. However, fructose is also isolated from fruits and then added into foods. It is this added (refined) form of fructose that is best avoided, particularly high fructose corn syrup. While isolated (refined) fructose has a relatively low glycemic index, studies suggest it can lead to detrimental health consequences, such as increased blood lipid (fat) levels, and obesity. As you have stated though, fructose from fresh fruits is fine.
Posted on 2013-02-01 16:49:31
Name:Karen
Location:Birmingham
Subject:What is a healthy carbohydrate?
I amm wondering why perfectly decent healthy foods are being mixed in with a list of crap? In my honest opinion avoiding fructose, refined sugar, and fatty or fried foods is common sense. Not necessarily wise to discourage people from eating dried fruits, and fruit jams (100% fruit of course). I also don't see the issue with low fat crackers and rice cakes and why they are listed along side potato chips. I do not understand. As far as pizza is concerned I do agree thick doughy crust is not ideal but feel that toppings are more important - avoiding high salt, high fat items like meats and extra cheese or cheese filled crust. sorry to disagree with some things on here, but common sense says avoid refined sugars, fried rubbish and grease more than fruit or baked potato with skin.
Posted on 2013-02-18 14:26:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: What is a healthy carbohydrate?
Hi Karen, thanks for your comments. The main factor discouraging consumption of all these high carbohydrate foods is their glycemic load, or how much insulin they cause the body to release and how fast sugar is absorbed into the blood stream. There is a big difference in glycemic load between dry and fresh fruits. This is why eating dry fruits is discouraged. A high glycemic load has a wide range of bad health consequences, most prominently, an increased risk of type II diabetes, and heart disease. Interestingly, eating carbohydrates with fat, protein, and fiber can actually mediate the glycemic load, making high carbohydrate foods more healthy. Of course, you would want to choose healthy fats and proteins, such as nuts. Hope those comments help explain the recommendations on this article.
Posted on 2013-02-18 19:08:41
Name:Hannah
Location:Virginia
Subject:Low Carb Food List
Could you by any chance provide a list of the top 10 lowest carb filled foods?
Posted on 2013-02-21 17:07:55
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low Carb Food List
Hi Hannah, thanks for your suggestion. What kind of low carb foods would you be looking for? You can use the nutrient ranking tool to list low carb foods, you can also filter by food group. Here is a list of 1000 foods that have no carbs. A curated article of low carb foods will be created to capture common foods. Thanks again for the suggestion.
Posted on 2013-02-21 20:12:52
Name:Carbs
Subject:List of good carbs
In Australia and surely in other countries carbohydrates (including cereals, breads, pastas, rices etc.) are the recommended majority of our diet, so this list is slightly misleading. The carb type listed here are complex and sugary; though they do contain vast amounts of carbohydrates, it would be better to list the healthier carbs and the ones people should be eating, for example cereals (not breakfast cereals), breads, pastas, rices etc. rather than portraying carbs as a bad food type
Posted on 2013-03-24 01:52:33
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: List of good carbs
Thanks for your comment and suggestion. There are indeed many good high carb foods, and an extended list of healthy carbs will be created and added to this article. There are plenty of good carbohydrates found in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, beans, lentils, and nuts. You can find some how to recipes for healthy whole grains here.
Posted on 2013-03-24 11:18:18
Name:Ahyela
Location:Middle East
Subject:High Carbs to Avoid for an Acne Free Diet
I am researching an acne free diet and high carbohydrates is listed among the foods should be avoided. I find your article very helpful, thank you. Maybe you can add to your introduction: "obesity,type II diabetes,skin disorders(acne), and cancer." Just a suggestion...
Posted on 2013-03-28 06:34:46
Name:Christina
Location:Strathroy, ON Canada
Subject:Carb craving when tired?
Hi there..... I'm curious if there is a reason for craving carbs when tired. I've noticed this to be a regular correlation for me.. When I go to bed, read for a bit and get tired, I crave carby foods. Other people in a group I belong to are the same way... So I wondered if there is a reason for this. For me, it only happens at night. I can be tired and about to nap during the day, but not have the cravings then. It's bizarre that way. Thank you for any input and I have to say: I love this site, lots of info, love the lists, etc and I especially like reading the comments and seeing that someone actually responds to the questions. Thank you for that.
Posted on 2013-04-09 04:49:03
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Carb craving when tired?
Hi Christina, thanks for your question. There are many reasons why people get food cravings, particularly for carbohydrates. First of all, carbs give you an energy boost, or "sugar rush", which people become addicted to and crave. Further, carbs are the main source of energy for your brain. So when you read, your brain will work harder and your body may crave carbs. Further, sugary foods also release opiods in the brain, giving you a good feeling that becomes addictive. People get accustomed to certain ques with addictions. It can be getting home from work, studying, or just before you sleep. In your case, you may have become addicted to sugary foods before you sleep. Try drinking soda water, or lemon water, before bed to train yourself to expect something different. Good luck with beating your cravings. Wikipedia also has a good article on the topic of food cravings.
Posted on 2013-04-09 05:46:06
Name:Christina
Location:Armed Forces Europe
Subject:Best Carbs Post Workout?
So for someone who is new at fitness, and beginning a new work out routine, would there be a list of foods that are good to eat after a work out? I keep seeing articles about drinking whey protein shakes along with foods high in carbohydrates after working out...now I'm confused. What healthy, carb packed food should I pair my whey protein with post workout? TIA!
Posted on 2013-05-12 18:16:51
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Best Carbs Post Workout
Hi Christina, thanks for your question. What is best to eat after a workout depends on your goals: do you want to lose weight, or build muscle, or both? There is a wide variety of advice on the topic, and for weight loss, it is likely many people would advise you to avoid carbs altogether. However, it is best to have some kind of complex carbohydrate after a workout, especially to build muscle. Try adding fruit, like bananas, to your whey protein shake. Further, nuts can be a great source of both carbs and protein. Consider adding almonds, or peanut butter. If peanut butter is not so common in Europe, then Hazelnut spread should be OK, just watch the sugar content. In the end you are going to have to experiment with different things and find what works for you. Just be sure you are drinking plenty of water, and try to choose whole-unrefined foods. Hope those thoughts help.
Posted on 2013-05-14 03:04:44
Name:Chris
Location:London
Subject:High carb diet for the win
From reading this article, I get a sense of why the western world has the highest levels of obesity, heart disease and diabetes on the planet. Carbohydrate is GOOD and is the body's preferred nutrient. The brain runs exclusively on glucose so it makes sense to eat a high carb diet. Foods such as fruits, rice, pasta, potatoes, bread, wholegrain cereal should be eaten in abundance. They provide the body with adequates amounts of complex carbohydrates for prolonged energy aswell as vital vitamins and minerals for healthy bodily function. In the list above I quote, "french fries 27% carbs...pizzas 22-30% carbs...hash browns 35% carbs". These percentages are not high at all for carbohydrate based foods which means that one could only suggest that these are high fat foods that promote obesity and heart disease from all the fat from how they are prepared e.g fried. This article is misleading. Any body who is on a high carbohydrate diet will be leaner and slimmer than people on a high fat or high protein diet, period. Look at the professional sprinters and distance runners, the former being mesomorphs and the latter ectomorphs but the commonality that these athletes share is that they have high levels of fitness and low levels of fat and are extremely healthy. If one was to eat unlimited amounts of fruit, bread, rice, pasta, cereal and potatoes for a year in contrast to someone who eats unlimited amounts of cooked mince beef, fish, cheese, chips for a year it doesn't take a smart person to know which person would be healthier. ps I got my blood tested a few weeks ago and all results came back excellent for everything. DONT GET SCAMMED PEOPLE!
Posted on 2013-05-16 00:50:42
Name:Tim
Location:Australia
Subject:Re: High carb diet for the win

Chris, You are not fully informed about carbs, or how your body works. Try reading Why we get fat, and what to do about it by Gary Taubes. The science of adiposity (how our fat stores are controlled - otherwise known as endocrinology), has been known for many years, but largely ignored by the people that dish out nutritional and lifestyle advice.

In a nutshell, the presence of insulun controls what goes in and out of a fat cell. Fat goes in, no fat comes out, until the carb load, and the insulun, goes away. Our body releases insulun in response to the foods we eat - by a huge margin, it releases it for sugar and other carbs. Eating fat does not cause us to release insulun, so by that logic, you can't get fat eating fat alone. (practically we almost never do).If you eat carbs and fat, the fat is stored for later use, while the body burns the carbs off. If you are consistently eating sufficient carbs, the fat never gets a chance to get used. If you're lucky you might burn some before breakfast (in or out of bed), after an all-night fast. (remember folks - this is the nutshell version, the details are quite, well, detaily). For people consistently releasing insulun, their cells can become insulun-resistant, so the body produces more - vicious circle.

Certain people are genetically disposed to store fat rather than burn it - these are the ones that get obese over time. Also why fat parents often have fat kids. its not ONLY that the eating habits rub off, to a certain extent they can't help it. Anyone doubting that excess insulun makes you fat should look at the photo of a diabetic woman that consistently injected insulun into the same spot on each thigh, and over a peroid of 40 yrs developed camel-like mounds of fat in each location. He debunks the relatively recent myth that obesity is caused by overeating and under-exercising (so-called gluttony & sloth).

Adiposity 101: the amount of fat we store is precisely and directly regulated by our hormones. Gettting obese is a fault in the regulation system, not a moral or psychological failing. People overeat because they are fat, not the other way around. If the reason we get fat is an imbalance in calories in/out, then if we over or undereat by 20 calories/day, that would make us chronically obese/thin respectively within very few years. The fact is that the average person simply does not (and cannot) quantify how much energy they are consuming or expending, let alone get it spot on over vast periods of time, yet they can maintain a healthy weight. The accuracy required (if that theory were true) is beyond most machinery - a mathematical impossibility.

The brain does not run 'exclusively' on glucose. Sure it does, if there is plenty of glucose available, but if it couldnt run on anything else, a carb and sugar free diet would be debilitating or fatal, but its not. In fact we can survive fine without them. The reason is that in the absence of glucose, the liver produces ketones from fat, and the brain burns them instead. This is the so-called 'ketogenic' state you get in when deprived of carbs. Off-smelling breath in the morning? you are ketogenic. or you ate a lot of garlic for dinner :-)

You cannot point to a runner eating lots of carbs to prove that a high carb diet will make you slim. That is putting the cart before the horse. The fact is that the runner body type can eat carbs with impunity, as they are not genetically predisposed to store the energy as fat. they have plenty of 'spare energy' and tend to lead active lifestyles. An obese person has the opposite problem - their body preferentially stores fat. That this happens has been shown unquestionably using lab rats & other animals. Rats bred to have the predisposition will fatten on any amount of calories short of starvation, and will be lethargic, as they dont have any spare energy. Their body is 'hogging' it all to push it into fat cells. Once fat, you can starve it, and it will die fat, as its body refuses to release the fat once its in. Hibernating animals do not get fat before winter because they overeat, but because their hormones kick in to make them fat. In experiments, researchers have been unable to prevent hibernating animals from getting fat by controlling their calorie intake, short of starvation, but then the body consumes itself to create and store fat. Beef, fish and cheese are all healthy. Fats in whole foods are all healthy. Only hydrogenated and industrially processed fats are unhealthy (eg hard fats made from oils, & bulk vegetable oils). Fats from whole foods, even (gasp) saturated fats, do not cause heart disease. This is the truth, made plain by the likes of Dr Mary Enig, Dr Malcolm Kendrick, Dr Uffe Ravnskov, & many others. Given the above knowledge, if potatoes (healthy enough in themselves) are cooked in a fat that does not denature and form toxic compounds at higher temperatures (eg a saturated fat), reason says there is nothing wrong with eating chips in moderation. Chips always used to be fried in tallow, which mainly consists of fats such as stearic acid and other saturated fats that have been shown to be beneficial to health. Nowadays they are fried in vegetable oil, which was unhealthy before it came out of the can, and then gets totally denatured in the fryer. Lard - a word that strikes fear into the heart of the modern health nut. Well would you believe, its major constituent is the monounsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid - as you have probably guessed, the same as found in olive oil. Healthy? you betcha. The food our great grandparents ate was healthy after all - no heart disease or obesity epidemics back then. The problem with todays carbs (wheat) is its unnaturally (genetically bred) high gluten content. The number of true celiacs and those with a gluten sensitivity has hugely increased in recent years. Besides the fact that now its in virtually everything, even where you wouldnt expect it. I know this - my Uncle was a celiac from teen, my mother acquired it later in life, and my daughter is sensitive to it. Cue lots of label reading and gluten free cooking. In summary, an average person that is not predisposed to store a lot of fat can eat carbs as part of a normal balanced diet. People with a very low predisposition to store (your runners) can eat plenty if they so desire. People with the predisposition to store, cannot eat much or any carbs/sugar, if they want to get and/or remain lean.

Posted on 2013-05-20 01:30:18
Name:Bull
Location:Australia
Subject:Honey ginger garlic (Is honey a good carb?)
I had to go on a low carb diet to have a operation. I use honey ginger and garlic on and in most meats I cook. I also use honey instead of sugar where its required. Could you give me the run down on these please? I noticed you had honey as a high carb...I was under the belief it was good for me.
Posted on 2013-05-27 21:53:13
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Honey ginger garlic (Is honey a good carb?)
Hi Bull, thanks for your question. While honey does have some health benefits, it is not a low carb food, and has no place in a low carb diet. See the nutrition facts comparison for honey and sugar. Honey has 82 grams of sugar per 100 grams, and sugar has 99.9grams per 100 grams. Basically, honey is 82% sugar while sugar is 100%. Thus while honey is a good substitute for sugar, it is not low carb. Try go without honey while you are being low carb.
Posted on 2013-05-28 03:19:41
Name:Wendy Parks
Location:Charlotte NC
Subject:Good carbs for losing belly fat?
Can someone tell me what I can have with lots of carbs that is healthy for you? I eat a salad and fruits for lunch and dinner, but I have slowed down on drinking water. What can I do next to get back on drinking my water? I m trying to loose my belly fat! Thanks, Wendy.
Posted on 2013-07-18 13:22:17
Name:LeeAnne
Location:South Africa
Subject:Good list of foods to avoid if you have diabetes
I agree fully with this list. I have diabetes and have encountered some health problems. As I just visited my endocrinologist yesterday I was advised strictly against foods high in carbs and sugar and foods high in starch. So yes some of these foods are healthy, but I have to avoid them. I can't eat potatoes, rice, pasta, bread (besides low gi health). Starchy vegetables, foods high in carbs, and sugar. And even fresh fruit such as bananas because of the carb and sugar load.
Posted on 2013-07-19 09:34:25
Name:Sue
Location:Virginia
Subject:Wheat
Hi, I've recently eliminated wheat from my diet in an effort to get better control over my weight. I have noticed a number of positive effects and some (not so positive)I'm wondering if they're related to my new diet. By noon I often feel bone tired which sometimes lasts all afternoon - obviously making it difficult to work. I eat breakfast, lunch and dinner and often have snacks (nuts, p'nut butter, etc.). If this is related, is there a recommended amount of wheat I should be eating? Thanks, Sue.
Posted on 2013-07-24 07:25:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Wheat
Hi Sue, thanks for your question. A diet change can lead to a lack of energy, or just a general bad feeling. If you still feel bad after 2-3 weeks you probably want to bring wheat back into your diet. There is a lot of bad press on wheat these days, but everyone is different and some people probably should eat wheat. It is a great source of energy, and should not be overlooked if it helps keep you feeling good. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-07-25 23:27:48
Name:Dana
Location:Canada
Subject:A low carb diet has worked for me...
Your article is fantastic on its own, and I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. What I enjoyed even more though, was the response to "high carb for the win". Excellent advise and information provided. I myself have been low carb high fat for 2 years now. I am one of those people you referred to as being pre-disposed to storing fat. I was a yo-yo dieter, struggling with weight fluctuations my whole adult life. Never really very overweight, simply unhappy with the excess weight I could not get rid of. I ate low fat, high "healthy" carbs, as was the recommendation of every doctor, nutritionist and diet book out there. I turned to High Fat Low Carb (I follow the Paleo lifestyle) 2 years ago, and have NEVER been healthier. Not only did the stubborn 20 lbs fall away, my LDL cholesterol levels decreased, and my HDL increased. I have fantastic energy, no mid-afternoon sugar crashes so I have been more efficient at work, have time and energy for the gym afterwards, and am an all around a happier person. A happy person who eats bacon, full fat coconut milk, red meat, and full eggs on a daily basis. Which by any normal medical standards would be shunned and strictly advised against. My lifestyle is almost always met with the same response - "thats terrible! your going to die from all that red meat! your killing your kids with all the fat!". I am constantly defending the foods my family eats, but society has drilled high fat = bad into our heads for so long, it is often met with nothing but amazement. Your article will be one i will be recommending to people from now on. Thank you!
Posted on 2013-07-29 16:00:11
Name:Stuart Meigh
Location:Cornwall
Subject:I like a low carb diet too!
I dont usually write into things like this, but after reading the article and every word of the questions and answers afterwards, I feel I want to! I agree wholeheartedly with the article, and also Dana from Canada. Rock on protein and fats, hiss boo to carbs and sugar! If you live your life like that, you will get a lot more out of it I promise you...and after 3 weeks or so of ditching the carbs and sugar, you will miss them less and less.
Posted on 2013-08-17 16:58:16
Name:Vianna
Location:UK
Subject:Natural foods are best
The main problem is that we have way to much to choose in the supermarket and all of us should know that all natural unprocessed foods are good for us. Our bodies do not need so much food at all if each of us has 3 small portions a day, no snacks and junk, then we will always stay slim.
Posted on 2013-08-22 21:51:49
Name:Jess
Location:NZ
Subject:Carbs/Fats
As mentioned, the body deals with one primary fuel at a time - carbs, then stores the fats to deal with afterwards. If you eat another meal, same thing happens and body never gets around to burning the fat. So would separating fats and (healthy carbs - veges,quinoa,oats etc) be beneficial? Like eat a meal where primary source is healthy fats and then a few hours later eat a meal with a primary fuel source of healthy carbs? Switching it up so your body has one fuel source to deal with at a time. Is there any truth to that in your opinion?
Posted on 2013-09-17 17:25:54
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Carbs/Fats
Hi Jess thanks for your question. While you could eat a high fat meal, and then a high carb meal, it is unlikely that your body would have burned away all the fat in a few hours. It might take half a day or more, depending on your levels of activity. The kind of "low carb diets" try to get your body to burn fat but keeping your level of carbs low for several days. That kind of diet may work for some people, but a balanced diet of vegetables and whole grains can work well too.
Posted on 2013-09-18 23:36:10
Name:James C
Location:South Africa
Subject:Carb Intolerant
My wife is a type II diabetic and was eventually placed on insulin in an attempt to control her blood sugar. She read Tim Noakes' article on carb intolerance and said that's me. We followed a carb reduced diet and within a few months she no longer uses insulin injections. Her blood sugar is controlled with one tablet. My wife loved fruit and fruit juice. We now avoid the whole fruits and juice and eat mainly berries instead. We say that we spend our carbohydrates and try and limit them to 100 grams per day. Read the labels. All the best.
Posted on 2013-09-27 05:23:12
Name:Heather
Location:Gloucestershire
Subject:Taking the sensible approach
This extensive list of Carbohydrates is informative but you should not cut out all the list. We all need Carbohydrates and there are good ones and bad ones plus even the bad ones can be eaten occasionally surely. I would use this list as information. Common sense should tell you what to eat every day and what you can eat occasionally.
Posted on 2013-10-10 06:33:19
Name:Emily
Location:Australia
Subject:Fruit
Whoever said eat as much fruit as you want is completly off. Fruit is ok, but you should only be having 1-2 servings of fruit a day if you really need it. A serving being like an apple etc... Even for me, I am paleo and only eat 1 serving of fruit per week! I feel great now and can see a difference in my body straight away.
Posted on 2013-10-14 20:22:57
Name:Vijaya
Location:USA
Subject:Confused about cause of high cholesterol
I don't smoke or drink, never had a can/bottle of soda or coffe/tea...I am vegetarian & stay away from fried foods too. So what I eat is basically rice, mostly green/orange vegetables, bananas, apples, oats, 1%milk, lentils, coconut and an occasional sweet treat. Yet I have very high cholesterol. Any ideas why?
Posted on 2013-10-23 11:09:43
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Confused about cause of high cholesterol
Hi Vijaya, thanks for your question. High cholesterol has many causes including eating foods high in cholesterol like butter and milk, and also eating saturated fats. This is in addition to problems like genetics or a lack of exercise. See the article on high cholesterol foods to make sure you are avoiding all high cholesterol foods, the article on cholesterol lowering foods could also give you some good ideas going forward.
Posted on 2013-10-24 07:05:54
Name:Debbi
Location:South Africa
Subject:Honey
Is honey a healthier option to fructose or other sweetening choices?
Posted on 2013-10-30 14:16:50
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Honey
Hi Debbi, thanks for your question. Honey is a better sweetener due to the fact it has a lower percentage of pure sugars, and as such, would take more time to enter your blood stream. Along those lines, molasses and sorghum syrup would be even better. Here is the nutrition facts comparison of honey, molasses, and sorghum syrup.
Posted on 2013-10-31 07:15:55
Name:Flying Pig
Location:Canada
Subject:RE: Honey
Debbie, honey has essentially the same sugar content as table sugar (sucrose) which is about 50% glucose and 50% fructose, which is also about the same as high fructose corn syrup. So- called nutritionists always like portray honey as healthy, in spite of the horrendous data on the nutrition table. Honey is SUGAR, period. Don't eat it.
Posted on 2013-11-04 07:30:16
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Honey
Hi and thanks for adding more to this. It is true that honey is not the healthiest food, however, gram per gram, it does have less sugar than table sugar, mainly due to the water content. Molasses has even less sugar per gram with a greater concentration of minerals. Here is the complete nutrition facts comparison. You could argue that honey is water-downed sugar, however, this would also make it "better than sugar" for someone looking to limit their sugar intake. Of course, all sweeteners are best limited or avoided, however, if someone is looking for a sweetener, what would your recommend?

Artificial sweeteners have their own health problems, and even alternatives, like stevia, are not without fault. The best may simply be using small amounts of natural sweeteners, in which case, honey and molasses are the lesser evil to table sugar and high fructose corn syrup. People can make up their own mind based on their own diet preferences/requirements from this.

Posted on 2013-11-05 01:52:02
Name:Peter
Location:World Traveller
Subject:Carbs
Well what types of carbs depends on your activity levels. While I agree that if you live a sedentary lifestyle then you should limit the foods above, however if you are active you don't need to. In other societies where their intake of carbs is even higher than the US, they are slimmer. For example Michael Phelps gulps down 12 thousand calories a day, including things like pizzas. So what are carbohydrates? They are the fuel source of our body and if you are active you will need a lot of fuel.
Posted on 2013-12-09 20:58:59
Name:Bill
Location:Canada
Subject:How about Alcohol?
Am I correct in assuming alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine, and whisky are high in carbohydrates?

How significant is the carb content in these drinks?

Posted on 2014-01-05 15:53:23
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How about Alcohol?
Hi Bill, thanks for your question. Typically alcohol is created by converting the carbohydrates in a liquid to alcohol. Thus the more alcohol a beverage contains, the less carbs it provides. With this is mind, beer is the highest carb beverage providing 12.6 grams in a 12 ounce serving, then wine with 4 grams in a 5 ounce serving (10 grams per 12 ounces), and then whiskey and other strong 80 proof drinks with almost no carbs at all. Here are the complete nutrition facts for beer, wine, and whiskey. Please note that alcohol provides 7 calories per gram, while carbohydrates typically provide 4 calories per gram. So while a drink may be low in carbohydrates it can still be high in calories, leading to weight gain.
Posted on 2014-01-13 17:31:45
Name:Geo
Location:Beirut
Subject:A Question About Sugar
Hi and thank you for your article. I have a question concerning sugar. I know that refined sugar is bad for health, but what about sugar in beets or in avocados (which BTW are both considered super foods)? Can a cancer patient eat them? Cause as you probably know, cancer thrives on sugar. Thanks again!
Posted on 2014-02-03 11:39:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: A Question About Sugar
Hi Geo, thanks for your question. In regards to cancer, yes sugar is bad, but antioxidants and other micro nutrients in fruits are considered good, and that is what a "super food" typically denotes. How this balances out is questionable. You are best going for low sugar fruits and vegetables like lettuce, avocados, and olives. Avocados are actually very low in sugar with 0.7 grams in an average avocado. Beets are high in sugar though, with one beet providing 4 grams of sugar. Still that is not bad compared to an ice-cream sandwich which contains 18 grams of sugar. Here are the complete nutrition facts for beets, avocados, and ice cream sandwiches. Here is a list of low sugar fruits, and low sugar vegetables.
Posted on 2014-02-04 19:08:08
Name:Pelvaniia
Subject:Best low carb foods
Hi there, well as I am reading all of these comments and questions, I am really impressed! I like this site. It has a lot of information that I am looking for. So could any one be so kind and tell me the best low carb foods to eat?
Posted on 2014-02-06 03:51:30
Name:Todd McNaughton
Location:CA
Subject:Add milk?
I think that milk should be added to the list.... there is 12 grams of carbs per serving and who only drinks one serving of milk.. so there is more carbs is a 16 oz glass of milk than in a baked potato...any thoughts?
Posted on 2014-02-07 10:34:06
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Add milk?
Hi Todd, thanks for the suggestion. This article will be revised in the next few weeks and milk will be added. Further, while milk is sweet and high in carbs, it also provides protein and fat which can help smooth the glycemic load of the sugars in milk.
Posted on 2014-02-08 01:09:30
Name:Mark
Location:Norfolk, England
Subject:NSNG Diet
Tim in Australia is spot on! Chris in London has bought the advice that has led to the Western World's addiction to foods that are killing us. For any doubt read "Wheat Belly" by William Davis MD then read "Grain Brain" by David Perlmutter MD.

Look on the shelves of your local supermarket to find foods not containing wheat - a modern cross bred, genetically modified product manufactured on mass, supported by subsidies and with non tested glutens that has seen a rapidly increasing number of Coeliac diagnosis in recent years.

How much money and lobbying is focused on pushing this product into the food chain? Well the answer is unfortunately "enough to fool the masses into buying it".

I've always been fairly slim and never had a problem with weight gain(although supported a bit of a beer belly at times)but as a teenager my Doctor diagnosed "IBS" and told me to eat more fiber & wholewheat. Throughout my 40+ years my IBS has always been there but never gotten to the stage where I have sought further medical advice. My joints have slowly become a little stiffer to get going in the morning and nagging pains have become the norm - until I gave up sugar, wheat & grains.

After a relatively short time I now spring out of bed and walk down the stairs without grimacing. my energy is constant throughout the days (I sometimes had to pull over whilst driving mid afternoon for a power nap). I have no cravings mid morning for a pastie, sausage roll or doughnut - or a slice of cake mid afternoon. My weight has kept constant and my sense of taste and smell has increased.

For the record both my Daughter and my Sister have Coeliac disease. My mother in Law died from the potentially fatal knock on effects of the disease because it was not diagnosed until too late - and yes, her Doctor told her to eat more brown bread!

NSNG rules!

Posted on 2014-02-11 10:37:06
Name:Rae
Location:USA
Subject:Need to gain weight and eat more carbs
I am trying to gain weight and I need more carbs in my diet. What are some foods that are high in carbs and are healthy? I keep searching the internet for food high in carbs (that are healthy), but I keep getting things like cake, pizza, and french fries. I need to gain the weight, but I also need food that is going to help restore the inner parts of my body.
Posted on 2014-02-24 19:20:14
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Need to gain weight and eat more carbs
Hi Rae, thanks for your question and suggestion. A list of healthy carbs will be added to this article soon. In the meantime, the article on high calorie foods can provide you with suggestions on healthy foods for weight gain. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2014-02-25 13:20:17

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References

    • USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.