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Top 10 Foods Highest in Saturated Fat


Saturated fat refers to a group of fatty acids, each with its own properties and characteristics. Some of the saturated fatty acids may be healthy, while others less so, and more research needs to be conducted so consumers can make better diet choices. Despite saturated fats potential health benefits, saturated fat has long been associated with increased risk of heart disease, stroke, and even cancer. While such evidence is controversial, it still doesn't hurt to limit intake of saturated fats. The key word being limit and not eliminate. Don't substitute anything on this list with trans fats, or margarine, as they are now seen as being even worse for health than natural saturated fats. The DV for saturated fat is 20 grams per day. Below is a list of the top ten foods highest in saturated fat.

#1: Hydrogenated Oils (Palm, Coconut)
With every carbon bond saturated by a hydrogen atom, hydrogenated oils are, by definition, the food with the highest amount of saturated fat. Commercially processed palm kernel and coconut oils are 93% saturated fat, accounting for around 470% of the DV per 100 gram serving, 13g (65% DV) per tablespoon. Natural palm and or coconut oil contains slighty less saturated fat at 86.5g (433% DV) per 100g serving, and 12g (61% DV) of saturated fat per tablespoon.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#2: Dried Coconut
Coconut is often used in sweet confections like cakes and candy bars. Dried coconut can also be found in some Asian curries and soups. Dried unsweetened coconut contains 57 grams of saturated fat per 100 gram serving, or 286% of the DV. The sweetened flake variety of coconut contains half as much saturated fat at 26 grams or 132% DV. The raw coconut meat has 27 grams per 100 gram serving or 148% of the DV.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#3: Butter
Common in cakes, cookies, on bread, and vegetables, butter is everywhere. 100 grams of butter packs 51 grams (257% DV) of saturated fat, one stick has more with 58 grams (290% DV), and one table spoon contains 7 grams or 36% of the DV.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#4: Rendered Animal Fats (Tallow, Suet, Lard, Shortening (Includes vegetable)
These fats are typically used to make burgers, meatballs, sausages, gravy, or fried foods. In general these fats are around 40% saturated fat, with a 100 gram serving providing between 35-45 grams or 180-225% DV. Bacon grease is 40% saturated fat, 195% DV per 100 grams. Vegetable shortenings will also contain similar quantities of saturated fats. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#5: Dark Chocolate
Dark chocolate is a nutrient and antioxidant packed food that is probably your best source of saturated fat, just remember, moderation! One hundred grams of pure baking chocolate (about a cup) will provide 32g saturated fat (162% DV). A bar of milk chocolate in contrast has 9.1 grams of saturated fat, or 46% of the DV. Pure cocoa powder contains hardly any saturated fat at all, less than 2% and can be used as a good substitute in baking, or in preparing Chocolate Banana Pudding. Some types of Cocoa powder may contain up to 25% saturated fat, so check nutrition labels to be sure of the saturated fat content. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#6: Fish Oil (Menhaden and Sardine)
Even though fish and fish oils do carry good omega 3 fats their quantity of saturated fats should not be ignored. The fish with the most saturated fats are Menhaden and Sardine oils (30% saturated fat), Cod liver oil (23%), Herring oil (21%), and Salmon oil (20%).
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#7: Cheese
A vegetarian source of protein, and also a good source of calcium, cheese is a tasty addition to most any dish. Hard goat cheese contains the most saturated fat at 24 grams per 100 gram serving, or 123% of the DV. It is followed by Cheddar (105% DV), Roquefort (96% DV), Fontina (96% DV), and Gjetost, Gruyere, Muenster, Monterey, and Parmesan all at 95% DV per 100 grams, or about 20% saturated fat.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#8: Nuts and Seeds (Pilinuts, Brazilnuts, Macadamia)
Packed with vitamins, minerals, and heart healthy fats and fibers, nuts and seeds are a great snack food, particularly if they are dry roasted unsalted. They do, however, also carry saturated fats, the highest being pilinuts at 31% saturated fat, or 156% DV per 100 grams. It is followed by Brazil nuts (15% saturated fat), Macadamia (12%), Watermelon seeds (10%), Cashews (10%), Pine nuts (10%), and Sesame Seeds (9%).
Click to see complete nutrition facts. Click here for a list of seeds and nuts lowest in calories.

#9:Processed Meats (Sausage and Pâté)
Sausages and Pâté contain a lot of the animal fats that are #4 on this list, so it is no surprise that they appear here. Most sausages and pâtés are 15% saturated fat. A single serving of Bratwurst (84 grams) will have 12.5 grams of saturated fat for 63% of the DV.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#10: Whipped Cream
The classic topping to cakes, pies, and coffees, whipped cream is about 14% saturated fat. One hundred grams provides 14 grams of saturated fat, or 69% of DV. One cup provides 41% DV, and a tablespoon(3g) provides 2% DV.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.



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Comments.
Name:Sam
Location:London
Subject:Coconuts
The saturated fat in coconut is simply not the same as that found in animal fats. I used to avoid coconut milk because of all the scaremongering about how unhealthy it was. Then I took a job in Sri Lanka and ate coconut-based curries and other foods for lunch and dinner every day for 4 months. I lost a huge amount of weight in doing so and have never been healthier. What I did cut down on was red meat, alcohol, and processed sugars. There is absolutely nothing 'unhealthy' per se about coconut.
Posted on 2011-08-09 09:00:38
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coconuts
Hi Sam, thanks for your comment. Contrary to what you have stipulated this article does not condone or endorse the use of coconuts. It does state that saturated fats have been linked to heart disease and that this finding is controversial. Please also note that dark chocolate, another food listed here that is high in saturated fat, is also a HealthAliciousNess superfood. As always, different foods work well for different people. Thanks for sharing your opinion and experiences here.
Posted on 2011-08-09 09:04:09
Name:Foodie
Location:USA
Subject:Cocoa Powder Fat Content
Cocoa Powder fat content ranges from 5% to 25%, so you need to add a statement about it in your article.
Posted on 2011-08-15 18:47:59
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cocoa Powder Fat Content
Thanks for your comment, a line about the possible higher fat content in cocoa powder has now been added. All the data from this ranking is sourced from the U.S. Agriculture Research Service Nutrition Facts Database that states cocoa powder contains 2% fat. Do you have any reference to a cocoa powder product which contains more fat?
Posted on 2011-08-16 22:52:31
Name:Anj
Location:India
Subject:Coconut
Hi there, I am a little confused about chocolate and nuts, sometimes they say they are both good to have and that they reduce fat or help to reduce it, and sometimes different, so I don't exactly understand what actually is right.
Posted on 2011-10-05 10:02:17
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coconut and Healthy Saturated Fats
Hi Anj, thanks for your question. Basically there are conflicting studies on saturated fat, with some studies reporting that saturated fats are good, and others saying they are bad. No saturated fat will actually lower the amount of fat in your body, but some, like almonds, can help to lower your cholesterol. The thing about coconuts, nuts, and chocolate is that they are all high fiber foods, the fact that they are high in fiber means that they are likely the healthiest of all saturated fats and can help lower your cholesterol and possibly help as part of a fat loss program, but because they are also high in calories, you need to be careful. Hope that helps!
Posted on 2011-10-05 10:14:48
Name:Jenny
Location:Australia
Subject:Saturated Fats and Acne
Hi, I've been reading that saturated fats (not the natural ones, but the "bad" saturated fats such as KFC) can be a cause of acne. Does this mean that eating a healthy amount of "good" saturated fats, such as the ones found in nuts will also trigger acne flares? Thanks!
Posted on 2011-10-09 12:38:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Saturated Fat and Acne
Hi Jenny, thanks for your question. Basically fats that are high in dietary fiber, like almonds and dark chocolate (at least 80% Cacao) will be less likely to affect acne and may even have a positive effect. Please note that acne can also be caused by genetic, hormonal, and other reasons than diet! In terms of diet, you are better off avoiding sugars and other sweet foods in order to minimize flare ups. Hope that helps!
Posted on 2011-10-09 12:43:36
Name:Farouha
Location:Dubai
Subject:Pili Nuts
I love pili nuts! How much can one eat in a day and not exceed the DV for saturated fat? Even the candied ones???
Posted on 2012-01-25 03:45:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Pili Nuts
Hi Farouha, thanks for your question. Around 2 ounces or 30 pilinuts will contain the percent daily value (DV) for saturated fat. Candied pilinuts are likely to contain more saturated fat, due to the use of some fat, like butter, in creating their candy coating.
Posted on 2012-01-25 03:53:17
Name:Cha
Location:Philippines
Subject:Are all Saturated Fats Bad?
Well I disagree about the fish oil, the peanuts, and the dark chocolate. Of course you can eat a small chocolate like a hershey's kiss, and with the peanut, I do love peanuts, it's best food to make your brain smart. With fish you just have to avoid the wild and the farm fish because they have a high content of mercury.
Posted on 2012-01-25 04:01:05
Name:William
Location:St Thomas
Subject:Acne Question
Just to add to the answer about saturated fats and acne, it has been suggested to me in the past that perhaps the reason that 'bad saturated' fats such as KFC are bad for acne is because they're inherently greasy, so it may be that touching foods like french fries and fried chicken and then inevitably touching your face is what causes more acne. Thanks.
Posted on 2012-01-26 21:05:56
Name:Ron Boydston
Location:Canada
Subject:Saturated fat
  1. Saturated fat lowers your risk of heart disease: it increases levels of HDL.
  2. Saturated fat strengthens your immunity: it contains fatty acids like lauric, myristic, & caprylic, which function as powerful anti-viral, fungal, and microbial agents.
  3. Saturated fat feeds your brain: it supplies the vital chemicals you brain needs to remain sharp and focused.
  4. Saturated fat strengthens your bones: bones need it in order to utilize calcium.
  5. Saturated fat is vital for healthy cells: it gives the materials for building resilient cells. Fats give us energy for physical activity, and is a natural defense against depression.
Posted on 2012-03-04 12:20:18
Name:June A
Subject:Hydrogenated Oils
I think your listing on Hydrogenated Oils is misleading. You imply that palm oil and coconut oil are hydrogenated in their natural state. In truth, there is no such thing as a natural hydrogenated oil. All hydrogenated oils are processed oils and are usually vegetable or seed oils. While both palm oil and coconut oil may be hydrogenated, you can get virgin oils that are naturally saturated but not hydrogenated.
Posted on 2012-03-15 11:18:28
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hydrogenated Oils
Hi June, thanks for your comment. The article has now been changed to incorporate the distinction in commercial processing of hydrogenated oils.
Posted on 2012-03-15 15:54:30
Name:Donna
Location:United States
Subject:Foods with 20 Grams of Fat
I am about to start a medication treatment which requires me to eat at least 20 grams of fat 30 minutes before I take my pill. I have to do this three times a day. Any suggestions?
Posted on 2012-03-29 21:34:55
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Foods with 20 Grams of Fat
Hi Donna, thanks for your question. Here are some serving size suggestions of various high fat foods which contain approximately 20 grams of fat. You can also eat larger portion sizes or eat them in combination.
  • 1oz Macadamia Nuts (~11 nuts): 21g of fat
  • 1oz Brazil Nuts (~6 nuts): 19g of fat
  • 1oz Almonds (~23 nuts): 14g of fat
  • 1 Avocado: 30g of fat
  • 1oz Dark Chocolate: 15g of fat
  • 1 Tablespoon Olive Oil: 14g of fat
Hope that helps!

Complete nutrition facts for Macadamia Nuts, Brazil Nuts, and Almonds.

Complete nutrition facts for Avocados, Dark Chocolate, and Olive Oil.
Posted on 2012-03-30 15:06:36
Name:Tammi Henderson
Location:Ohio
Subject:Saturated Fats
I'm a student at The Southwest Institute of the Healing Arts. Currently enrolled in holistic nutrition! I'd like to state as a fact, saturated fats are only bad when they contain arachadonic acid, which is found in conventionally farmed animals, who are over loaded with hormones and antibiotics! This has caused the rise of cancer in America, heart disease, depression, copd, ADHD/ADD, obesity, and probably more! My advice to anyone who wants to lose weight, go organic! Meats & vegetables with hormones, antibiotics and pesticides is strait poisoning America!
Posted on 2012-04-26 19:23:41
Name:Laura Harwood
Location:Reading,UK
Subject:Confused
I thought that saturated fat was now considered to be good for you? I had heard that polyunsaturates were bad, trans fat every one seems to agree on are bad, mono fats good.

Proprietary Low fat spreads and foods are bad because of the amount of chemicals etc, and because they are just an unnatural food.

Sugar is the biggest enemy of all, as per Yudkins 'pure white and deadly' book.

Apparently the public has been grossly misled over the fat issue due to the misleading work of Ancel Keys in the 50's. The NHS and british heart foundation are still spouting the sat.fat is bad line.

How are we supposed to make healthy choices when there is so much mis/dis information around?!

Posted on 2012-08-29 09:34:09
Name:Bob Lecro
Location:Brooklyn
Subject:Healthy Food Choices?
What are the best foods to eat when you are a vegetarian and want to eat good fats?
Posted on 2012-10-23 16:43:53
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Healthy Food Choices?
Hi Bob, thanks for your question. Aim to get your fats from nuts and seeds, avocados, olives and olive oil, as well as canola oil. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-10-23 19:00:47
Name:Naomi Most
Location:Oakland, CA
Subject:This is my diet.
I eat 70% of my daily calories from all of the sources you wrote in this article, with the exception of #1 and #8. I have never looked better, felt better, or performed better in my entire life.
Posted on 2012-10-30 01:26:41
Name:Adam
Location:Indiana
Subject:Saturated Fat
The whole idea that saturated fat is bad is nothing more than a myth. It was a theory that was very flawed and pushed. Many studies show improved cholestrol levels on a low carb diet. A low fat diet struggles to even show decreased risk in heart disease.
Posted on 2012-11-21 19:48:01
Name:Citygirl
Location:Dallas, TX
Subject:Coconut oil
Coconut oil is NOT hydrogenated. (99% of it on the market is not hydrogenated, there will always be "one" lone product that is). Coconut oil is one of the healthiest oils you can eat. Look up Bruce Fife on amazon.
Posted on 2012-11-26 16:42:34
Name:PF
Location:San Diego, CA
Subject:Fat or No fat
What I experienced is this: "what you intake must be less than what you burn!" I have been using this method for many years and it works. If I don't exercise I gain weight, and that's all there is to it - so get off your duff and set some goals to burn it off. Healthy food and a small amount of determination gets you out of unknowns! Don't say I didn't tell you!
Posted on 2013-01-25 12:07:40
Name:Lisa
Location:Central New Jersey
Subject:Cholesterol
I was diagnosed with a cholesterol level total of 250 last year. I have been going crazy doing everything I can do to diet and exercise, not eating anything out of the way and all of the foods listed above. Last month my total was down to 212, still high, but better. A lot of times the cholesterol levels can be hereditary. I am not so sure about the avocados and the salmon though. Salmon is good to lower triglycerides, but not ldl cholesterol it seems. Same with avocados it seems possibly.
Posted on 2013-01-27 08:24:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cholesterol
Hi Lisa, thanks for sharing your experience. It is true that genetics plays a role, and some foods may work to reduce cholesterol for some people, but not others. Refer to the article on cholesterol lowering foods for more ideas to lower your cholesterol. Keep trying and experimenting to get your numbers down. Good luck!
Posted on 2013-01-27 15:14:30
Name:Greg
Location:Denver, CO
Subject:Misinformation regarding saturated fat and coronary heart disease link
After reading the comments to this article, it is quite evident that you are cherry picking the responses that you'd like to address. Your argument would hold much more water if you addressed some of the insightful and scientifically proven counterarguments that have been mentioned. Your only reference cited is the USDA. Therefore, this simply reads as an opinion piece that has no means of propping itself up. I urge you to look beyond the USDA's daily recommendations for your information, as I assure you that the peer-reviewed scientific literature will change your mind if you read it objectively. For instance, dietary cholesterol (via saturated fatty acids) has little to no correlation to coronary heart disease. This has been scientifically proven in hundreds of articles. Here is one mere example.
Posted on 2013-01-31 22:16:22
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Misinformation regarding saturated fat and coronary heart disease link
Hi Greg, thanks for your comments and concerns. Firstly, this article clearly states in the introduction that the link between saturated fat and heart disease is controversial, advising that the safe option is to limit intake of saturated fats.

Even looking at the abstract of the article you give as an example, the phrases and statements they use do not agree with your assertion that "dietary cholesterol (via saturated fatty acids) has little to no correlation to coronary heart disease". Take for example this line in the abstract: "lowering dietary cholesterol content might reduce the risk of CHD considerably in a subgroup of individuals who are highly responsive to changes in cholesterol intake". So at least for some people, eating saturated fat and cholesterol increases their risk of heart disease. The question is: how big is that sub-group? And is it worth taking the risk you are not in it?

There are many people who smoke cigarettes and live into their 80s, 90s, and beyond, does that mean cigarettes are not dangerous? This example is pertinent since it took so long to prove the danger of cigarettes, and took the public so long to stop smoking them, at great cost to their health and society.

Substituting low-fat, low-fiber, high sugar foods is definitely not the answer to heart health. However, this site advocates limiting, not eliminating, saturated fats, while maintaining a diet high in vegetables, whole grains, and fruits. It seems the article you provided is in total agreement with this advice.

Heart disease has been among the top 2 causes of death in the United States for many years. It is largely viewed as a preventable cause of death. If dietary saturated fat and cholesterol is not increasing the risk of heart disease then what is? Is the link between dietary saturated fat/cholesterol so weak that it is misinformation to suggest people limit saturated fats? Even the article you referenced states "animal studies have pointed to a causal role of dietary cholesterol in atherogenesis (formation plaques in the lining of arteries)". If this is the case in animal studies then why are humans immune?

Many people in the United States and other developed countries suffer and die from heart disease. It is likely they can reduce the risk and prevent much of this disease via various lifestyle factors including consumption of high fiber low calorie foods, avoidance of high sugar foods, limiting intake of saturated fats and cholesterol, and getting regular aerobic exercise.

Posted on 2013-01-31 22:41:28
Name:Anonymous
Subject:Saturated Fat is Good for You
In my mind, it is sugar and grains which lead to weight gain and people should eat as much saturated fat as they like. Excess glycogen is what is converted and stored as fat on the body, not saturated fat.
Posted on 2013-02-01 13:37:39
Name:Natalie
Location:England
Subject:Agree!
I was just going to say, it's sugar and refined grains that are causing the obesity epidemic, not fats.
Posted on 2013-02-01 14:18:41
Name:Mike
Location:San Diego
Subject:Bacon & Eggs Verses A Bagel with Plain Cream Cheese
Which has more Saturated Fats? Which is healthier?
Posted on 2013-02-04 16:49:44
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Bacon & Eggs Verses A Bagel with Plain Cream Cheese
Hi Mike, thanks for your question, and whether it is rhetorical or not, here is some information.

Nutrition facts for Bacon and Eggs.
Nutrition facts for a plain bagel, cream cheese (fat and non-fat).

Looking at the nutrition facts it is apparent that a plain bagel with 1oz of full fat cream cheese has more saturated fat than 1 fried egg and up to 4 pieces of bacon. Interestingly, the fat free cream cheese still has saturated fat, however, it is much less than even 1 slice of bacon and an egg.

If you are looking for healthy breakfast options with heart healthy fats then try:

  • Whole wheat toast with avocado and egg
  • Whole wheat toast with an egg and tomato
  • Rolled Oats with oat bran, flax seeds/almonds, and blue berries
  • Whole wheat toast with smoked salmon and dill
  • Fresh salad with vegetables, almonds and olive oil vinaigrette
If you have high cholesterol (200mg/dL+) or have a genetic predisposition to high cholesterol then you may not want to eat even 1 egg, and substitute tofu or salmon instead. Hope those suggestions help.
Nutrition facts for avocados, smoked salmon, and whole wheat toast.
Posted on 2013-02-04 19:20:28
Name:Jeff
Location:USA
Subject:Saturated fat is not bad
Like many posters above me who have looked at all the literature themselves saturated fat, cholesterol, and fat in general is not bad for our bodies. The refined and processed carbohydrates they have pushed as healthy are what is causing heart disease. The high insulin levels due to over consumption of carbohydrates causes inflammation in the arterial wall causing cracks. LDL comes to plug up the cracks and when healed is taken away by HDL. In chronically elevated insulin levels there are so many cracks that a plaque begins to form (not too mention carbs causing the bad kind of LDL to form).

If you look at the majority of literature it really isn't controversial at all that fat is not the culprit. Obesity is still on the rise even though everything around us is not "low-fat", or "no-fat". It's a complete fallacy. Low fat diets are prone to making people depressed as well. I could sit here and post all the literature but people will never open their eyes unless they want to.

Posted on 2013-02-06 20:17:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Saturated fat is not bad

Hi Jeff, thanks for your comments. It is true that refined carbohydrates and sugar have caused many health problems, however, it is not right to assume that this means saturated fats are fine, and people can eat as much saturated fat as they want.

Saturated fats are found in different foods and those foods are not created equally. As previously mentioned, saturated fats from almonds, flax seeds, or dark chocolate are healthy and listed as super foods on this site.

Further, people are different. As the article in a prior comment noted, saturated fats can increase cardiovascular risk for a portion of the population. Till medicine can be personalized, all people should limit, or moderate, saturated fat consumption.

Numerous comments have suggested that saturated fat is not to be blamed for the obesity epidemic, and have therefore implied that saturated fats are safe and not related to heart disease. This is false. Being obese is not necessarily related to an elevated risk of heart disease, and someone who has an average body weight, may still have a higher chance of heart disease. Yes, refined sugars and carbs have contributed to weight gain, but that does not mean that saturated fats are pardoned.

People looking for more literature and insights into this issue can check the wikipedia article on the saturated fat controversy.

Posted on 2013-02-06 20:37:11
Name:Eddie Alianiello
Location:United States
Subject:Growing Consensus on Health Benefits of Saturated Fat
Your article is well written, well laid out, and I found it useful, but...As you've noticed most of these comments were aligned with debunking all or part of the theory that saturated fats are unhealthy. Probably because the evidence is overwhelmingly opposed. The litany of health benefits associated with your above list of foods is hardly available at 20 grams a day. Check out the cross cultural studies...

I can understand erring on the side of caution, but this "controversy" is about as inconclusive as global warming. The small fraction of scientists still disputing its probability are on the industries payroll.

Comparing a small subgroup of potential cholesterol victims (not saturated-fats) to a small subgroup of smoking survivors is not analogous. It would be like concluding that no one should eat peanuts because they might be deadly.

The health benefits of saturated fats as echoed by Naomi (above) need to be pronounced more clearly. Right now, thanks to deliberate misinformation in the service of profit, people still have the cure confused with the disease. Hopefully you will use your platform and talents and raise your voice a little. (Also, fittingly KFC uses hydrogenated unsaturated fat, which was the bad kind after all.)

Posted on 2013-02-27 18:58:04
Name:John Doyle
Location:Australia
Subject:SFA and PUFA
I also agree with the respondents who support SFAs (Saturated Fatty Acids). This is largely because of our evolutionary history where SFAs were limited but the preferred food, the most valuable food. As with all fats, moderation matters. I personally lost 15kg, mostly by discarding all PUFA (Poly-unsaturated fatty acids) and switching to coconut oil. As I understand, apart from the balance of Omega 6 to omega 3 PUFA [ideally max 2:1 instead of 20:1 we see today] a major flaw in PUFA is it's instability. It oxidizes quickly and does so at body temperature, and during storage can go rancid particularly if exposed to sunlight. SFA are stable at body temperature so we don't use up the body's supply of antioxidants fighting a foodstuff we don't need anyway. Possibly all the studies favourable to PUFA used perfectly preserved fat and not what one finds in normal life.
Posted on 2013-04-23 01:03:16
Name:Troy
Location:Los Angeles
Subject:Saturated Fats Improved My Health...
I had high cholesterol 290, and my body was always getting injured from silly things like any kind of simple exercise. I was vegan and diabetic, and eating a NO FAT diet. After reading about the benefits of fat, I started on a high fat, high animal protein diet with the only carbs being vegetables. I also at a lot of eggs. After 1 year my cholesterol normalized, I don't get any more injures working out and my health is better than its ever been. Its important to eat organic meats as much as possible as the health benefits from them are much greater...I also eat a lot of nuts and tons of leafy green vegetables...I also avoid fruits as they have a high fructose content and instead eat berries of all kinds. One important point, someone recommended using canola oil which has been proven to be toxic to the human body by causing inflammation because of its high omega 6 content, not to mention its made from rapeseed which is poisonous to humans. I also take krill and salmon oil supplements to keep up my omega 3 intake daily. The most important thing I learned is that each individual should adjust their diet to suit themselves as everyone is different...these worked for me, but you might need to eat slightly differently. Doing the exact opposite of the AMA recommendations is a good starting point.
Posted on 2013-06-18 17:19:27
Name:Suraj
Location:India
Subject:AML Prolapse due to fat & magnesium deficiency
Hello. I'm 18 and just had a health check-up. My report says I have "Mild AML Prolapse". My body fat percent is abnormally low (7.1%). I need to have fat-rich foods, but what kind should I have - saturated or unsaturated? What are the easily available foods pertaining to my disorder?
Posted on 2013-06-25 10:17:39
Name:Lou
Location:Ireland
Subject:Saturated fats and MS
I've been looking into saturated fats in some detail for an MS diagnosis and Swank's diet of 15g or less of saturated fats per day stops the progression of MS. Definitely worth cutting it out to prevent such diseases.
Posted on 2013-07-07 12:06:09
Name:Alan
Location:Ohio
Subject:RE: Saturated Fats and MS
Lou, please keep your mind open. Among the many benefits of saturated fat is the ability to protect myelin. I would suggest that eliminating gluten, indeed all cereal grains and most carbohydrates, would do wonders for your gut where it appears many auto immune conditions originate. Try "The Perfect Health Diet" by Paul Jaminet and "Why we get fat" by Gary Taubes as general books on the best way to eliminate the toxins that are responsible for so much of our chronic disease and obesity.
Posted on 2013-07-09 22:29:26
Name:Markku
Location:Finland
Subject:Saturated fat is complicated
This is a typical backwards article. First you take the premise saturated fat is bad for you and the construct an inaccurate story from that. Why don't you accept that fats are good for you except for hydrogenated, trans fat, commercially processed fat, Omega 6 fats (because the ratio between Omega 3 and Omega 6 is so skewed ..) So, instead of looking at those factors you completely confuse the issue.
Posted on 2013-07-14 17:15:47
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Saturated fat is complicated
Hi Marrku, thanks for your comment. The introduction to the article has now been rewritten to reflect the complexity of saturated fats. Further, new articles will be made to highlight foods for each of the saturated fatty acids, so please check back.
Posted on 2013-07-15 11:02:20
Name:Mike
Location:St. Louis
Subject:Serve me up some saturated fat and cream...
...just don't feed me that carb crap that increases insulin, turns on fat storage and inflammation.
Posted on 2013-09-30 05:36:31
Name:Nathan
Location:Texas, USA
Subject:My opinion: Saturated Fats are Good
Thanks for this list. I am trying to seriously increase the level of saturated fat in my diet. This list and other nutrition information charts are invaluable.

1) I 100% disagree with the USDA food pyramid guidelines. For example, it says to restrict sugar to just a little in the top section, but then they say to base your diet on grains, starches and carbohydrates which are merely long chains of sugar.

2a) Not a single study has proven a causative correlation of dietary fat w/ increased heart disease or higher body fat, but numerous studies and personal tests have shown a clear correlation opposite. There's a big difference between a cause and a correlation. If you have a beer and go to bed and a train runs into your house, there's a correlation as an 'alcohol-related' accident. That beer wasn't the cause but was 'co-related' to the accident.

2b) The fallback of "As always, different foods work well for different people." only goes so far. Remember, at our core, all people on this planet have the same grandparents. We need the same core nutrition to deal with the same physical needs. Thus my need or specific nutrition may be different, but my body still deals with the same foods the same way.

3) Watch "FatHead" (2002) for a quick primer on government-inflicted health problems and government-inflicted failed solutions. Then educate yourself because the government and agri-businesses aren't going to do it.

Posted on 2013-11-13 15:21:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: My opinion: Saturated Fats are Good
Hi Nathan, thanks for your comments, look for this list to be expanded in the near future.

In regards to your comments, there are plenty of studies which state good and bad things about saturated fats, especially with regard to heart disease. This meta-analysis on saturated fats and heart disease states: "Intake of saturated fat in the United States and Europe has fallen markedly since the first recommendations on dietary fat quality were issued 50 y ago. The resulting fall in LDL cholesterol led to a distinct decrease in CHD, especially in the early period before the arrival of statins in the 1990s".

You can argue this all you want, but the best you can say is that the issue is controversial and the worst you can say is that high consumption of saturated fats greatly increase risk of heart disease.

If you want to argue that this is just correlation, and not the cause. Well you are welcome too, but it would be wrong to advise others that saturated fats are healthy because there is a lack of causation, when there is so much convincing correlation. The same causation/correlation argument was brought up with cigarettes years ago, and we all know how that ended. Exercise caution before blaming conflicts of interest with business. After all, there are industries on both sides of this argument with profits on the line. As Markku commented above, there are a wide range of saturated fats, and the details regarding to health will likely be in the type of fat. More detailed lists on the type of fats will be published here later.

Posted on 2013-11-13 18:30:22
Name:Lisa
Location:Indiana
Subject:High in fat foods
Can somebody give me some meals to make high in fat? I see a lot I can snack on but what meals? I started medication I have to take 4x day and with fatty food...
Posted on 2013-11-20 21:33:51
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: High fat food recipes...
Hi Lisa, thanks for your question, and your suggestion of creating high fat recipes. You can try this High Fat High Calorie recipe book on Amazon.com. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-11-25 21:54:04
Name:Inogen
Location:England
Subject:Fat
Coconut oil is brilliant - I also lost loads of weight when I started using it. Lisa, coconut and any nut or seed is good. Eat lots of vegetables as well and steer clear of meat and milk - unethical and unhealthy. Good luck.
Posted on 2013-11-26 07:32:16
Name:Julian
Location:Puerto Rico
Subject:Saturated Fats
Saturated fats are good for you. Its in combination with high carb diets that are bad and stored in the body. Try a low or no carb, high fat (specially saturated fats), moderate proteins and you will lose weight, lower bad cholesterol, and have higherr HDL.
Posted on 2014-01-28 15:56:40

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Comments.
Name:Sam
Location:London
Subject:Coconuts
The saturated fat in coconut is simply not the same as that found in animal fats. I used to avoid coconut milk because of all the scaremongering about how unhealthy it was. Then I took a job in Sri Lanka and ate coconut-based curries and other foods for lunch and dinner every day for 4 months. I lost a huge amount of weight in doing so and have never been healthier. What I did cut down on was red meat, alcohol, and processed sugars. There is absolutely nothing 'unhealthy' per se about coconut.
Posted on 2011-08-09 09:00:38
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coconuts
Hi Sam, thanks for your comment. Contrary to what you have stipulated this article does not condone or endorse the use of coconuts. It does state that saturated fats have been linked to heart disease and that this finding is controversial. Please also note that dark chocolate, another food listed here that is high in saturated fat, is also a HealthAliciousNess superfood. As always, different foods work well for different people. Thanks for sharing your opinion and experiences here.
Posted on 2011-08-09 09:04:09
Name:Foodie
Location:USA
Subject:Cocoa Powder Fat Content
Cocoa Powder fat content ranges from 5% to 25%, so you need to add a statement about it in your article.
Posted on 2011-08-15 18:47:59
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cocoa Powder Fat Content
Thanks for your comment, a line about the possible higher fat content in cocoa powder has now been added. All the data from this ranking is sourced from the U.S. Agriculture Research Service Nutrition Facts Database that states cocoa powder contains 2% fat. Do you have any reference to a cocoa powder product which contains more fat?
Posted on 2011-08-16 22:52:31
Name:Anj
Location:India
Subject:Coconut
Hi there, I am a little confused about chocolate and nuts, sometimes they say they are both good to have and that they reduce fat or help to reduce it, and sometimes different, so I don't exactly understand what actually is right.
Posted on 2011-10-05 10:02:17
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Coconut and Healthy Saturated Fats
Hi Anj, thanks for your question. Basically there are conflicting studies on saturated fat, with some studies reporting that saturated fats are good, and others saying they are bad. No saturated fat will actually lower the amount of fat in your body, but some, like almonds, can help to lower your cholesterol. The thing about coconuts, nuts, and chocolate is that they are all high fiber foods, the fact that they are high in fiber means that they are likely the healthiest of all saturated fats and can help lower your cholesterol and possibly help as part of a fat loss program, but because they are also high in calories, you need to be careful. Hope that helps!
Posted on 2011-10-05 10:14:48
Name:Jenny
Location:Australia
Subject:Saturated Fats and Acne
Hi, I've been reading that saturated fats (not the natural ones, but the "bad" saturated fats such as KFC) can be a cause of acne. Does this mean that eating a healthy amount of "good" saturated fats, such as the ones found in nuts will also trigger acne flares? Thanks!
Posted on 2011-10-09 12:38:19
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Saturated Fat and Acne
Hi Jenny, thanks for your question. Basically fats that are high in dietary fiber, like almonds and dark chocolate (at least 80% Cacao) will be less likely to affect acne and may even have a positive effect. Please note that acne can also be caused by genetic, hormonal, and other reasons than diet! In terms of diet, you are better off avoiding sugars and other sweet foods in order to minimize flare ups. Hope that helps!
Posted on 2011-10-09 12:43:36
Name:Farouha
Location:Dubai
Subject:Pili Nuts
I love pili nuts! How much can one eat in a day and not exceed the DV for saturated fat? Even the candied ones???
Posted on 2012-01-25 03:45:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Pili Nuts
Hi Farouha, thanks for your question. Around 2 ounces or 30 pilinuts will contain the percent daily value (DV) for saturated fat. Candied pilinuts are likely to contain more saturated fat, due to the use of some fat, like butter, in creating their candy coating.
Posted on 2012-01-25 03:53:17
Name:Cha
Location:Philippines
Subject:Are all Saturated Fats Bad?
Well I disagree about the fish oil, the peanuts, and the dark chocolate. Of course you can eat a small chocolate like a hershey's kiss, and with the peanut, I do love peanuts, it's best food to make your brain smart. With fish you just have to avoid the wild and the farm fish because they have a high content of mercury.
Posted on 2012-01-25 04:01:05
Name:William
Location:St Thomas
Subject:Acne Question
Just to add to the answer about saturated fats and acne, it has been suggested to me in the past that perhaps the reason that 'bad saturated' fats such as KFC are bad for acne is because they're inherently greasy, so it may be that touching foods like french fries and fried chicken and then inevitably touching your face is what causes more acne. Thanks.
Posted on 2012-01-26 21:05:56
Name:Ron Boydston
Location:Canada
Subject:Saturated fat
  1. Saturated fat lowers your risk of heart disease: it increases levels of HDL.
  2. Saturated fat strengthens your immunity: it contains fatty acids like lauric, myristic, & caprylic, which function as powerful anti-viral, fungal, and microbial agents.
  3. Saturated fat feeds your brain: it supplies the vital chemicals you brain needs to remain sharp and focused.
  4. Saturated fat strengthens your bones: bones need it in order to utilize calcium.
  5. Saturated fat is vital for healthy cells: it gives the materials for building resilient cells. Fats give us energy for physical activity, and is a natural defense against depression.
Posted on 2012-03-04 12:20:18
Name:June A
Subject:Hydrogenated Oils
I think your listing on Hydrogenated Oils is misleading. You imply that palm oil and coconut oil are hydrogenated in their natural state. In truth, there is no such thing as a natural hydrogenated oil. All hydrogenated oils are processed oils and are usually vegetable or seed oils. While both palm oil and coconut oil may be hydrogenated, you can get virgin oils that are naturally saturated but not hydrogenated.
Posted on 2012-03-15 11:18:28
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Hydrogenated Oils
Hi June, thanks for your comment. The article has now been changed to incorporate the distinction in commercial processing of hydrogenated oils.
Posted on 2012-03-15 15:54:30
Name:Donna
Location:United States
Subject:Foods with 20 Grams of Fat
I am about to start a medication treatment which requires me to eat at least 20 grams of fat 30 minutes before I take my pill. I have to do this three times a day. Any suggestions?
Posted on 2012-03-29 21:34:55
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Foods with 20 Grams of Fat
Hi Donna, thanks for your question. Here are some serving size suggestions of various high fat foods which contain approximately 20 grams of fat. You can also eat larger portion sizes or eat them in combination.
  • 1oz Macadamia Nuts (~11 nuts): 21g of fat
  • 1oz Brazil Nuts (~6 nuts): 19g of fat
  • 1oz Almonds (~23 nuts): 14g of fat
  • 1 Avocado: 30g of fat
  • 1oz Dark Chocolate: 15g of fat
  • 1 Tablespoon Olive Oil: 14g of fat
Hope that helps!

Complete nutrition facts for Macadamia Nuts, Brazil Nuts, and Almonds.

Complete nutrition facts for Avocados, Dark Chocolate, and Olive Oil.
Posted on 2012-03-30 15:06:36
Name:Tammi Henderson
Location:Ohio
Subject:Saturated Fats
I'm a student at The Southwest Institute of the Healing Arts. Currently enrolled in holistic nutrition! I'd like to state as a fact, saturated fats are only bad when they contain arachadonic acid, which is found in conventionally farmed animals, who are over loaded with hormones and antibiotics! This has caused the rise of cancer in America, heart disease, depression, copd, ADHD/ADD, obesity, and probably more! My advice to anyone who wants to lose weight, go organic! Meats & vegetables with hormones, antibiotics and pesticides is strait poisoning America!
Posted on 2012-04-26 19:23:41
Name:Laura Harwood
Location:Reading,UK
Subject:Confused
I thought that saturated fat was now considered to be good for you? I had heard that polyunsaturates were bad, trans fat every one seems to agree on are bad, mono fats good.

Proprietary Low fat spreads and foods are bad because of the amount of chemicals etc, and because they are just an unnatural food.

Sugar is the biggest enemy of all, as per Yudkins 'pure white and deadly' book.

Apparently the public has been grossly misled over the fat issue due to the misleading work of Ancel Keys in the 50's. The NHS and british heart foundation are still spouting the sat.fat is bad line.

How are we supposed to make healthy choices when there is so much mis/dis information around?!

Posted on 2012-08-29 09:34:09
Name:Bob Lecro
Location:Brooklyn
Subject:Healthy Food Choices?
What are the best foods to eat when you are a vegetarian and want to eat good fats?
Posted on 2012-10-23 16:43:53
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Healthy Food Choices?
Hi Bob, thanks for your question. Aim to get your fats from nuts and seeds, avocados, olives and olive oil, as well as canola oil. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-10-23 19:00:47
Name:Naomi Most
Location:Oakland, CA
Subject:This is my diet.
I eat 70% of my daily calories from all of the sources you wrote in this article, with the exception of #1 and #8. I have never looked better, felt better, or performed better in my entire life.
Posted on 2012-10-30 01:26:41
Name:Adam
Location:Indiana
Subject:Saturated Fat
The whole idea that saturated fat is bad is nothing more than a myth. It was a theory that was very flawed and pushed. Many studies show improved cholestrol levels on a low carb diet. A low fat diet struggles to even show decreased risk in heart disease.
Posted on 2012-11-21 19:48:01
Name:Citygirl
Location:Dallas, TX
Subject:Coconut oil
Coconut oil is NOT hydrogenated. (99% of it on the market is not hydrogenated, there will always be "one" lone product that is). Coconut oil is one of the healthiest oils you can eat. Look up Bruce Fife on amazon.
Posted on 2012-11-26 16:42:34
Name:PF
Location:San Diego, CA
Subject:Fat or No fat
What I experienced is this: "what you intake must be less than what you burn!" I have been using this method for many years and it works. If I don't exercise I gain weight, and that's all there is to it - so get off your duff and set some goals to burn it off. Healthy food and a small amount of determination gets you out of unknowns! Don't say I didn't tell you!
Posted on 2013-01-25 12:07:40
Name:Lisa
Location:Central New Jersey
Subject:Cholesterol
I was diagnosed with a cholesterol level total of 250 last year. I have been going crazy doing everything I can do to diet and exercise, not eating anything out of the way and all of the foods listed above. Last month my total was down to 212, still high, but better. A lot of times the cholesterol levels can be hereditary. I am not so sure about the avocados and the salmon though. Salmon is good to lower triglycerides, but not ldl cholesterol it seems. Same with avocados it seems possibly.
Posted on 2013-01-27 08:24:12
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cholesterol
Hi Lisa, thanks for sharing your experience. It is true that genetics plays a role, and some foods may work to reduce cholesterol for some people, but not others. Refer to the article on cholesterol lowering foods for more ideas to lower your cholesterol. Keep trying and experimenting to get your numbers down. Good luck!
Posted on 2013-01-27 15:14:30
Name:Greg
Location:Denver, CO
Subject:Misinformation regarding saturated fat and coronary heart disease link
After reading the comments to this article, it is quite evident that you are cherry picking the responses that you'd like to address. Your argument would hold much more water if you addressed some of the insightful and scientifically proven counterarguments that have been mentioned. Your only reference cited is the USDA. Therefore, this simply reads as an opinion piece that has no means of propping itself up. I urge you to look beyond the USDA's daily recommendations for your information, as I assure you that the peer-reviewed scientific literature will change your mind if you read it objectively. For instance, dietary cholesterol (via saturated fatty acids) has little to no correlation to coronary heart disease. This has been scientifically proven in hundreds of articles. Here is one mere example.
Posted on 2013-01-31 22:16:22
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Misinformation regarding saturated fat and coronary heart disease link
Hi Greg, thanks for your comments and concerns. Firstly, this article clearly states in the introduction that the link between saturated fat and heart disease is controversial, advising that the safe option is to limit intake of saturated fats.

Even looking at the abstract of the article you give as an example, the phrases and statements they use do not agree with your assertion that "dietary cholesterol (via saturated fatty acids) has little to no correlation to coronary heart disease". Take for example this line in the abstract: "lowering dietary cholesterol content might reduce the risk of CHD considerably in a subgroup of individuals who are highly responsive to changes in cholesterol intake". So at least for some people, eating saturated fat and cholesterol increases their risk of heart disease. The question is: how big is that sub-group? And is it worth taking the risk you are not in it?

There are many people who smoke cigarettes and live into their 80s, 90s, and beyond, does that mean cigarettes are not dangerous? This example is pertinent since it took so long to prove the danger of cigarettes, and took the public so long to stop smoking them, at great cost to their health and society.

Substituting low-fat, low-fiber, high sugar foods is definitely not the answer to heart health. However, this site advocates limiting, not eliminating, saturated fats, while maintaining a diet high in vegetables, whole grains, and fruits. It seems the article you provided is in total agreement with this advice.

Heart disease has been among the top 2 causes of death in the United States for many years. It is largely viewed as a preventable cause of death. If dietary saturated fat and cholesterol is not increasing the risk of heart disease then what is? Is the link between dietary saturated fat/cholesterol so weak that it is misinformation to suggest people limit saturated fats? Even the article you referenced states "animal studies have pointed to a causal role of dietary cholesterol in atherogenesis (formation plaques in the lining of arteries)". If this is the case in animal studies then why are humans immune?

Many people in the United States and other developed countries suffer and die from heart disease. It is likely they can reduce the risk and prevent much of this disease via various lifestyle factors including consumption of high fiber low calorie foods, avoidance of high sugar foods, limiting intake of saturated fats and cholesterol, and getting regular aerobic exercise.

Posted on 2013-01-31 22:41:28
Name:Anonymous
Subject:Saturated Fat is Good for You
In my mind, it is sugar and grains which lead to weight gain and people should eat as much saturated fat as they like. Excess glycogen is what is converted and stored as fat on the body, not saturated fat.
Posted on 2013-02-01 13:37:39
Name:Natalie
Location:England
Subject:Agree!
I was just going to say, it's sugar and refined grains that are causing the obesity epidemic, not fats.
Posted on 2013-02-01 14:18:41
Name:Mike
Location:San Diego
Subject:Bacon & Eggs Verses A Bagel with Plain Cream Cheese
Which has more Saturated Fats? Which is healthier?
Posted on 2013-02-04 16:49:44
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Bacon & Eggs Verses A Bagel with Plain Cream Cheese
Hi Mike, thanks for your question, and whether it is rhetorical or not, here is some information.

Nutrition facts for Bacon and Eggs.
Nutrition facts for a plain bagel, cream cheese (fat and non-fat).

Looking at the nutrition facts it is apparent that a plain bagel with 1oz of full fat cream cheese has more saturated fat than 1 fried egg and up to 4 pieces of bacon. Interestingly, the fat free cream cheese still has saturated fat, however, it is much less than even 1 slice of bacon and an egg.

If you are looking for healthy breakfast options with heart healthy fats then try:

  • Whole wheat toast with avocado and egg
  • Whole wheat toast with an egg and tomato
  • Rolled Oats with oat bran, flax seeds/almonds, and blue berries
  • Whole wheat toast with smoked salmon and dill
  • Fresh salad with vegetables, almonds and olive oil vinaigrette
If you have high cholesterol (200mg/dL+) or have a genetic predisposition to high cholesterol then you may not want to eat even 1 egg, and substitute tofu or salmon instead. Hope those suggestions help.
Nutrition facts for avocados, smoked salmon, and whole wheat toast.
Posted on 2013-02-04 19:20:28
Name:Jeff
Location:USA
Subject:Saturated fat is not bad
Like many posters above me who have looked at all the literature themselves saturated fat, cholesterol, and fat in general is not bad for our bodies. The refined and processed carbohydrates they have pushed as healthy are what is causing heart disease. The high insulin levels due to over consumption of carbohydrates causes inflammation in the arterial wall causing cracks. LDL comes to plug up the cracks and when healed is taken away by HDL. In chronically elevated insulin levels there are so many cracks that a plaque begins to form (not too mention carbs causing the bad kind of LDL to form).

If you look at the majority of literature it really isn't controversial at all that fat is not the culprit. Obesity is still on the rise even though everything around us is not "low-fat", or "no-fat". It's a complete fallacy. Low fat diets are prone to making people depressed as well. I could sit here and post all the literature but people will never open their eyes unless they want to.

Posted on 2013-02-06 20:17:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Saturated fat is not bad

Hi Jeff, thanks for your comments. It is true that refined carbohydrates and sugar have caused many health problems, however, it is not right to assume that this means saturated fats are fine, and people can eat as much saturated fat as they want.

Saturated fats are found in different foods and those foods are not created equally. As previously mentioned, saturated fats from almonds, flax seeds, or dark chocolate are healthy and listed as super foods on this site.

Further, people are different. As the article in a prior comment noted, saturated fats can increase cardiovascular risk for a portion of the population. Till medicine can be personalized, all people should limit, or moderate, saturated fat consumption.

Numerous comments have suggested that saturated fat is not to be blamed for the obesity epidemic, and have therefore implied that saturated fats are safe and not related to heart disease. This is false. Being obese is not necessarily related to an elevated risk of heart disease, and someone who has an average body weight, may still have a higher chance of heart disease. Yes, refined sugars and carbs have contributed to weight gain, but that does not mean that saturated fats are pardoned.

People looking for more literature and insights into this issue can check the wikipedia article on the saturated fat controversy.

Posted on 2013-02-06 20:37:11
Name:Eddie Alianiello
Location:United States
Subject:Growing Consensus on Health Benefits of Saturated Fat
Your article is well written, well laid out, and I found it useful, but...As you've noticed most of these comments were aligned with debunking all or part of the theory that saturated fats are unhealthy. Probably because the evidence is overwhelmingly opposed. The litany of health benefits associated with your above list of foods is hardly available at 20 grams a day. Check out the cross cultural studies...

I can understand erring on the side of caution, but this "controversy" is about as inconclusive as global warming. The small fraction of scientists still disputing its probability are on the industries payroll.

Comparing a small subgroup of potential cholesterol victims (not saturated-fats) to a small subgroup of smoking survivors is not analogous. It would be like concluding that no one should eat peanuts because they might be deadly.

The health benefits of saturated fats as echoed by Naomi (above) need to be pronounced more clearly. Right now, thanks to deliberate misinformation in the service of profit, people still have the cure confused with the disease. Hopefully you will use your platform and talents and raise your voice a little. (Also, fittingly KFC uses hydrogenated unsaturated fat, which was the bad kind after all.)

Posted on 2013-02-27 18:58:04
Name:John Doyle
Location:Australia
Subject:SFA and PUFA
I also agree with the respondents who support SFAs (Saturated Fatty Acids). This is largely because of our evolutionary history where SFAs were limited but the preferred food, the most valuable food. As with all fats, moderation matters. I personally lost 15kg, mostly by discarding all PUFA (Poly-unsaturated fatty acids) and switching to coconut oil. As I understand, apart from the balance of Omega 6 to omega 3 PUFA [ideally max 2:1 instead of 20:1 we see today] a major flaw in PUFA is it's instability. It oxidizes quickly and does so at body temperature, and during storage can go rancid particularly if exposed to sunlight. SFA are stable at body temperature so we don't use up the body's supply of antioxidants fighting a foodstuff we don't need anyway. Possibly all the studies favourable to PUFA used perfectly preserved fat and not what one finds in normal life.
Posted on 2013-04-23 01:03:16
Name:Troy
Location:Los Angeles
Subject:Saturated Fats Improved My Health...
I had high cholesterol 290, and my body was always getting injured from silly things like any kind of simple exercise. I was vegan and diabetic, and eating a NO FAT diet. After reading about the benefits of fat, I started on a high fat, high animal protein diet with the only carbs being vegetables. I also at a lot of eggs. After 1 year my cholesterol normalized, I don't get any more injures working out and my health is better than its ever been. Its important to eat organic meats as much as possible as the health benefits from them are much greater...I also eat a lot of nuts and tons of leafy green vegetables...I also avoid fruits as they have a high fructose content and instead eat berries of all kinds. One important point, someone recommended using canola oil which has been proven to be toxic to the human body by causing inflammation because of its high omega 6 content, not to mention its made from rapeseed which is poisonous to humans. I also take krill and salmon oil supplements to keep up my omega 3 intake daily. The most important thing I learned is that each individual should adjust their diet to suit themselves as everyone is different...these worked for me, but you might need to eat slightly differently. Doing the exact opposite of the AMA recommendations is a good starting point.
Posted on 2013-06-18 17:19:27
Name:Suraj
Location:India
Subject:AML Prolapse due to fat & magnesium deficiency
Hello. I'm 18 and just had a health check-up. My report says I have "Mild AML Prolapse". My body fat percent is abnormally low (7.1%). I need to have fat-rich foods, but what kind should I have - saturated or unsaturated? What are the easily available foods pertaining to my disorder?
Posted on 2013-06-25 10:17:39
Name:Lou
Location:Ireland
Subject:Saturated fats and MS
I've been looking into saturated fats in some detail for an MS diagnosis and Swank's diet of 15g or less of saturated fats per day stops the progression of MS. Definitely worth cutting it out to prevent such diseases.
Posted on 2013-07-07 12:06:09
Name:Alan
Location:Ohio
Subject:RE: Saturated Fats and MS
Lou, please keep your mind open. Among the many benefits of saturated fat is the ability to protect myelin. I would suggest that eliminating gluten, indeed all cereal grains and most carbohydrates, would do wonders for your gut where it appears many auto immune conditions originate. Try "The Perfect Health Diet" by Paul Jaminet and "Why we get fat" by Gary Taubes as general books on the best way to eliminate the toxins that are responsible for so much of our chronic disease and obesity.
Posted on 2013-07-09 22:29:26
Name:Markku
Location:Finland
Subject:Saturated fat is complicated
This is a typical backwards article. First you take the premise saturated fat is bad for you and the construct an inaccurate story from that. Why don't you accept that fats are good for you except for hydrogenated, trans fat, commercially processed fat, Omega 6 fats (because the ratio between Omega 3 and Omega 6 is so skewed ..) So, instead of looking at those factors you completely confuse the issue.
Posted on 2013-07-14 17:15:47
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Saturated fat is complicated
Hi Marrku, thanks for your comment. The introduction to the article has now been rewritten to reflect the complexity of saturated fats. Further, new articles will be made to highlight foods for each of the saturated fatty acids, so please check back.
Posted on 2013-07-15 11:02:20
Name:Mike
Location:St. Louis
Subject:Serve me up some saturated fat and cream...
...just don't feed me that carb crap that increases insulin, turns on fat storage and inflammation.
Posted on 2013-09-30 05:36:31
Name:Nathan
Location:Texas, USA
Subject:My opinion: Saturated Fats are Good
Thanks for this list. I am trying to seriously increase the level of saturated fat in my diet. This list and other nutrition information charts are invaluable.

1) I 100% disagree with the USDA food pyramid guidelines. For example, it says to restrict sugar to just a little in the top section, but then they say to base your diet on grains, starches and carbohydrates which are merely long chains of sugar.

2a) Not a single study has proven a causative correlation of dietary fat w/ increased heart disease or higher body fat, but numerous studies and personal tests have shown a clear correlation opposite. There's a big difference between a cause and a correlation. If you have a beer and go to bed and a train runs into your house, there's a correlation as an 'alcohol-related' accident. That beer wasn't the cause but was 'co-related' to the accident.

2b) The fallback of "As always, different foods work well for different people." only goes so far. Remember, at our core, all people on this planet have the same grandparents. We need the same core nutrition to deal with the same physical needs. Thus my need or specific nutrition may be different, but my body still deals with the same foods the same way.

3) Watch "FatHead" (2002) for a quick primer on government-inflicted health problems and government-inflicted failed solutions. Then educate yourself because the government and agri-businesses aren't going to do it.

Posted on 2013-11-13 15:21:30
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: My opinion: Saturated Fats are Good
Hi Nathan, thanks for your comments, look for this list to be expanded in the near future.

In regards to your comments, there are plenty of studies which state good and bad things about saturated fats, especially with regard to heart disease. This meta-analysis on saturated fats and heart disease states: "Intake of saturated fat in the United States and Europe has fallen markedly since the first recommendations on dietary fat quality were issued 50 y ago. The resulting fall in LDL cholesterol led to a distinct decrease in CHD, especially in the early period before the arrival of statins in the 1990s".

You can argue this all you want, but the best you can say is that the issue is controversial and the worst you can say is that high consumption of saturated fats greatly increase risk of heart disease.

If you want to argue that this is just correlation, and not the cause. Well you are welcome too, but it would be wrong to advise others that saturated fats are healthy because there is a lack of causation, when there is so much convincing correlation. The same causation/correlation argument was brought up with cigarettes years ago, and we all know how that ended. Exercise caution before blaming conflicts of interest with business. After all, there are industries on both sides of this argument with profits on the line. As Markku commented above, there are a wide range of saturated fats, and the details regarding to health will likely be in the type of fat. More detailed lists on the type of fats will be published here later.

Posted on 2013-11-13 18:30:22
Name:Lisa
Location:Indiana
Subject:High in fat foods
Can somebody give me some meals to make high in fat? I see a lot I can snack on but what meals? I started medication I have to take 4x day and with fatty food...
Posted on 2013-11-20 21:33:51
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: High fat food recipes...
Hi Lisa, thanks for your question, and your suggestion of creating high fat recipes. You can try this High Fat High Calorie recipe book on Amazon.com. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-11-25 21:54:04
Name:Inogen
Location:England
Subject:Fat
Coconut oil is brilliant - I also lost loads of weight when I started using it. Lisa, coconut and any nut or seed is good. Eat lots of vegetables as well and steer clear of meat and milk - unethical and unhealthy. Good luck.
Posted on 2013-11-26 07:32:16
Name:Julian
Location:Puerto Rico
Subject:Saturated Fats
Saturated fats are good for you. Its in combination with high carb diets that are bad and stored in the body. Try a low or no carb, high fat (specially saturated fats), moderate proteins and you will lose weight, lower bad cholesterol, and have higherr HDL.
Posted on 2014-01-28 15:56:40

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References

    • USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.