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Top 10 Foods Highest in Protein


Protein is a macro nutrient composed of amino acids that is necessary for the proper growth and function of the human body. While the body can manufacture several amino acids required for protein production, a set of essential amino acids needs to be obtained from animal and/or vegetable protein sources. Animal protein sources contain the complete set of essential amino acids, while all the essential amino acids can be obtained by eating a wide variety of plant foods. There is considerable debate over the amount of protein a person needs to consume per day, the current recommended daily intake (RDI) of protein is 46 grams for women aged 19-70 and 56 grams for men aged 19-70. Any excess protein consumed is turned into energy by the body, and it is controversial whether this excess protein causes a strain on the liver. A deficiency in protein leads to muscle atrophy, and impaired functioning of the human body in general. Below is a list of common foods with the highest protein to calorie ratio, for more information, see the sections on protein dense foods, other protein rich foods, low calorie high protein snacks, and protein isolates.

#1: Turkey Breast (and Chicken Breast)
Protein in 100gHalf-Breast (306g)Protein to Calorie Ratio
30g92g1g protein per 4.5 calories
Chicken: Chicken Breast (58g) provides 17g protein. Chicken Leg (69g) provides 18g protein. Chicken Thigh (37g) provides 9g protein. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#2: Fish (Tuna, Salmon, Halibut)
Protein in 100g3oz Fillet (85g)Protein to Calorie Ratio
26g22g1g protein per 4.5 calories
Other fish high in protein per fillet(3oz or 85g): Tuna (22g), Salmon (22g), Halibut (22g), Snapper (22g), Perch(21g), Flounder and Sole (21g), Cod (20g), Tilapia (17g). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#3: Cheese (Non-fat Mozzarella)
Protein in 100g1oz Slice (28g)Protein to Calorie Ratio
32g9g1g protein per 4.7 calories
Other cheese high in protein per ounce(28g): Low-fat Cottage Cheese (5g), Low-fat Swiss Cheese (8g), Low-fat Cheddar (6g), Parmesan (10g), Romano (9g). *Low or Non Fat Mozzarella and Cottage Cheese provide the most protein per calorie, full fat cheeses typically only provide 1g protein per 20 calories, and are less optimal sources of protein. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#4: Pork Loin (Chops)
Protein in 100g1 Chop (134g,~5oz)Protein to Calorie Ratio
25g33g1g protein per 5.2 calories
Sirloin Roast 3oz (28g) provides 23g of protein, Ham 3oz (28g) provides 18g of protein, 1 slice of bacon (8g) provides 3g of protein. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#5: Lean Beef and Veal (Low Fat)
Protein in 100g3oz Slice (85g)Protein to Calorie Ratio
36g31g1g protein per 5.3 calories
T-Bone Steak 3oz (28g) provides 19g of protein, 1 Piece of Beef Jerky (20g) provides 7g of protein. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#6: Tofu
Protein in 100g3oz Slice (85g)Protein to Calorie Ratio
7g6g1g protein per 7.4 calories
Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#7: Beans (Mature Soy Beans)
Protein in 100g1 cup (172g)Protein to Calorie Ratio
17g29g1g protein per 10.4 calories
Other beans high in protein per cup cooked: Kidney Beans (17g), White Beans (17g), Lima Beans (15g), Fava Beans (14g), Black Beans (15g), Mung Beans (14g). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#8: Eggs (Especially Egg Whites)
Protein in 100g1 Large Egg (50g)Protein to Calorie Ratio
13g6g1g protein per 12 calories
1 Egg White (33g) provides 4g protein, 1g protein to 4.4 calories.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#9: Yogurt, Milk, and Soymilk
Protein in 100g1 cup (245g)Protein to Calorie Ratio
6g14g1g protein per 18 calories
1 cup skim milk (245g) provides 8g protein, 1 cup soymilk (243g) provides 8g protein. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#10: Nuts and Seeds (Pumpkin, Squash, and Watermelon Seeds, Peanuts, Almonds)
Protein in 100g1 Ounce (28g)Protein to Calorie Ratio
33g9g1g protein per 15.8 calories
Other nuts and seeds high in protein (grams proten per ounce (28g)): Peanuts (7g), Almonds (6g), Pistachios (6g), Sunflower Seeds (6g), Flaxseed (5g), Mixed Nuts (4g). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



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The Top 10 High Protein Foods by Nutrient Density (Protein per Gram)

#1: Spirulina (Buy from Amazon.com) 58g per 100 grams4g per tablespoon (7 grams)1g protein per 5 calories Click to see complete nutrition facts for Spirulina
#2: Parmesan Cheese 42g per 100 grams2g per tablespoon (5 grams)1g protein per 11 calories Click to see complete nutrition facts for Parmesan Cheese
#3: Dry Roasted Soy Beans 40g per 100 grams68g per cup (172 grams)1g protein per 11.3 calories Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dry Roasted Soybeans
#4: Lean Veal and Beef 37g per 100 grams31g per 3 ounce serving (85 grams)1g protein per 5.5 calories Click to see complete nutrition facts for Lean Veal
#5: Lamb (Shoulder) 36g per 100 grams20g per chop (55 grams)1g protein per 7.9 calories Click to see complete nutrition facts for Lamb Shoulder
#6: Chicken and Turkey Breast 33g per 100 grams58g in a chicken breast (172 grams)1g protein per 5.6 calories Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Cod
#7: Squash and Pumpkin Seeds 33g per 100 grams9g per ounce (28 grams)1g protein per 15.8 calories Click to see complete nutrition facts for Squash and Pumpkin Seeds
#8: Non-fat Mozzarella 32g per 100 grams36g per cup shredded (113 grams)1g protein per 4.7 calories Click to see complete nutrition facts for Non-fat Mozzarella
#9: Fish (Tuna) 30g per 100 grams26g per 3 ounce serving (85 grams)1g protein per 4.6 calories Click to see complete nutrition facts for Tuna Fish
#10: Pork Loin (Chops) 30g per 100 grams23g per chop (78 grams, ~3oz)1g protein per 9.2 calories Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pork Chops

Other Protein Rich Foods (Especially for Pescatarians and Vegetarians)

Almonds21g per 100 gram serving (575 calories)30g per cup (143 grams) (822 calories)6g per ounce (28 grams) (161 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Almonds
Pistachios (Dry Roasted)21g per 100 gram serving (571 calories)26g per cup (123 grams) (702 calories)6g per ounce (28 grams) (160 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pistachios
Peanuts24g per 100 gram serving (585 calories)35g per cup (146 grams) (854 calories)7g per ounce (28 grams) (164 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Peanuts
Pine Nuts14g per 100 gram serving (673 calories)19g per cup (135 grams) (909 calories)4g per ounce (28 grams) (188 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pine Nuts
Pecans9g per 100 gram serving (691 calories)9g per cup (99 grams) (684 calories)2.6g per ounce (28 grams) (193 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pecans
Sunflower Seeds21g per 100 gram serving (584 calories)30g per cup (140 grams) (818 calories)6g per ounce (28 grams) (164 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sunflower Seeds
Cocoa Powder (Unsweetened)20g per 100 gram serving (229 calories)17g per cup (86 grams) (197 calories)1g per tablespoon (5 grams) (11 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
Flax Seeds18g per 100 gram serving (534 calories)31g per cup (168 grams) (897 calories)2g per tablespoon (10 grams) (53 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Flax Seeds
Sesame Seeds18g per 100 gram serving (573 calories)26g per cup (144 grams) (825 calories)1.6g per tablespoon (9 grams) (52 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Whole Dried Sesame Seeds
Vital Wheat Gluten75g per 100 gram serving (370 calories)63g per 3oz serving (85 grams)21g per ounce (28 grams) (104 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Vital Wheat Gluten
Tempeh (Cooked)18g per 100 gram serving (196 calories)15g per 3 ounce serving (84 grams) (165 calories)5g per ounce (28 grams) (55 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cooked Tempeh
Lentils9g per 100 gram serving (114 calories)18g per cup cooked (198 grams) (226 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cooked Lentils
Lobster26g per 100 gram serving (143 calories)43g per lobster (163 grams) (233 calories)22g per 3 ounce serving (85 grams) (122 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Lobster
Crab19g per 100 gram serving (97 calories)26g per King Crab leg (134 grams) (130 calories)16g per 3 ounce serving (85 grams) (82 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Crab
Octopus30g per 100 gram serving (164 calories)25g per 3oz serving (85 grams) (139 calories)8g per ounce (28 grams) (46 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Octopus
Fish Roe (Eggs)29g per 100 gram serving (204 calories)24g per 3oz serving (85 grams) (173 calories)8g per ounce (28 grams) (57 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fish Roe
Abalone20g per 100 gram serving (189 calories)17g per 3 ounce serving (85 grams) (161 calories)6g per ounce (28 grams) (54 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Abalone
Whey Powder13g per 100 gram serving (353 calories)19g per cup (145 grams) (512 calories)1g per tablespoon (8 grams) (28 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sweet Whey Powder
Zwieback10g per 100 gram serving (426 calories)0.7g per piece (7 grams) (30 calories)3g per ounce (28 grams) (119 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Zwieback
Yeast Extract Spread (Marmite)28g per 100 gram serving (158 calories)2g per teaspoon (6 grams) (9 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Yeast Extract Spread
Quinoa (Cooked)4.4g per 100 gram serving (120 calories)8.1g per cup cooked (185 grams) (222 calories)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cooked Quinoa
To find even more high protein foods, use the nutrient ranking tool.



Low Calorie Snacks High in Protein (50~200 Calories Each)

Serving SizeProteinCaloriesProtein(g) per Calorie
Canned Tuna1 can (165g / 6oz)42 grams191 calories1g per 4.6cal
Dry Roasted Soybeans1/4 Cup (43g)17 grams194 calories1g per 11.4cal
3 Pieces of Cheese (Parmesan)3 cubic inches (30g)11 grams117 calories1g per 10.6cal
Dry Roasted Peanuts1/4 Cup (37g)9 grams214 calories1g per 23.8cal
Almonds1/4 Cup (36g)8 grams206 calories1g per 25.8cal
Pistachios1/4 Cup (31g)7 grams176 calories1g per 25.1cal
Sunflower Seeds1/4 Cup (35g)7 grams205 calories1g per 29.3cal
Non-Fat (Skim) Milk1 cup (245g / 8oz)8 grams83 calories1g per 10.4cal
Soymilk (Unsweetened)1 cup (243g / 8oz)7 grams80 calories1g per 11.4cal
Hard Boiled Egg1 egg (50g)6 grams78 calories1g per 13cal
Toasted Whole Wheat with Yeast Extract Spread (Marmite)1 slice + 1 tsp (48g)6 grams137 calories1g per 22.8cal
Use the nutrient ranking tool to find more foods with a high protein to calorie ratio.

Protein Isolates

As obtaining too much protein may have adverse health affects, use of protein isolates should be approached with caution and is best for those looking to moderately boost their protein intake or gain weight/muscle mass. For more information on gaining weight see the article on high calorie foods.
Protein per 100 gramsCaloriesProtein(g) per Calorie
Unsweetened Dry Gelatin86 grams335 calories1g per 3.9cal
Egg White Powder82 grams376 calories1g to 4.6cal
Soy Protein Isolate81 grams338 calories1g to 4.2cal
Vital Wheat Gluten75 grams370 calories1g to 4.9cal
Spirulina (Dried Seaweed)58 grams290 calories1g to 5cal
De-fatted Peanut Flour52 grams327 calories1g to 6.3cal
Low-fat Sunflower Seed Flour48 grams326 calories1g to 6.8cal
Low-fat Soy Flour47 grams372 calories1g to 7.9cal
Non-fat Milk Powder36 grams362 calories1g to 10cal
Dried Whey13 grams353 calories1g to 27.2cal


Further Reading




Comments.
Name:Ashok
Location:India
Subject:Highest Protein Food - Spirulina
I think the highest protein food must be spirulina. 1 kilogram of spirulina is equal 100 kgs of most vegetables.
Posted on 2011-06-22 06:31:53
Name:Lesli
Location:Alaska, USA
Subject:Ashok-Highest Protein Food
Ashok, you are almost correct. There is one protein food just slightly higher in protein than spirulina, Blue Green Algae. These two protein foods are the highest in protein, per 100 grams, by weight, than any other protein food source that I have researched.
Posted on 2011-09-02 14:15:48
Name:Olivia
Subject:Thanks!
Thank You so much! I've recently decided I want to become a Pescatarian, and I'm the only one in my household who is. I'm 14 and I have to figure it all out by myself so this is so helpful!
Posted on 2011-09-07 15:54:13
Name:Anonymous
Subject:Spirulina and Blue Green Algae
Both may be the highest in protein, but not all proteins are created equally. The best forms of protein are whey concentrate, isolate and hydrolysate which are made from cow milk.
Posted on 2011-09-28 07:12:53
Name:Tbone
Location:London
Subject:Spirulina and Blue Green Algae
If you are looking for a high natural source of untouched protein then this is your option. If you want meat with its trace elements of drugs, toxins, etc then meat is your option... consider which of these aid an alkaline body or acidic body system.
Posted on 2011-11-07 04:51:02
Name:Anonymous
Location:Gold Coast
Subject:Wheat Protein Percentage
Is vital wheat gluten like Weet-Bix? The article says vital wheat gluten provides 75 grams of protein per 100 grams, so thats 75% protein? Is that correct?
Posted on 2011-11-18 05:25:24
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Wheat Protein Percentage
Yes, you are right that vital wheat gluten (aka: Seitan) is 75% protein. This is not true for Weet-Bix which is only 11% protein. Here is a side by side nutrition facts comparison for both foods.
Posted on 2011-11-21 04:00:15
Name:Rick
Subject:Protein that Builds Muscle
What high protein foods help build muscle?
Posted on 2011-12-28 16:19:19
Name:Workout Girl
Subject:100 Calorie Servings?
Great article. Thanks for the insight. The only change I would make is in how you report the calories and food weight. For most people who are calorie conscious it's better to use 100 calories as a benchmark as I am not going to blow 534 calories on pine nuts for any reason including protein. :-) Using 100 calories surely lessens the amount of protein you are listing but using grams per 100 calories is the most useful way for the health conscious.
For example:
Pecans --
1.3 grams of protein per 100 calories (14g) of pecans.
Octopus --
18.2 grams of protein per 100 calories (61g) of Octopus.
Posted on 2012-01-12 19:58:36
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: 100 Calorie Servings?
Thanks for your suggestion, a section detailing 100 calorie meals for protein will be created soon.
Posted on 2012-01-12 19:58:36
Name:Anonymous
Location:USA
Subject:RE: Spirulina
Spirulina is Blue Green Algae!! @ Lesli Not sure why you consider the two to be different.
Posted on 2012-01-30 12:58:06
Name:Andreas
Location:Germany
Subject:Whey Protein
Great article about Protein. Whey Protein is another great source to supplement protein. I highly can recommend whey protein. It helps to fuel your demands and needs of amino acids!
Posted on 2012-02-01 05:37:03
Name:Yogi
Location:Canada
Subject:re: Alkaline Body
TBONE I have been searching for some credible evidence to suggest that having a more alkaline body will result in great health benifits. I am wondering where you find your research.
Posted on 2012-02-05 00:15:22
Name:Jane
Location:St Paul
Subject:Plant proteins are incomplete
Maybe I missed it, but it did not mention that most plant proteins are incomplete. If you are attempting to fill your protein needs using just plants, please research combining proteins. Rice and beans are a classic combination.
Posted on 2012-02-08 15:19:32
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Plant proteins are incomplete
Thanks for the suggestion, information about obtaining complete sources of protein with all the essential amino acids will be incorporated into the article.
Posted on 2012-02-09 06:03:15
Name:Anonymous
Subject:Protein and amino-acid content
Spirulina contains about 60% (51–71%) protein. It is a complete protein containing all essential amino acids, though with reduced amounts of methionine, cysteine and lysine when compared to the proteins of meat, eggs, and milk. It is, however, superior to typical plant protein, such as that from legumes. Overall, while spirulina is often marketed as an excellent source of protein, it is no better in this regard than milk or meat (in that they are all complete proteins), and is approximately 30 times more expensive per gram of protein. (Sourced from Wikipedia)
Posted on 2012-03-11 18:55:30
Name:Mujtaba
Location:India
Subject:Bananas and milk
Guys does a banana milk shake provide high protien? I'm a beginner in gym and don't wonna get with supplements as they have many harmful effects. Please help.
Posted on 2012-03-13 02:08:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Bananas and milk
Hi Mujtaba, thanks for your question. Bananas have very little protein but are a good source of complex carbohydrates, and are good to eat after a work out. Milk is a fairly good source of protein, try also to eat nuts, seeds, lentils, beans, and eggs. If you are not vegetarian, then fish can also be a great source of protein.
Posted on 2012-03-13 02:13:10
Name:Spencer
Location:USA
Subject:RE: Bananas and milk
My smoothies consist of apple juice or pineapple juice and lots of organic fruits (berries, mango, bananas, peaches) and I also add some carrots, kale, and protein powder. If your like me you don't like eggs and other stuff like that in your smoothly, and just use protein powder to get some protein in my body. You just have to make sure there are minimal to no artificial flavored or sweeteners. I personally use whey protein powder.
Posted on 2012-03-14 14:07:33
Name:Merrie
Location:Jamaica WI
Subject:Protein Food Source
The material on protein was greatly welcomed, because I wanted to know what food, what calories, and what gram each one has.
Posted on 2012-03-19 18:05:01
Name:Axeteve
Location:India
Subject:Essential 9 amino acids
It'll be great if the same type of list is compiled for "essential 9 amino acids" with relative % of DV mentioned in brackets () will make it very useful.
Posted on 2012-04-15 13:55:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Essential 9 amino acids
Hi Axeteve, thanks for the suggestion. A list of amino acids is being created. However, please note that there is not set DV for any of the amino acids and trying to determine a daily requirement has proved challenging to government advisory boards. The amino acids are essential though, as are complete sources of protein. Thanks again for your suggestion.
Posted on 2012-04-15 13:55:18
Name:Fred Schulz
Location:Sydney - Australia
Subject:Protein foods for gout
My Doctor has told me to stay away from high protein foods, any suggestions as to what foods containing proteins that I can eat, so I can control my severe gout attacks. Thanks, Fred
Posted on 2012-04-19 19:14:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Protein foods for gout
Hi Fred, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your condition. Both this study and this study on protein foods and gout conclude that protein from meat and seafood increases uric acid levels and risk of gout. Protein from dairy sources correlated with lower uric acid levels and decreased risk of gout. Protein from plant foods appeared to have no affect. So you are recommended to stay away from meat and seafood and focus instead on dairy (low-fat milk, low-fat yogurt) and also vegetable sources of protein like nuts and seeds, tofu, but not legumes.

The National Library of Medicine article on Gout also suggests you avoid alcohol, anchovies, sardines, oils, herring, organ meat (liver, kidney, and sweetbreads), legumes (dried beans and peas), gravies, mushrooms, spinach, asparagus, cauliflower, consommé, and baking or brewer's yeast. (Avoid Marmite or Vegemite also). It also suggests you avoid fatty foods such as salad dressings, ice cream, and fried foods.

Given all that, the NLM also cautions you do not loose weight to fast! Eat healthy carbs, like Brown Rice, to keep the pounds on! Quinoa is a great grain to try that has all the essential amino acids your body needs.

Posted on 2012-04-19 22:39:44
Name:Keith
Location:Virginia
Subject:Fermented vegetables help gout
How come the answer to gout is a long list of what not to eat? It is the "rich man's disease" because they won't eat "poor people's food". Fermented vegetables (lactic acid fermentation) has the pro biotic ability to digest the protein so you won't get gout. The side effect is it breaks down calcium so you won't get bone spurs or kidney stones. Throw out the processed foods and eat "live" cultured foods like humans have since the beginning of humanity.
Posted on 2012-04-20 19:14:52
Name:Ronald Muzambi
Location:Zimbabwe, Harare
Subject:Protein for Building Muscle
I'm doing body building as a sport and I would like to know the best foods for muscle growth without teking any supplements. Thank You.
Posted on 2012-05-06 01:30:33
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Protein for Building Muscle
Hi Ronald, thanks for your suggestion, a section or article answering this question will be created. For now, focus on getting a lot of high quality protein (all the essential amino acids). This includes meats and a variety of plant proteins like beans and nuts. Drink plently of water to help your muscles rebuild and recover, working out properly and giving your muscles time to rest is as important as what you eat.
Posted on 2012-05-06 01:40:22
Name:Mr. D
Location:Canada
Subject:Blue Green Algae
Question...isn't Blue Green Algae the high bacteria plant that grows in low ponds and still waters? That stuff will make you sick won't it? Even if you boil it or however you prep it?
Posted on 2012-05-18 08:34:39
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Blue Green Algae
Hi, thanks for your question. You are right, not all types of blue green algae are edible. Like mushrooms, some are edible, and some are not, and you need to know what you are doing before you harvest any from your backyard. Basically, it is suggested that you buy and consume Spirulina, a form of blue green algae that is safe to eat and nutritious.
Posted on 2012-05-18 08:34:39
Name:Lili
Location:Japan
Subject:Protein at Breakfast
I eat 30 gr of protein for breakfast like this: 200 gr of yogurt (14 gr of P) 10 gr of walnuts(1.5 gr) 100 gr of ham (15 gr)
Posted on 2012-07-01 05:03:36
Name:Teresa
Location:Festus, MO
Subject:Metabolism
I recently lost 76 lbs by walking, jogging, and using my stationary bike. I recently added hiking in my local State Park to my regiment just to mix it up a little. I do about eight miles, at least three times a week. In doing so my metabolism is through the roof now. I can't stay full! It seems my food burns right through me in an hour. I hate this feeling of being hungry all the time. Can you suggest some foods or practices than can help me out.
Posted on 2012-08-15 08:16:36
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Metabolism
Hi Teresa, thanks for your question and congratulations on your weight loss. For people in your position eating frequently is a good idea. Try to eat something with a lot of energy every 2 hours throughout the day. Even when you are exercising. Typical atheletes may turn to energy bars, but you could also try more natural foods like nuts, seeds, and dried fruits. All are very nutrient dense and will give you energy. To feel full you want to eat fat and fiber. This can mean nut butters or dark chocolate for fats, and things like fruit smoothies for fiber. Try those foods throughout the day and see if it helps. Good luck.
Posted on 2012-08-15 08:16:36
Name:Matt
Location:Tampa, Fl
Subject:Protein Assimilation
One thing that is extremely important that I don't see in this blog/article is protein assmilation. Eating whole cooked eggs has a protein assimlation of 98%. Cooked eggs are the number one source of protein in the world, by far, and all other protein sources are compared to them. Milk is next best protein being absorbed at 60%, then meats like fish and chicken are 40% and vegetable proteins are 15% at best. What all this means is for example, you would have to eat 3 large chicken breasts to absorb the same amount of protein you can get from just 5-6 cooked eggs. Assimilation is SOOO important. I have been training and dieting for 20 years and I have got by best results from sticking with eggs, milk chicken and fish. Eggs being my main protein source b/c of the highest assimilation values they have. Dont worry about the cholesterol or fat in the eggs. It is good and healthy and will actually boost your good cholesterol levels. As a side note, stay away from whey or powdered proteins. They do have high assimilation values but its a powder. lol Your body has to do very little to digest it. They are a waste of money. Stick with real food. The only time powdered proteins would be acceptable would be immediately after a workout, but again, real food puts powdered protein in the dirt. I used to be into the whey protein hype, but after extensive testing and trials i have put my body through, I have got quadruple the results by staying away from those "powdered" proteins and relying on FOOD, hard-boiled eggs being by far the best source.
Posted on 2012-08-21 01:29:00
Name:Rosie
Location:Melbourne, Aust.
Subject:Protein Assimilation
My 15 yr old son has been asking me to buy him some protein powder but after reading Matt's comments I think we'll stick with real food...(and always only Free Range Eggs).
Posted on 2012-08-27 09:58:41
Name:Abhinav
Location:India
Subject:Protein Assimilation
Thanks @Matt for the insights. Could you also elaborate as to what exactly does protein assimilation mean and how does this contribute to muscle building?
Posted on 2012-09-04 07:13:09
Name:Shaun
Location:Tasmania, Australia
Subject:Assimilation
Gday Matt, Like your article mate..When you are in training what would be a days intake of protein consist of? I started weight training about 18 months ago and I haven't really had a real crack at eating properly to get the most out of training and want to eat the propper foods and not the powders...so just wondering if anyone could help me out?
Posted on 2012-09-06 12:12:14
Name:Angela
Location:Australia
Subject:Food intolerances
My daughter struggles with protein intake as she has intolerance to dairy, nuts, eggs, lentils, and beans. Although she seems to be able to cope with very bland foods, and chickpeas, and rice. She eats a lot of bread as this does not upset her, however she is always hungry as a result.
Posted on 2012-09-08 22:52:58
Name:Beth
Location:Melbourne, Australia
Subject:Protein in Soup?
I love Matt's interesting information about protein assimilation, but am not sure what it really means. Is there anyone out there who knows if there is any protein in chicken soup made with chicken bones and vegetables?
Posted on 2012-09-15 11:47:58
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Protein in Soup?
Hi Beth, thanks for your question. Protein assimilation can be defined as the "apparent digestibility and absorption" of protein. While eggs work well for Matt, there is no rule that eggs will work well for everyone. You may have to experiment to find which protein source works well for you. You can measure your success by building muscle mass, or whatever your goals are. As for your other question, boiled chicken bones, or chicken broth, provides 3.3 grams of protein in an 8oz cup of liquid broth. That is 1.4 grams of protein per 100 grams of soup broth. Vegetable broth provides very little protein, less than 0.1grams per 100 grams. Nutrition facts for chicken and vegetable broth.
Posted on 2012-09-15 11:47:58
Name:Maggie
Location:California
Subject:Pregnancy and protein
Thank you for the article and the information you provided. I'm half way through my pregnancy. I was a vegetarian prior to being pregnant and now I have added fish and some chicken to my diet. Although I eat every 2 hours, I am finding that I'm not gaining much weight, hence about 4 pounds lighter than needed at this point. Any suggestions for pregnant women and protein sources?
Posted on 2012-09-19 12:08:55
Name:Insert Happy Face
Location:Los Angeles, CA
Subject:RE: Pregnancy and protein
Hey Maggie, I don't know about you but for me I ate tons of peanut butter. Even now to this day I keep a personal jar in my night stand with a spoon in it. Once I get nibbling before I know it I have eaten about 5 spoons of it. At 7 grams per spoon a few peanut butter snack breaks a day go a long way. I never worried about the fatty oils of it or the sugar content but fat free or low sodium varieties must be out there if you are concerned with such. All in all peanut butter has been my "go to" source of protein for some time now. G'luck n congrats on the baby. -Shelly
Posted on 2012-09-30 09:03:06
Name:Maggie
Location:California
Subject:RE: Pregnancy Protein
Thanks Shelly, I think its a good idea to add nut butters to my diet.
Posted on 2012-10-01 00:22:45
Name:Neal
Location:Asia
Subject:Muscle building and protein
I am a veg (meat and egg products) but I eat dairy products. I weigh about 64Kgs with height 5'9". My age is 23 now. Recently, I joined aa Fitness center to develop muscle as I look pretty slim. My trainer suggested I take heavy protein products and I am stuck, as iI am a veg as mentioned before. How would you suggest me to manage my diet?
Posted on 2012-10-04 11:17:52
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Muscle building and protein
Hi Neal, thanks for your question. First, a lot of protein products are suitable for vegetarians. Whey power, spirulina, soy protein isolate, and vital wheat gluten are all vegetarian, even vegan. If you don't want to take protein powders and commercial products, you can also get plenty of protein from natural foods like nuts, soy products (tofu), dairy, beans and rice, and so on. Also, check out the article on high calorie foods for more ideas on what to eat to gain weight.
Posted on 2012-10-04 18:56:40
Name:Adnan
Location:Kerala, India
Subject:Muscle & Gym
Below is a usual diet for gym goers of kerala...egg(raw or boiled...hen or duck)+ broiler chicken + nuts(peanut,..) + tapioca + some beans + wheat foods... all other protein rich foods are....too costly here(spirulina....etc)..healthaliciousness please give me a comment on this...is that good?
Posted on 2012-11-19 23:15:27
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Muscle & Gym
Hi Adnan, that sounds like a great high protein diet. Have you also considered bean sprouts, like mung bean sprouts? They are also very high in protein for the amount of calories. This article will soon have a section for cheap sources of high protein. So please check back in a couple weeks.
Posted on 2012-11-20 01:24:18
Name:Verna
Location:long island, NY
Subject:How to buy and prepare spirulina
How do you prepare spirulina to eat it and what does it taste like? Do you have to cook it? Lastly, where can I buy it?
Posted on 2013-01-05 11:56:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How to buy and prepare spirulina
Hi Verna, thanks for your question. Spirulina is really more a type of supplement, sold as a pill or powder. The pills can be swallowed whole of course, and the powder can be used in shakes, smoothies, vegetable juice, etc...There are various creative recipes out on the internet. You can buy Spirulina on Amazon.com or at your local health food store.
Posted on 2013-01-07 20:22:13
Name:Alexander
Location:UK
Subject:Misleading protein info
Honestly the information here is biased and somewhat misleading. Did you know: "Broccoli has 8.9 grams of protein per 100 calories? In opposition to that which people tend to argue: "but's it's not a complete protein"- Well that's why nature designed the body to pool amino acids together like a fuel tank- as long as you eat a varied diet of more than one food it makes no difference whether that food was a complete protein as food because as soon as it enters your body it is broken down into amino acids and pooled with the others for future use. That is natures design for us not having to eat 'complete proteins': which incidentally a) can be found in plant products, and b) in the form of animal proteins are very damaging to the human digestive system. It's hard to suffer protein deficiency if you're eating sufficient calories: You all need to worry about what's in your food besides this one macro nutrient!
Posted on 2013-01-14 17:36:29
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Misleading protein info
Hi Alexander, thanks for your comment. Perhaps you mean the protein info is misleading because it does not highlight enough vegetarian foods. While it is true that cooked broccoli provides 3.1 grams of protein per 100 grams, it means you have to eat about 2 cups cooked to get 100 calories, and also to get around 12 grams of protein. The protein to calorie ratio is 1 to 9, while the protein to calorie ratio of soybeans is 1 to 10, however, eating 1 cup of soybeans gets you 29 grams of protein, compared to the 6 you get from eating a cup of broccoli. This is why the list is the way it is. However, your point is valid, and in addition to the article on high protein vegetables still out there, a section will be made here to highlight vegetables which are good sources of protein. Till then, feel free to use the protein to calorie ratio ranking of all 8171 foods in the database. Or filter it for just vegetables. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-01-15 10:34:32
Name:George H
Location:Chicago
Subject:Whey, Omega-6
Is Dried Whey and Whey Powder people talked about here the same as other people refer to as "Whey Protein" in other places? It seems some commercial Whey protein Isolates products have a much higher protein content than 13% listed in the last table under "Dried Whey".

A separate question. Some people are concerned with the excessive Omega-6 content when people consume a lot of the common "healthy " foods, e.g. nuts, even eggs. What's your opinion?

Posted on 2013-01-16 15:22:56
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:Whey, Omega-6
Hi George, thanks for your questions. You are right, commercial whey protein powders vary considerably in their protein content. Certain products consist of 80% protein gram per gram. You have to check the nutrition facts of each product to be sure. The facts listed on this site are for "natural" whey powder.

In regards to your question about Omega 6 to Omega 3 ratios, some studies suggest you get this ratio as close to 1 as possible to reduce risk of a lot of pathologies ranging from cardiovascular disease to arthritis. Most Americans currently eat at a ratio of 16 omega6s to 1 omega3. While more studies on this need to be done, an article will be created on this site for foods with good omega 6 to omega 3 ratios.

Posted on 2013-01-16 16:45:10
Name:George H
Location:Chicago
Subject:How do we absorb nutrients and energy?
Thanks for your quick response. Good post. The comparison tool is awesome. Even with the knowledge of Omega-3 and Omega-6 content, I think it is a challenge to the vast majority of the people to get to a diet that is remotely close ideal in terms of this measure.

I've got a couple of more questions, if you don't mind.

The first one is quite simple. Someone mentioned assimilation rate. It seems the same as "biological value" for proteins. I don't know if this is at times plainly referred to as "food absorption rate". It seems an important measure as, if we can't absorb the content, the nutrient content in the food is not as relevant. Is there research in this measure?

That leads to another more complicated question. We have food nutrient and energy measurements (calorie, protein, carb, fat and other). We also know there are foods with negative calorie (the ones I know are some celery and cucumber) that require more calories from the body to digest than the energy the body can get from them. There is also calorie difference between raw food (which seems to be the source of how calorie counts are measured) and the cooked food (the way we eat). So both nutrients and energy (calorie) absorption measurements seem to be totally complicated and confusing. Is what we read from FDA and the industry what our body gets?

Posted on 2013-01-17 14:29:34
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How do we absorb nutrients and energy?
Hi George, thanks for some great questions, they are complicated and the answer is basically we have to go with what we know now. There is actually debate over what protein sources are best and which is best absorbed, plus which is most complete in terms of amino acids. Further, there is debate about which amino acids are best. To complicate matters even more, the amount of protein you absorb probably also depends on your own genetics, metabolism, and state of your body. We don't need to fear though, because the generalities can guide us. Yes, it is wrong to take an exact number like "23 grams of protein" very seriously. What is true is that the food will certainly have aroud 23g of protein, and will likely provide much more protein than a food with 5 grams. This is the best way to think of nutrition facts and calories which come from the government. They serve as a general guideline for what to eat. They are general till we can get the technology and basic science to move forward and make better decisions on what to eat. In the future perhaps every person will have their own optimal diet, tailored for their own metabolism. The U.S. government also devised the Percent Daily Value (%DV) to help guide people in their food choices. This basic metric incorporates absorption of nutrients to some extent. The short answer is that the numbers and analysis we have serve primarily as a comparative guide on what to eat, and should not be taken exactly. For more see the article on pitfalls and problems with food nutrient rankings.
Posted on 2013-01-17 18:27:30
Name:Maria
Location:Australia
Subject:High protein diet portions
When a diet high in protein says 100g serve of protein, does that mean you work out the serve by reading the food label? e.g peanuts - 24g protein/100g serving means that in order to get a 100g serve of protein you need approx 400g peanuts?
Posted on 2013-01-23 08:42:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: High protein diet portions
Hi Maria, thanks for your question. Your calculation is right, you would need 400g of peanuts to get 96g (~100g) of protein. However, note that 400 grams of peanuts also provides 2340 calories, which is most of all the calories you need in a day. As is, the recommended daily intake of protein for women aged 19-70 is 46 grams. Be careful not too eat too much protein. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-01-23 13:09:40
Name:Barbara
Location:Australia
Subject:L-arginine and Wound Healing
My Husband suffered from a large Ulcerated wound on his leg, it has been treated and has reduced in size, but right now it is stagnating. We have been advised to use a Protein Drink that contains L-arginine (Amino Acids, I am led to believe), but as a pensioner, this drink product is rather expensive...what foods would he have to eat to get enough protein to heal the remainder of the wound? Everything is very confusing.
Posted on 2013-02-05 23:43:58
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: L-arginine and Wound Healing
Hi Barbara, thanks for your question. L-arginine does help with wound healing, some people even apply it topically as a cream. This website does not list foods high in amino acids yet, you can refer to this site which ranks foods by arginine content. The list is not curated so you will have to work through it. Spinach, turkey, and tuna may be the best sources. Not sure what your budget is, but you can buy L-arginine supplements from Amazon, 250 pills goes for about $12.50. This would last about a 2 months. There are also a wide variety of creams if you want to try them...
Posted on 2013-02-06 15:10:58
Name:Mary
Location:Mississauga
Subject:Protein for weight loss
Your chart indicates 1 50 gr egg is 14 gr of protein. The egg carton in my fridge states a 53 gr egg has 6 gr of protein. Your numbers are more than double. Confusing. How much protein per day is recommended for weight loss?
Posted on 2013-02-06 16:11:56
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Protein for weight loss
Hi Mary, thanks for pointing out that error, 6g is the correct amount of protein for one 50g egg. As for your second question, the amount of protein you should eat depends on if you are building muscle via exercise. Even running/swimming/ and bicycling build muscle. That said, eating more than a "normal" amount of protein is not really going to help you lose weight, and you are best off avoiding high calorie foods.
Posted on 2013-02-06 20:06:12
Name:Sandra
Location:Ontario, Canada
Subject:Protein Snacks for Weight Loss
I drive a big truck between Canada and USA and so my activity level is limited, but I want to loose some weight and have been told that high protein is the best way to go. I am a 'grazer' and like to nibble throughout the day as I drive, what would you suggest I can take back and forth across the border, as food regulations are strict. Stopping to find a grocery store along the way is not a very good option.
Posted on 2013-02-09 17:21:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Protein Snacks for Weight Loss
Hi Sandra, thanks for your question. It sounds like snacking on fresh fruits and vegetables might be a problem due to border customs. Not sure if high protein snacks are the best for weight loss, unless you are also doing some strength building exercises. Trying to lift weights, do situps, etc...before you drive, combined with protein snacks might work as your body would burn energy rebuilding muscle while you drive. Besides the low calorie high protein snacks listed on this page, you could try a low carbohydrate jerky. This turkey jerky is low in carbs and high in protein. This beef jerky also has no sugar whatsoever. Besides those two options, you could also try dry roasted soybeans. Hope that helps, and good luck!
Posted on 2013-02-09 18:26:51
Name:Ashlee
Location:South Dakota
Subject:Breast feeding and protein
I am looking to increase my milk supply and was told to up my protein. Can anyone recommend any specific foods that work best?
Posted on 2013-02-15 17:29:21
Name:Jason
Location:London
Subject:RDI and excercise: How much protein do you need?
Thanks for a lot of great information. Is the protein RDI based on assuming a certain level of activity? If I up my amount of exercise, and build muscle in the process, don't I need to increase taking in protein to support this? If so is there a formula for how to gradually increase protein intake? Thanks, Jason.
Posted on 2013-03-21 09:36:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: RDI and excercise: How much protein do you need?
Hi Jason, thanks for your question. You are right to assume that the RDI is just a general best estimate. It is in no way a hard and fast number. The amount of protein you need can depend on your height, weight, level of exercise, and genetics, among other things. The amount of protein you need every day is a matter of debate, and we are not sure how the body exactly metabolizes and uses protein. There are likely many formulas out there for knowing exactly how much protein you need, however, that would go into sport science, or body building, which is not in the scope of this web page. Sorry to not provide more information, but hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-03-21 13:17:05
Name:JayM
Location:USA
Subject:Most Get Too Much Protein
Most people get too much protein. Excess protein (esp animal derived) is a significant factor in promoting common health problems (heart disease, cancer, diabetes). Excess protein reduces longevity.
Posted on 2013-06-01 18:57:39
Name:OldNick
Location:Australia
Subject:Protein count for lentils
I read and read again that lentils are 20-25gm/100gm, not 9gm/100gm. This is the first claim of 9 vs 20 that I have seen. What's the truth? Id this a meat - based site? Is it? hmmm.
Posted on 2013-07-09 08:15:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Protein count for lentils
Hi OldNick, thanks for your question. The 25grams/100grams refers to the protein content of raw lentils. Cooked lentils provide 9 grams per 100 grams. Here is the nutrition facts comparison.
Posted on 2013-07-09 09:46:27
Name:Maliha
Subject:Pescetarian
Hey thanks for the article. I'm a pescetarian, though I do not eat much fish because there a few I do not like, such as tuna. I just realized how less protein, if any, because all of the items above I do not consume. But I shall make an effort to at least include a few in my diet! Thanks :)
Posted on 2013-07-28 09:10:41
Name:Sami
Location:Porto
Subject:Protein Hype

Protein is in all foods except sugars, alcohols (though even beer has some), and pure fats such as oils.

When has anyone seen someone suffering from protein deficiency? Anyone who has it is suffering from a lack of food, not protein. For instance, food disorders (bulemia, anorexia), alcoholism, and starvation (as in Haiti, Sudan, Etheopia).

Food combining and so-called, "complete" proteins is a myth that came out in a book in the 70s by a sociologist who has since recanted her theory but for which some strange reason is now being taught even in medical school based on absolutely nothing (which makes one wonder just how competent so-called "mainstream" doctors are but even at best they get mere hours of nutritional training so are not the experts by any means).

All one has to do is eat enough to meet the caloric needs and s/he will meet the protein needs even if eating just one plant-based food such as potatoes (the Irish did it for years when the Brits took all but the spuds). Check out Doctor McDougal (who has studied nutrition extensively) who explains it and has very comprehensive charts.

As for body building, check out Vegan Bodybuilding. There's even a raw vegan champion.

For those trying to build muscle mass, working out creates a need for more calories, therefore a higher food intake which naturally comes with a higher protein intake. No need for "special" protein.

And whey protein is a waste product of cheese-making that has been successfully marketed so people will pay huge prices to take it away rather than having to pay people to dump it on their fields as a poor fertilizer (fields can only take so much).

Powders are reductionist foods. Whole foods that have nutrients in synergy are the way to go. Focus on protein will lead to deficiencies in other nutrients as people fill up on an empty macro-nutrient to the detriment of the micro-nutrients that are so essential. Not to mention that most powders are likely to have GE/GMO contamination (whey especially as not only are the animals fed GE/GMO feed, but there is also the hormone rBST/rGBH to worry about).

Animal sourced protein though (including dairy) is acidic which pulls calcium from the bones to balance the blood (which really is essential). Protein is not stored, nor converted into energy. Excess is processed through the body which is hard on the kidneys.

Further animal proteins are difficult to break-down which throws much energy just into digestion.

The best thing for gout, and several other conditions is a raw vegan diet. Most people will find huge relief within a week. It also relieves cravings which so many suffer from because the nutrition they have been taking in is so deficient.

If someone is hungry on a good diet, then eat more. Nut & Date bars are a great and simple treat. Avocados added to salads, or just with a touch of salt (and garlic, cumin, etc) are also wonderful.

And of course simple smoothies, mostly green with some fruit (but no powders! or dairy!) are great. Make a big one in the morning, drink some during the day as a healthy, filling snack.

Greens (which are missing from the charts on this site) are great for protein as well as many other fabulous nutrients.

Posted on 2013-08-13 15:47:55
Name:Jimbo
Location:Australia
Subject:My protein intake as a body builder
To cover a protein daily intake for a body builder you need: breakfast 5 boiled eggs, mid meal 200g skinless chicken breast, afternoon meal 200g beef steak, dinner 400g tin of tuna. This will give you the required protein intake daily of 257g which is all a body builder needs. No need for whey powder from the chemical shop.
Posted on 2013-08-19 22:25:14
Name:Rineans06
Location:Maryland,USA
Subject:I'm allergic to dairy products(included whey powder),nuts, tree nuts and cocoa
I'm currently on my 8th week workout/training, and I lost more than 12lbs already and wanted to build up some muscles in my body and to stay on my weight, so I stopped consuming dairy products, including nuts and etc..since last week, so when I found that the cause of my acne and pimples are from consuming dairy products(everything that has milk content/ingredients), even soy and cocoa are actually triggered my acne and pimples and makes it worse and I can see how it affects my body and my lovely face. So what can you advise? Since I'm vegan/vegetarian for the last 3 months, I normally eat organic foods only, no more processed foods and high cholesterol food. Please me help out with my problem, I need some alternative way of eating high protein foods that I'm not allergic to it. I need this to build my muscles and to stay healthy. Thank for your response.
Posted on 2013-10-03 20:30:38
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: I'm allergic to dairy products(included whey powder),nuts, tree nuts and cocoa
Hi Rineans06, thanks for sharing your experience, and your question. Given your allergies, you are best getting your protein from legumes (beans) and whole grains. Some vegetables can also be a good source of protein. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-04 04:53:48
Name:Anon
Location:Canada
Subject:Hemp hearts
Why aren't hemp hearts (shelled hemp seeds) on the list? They contain around 40% protein, making them one of the highest protein foods.
Posted on 2013-10-15 06:43:26
Name:Sam
Location:Canada
Subject:Whey in Cheese Curds
Communities near Cheese Factories often have affordable cheese curds for sale. This is simply cheese without all of the whey squeezed out of it (and obviously not aged). A great way to increase whey protein without taking in chemical additives. Also a tasty and affordable alternative to cheese but be careful cooking with it as the moisture will make it burn a little easier. That moisture makes it a great after workout snack to aid in rehydration as well.
Posted on 2013-11-11 04:30:20
Name:Ben
Location:Nottingham
Subject:Only non-fat mozzarella is high in protein and most cheese should be ranked lower
Cottage cheese doesn't give 33g protein per 100g, neither does any regular cheese for that matter. It's far closer to a third of this figure.
Posted on 2014-01-02 14:21:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Only non-fat mozzarella is high in protein and most cheese should be ranked lower
Hi Ben, thanks for bringing up this point. This ranking was made in terms of grams of protein per calorie. As states non-fat mozzarella provides 1g per 4.7 calories. Non-fat cottage cheese provides 1g to 7 calories, which would move cheese down to the number 5 spot on the list. The complete nutrition facts are here. However, your point that most cheeses are lower in protein is wise, when you add fat back into cheese the protein to calorie ratios change and a note will be added to inform readers.
Posted on 2014-01-03 10:48:19
Name:Laura Blank
Location:California
Subject:Rabbit
I've been told and it's listed on the USDA website that rabbit meat is higher in protein and lower in fat than chicken and turkey. Why hasn't this been listed?
Posted on 2014-01-19 05:20:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Rabbit
Hi Laura, thanks for your question. You are right that rabbit is a good source of protein, however, turkey breast does have a higher protein to calorie ratio and less fat/protein. Here is the comparison.

Further, rabbit is not listed because it is not commonly consumed or available. The USDA database also has antelope, and turtle, both of which are high in protein for the calories.

Down the road a new section/article for game meat high in protein can be created. Thanks again for your comment and suggestion, and I hope all that makes sense.

Posted on 2014-01-20 15:09:27
Name:Dawn Graves
Location:Gambrills, MD
Subject:Too much protein is dangerous
I just read Dr. T. Campbell's book The China Study published in 2006. He is a credible scientific researcher who's worked for Cornell, MT and other similarly prestigious universities. His last 25 years of research has proven a link between eating too much protein per day (@46 g for women and 56g for men) to major health risks like cancer and cardiovascular disease as well as many others none of us ever want to experience. He found animal sourced protein, especially dairy, to promote cancer. It shocked me, because I've been an avid consumer of dairy and leanmeat, because I'm an athlete. I'm going dairy free, and I'll be getting my protein from plant sources from now on. You just have to eat a wide range of veggies, and you'll get all the necessary amino acids you need. Anyway, for those new to bodybuilding, read this book before you start living on whey shakes.
Posted on 2014-02-27 19:27:44

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Comments.
Name:Ashok
Location:India
Subject:Highest Protein Food - Spirulina
I think the highest protein food must be spirulina. 1 kilogram of spirulina is equal 100 kgs of most vegetables.
Posted on 2011-06-22 06:31:53
Name:Lesli
Location:Alaska, USA
Subject:Ashok-Highest Protein Food
Ashok, you are almost correct. There is one protein food just slightly higher in protein than spirulina, Blue Green Algae. These two protein foods are the highest in protein, per 100 grams, by weight, than any other protein food source that I have researched.
Posted on 2011-09-02 14:15:48
Name:Olivia
Subject:Thanks!
Thank You so much! I've recently decided I want to become a Pescatarian, and I'm the only one in my household who is. I'm 14 and I have to figure it all out by myself so this is so helpful!
Posted on 2011-09-07 15:54:13
Name:Anonymous
Subject:Spirulina and Blue Green Algae
Both may be the highest in protein, but not all proteins are created equally. The best forms of protein are whey concentrate, isolate and hydrolysate which are made from cow milk.
Posted on 2011-09-28 07:12:53
Name:Tbone
Location:London
Subject:Spirulina and Blue Green Algae
If you are looking for a high natural source of untouched protein then this is your option. If you want meat with its trace elements of drugs, toxins, etc then meat is your option... consider which of these aid an alkaline body or acidic body system.
Posted on 2011-11-07 04:51:02
Name:Anonymous
Location:Gold Coast
Subject:Wheat Protein Percentage
Is vital wheat gluten like Weet-Bix? The article says vital wheat gluten provides 75 grams of protein per 100 grams, so thats 75% protein? Is that correct?
Posted on 2011-11-18 05:25:24
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Wheat Protein Percentage
Yes, you are right that vital wheat gluten (aka: Seitan) is 75% protein. This is not true for Weet-Bix which is only 11% protein. Here is a side by side nutrition facts comparison for both foods.
Posted on 2011-11-21 04:00:15
Name:Rick
Subject:Protein that Builds Muscle
What high protein foods help build muscle?
Posted on 2011-12-28 16:19:19
Name:Workout Girl
Subject:100 Calorie Servings?
Great article. Thanks for the insight. The only change I would make is in how you report the calories and food weight. For most people who are calorie conscious it's better to use 100 calories as a benchmark as I am not going to blow 534 calories on pine nuts for any reason including protein. :-) Using 100 calories surely lessens the amount of protein you are listing but using grams per 100 calories is the most useful way for the health conscious.
For example:
Pecans --
1.3 grams of protein per 100 calories (14g) of pecans.
Octopus --
18.2 grams of protein per 100 calories (61g) of Octopus.
Posted on 2012-01-12 19:58:36
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: 100 Calorie Servings?
Thanks for your suggestion, a section detailing 100 calorie meals for protein will be created soon.
Posted on 2012-01-12 19:58:36
Name:Anonymous
Location:USA
Subject:RE: Spirulina
Spirulina is Blue Green Algae!! @ Lesli Not sure why you consider the two to be different.
Posted on 2012-01-30 12:58:06
Name:Andreas
Location:Germany
Subject:Whey Protein
Great article about Protein. Whey Protein is another great source to supplement protein. I highly can recommend whey protein. It helps to fuel your demands and needs of amino acids!
Posted on 2012-02-01 05:37:03
Name:Yogi
Location:Canada
Subject:re: Alkaline Body
TBONE I have been searching for some credible evidence to suggest that having a more alkaline body will result in great health benifits. I am wondering where you find your research.
Posted on 2012-02-05 00:15:22
Name:Jane
Location:St Paul
Subject:Plant proteins are incomplete
Maybe I missed it, but it did not mention that most plant proteins are incomplete. If you are attempting to fill your protein needs using just plants, please research combining proteins. Rice and beans are a classic combination.
Posted on 2012-02-08 15:19:32
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Plant proteins are incomplete
Thanks for the suggestion, information about obtaining complete sources of protein with all the essential amino acids will be incorporated into the article.
Posted on 2012-02-09 06:03:15
Name:Anonymous
Subject:Protein and amino-acid content
Spirulina contains about 60% (51–71%) protein. It is a complete protein containing all essential amino acids, though with reduced amounts of methionine, cysteine and lysine when compared to the proteins of meat, eggs, and milk. It is, however, superior to typical plant protein, such as that from legumes. Overall, while spirulina is often marketed as an excellent source of protein, it is no better in this regard than milk or meat (in that they are all complete proteins), and is approximately 30 times more expensive per gram of protein. (Sourced from Wikipedia)
Posted on 2012-03-11 18:55:30
Name:Mujtaba
Location:India
Subject:Bananas and milk
Guys does a banana milk shake provide high protien? I'm a beginner in gym and don't wonna get with supplements as they have many harmful effects. Please help.
Posted on 2012-03-13 02:08:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Bananas and milk
Hi Mujtaba, thanks for your question. Bananas have very little protein but are a good source of complex carbohydrates, and are good to eat after a work out. Milk is a fairly good source of protein, try also to eat nuts, seeds, lentils, beans, and eggs. If you are not vegetarian, then fish can also be a great source of protein.
Posted on 2012-03-13 02:13:10
Name:Spencer
Location:USA
Subject:RE: Bananas and milk
My smoothies consist of apple juice or pineapple juice and lots of organic fruits (berries, mango, bananas, peaches) and I also add some carrots, kale, and protein powder. If your like me you don't like eggs and other stuff like that in your smoothly, and just use protein powder to get some protein in my body. You just have to make sure there are minimal to no artificial flavored or sweeteners. I personally use whey protein powder.
Posted on 2012-03-14 14:07:33
Name:Merrie
Location:Jamaica WI
Subject:Protein Food Source
The material on protein was greatly welcomed, because I wanted to know what food, what calories, and what gram each one has.
Posted on 2012-03-19 18:05:01
Name:Axeteve
Location:India
Subject:Essential 9 amino acids
It'll be great if the same type of list is compiled for "essential 9 amino acids" with relative % of DV mentioned in brackets () will make it very useful.
Posted on 2012-04-15 13:55:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Essential 9 amino acids
Hi Axeteve, thanks for the suggestion. A list of amino acids is being created. However, please note that there is not set DV for any of the amino acids and trying to determine a daily requirement has proved challenging to government advisory boards. The amino acids are essential though, as are complete sources of protein. Thanks again for your suggestion.
Posted on 2012-04-15 13:55:18
Name:Fred Schulz
Location:Sydney - Australia
Subject:Protein foods for gout
My Doctor has told me to stay away from high protein foods, any suggestions as to what foods containing proteins that I can eat, so I can control my severe gout attacks. Thanks, Fred
Posted on 2012-04-19 19:14:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Protein foods for gout
Hi Fred, thanks for your question and sorry to hear of your condition. Both this study and this study on protein foods and gout conclude that protein from meat and seafood increases uric acid levels and risk of gout. Protein from dairy sources correlated with lower uric acid levels and decreased risk of gout. Protein from plant foods appeared to have no affect. So you are recommended to stay away from meat and seafood and focus instead on dairy (low-fat milk, low-fat yogurt) and also vegetable sources of protein like nuts and seeds, tofu, but not legumes.

The National Library of Medicine article on Gout also suggests you avoid alcohol, anchovies, sardines, oils, herring, organ meat (liver, kidney, and sweetbreads), legumes (dried beans and peas), gravies, mushrooms, spinach, asparagus, cauliflower, consommé, and baking or brewer's yeast. (Avoid Marmite or Vegemite also). It also suggests you avoid fatty foods such as salad dressings, ice cream, and fried foods.

Given all that, the NLM also cautions you do not loose weight to fast! Eat healthy carbs, like Brown Rice, to keep the pounds on! Quinoa is a great grain to try that has all the essential amino acids your body needs.

Posted on 2012-04-19 22:39:44
Name:Keith
Location:Virginia
Subject:Fermented vegetables help gout
How come the answer to gout is a long list of what not to eat? It is the "rich man's disease" because they won't eat "poor people's food". Fermented vegetables (lactic acid fermentation) has the pro biotic ability to digest the protein so you won't get gout. The side effect is it breaks down calcium so you won't get bone spurs or kidney stones. Throw out the processed foods and eat "live" cultured foods like humans have since the beginning of humanity.
Posted on 2012-04-20 19:14:52
Name:Ronald Muzambi
Location:Zimbabwe, Harare
Subject:Protein for Building Muscle
I'm doing body building as a sport and I would like to know the best foods for muscle growth without teking any supplements. Thank You.
Posted on 2012-05-06 01:30:33
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Protein for Building Muscle
Hi Ronald, thanks for your suggestion, a section or article answering this question will be created. For now, focus on getting a lot of high quality protein (all the essential amino acids). This includes meats and a variety of plant proteins like beans and nuts. Drink plently of water to help your muscles rebuild and recover, working out properly and giving your muscles time to rest is as important as what you eat.
Posted on 2012-05-06 01:40:22
Name:Mr. D
Location:Canada
Subject:Blue Green Algae
Question...isn't Blue Green Algae the high bacteria plant that grows in low ponds and still waters? That stuff will make you sick won't it? Even if you boil it or however you prep it?
Posted on 2012-05-18 08:34:39
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Blue Green Algae
Hi, thanks for your question. You are right, not all types of blue green algae are edible. Like mushrooms, some are edible, and some are not, and you need to know what you are doing before you harvest any from your backyard. Basically, it is suggested that you buy and consume Spirulina, a form of blue green algae that is safe to eat and nutritious.
Posted on 2012-05-18 08:34:39
Name:Lili
Location:Japan
Subject:Protein at Breakfast
I eat 30 gr of protein for breakfast like this: 200 gr of yogurt (14 gr of P) 10 gr of walnuts(1.5 gr) 100 gr of ham (15 gr)
Posted on 2012-07-01 05:03:36
Name:Teresa
Location:Festus, MO
Subject:Metabolism
I recently lost 76 lbs by walking, jogging, and using my stationary bike. I recently added hiking in my local State Park to my regiment just to mix it up a little. I do about eight miles, at least three times a week. In doing so my metabolism is through the roof now. I can't stay full! It seems my food burns right through me in an hour. I hate this feeling of being hungry all the time. Can you suggest some foods or practices than can help me out.
Posted on 2012-08-15 08:16:36
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Metabolism
Hi Teresa, thanks for your question and congratulations on your weight loss. For people in your position eating frequently is a good idea. Try to eat something with a lot of energy every 2 hours throughout the day. Even when you are exercising. Typical atheletes may turn to energy bars, but you could also try more natural foods like nuts, seeds, and dried fruits. All are very nutrient dense and will give you energy. To feel full you want to eat fat and fiber. This can mean nut butters or dark chocolate for fats, and things like fruit smoothies for fiber. Try those foods throughout the day and see if it helps. Good luck.
Posted on 2012-08-15 08:16:36
Name:Matt
Location:Tampa, Fl
Subject:Protein Assimilation
One thing that is extremely important that I don't see in this blog/article is protein assmilation. Eating whole cooked eggs has a protein assimlation of 98%. Cooked eggs are the number one source of protein in the world, by far, and all other protein sources are compared to them. Milk is next best protein being absorbed at 60%, then meats like fish and chicken are 40% and vegetable proteins are 15% at best. What all this means is for example, you would have to eat 3 large chicken breasts to absorb the same amount of protein you can get from just 5-6 cooked eggs. Assimilation is SOOO important. I have been training and dieting for 20 years and I have got by best results from sticking with eggs, milk chicken and fish. Eggs being my main protein source b/c of the highest assimilation values they have. Dont worry about the cholesterol or fat in the eggs. It is good and healthy and will actually boost your good cholesterol levels. As a side note, stay away from whey or powdered proteins. They do have high assimilation values but its a powder. lol Your body has to do very little to digest it. They are a waste of money. Stick with real food. The only time powdered proteins would be acceptable would be immediately after a workout, but again, real food puts powdered protein in the dirt. I used to be into the whey protein hype, but after extensive testing and trials i have put my body through, I have got quadruple the results by staying away from those "powdered" proteins and relying on FOOD, hard-boiled eggs being by far the best source.
Posted on 2012-08-21 01:29:00
Name:Rosie
Location:Melbourne, Aust.
Subject:Protein Assimilation
My 15 yr old son has been asking me to buy him some protein powder but after reading Matt's comments I think we'll stick with real food...(and always only Free Range Eggs).
Posted on 2012-08-27 09:58:41
Name:Abhinav
Location:India
Subject:Protein Assimilation
Thanks @Matt for the insights. Could you also elaborate as to what exactly does protein assimilation mean and how does this contribute to muscle building?
Posted on 2012-09-04 07:13:09
Name:Shaun
Location:Tasmania, Australia
Subject:Assimilation
Gday Matt, Like your article mate..When you are in training what would be a days intake of protein consist of? I started weight training about 18 months ago and I haven't really had a real crack at eating properly to get the most out of training and want to eat the propper foods and not the powders...so just wondering if anyone could help me out?
Posted on 2012-09-06 12:12:14
Name:Angela
Location:Australia
Subject:Food intolerances
My daughter struggles with protein intake as she has intolerance to dairy, nuts, eggs, lentils, and beans. Although she seems to be able to cope with very bland foods, and chickpeas, and rice. She eats a lot of bread as this does not upset her, however she is always hungry as a result.
Posted on 2012-09-08 22:52:58
Name:Beth
Location:Melbourne, Australia
Subject:Protein in Soup?
I love Matt's interesting information about protein assimilation, but am not sure what it really means. Is there anyone out there who knows if there is any protein in chicken soup made with chicken bones and vegetables?
Posted on 2012-09-15 11:47:58
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Protein in Soup?
Hi Beth, thanks for your question. Protein assimilation can be defined as the "apparent digestibility and absorption" of protein. While eggs work well for Matt, there is no rule that eggs will work well for everyone. You may have to experiment to find which protein source works well for you. You can measure your success by building muscle mass, or whatever your goals are. As for your other question, boiled chicken bones, or chicken broth, provides 3.3 grams of protein in an 8oz cup of liquid broth. That is 1.4 grams of protein per 100 grams of soup broth. Vegetable broth provides very little protein, less than 0.1grams per 100 grams. Nutrition facts for chicken and vegetable broth.
Posted on 2012-09-15 11:47:58
Name:Maggie
Location:California
Subject:Pregnancy and protein
Thank you for the article and the information you provided. I'm half way through my pregnancy. I was a vegetarian prior to being pregnant and now I have added fish and some chicken to my diet. Although I eat every 2 hours, I am finding that I'm not gaining much weight, hence about 4 pounds lighter than needed at this point. Any suggestions for pregnant women and protein sources?
Posted on 2012-09-19 12:08:55
Name:Insert Happy Face
Location:Los Angeles, CA
Subject:RE: Pregnancy and protein
Hey Maggie, I don't know about you but for me I ate tons of peanut butter. Even now to this day I keep a personal jar in my night stand with a spoon in it. Once I get nibbling before I know it I have eaten about 5 spoons of it. At 7 grams per spoon a few peanut butter snack breaks a day go a long way. I never worried about the fatty oils of it or the sugar content but fat free or low sodium varieties must be out there if you are concerned with such. All in all peanut butter has been my "go to" source of protein for some time now. G'luck n congrats on the baby. -Shelly
Posted on 2012-09-30 09:03:06
Name:Maggie
Location:California
Subject:RE: Pregnancy Protein
Thanks Shelly, I think its a good idea to add nut butters to my diet.
Posted on 2012-10-01 00:22:45
Name:Neal
Location:Asia
Subject:Muscle building and protein
I am a veg (meat and egg products) but I eat dairy products. I weigh about 64Kgs with height 5'9". My age is 23 now. Recently, I joined aa Fitness center to develop muscle as I look pretty slim. My trainer suggested I take heavy protein products and I am stuck, as iI am a veg as mentioned before. How would you suggest me to manage my diet?
Posted on 2012-10-04 11:17:52
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Muscle building and protein
Hi Neal, thanks for your question. First, a lot of protein products are suitable for vegetarians. Whey power, spirulina, soy protein isolate, and vital wheat gluten are all vegetarian, even vegan. If you don't want to take protein powders and commercial products, you can also get plenty of protein from natural foods like nuts, soy products (tofu), dairy, beans and rice, and so on. Also, check out the article on high calorie foods for more ideas on what to eat to gain weight.
Posted on 2012-10-04 18:56:40
Name:Adnan
Location:Kerala, India
Subject:Muscle & Gym
Below is a usual diet for gym goers of kerala...egg(raw or boiled...hen or duck)+ broiler chicken + nuts(peanut,..) + tapioca + some beans + wheat foods... all other protein rich foods are....too costly here(spirulina....etc)..healthaliciousness please give me a comment on this...is that good?
Posted on 2012-11-19 23:15:27
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Muscle & Gym
Hi Adnan, that sounds like a great high protein diet. Have you also considered bean sprouts, like mung bean sprouts? They are also very high in protein for the amount of calories. This article will soon have a section for cheap sources of high protein. So please check back in a couple weeks.
Posted on 2012-11-20 01:24:18
Name:Verna
Location:long island, NY
Subject:How to buy and prepare spirulina
How do you prepare spirulina to eat it and what does it taste like? Do you have to cook it? Lastly, where can I buy it?
Posted on 2013-01-05 11:56:25
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How to buy and prepare spirulina
Hi Verna, thanks for your question. Spirulina is really more a type of supplement, sold as a pill or powder. The pills can be swallowed whole of course, and the powder can be used in shakes, smoothies, vegetable juice, etc...There are various creative recipes out on the internet. You can buy Spirulina on Amazon.com or at your local health food store.
Posted on 2013-01-07 20:22:13
Name:Alexander
Location:UK
Subject:Misleading protein info
Honestly the information here is biased and somewhat misleading. Did you know: "Broccoli has 8.9 grams of protein per 100 calories? In opposition to that which people tend to argue: "but's it's not a complete protein"- Well that's why nature designed the body to pool amino acids together like a fuel tank- as long as you eat a varied diet of more than one food it makes no difference whether that food was a complete protein as food because as soon as it enters your body it is broken down into amino acids and pooled with the others for future use. That is natures design for us not having to eat 'complete proteins': which incidentally a) can be found in plant products, and b) in the form of animal proteins are very damaging to the human digestive system. It's hard to suffer protein deficiency if you're eating sufficient calories: You all need to worry about what's in your food besides this one macro nutrient!
Posted on 2013-01-14 17:36:29
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Misleading protein info
Hi Alexander, thanks for your comment. Perhaps you mean the protein info is misleading because it does not highlight enough vegetarian foods. While it is true that cooked broccoli provides 3.1 grams of protein per 100 grams, it means you have to eat about 2 cups cooked to get 100 calories, and also to get around 12 grams of protein. The protein to calorie ratio is 1 to 9, while the protein to calorie ratio of soybeans is 1 to 10, however, eating 1 cup of soybeans gets you 29 grams of protein, compared to the 6 you get from eating a cup of broccoli. This is why the list is the way it is. However, your point is valid, and in addition to the article on high protein vegetables still out there, a section will be made here to highlight vegetables which are good sources of protein. Till then, feel free to use the protein to calorie ratio ranking of all 8171 foods in the database. Or filter it for just vegetables. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-01-15 10:34:32
Name:George H
Location:Chicago
Subject:Whey, Omega-6
Is Dried Whey and Whey Powder people talked about here the same as other people refer to as "Whey Protein" in other places? It seems some commercial Whey protein Isolates products have a much higher protein content than 13% listed in the last table under "Dried Whey".

A separate question. Some people are concerned with the excessive Omega-6 content when people consume a lot of the common "healthy " foods, e.g. nuts, even eggs. What's your opinion?

Posted on 2013-01-16 15:22:56
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:Whey, Omega-6
Hi George, thanks for your questions. You are right, commercial whey protein powders vary considerably in their protein content. Certain products consist of 80% protein gram per gram. You have to check the nutrition facts of each product to be sure. The facts listed on this site are for "natural" whey powder.

In regards to your question about Omega 6 to Omega 3 ratios, some studies suggest you get this ratio as close to 1 as possible to reduce risk of a lot of pathologies ranging from cardiovascular disease to arthritis. Most Americans currently eat at a ratio of 16 omega6s to 1 omega3. While more studies on this need to be done, an article will be created on this site for foods with good omega 6 to omega 3 ratios.

Posted on 2013-01-16 16:45:10
Name:George H
Location:Chicago
Subject:How do we absorb nutrients and energy?
Thanks for your quick response. Good post. The comparison tool is awesome. Even with the knowledge of Omega-3 and Omega-6 content, I think it is a challenge to the vast majority of the people to get to a diet that is remotely close ideal in terms of this measure.

I've got a couple of more questions, if you don't mind.

The first one is quite simple. Someone mentioned assimilation rate. It seems the same as "biological value" for proteins. I don't know if this is at times plainly referred to as "food absorption rate". It seems an important measure as, if we can't absorb the content, the nutrient content in the food is not as relevant. Is there research in this measure?

That leads to another more complicated question. We have food nutrient and energy measurements (calorie, protein, carb, fat and other). We also know there are foods with negative calorie (the ones I know are some celery and cucumber) that require more calories from the body to digest than the energy the body can get from them. There is also calorie difference between raw food (which seems to be the source of how calorie counts are measured) and the cooked food (the way we eat). So both nutrients and energy (calorie) absorption measurements seem to be totally complicated and confusing. Is what we read from FDA and the industry what our body gets?

Posted on 2013-01-17 14:29:34
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: How do we absorb nutrients and energy?
Hi George, thanks for some great questions, they are complicated and the answer is basically we have to go with what we know now. There is actually debate over what protein sources are best and which is best absorbed, plus which is most complete in terms of amino acids. Further, there is debate about which amino acids are best. To complicate matters even more, the amount of protein you absorb probably also depends on your own genetics, metabolism, and state of your body. We don't need to fear though, because the generalities can guide us. Yes, it is wrong to take an exact number like "23 grams of protein" very seriously. What is true is that the food will certainly have aroud 23g of protein, and will likely provide much more protein than a food with 5 grams. This is the best way to think of nutrition facts and calories which come from the government. They serve as a general guideline for what to eat. They are general till we can get the technology and basic science to move forward and make better decisions on what to eat. In the future perhaps every person will have their own optimal diet, tailored for their own metabolism. The U.S. government also devised the Percent Daily Value (%DV) to help guide people in their food choices. This basic metric incorporates absorption of nutrients to some extent. The short answer is that the numbers and analysis we have serve primarily as a comparative guide on what to eat, and should not be taken exactly. For more see the article on pitfalls and problems with food nutrient rankings.
Posted on 2013-01-17 18:27:30
Name:Maria
Location:Australia
Subject:High protein diet portions
When a diet high in protein says 100g serve of protein, does that mean you work out the serve by reading the food label? e.g peanuts - 24g protein/100g serving means that in order to get a 100g serve of protein you need approx 400g peanuts?
Posted on 2013-01-23 08:42:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: High protein diet portions
Hi Maria, thanks for your question. Your calculation is right, you would need 400g of peanuts to get 96g (~100g) of protein. However, note that 400 grams of peanuts also provides 2340 calories, which is most of all the calories you need in a day. As is, the recommended daily intake of protein for women aged 19-70 is 46 grams. Be careful not too eat too much protein. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-01-23 13:09:40
Name:Barbara
Location:Australia
Subject:L-arginine and Wound Healing
My Husband suffered from a large Ulcerated wound on his leg, it has been treated and has reduced in size, but right now it is stagnating. We have been advised to use a Protein Drink that contains L-arginine (Amino Acids, I am led to believe), but as a pensioner, this drink product is rather expensive...what foods would he have to eat to get enough protein to heal the remainder of the wound? Everything is very confusing.
Posted on 2013-02-05 23:43:58
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: L-arginine and Wound Healing
Hi Barbara, thanks for your question. L-arginine does help with wound healing, some people even apply it topically as a cream. This website does not list foods high in amino acids yet, you can refer to this site which ranks foods by arginine content. The list is not curated so you will have to work through it. Spinach, turkey, and tuna may be the best sources. Not sure what your budget is, but you can buy L-arginine supplements from Amazon, 250 pills goes for about $12.50. This would last about a 2 months. There are also a wide variety of creams if you want to try them...
Posted on 2013-02-06 15:10:58
Name:Mary
Location:Mississauga
Subject:Protein for weight loss
Your chart indicates 1 50 gr egg is 14 gr of protein. The egg carton in my fridge states a 53 gr egg has 6 gr of protein. Your numbers are more than double. Confusing. How much protein per day is recommended for weight loss?
Posted on 2013-02-06 16:11:56
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Protein for weight loss
Hi Mary, thanks for pointing out that error, 6g is the correct amount of protein for one 50g egg. As for your second question, the amount of protein you should eat depends on if you are building muscle via exercise. Even running/swimming/ and bicycling build muscle. That said, eating more than a "normal" amount of protein is not really going to help you lose weight, and you are best off avoiding high calorie foods.
Posted on 2013-02-06 20:06:12
Name:Sandra
Location:Ontario, Canada
Subject:Protein Snacks for Weight Loss
I drive a big truck between Canada and USA and so my activity level is limited, but I want to loose some weight and have been told that high protein is the best way to go. I am a 'grazer' and like to nibble throughout the day as I drive, what would you suggest I can take back and forth across the border, as food regulations are strict. Stopping to find a grocery store along the way is not a very good option.
Posted on 2013-02-09 17:21:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Protein Snacks for Weight Loss
Hi Sandra, thanks for your question. It sounds like snacking on fresh fruits and vegetables might be a problem due to border customs. Not sure if high protein snacks are the best for weight loss, unless you are also doing some strength building exercises. Trying to lift weights, do situps, etc...before you drive, combined with protein snacks might work as your body would burn energy rebuilding muscle while you drive. Besides the low calorie high protein snacks listed on this page, you could try a low carbohydrate jerky. This turkey jerky is low in carbs and high in protein. This beef jerky also has no sugar whatsoever. Besides those two options, you could also try dry roasted soybeans. Hope that helps, and good luck!
Posted on 2013-02-09 18:26:51
Name:Ashlee
Location:South Dakota
Subject:Breast feeding and protein
I am looking to increase my milk supply and was told to up my protein. Can anyone recommend any specific foods that work best?
Posted on 2013-02-15 17:29:21
Name:Jason
Location:London
Subject:RDI and excercise: How much protein do you need?
Thanks for a lot of great information. Is the protein RDI based on assuming a certain level of activity? If I up my amount of exercise, and build muscle in the process, don't I need to increase taking in protein to support this? If so is there a formula for how to gradually increase protein intake? Thanks, Jason.
Posted on 2013-03-21 09:36:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: RDI and excercise: How much protein do you need?
Hi Jason, thanks for your question. You are right to assume that the RDI is just a general best estimate. It is in no way a hard and fast number. The amount of protein you need can depend on your height, weight, level of exercise, and genetics, among other things. The amount of protein you need every day is a matter of debate, and we are not sure how the body exactly metabolizes and uses protein. There are likely many formulas out there for knowing exactly how much protein you need, however, that would go into sport science, or body building, which is not in the scope of this web page. Sorry to not provide more information, but hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-03-21 13:17:05
Name:JayM
Location:USA
Subject:Most Get Too Much Protein
Most people get too much protein. Excess protein (esp animal derived) is a significant factor in promoting common health problems (heart disease, cancer, diabetes). Excess protein reduces longevity.
Posted on 2013-06-01 18:57:39
Name:OldNick
Location:Australia
Subject:Protein count for lentils
I read and read again that lentils are 20-25gm/100gm, not 9gm/100gm. This is the first claim of 9 vs 20 that I have seen. What's the truth? Id this a meat - based site? Is it? hmmm.
Posted on 2013-07-09 08:15:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Protein count for lentils
Hi OldNick, thanks for your question. The 25grams/100grams refers to the protein content of raw lentils. Cooked lentils provide 9 grams per 100 grams. Here is the nutrition facts comparison.
Posted on 2013-07-09 09:46:27
Name:Maliha
Subject:Pescetarian
Hey thanks for the article. I'm a pescetarian, though I do not eat much fish because there a few I do not like, such as tuna. I just realized how less protein, if any, because all of the items above I do not consume. But I shall make an effort to at least include a few in my diet! Thanks :)
Posted on 2013-07-28 09:10:41
Name:Sami
Location:Porto
Subject:Protein Hype

Protein is in all foods except sugars, alcohols (though even beer has some), and pure fats such as oils.

When has anyone seen someone suffering from protein deficiency? Anyone who has it is suffering from a lack of food, not protein. For instance, food disorders (bulemia, anorexia), alcoholism, and starvation (as in Haiti, Sudan, Etheopia).

Food combining and so-called, "complete" proteins is a myth that came out in a book in the 70s by a sociologist who has since recanted her theory but for which some strange reason is now being taught even in medical school based on absolutely nothing (which makes one wonder just how competent so-called "mainstream" doctors are but even at best they get mere hours of nutritional training so are not the experts by any means).

All one has to do is eat enough to meet the caloric needs and s/he will meet the protein needs even if eating just one plant-based food such as potatoes (the Irish did it for years when the Brits took all but the spuds). Check out Doctor McDougal (who has studied nutrition extensively) who explains it and has very comprehensive charts.

As for body building, check out Vegan Bodybuilding. There's even a raw vegan champion.

For those trying to build muscle mass, working out creates a need for more calories, therefore a higher food intake which naturally comes with a higher protein intake. No need for "special" protein.

And whey protein is a waste product of cheese-making that has been successfully marketed so people will pay huge prices to take it away rather than having to pay people to dump it on their fields as a poor fertilizer (fields can only take so much).

Powders are reductionist foods. Whole foods that have nutrients in synergy are the way to go. Focus on protein will lead to deficiencies in other nutrients as people fill up on an empty macro-nutrient to the detriment of the micro-nutrients that are so essential. Not to mention that most powders are likely to have GE/GMO contamination (whey especially as not only are the animals fed GE/GMO feed, but there is also the hormone rBST/rGBH to worry about).

Animal sourced protein though (including dairy) is acidic which pulls calcium from the bones to balance the blood (which really is essential). Protein is not stored, nor converted into energy. Excess is processed through the body which is hard on the kidneys.

Further animal proteins are difficult to break-down which throws much energy just into digestion.

The best thing for gout, and several other conditions is a raw vegan diet. Most people will find huge relief within a week. It also relieves cravings which so many suffer from because the nutrition they have been taking in is so deficient.

If someone is hungry on a good diet, then eat more. Nut & Date bars are a great and simple treat. Avocados added to salads, or just with a touch of salt (and garlic, cumin, etc) are also wonderful.

And of course simple smoothies, mostly green with some fruit (but no powders! or dairy!) are great. Make a big one in the morning, drink some during the day as a healthy, filling snack.

Greens (which are missing from the charts on this site) are great for protein as well as many other fabulous nutrients.

Posted on 2013-08-13 15:47:55
Name:Jimbo
Location:Australia
Subject:My protein intake as a body builder
To cover a protein daily intake for a body builder you need: breakfast 5 boiled eggs, mid meal 200g skinless chicken breast, afternoon meal 200g beef steak, dinner 400g tin of tuna. This will give you the required protein intake daily of 257g which is all a body builder needs. No need for whey powder from the chemical shop.
Posted on 2013-08-19 22:25:14
Name:Rineans06
Location:Maryland,USA
Subject:I'm allergic to dairy products(included whey powder),nuts, tree nuts and cocoa
I'm currently on my 8th week workout/training, and I lost more than 12lbs already and wanted to build up some muscles in my body and to stay on my weight, so I stopped consuming dairy products, including nuts and etc..since last week, so when I found that the cause of my acne and pimples are from consuming dairy products(everything that has milk content/ingredients), even soy and cocoa are actually triggered my acne and pimples and makes it worse and I can see how it affects my body and my lovely face. So what can you advise? Since I'm vegan/vegetarian for the last 3 months, I normally eat organic foods only, no more processed foods and high cholesterol food. Please me help out with my problem, I need some alternative way of eating high protein foods that I'm not allergic to it. I need this to build my muscles and to stay healthy. Thank for your response.
Posted on 2013-10-03 20:30:38
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: I'm allergic to dairy products(included whey powder),nuts, tree nuts and cocoa
Hi Rineans06, thanks for sharing your experience, and your question. Given your allergies, you are best getting your protein from legumes (beans) and whole grains. Some vegetables can also be a good source of protein. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-04 04:53:48
Name:Anon
Location:Canada
Subject:Hemp hearts
Why aren't hemp hearts (shelled hemp seeds) on the list? They contain around 40% protein, making them one of the highest protein foods.
Posted on 2013-10-15 06:43:26
Name:Sam
Location:Canada
Subject:Whey in Cheese Curds
Communities near Cheese Factories often have affordable cheese curds for sale. This is simply cheese without all of the whey squeezed out of it (and obviously not aged). A great way to increase whey protein without taking in chemical additives. Also a tasty and affordable alternative to cheese but be careful cooking with it as the moisture will make it burn a little easier. That moisture makes it a great after workout snack to aid in rehydration as well.
Posted on 2013-11-11 04:30:20
Name:Ben
Location:Nottingham
Subject:Only non-fat mozzarella is high in protein and most cheese should be ranked lower
Cottage cheese doesn't give 33g protein per 100g, neither does any regular cheese for that matter. It's far closer to a third of this figure.
Posted on 2014-01-02 14:21:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Only non-fat mozzarella is high in protein and most cheese should be ranked lower
Hi Ben, thanks for bringing up this point. This ranking was made in terms of grams of protein per calorie. As states non-fat mozzarella provides 1g per 4.7 calories. Non-fat cottage cheese provides 1g to 7 calories, which would move cheese down to the number 5 spot on the list. The complete nutrition facts are here. However, your point that most cheeses are lower in protein is wise, when you add fat back into cheese the protein to calorie ratios change and a note will be added to inform readers.
Posted on 2014-01-03 10:48:19
Name:Laura Blank
Location:California
Subject:Rabbit
I've been told and it's listed on the USDA website that rabbit meat is higher in protein and lower in fat than chicken and turkey. Why hasn't this been listed?
Posted on 2014-01-19 05:20:46
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Rabbit
Hi Laura, thanks for your question. You are right that rabbit is a good source of protein, however, turkey breast does have a higher protein to calorie ratio and less fat/protein. Here is the comparison.

Further, rabbit is not listed because it is not commonly consumed or available. The USDA database also has antelope, and turtle, both of which are high in protein for the calories.

Down the road a new section/article for game meat high in protein can be created. Thanks again for your comment and suggestion, and I hope all that makes sense.

Posted on 2014-01-20 15:09:27
Name:Dawn Graves
Location:Gambrills, MD
Subject:Too much protein is dangerous
I just read Dr. T. Campbell's book The China Study published in 2006. He is a credible scientific researcher who's worked for Cornell, MT and other similarly prestigious universities. His last 25 years of research has proven a link between eating too much protein per day (@46 g for women and 56g for men) to major health risks like cancer and cardiovascular disease as well as many others none of us ever want to experience. He found animal sourced protein, especially dairy, to promote cancer. It shocked me, because I've been an avid consumer of dairy and leanmeat, because I'm an athlete. I'm going dairy free, and I'll be getting my protein from plant sources from now on. You just have to eat a wide range of veggies, and you'll get all the necessary amino acids you need. Anyway, for those new to bodybuilding, read this book before you start living on whey shakes.
Posted on 2014-02-27 19:27:44

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References

  1. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.