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Vegetables Highest in Protein


Everything in life needs protein to live, and vegetables can be a great source of protein. Below is a ranking of 34 vegetables highest in protein. The servings size for comparison is 100 grams which can be anywhere from half a cup to two cups depending on the weight and water content of the vegetables. The range of protein provided is between 3 - 14 grams per 100 gram serving. For more see the articles on high protein foods, beans and legumes highest in protein, and grains with the highest protein to carbohydrate ratio.
#1 Sun-Dried Tomatoes 258 calories Protein: 14% Carb: 56% Fat: 2% Other (water): 28%
#2 Soybean Sprouts 125 calories Protein: 13% Carb: 9% Fat: 7% Other (water): 71%
#3 Winged Beans 148 calories Protein: 12% Carb: 28% Fat: 1% Other (water): 59%
#4 Lentil Sprouts 106 calories Protein: 9% Carb: 22% Fat: 0% Other (water): 69%
#5 Baby Lima Beans 132 calories Protein: 8% Carb: 25% Fat: 0% Other (water): 67%
#6 Garlic 149 calories Protein: 6% Carb: 33% Fat: 0% Other (water): 61%
#7 Dried Seaweed(Sushi Nori) 306 calories Protein: 6% Carb: 81% Fat: 0% Other (water): 13%
#8 Grape Leaves 93 calories Protein: 6% Carb: 17% Fat: 1% Other (water): 76%
#9 Green Peas 77 calories Protein: 5% Carb: 14% Fat: 0% Other (water): 81%
#10 Succotash(Corn And Limas) 115 calories Protein: 5% Carb: 24% Fat: 1% Other (water): 70%
#11 Wasabi Root 109 calories Protein: 5% Carb: 24% Fat: 0% Other (water): 71%
#12 Portabella Mushrooms 35 calories Protein: 4% Carb: 5% Fat: 0% Other (water): 91%
#13 Spinach 34 calories Protein: 4% Carb: 5% Fat: 1% Other (water): 90%
#14 Alfalfa Sprouts 23 calories Protein: 4% Carb: 2% Fat: 1% Other (water): 93%
#15 Peas And Onions 70 calories Protein: 4% Carb: 14% Fat: 0% Other (water): 82%
#16 White Mushrooms 44 calories Protein: 4% Carb: 6% Fat: 0% Other (water): 90%
#17 Broccoli Raab 33 calories Protein: 4% Carb: 3% Fat: 0% Other (water): 93%
#18 Straw Mushrooms 32 calories Protein: 4% Carb: 5% Fat: 0% Other (water): 91%
#19 Brussels Sprouts 41 calories Protein: 4% Carb: 8% Fat: 0% Other (water): 88%
#20 Balsam-Pear (Bitter Gourd) 34 calories Protein: 4% Carb: 7% Fat: 0% Other (water): 89%
#21 Podded Peas 52 calories Protein: 4% Carb: 9% Fat: 0% Other (water): 87%
#22 Shiitake Mushrooms 48 calories Protein: 3% Carb: 8% Fat: 0% Other (water): 89%
#23 Peas And Carrots 53 calories Protein: 3% Carb: 11% Fat: 0% Other (water): 86%
#24 Turnip Greens 29 calories Protein: 3% Carb: 5% Fat: 0% Other (water): 92%
#25 Sweet Corn 108 calories Protein: 3% Carb: 25% Fat: 1% Other (water): 71%
#26 Oyster Mushrooms 43 calories Protein: 3% Carb: 6% Fat: 0% Other (water): 91%
#27 Kale 50 calories Protein: 3% Carb: 10% Fat: 0% Other (water): 87%
#28 Artichokes (Globe Or French) 47 calories Protein: 3% Carb: 11% Fat: 0% Other (water): 86%
#29 Chives 30 calories Protein: 3% Carb: 4% Fat: 1% Other (water): 92%
#30 Asparagus 24 calories Protein: 3% Carb: 4% Fat: 0% Other (water): 93%
#31 Broccoli 28 calories Protein: 3% Carb: 5% Fat: 0% Other (water): 92%
#32 Cauliflower 32 calories Protein: 3% Carb: 6% Fat: 0% Other (water): 91%
#33 Collards 36 calories Protein: 3% Carb: 7% Fat: 0% Other (water): 90%
#34 Parsley 36 calories Protein: 3% Carb: 6% Fat: 1% Other (water): 90%
For more suggestions try the nutrient ranking tool.


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Comments.
Name:Denise
Location:United States
Subject:Giving percentages is of little help
This chart would have been grand if it showed us in GRAMS not percentages.
Posted on 2012-11-18 19:18:05
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Giving percentages is of little help
Hi Denise, thanks for your comment. The percentages shown are based on 100 gram servings. That means that when an item listed here contains 14% protein, it also contains 14 grams of protein per 100 gram serving. So basically, the percentage and amount of grams are interchangeable for each item listed. Hope that makes sense.
Posted on 2012-11-18 21:40:55
Name:Zain
Location:Canada
Subject:Diet rich in Protein low in Carbs
I am 44, recently diagnosed with Type II diabetes and hyperlipidemia. I am looking for a diet that should be high in protein and low in carb and fats. Thanks!
Posted on 2012-11-22 12:09:45
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Diet rich in Protein low in Carbs
Hi Zain, thanks for your question. In addition to high protein foods low in carbs, consider eating more fiber rich foods, and cholesterol lowering foods. Here are lists of foods high in sugar, and foods high in carbs to avoid. It is probably best not to aim so much for eating high protein, but instead to eat foods that are heart healthy (like the cholesterol lowering foods), and low in sugar (like lots of vegetables).
Posted on 2012-11-22 20:58:20
Name:Katrina
Location:USA
Subject:Why by weight and not calories?
Sure, to try and make comparisons between foods would have to use a standard measure, but why choose weight? Why not calories? I would much rather know what percent of the calories in a given food come from protein. It would also give you a much more informative comparison. If you kept the first 256 calories for sun dried tomatoes which give you 14g protein and compared it to 256 calories of soybeans, the soybeans would give you almost 27g protein. That is a significant difference. People interested in the protein content are looking for a higher protein to carb ratio. Comparing foods by calorie would do that better. Also, 100g of sun dried tomatoes is 2 cups. 100 grams of garlic is over 33 cloves. Who is going to eat that in one sitting? Especially for a scant 6g protein.
Posted on 2013-04-22 01:15:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:Why by weight and not calories?
Hi Katrina, thanks for your comments and suggestions. The best would be to list high protein foods by calories and then to have another list by density (weight). This is how the current high protein foods article is listed. Eventually all articles on this site will be this way, so please check back! Thanks.
Posted on 2013-04-23 03:40:10
Name:Sean
Location:Australia
Hi, thanks for a really good article. Though im going to take it into an excel spreadsheet and calculate it by percentage of calories supplied by protein, as I feel this is the most `real` way to look at it.
Posted on 2013-08-07 19:20:18
Name:Shannon Jones
Location:United States
Subject:Where's the Quinoa?
I noticed that the list contains legumes, fungi, and vegetables so I was surprised you didn't round out vegetables (vegetation) with the grains. Quinoa is an excellent source of vegetable protein and is one of a very small handful of complete proteins in the vegetable family. Others include, soybeans, hemp seed, and spirulina a type of algae. These are very helpful for people on or considering a vegetarian or vegan diet as they have ALL the essential amino acids our body needs.
Posted on 2013-10-26 04:30:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Where's the Quinoa?
Hi Shannon, thanks for your comment and suggestion. Quinoa has now been added to the main article of high protein foods, and can also be found on the list of grains with the highest protein to carbohydrate ratio. Further there is an article on beans and legumes highest in protein. A note about these other articles has been added to the intro. However, based on your comments, a general article of protein for vegetarians will be useful, and developed. Thanks and please feel free to share any further thoughts or suggestions.
Posted on 2013-10-26 05:06:05
Name:Gail
Location:California
Subject:Complete Protein Sources
I am 70 and about 45 pounds overweight. I have tried to lose weight with various diets, don't eat fats, starches, sugars, but still the weight hangs on. I have decided to go vegan for 3 months based on Campbell's diet and others. How do I determine "complete" protein in my meals? For example rice and beans are considered complete protein when eaten together.
Posted on 2013-11-18 10:16:52
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Complete Protein Sources
Hi Gail, thanks for your question. To determine if the protein is complete or not, you have to look at the amino acids each food provides. Amino acid data will be available on this site in the next 2-3 months. Thanks to your question, an article on complete protein sources for vegans will be created. Till then, eat a varied diet of nuts, legumes, pulses, and whole grains, and you should be fine. Please also note that the grain quinoa is a complete source of protein. Here is a step by step recipe on how to cook quinoa.
Posted on 2013-11-19 04:40:19
Name:Johnny
Location:California
Subject:Thank you for percentages!
The percentage is EXACTLY what is needed to be able to compare different foods. There is no point in giving grams or any other measure such as "per serving" as they make it impossible to compare foods. Thank you!
Posted on 2014-01-07 14:08:49
Name:Lena
Location:New Jersey
Subject:Low Protein Diet
I am a type 2 diabetic and have just been through some painful bouts with kidney stones. They are uric acid stones and my doctor recommends a LOW protein diet BUT I have to watch my carbs because of the diabetes. What do you recommend diet wise? Thank you...
Posted on 2014-01-31 18:51:36
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low Protein Diet
Hi Lena, thanks for your question. It sounds like vegetables, and maybe some nuts, and very few whole grains will have to constitute your diet for a while. You can try to research what foods are low in Uric acid for a more accurate list of what to eat. Making such a list is a goal of this site, but it is not out yet. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2014-01-31 20:41:48
Name:Kathy
Location:Australia
Subject:Chia seeds are a complete protein
I am vegan and I came across your looking for high protein vegetables. I am impressed with your content but I didn't notice Chia Seeds on your list. They are a complete protein by themselves. I have it sprinkled on my morning oats plus I make a Chia Gel (add a third of a cup of chia seeds to 2 cups filtered water in a jar with a screw top lid. Shake immediately then occasionally for the next 10 minutes. Once there is no longer a chia seed/water separation, refrigerate). I have a quarter of a cup of this over half a cup of frozen berries as "treat", once a day.
Posted on 2014-03-18 14:25:00

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Comments.
Name:Denise
Location:United States
Subject:Giving percentages is of little help
This chart would have been grand if it showed us in GRAMS not percentages.
Posted on 2012-11-18 19:18:05
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Giving percentages is of little help
Hi Denise, thanks for your comment. The percentages shown are based on 100 gram servings. That means that when an item listed here contains 14% protein, it also contains 14 grams of protein per 100 gram serving. So basically, the percentage and amount of grams are interchangeable for each item listed. Hope that makes sense.
Posted on 2012-11-18 21:40:55
Name:Zain
Location:Canada
Subject:Diet rich in Protein low in Carbs
I am 44, recently diagnosed with Type II diabetes and hyperlipidemia. I am looking for a diet that should be high in protein and low in carb and fats. Thanks!
Posted on 2012-11-22 12:09:45
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Diet rich in Protein low in Carbs
Hi Zain, thanks for your question. In addition to high protein foods low in carbs, consider eating more fiber rich foods, and cholesterol lowering foods. Here are lists of foods high in sugar, and foods high in carbs to avoid. It is probably best not to aim so much for eating high protein, but instead to eat foods that are heart healthy (like the cholesterol lowering foods), and low in sugar (like lots of vegetables).
Posted on 2012-11-22 20:58:20
Name:Katrina
Location:USA
Subject:Why by weight and not calories?
Sure, to try and make comparisons between foods would have to use a standard measure, but why choose weight? Why not calories? I would much rather know what percent of the calories in a given food come from protein. It would also give you a much more informative comparison. If you kept the first 256 calories for sun dried tomatoes which give you 14g protein and compared it to 256 calories of soybeans, the soybeans would give you almost 27g protein. That is a significant difference. People interested in the protein content are looking for a higher protein to carb ratio. Comparing foods by calorie would do that better. Also, 100g of sun dried tomatoes is 2 cups. 100 grams of garlic is over 33 cloves. Who is going to eat that in one sitting? Especially for a scant 6g protein.
Posted on 2013-04-22 01:15:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:Why by weight and not calories?
Hi Katrina, thanks for your comments and suggestions. The best would be to list high protein foods by calories and then to have another list by density (weight). This is how the current high protein foods article is listed. Eventually all articles on this site will be this way, so please check back! Thanks.
Posted on 2013-04-23 03:40:10
Name:Sean
Location:Australia
Hi, thanks for a really good article. Though im going to take it into an excel spreadsheet and calculate it by percentage of calories supplied by protein, as I feel this is the most `real` way to look at it.
Posted on 2013-08-07 19:20:18
Name:Shannon Jones
Location:United States
Subject:Where's the Quinoa?
I noticed that the list contains legumes, fungi, and vegetables so I was surprised you didn't round out vegetables (vegetation) with the grains. Quinoa is an excellent source of vegetable protein and is one of a very small handful of complete proteins in the vegetable family. Others include, soybeans, hemp seed, and spirulina a type of algae. These are very helpful for people on or considering a vegetarian or vegan diet as they have ALL the essential amino acids our body needs.
Posted on 2013-10-26 04:30:49
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Where's the Quinoa?
Hi Shannon, thanks for your comment and suggestion. Quinoa has now been added to the main article of high protein foods, and can also be found on the list of grains with the highest protein to carbohydrate ratio. Further there is an article on beans and legumes highest in protein. A note about these other articles has been added to the intro. However, based on your comments, a general article of protein for vegetarians will be useful, and developed. Thanks and please feel free to share any further thoughts or suggestions.
Posted on 2013-10-26 05:06:05
Name:Gail
Location:California
Subject:Complete Protein Sources
I am 70 and about 45 pounds overweight. I have tried to lose weight with various diets, don't eat fats, starches, sugars, but still the weight hangs on. I have decided to go vegan for 3 months based on Campbell's diet and others. How do I determine "complete" protein in my meals? For example rice and beans are considered complete protein when eaten together.
Posted on 2013-11-18 10:16:52
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Complete Protein Sources
Hi Gail, thanks for your question. To determine if the protein is complete or not, you have to look at the amino acids each food provides. Amino acid data will be available on this site in the next 2-3 months. Thanks to your question, an article on complete protein sources for vegans will be created. Till then, eat a varied diet of nuts, legumes, pulses, and whole grains, and you should be fine. Please also note that the grain quinoa is a complete source of protein. Here is a step by step recipe on how to cook quinoa.
Posted on 2013-11-19 04:40:19
Name:Johnny
Location:California
Subject:Thank you for percentages!
The percentage is EXACTLY what is needed to be able to compare different foods. There is no point in giving grams or any other measure such as "per serving" as they make it impossible to compare foods. Thank you!
Posted on 2014-01-07 14:08:49
Name:Lena
Location:New Jersey
Subject:Low Protein Diet
I am a type 2 diabetic and have just been through some painful bouts with kidney stones. They are uric acid stones and my doctor recommends a LOW protein diet BUT I have to watch my carbs because of the diabetes. What do you recommend diet wise? Thank you...
Posted on 2014-01-31 18:51:36
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low Protein Diet
Hi Lena, thanks for your question. It sounds like vegetables, and maybe some nuts, and very few whole grains will have to constitute your diet for a while. You can try to research what foods are low in Uric acid for a more accurate list of what to eat. Making such a list is a goal of this site, but it is not out yet. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2014-01-31 20:41:48
Name:Kathy
Location:Australia
Subject:Chia seeds are a complete protein
I am vegan and I came across your looking for high protein vegetables. I am impressed with your content but I didn't notice Chia Seeds on your list. They are a complete protein by themselves. I have it sprinkled on my morning oats plus I make a Chia Gel (add a third of a cup of chia seeds to 2 cups filtered water in a jar with a screw top lid. Shake immediately then occasionally for the next 10 minutes. Once there is no longer a chia seed/water separation, refrigerate). I have a quarter of a cup of this over half a cup of frozen berries as "treat", once a day.
Posted on 2014-03-18 14:25:00

Post a comment.
Name:          
Location:       
Email:(Optional)
Subject:         

Spam Prevention *(REQUIRED):
Enter the last three letters of this sentence.

References

    • USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.