Home   Top 10 Lists   Nutrition Facts   Super Foods   Fruits   Vegetables   Recipes   Blog   FAQ   

Top 10 Foods Highest in Vitamin C


Vitamin C is an essential nutrient required by the body for the development and maintenance of scar tissue, blood vessels, and cartilage. Vitamin C is also necessary for creating ATP, dopamine, peptide hormones, and tyrosine. As a powerful antioxidant, vitamin C helps lessen oxidative stress to the body and is thought to lower cancer risk. The current DV for vitamin C is 60mg. Below is a list high vitamin C foods, click here for vitamin C foods by nutrient density, and here for an extended list of vitamin C rich foods.

#1: Peppers (Yellow Bell Peppers)
Vitamin C in 100gPer 10 strips (52g)Per large pepper (186g)
183.5mg (306% DV)95.4mg (159% DV)341.3mg (569% DV)
Other Peppers High in Vitamin C (%DV per large pepper): Sweet Red Peppers (349%), and Sweet Green Peppers (220%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#2: Guavas
Vitamin C in 100gPer cup (165g)Per fruit (55g)
228.3mg (381% DV)376.7mg (628% DV)125.6mg (209% DV)
Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#3: Dark Green Leafy Vegetables (Kale)
Vitamin C in 100gPer cup chopped (67g)
120mg (200% DV)80.4mg (134% DV)
Other Dark Green Leafy Vegetables High in Vitamin C (%DV per cup, chopped): Turnip Greens (55%), Swiss Chard (18%), and Spinach (14%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#4: Kiwi (Green)
Vitamin C in 100gPer cup, sliced (180g)Per fruit (69g)
92.7mg (155% DV)166.9mg (278% DV)64mg (107% DV)
Gold Kiwi are also High in Vitamin C (%DV per fruit): (151%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#5: Broccoli
Vitamin C in 100gPer cup chopped (92g)
89.2mg (149% DV)81.2mg (135% DV)
Other Brassica Vegetables High in Vitamin C (%DV per cup): Brussels Sprouts (125%), Green Cauliflower (94%), Cauliflower (86%), Red Cabbage (85%), and Cabbage (60%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#6: Berries (Strawberries)
Vitamin C in 100gPer cup sliced (166g)1 large strawberry (18g)
58.8mg (98% DV)97.6mg (163% DV)10.6mg (18% DV)
Other Berries High in Vitamin C (%DV per cup): Raspberries (54%), Blackberries (50%) and Blueberries (24%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#7: Citrus Fruits (Oranges)
Vitamin C in 100gPer cup, sections (180g)Per orange (131g)
53.2mg (89% DV)95.8mg (160% DV)69.7mg (116% DV)
Other Citrus Fruit High in Vitamin C (%DV per fruit): 1/4 Pomelo (155%), Lemon (74%), Clementine (60%), and 1/2 Grapefruit (57%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#8: Tomatoes (Cooked)
Vitamin C in 100gPer cup (240g)Per 2 tomatoes (246g)
22.8mg (38% DV)54.7mg (91% DV)56.1mg (93% DV)
2 medium tomatoes contain just 44 calories and 0.3 grams of fat. Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#9: Peas (Mange Tout)
Vitamin C in 100gPer cup (63g)Per 10 pods (34g)
60mg (100% DV)37.8mg (63% DV)20.4mg (34% DV)
Other Peas High in Vitamin C (%DV per cup): Green Peas (97%), and Frozen Peas cooked (59%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#10: Papaya
Vitamin C in 100gPer cup pieces (145g)1 small papaya (157g)
60.9mg (102% DV)88.3mg (147% DV)95.6mg (159% DV)
Other Fruits High in Vitamin C (%DV per cup, chunks or balls): Mango (100%), Pineapple (131%), Cantaloupe Melon (108%), and Honeydew Melon (53%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.




Advertisement


Top 10 High Vitamin C Foods by Nutrient Density (Vitamin C per Gram)

#1: Acerola Cherries 1677.6mg (2796% DV) per 100 grams83.9mg (140% DV) per cherry (5 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Acerola Cherries
#2: Dried Herbs & Spices (Coriander) 566.7mg (945% DV) per 100 grams5.7mg (9% DV) per teaspoon (1 gram)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Herbs & Spices
#3: Rose Hips 426mg (710% DV) per 100 grams541mg (902% DV) per cup (127 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Rose Hips
#4: Guavas 228.3mg (381% DV) per 100 grams125.6mg (209% DV) per guava (55 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Guavas
#5: Sweet Yellow Peppers 183.5mg (306% DV) per 100 grams341.3mg (569% DV) per large pepper (186 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sweet Yellow Peppers
#6: Blackcurrants 181mg (302% DV) per 100 grams202.7mg (338% DV) per cup (112 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Blackcurrants
#7: Fresh Herbs (Thyme) 160.1mg (267% DV) per 100 grams1.6mg (3% DV) per teaspoon (1 gram)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fresh Herbs
#8: Red Chili 143.7mg (240% DV) per 100 grams64.7mg (108% DV) per pepper (45 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Red Chili
#9: Scotch Kale 130mg (217% DV) per 100 grams87.1mg (145% DV) per cup, chopped (67 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Scotch Kale
#10: Gold Kiwi Fruit 105.4mg (176% DV) per 100 grams90.6mg (151% DV) per kiwi (86 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Gold Kiwi Fruit


Other Vitamin C Rich Foods

Fortified Cereals*210mg (350% DV) per 100 gram serving168mg (280% DV) in an average bowl (2 cups) (80 grams)84mg (140% DV) per cup (40 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fortified Cereals
Green Chilies 242.5mg (404% DV) per 100 gram serving 181.9mg (303% DV) per 1/2 cup, chopped (75 grams) 109.1mg (182% DV) per pepper (45 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Green Chilies
Jalapeno Peppers 118.6mg (198% DV) per 100 gram serving 106.7mg (178% DV) per cup, sliced (90 grams) 16.6mg (28% DV) per pepper (14 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Jalapeno Peppers
Litchis 71.5mg (119% DV) per 100 gram serving 135.9mg (226% DV) per cup (190 grams) 7.2mg (12% DV) per litchi (10 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Litchis
Garden Cress 69.0mg (115% DV) per 100 gram serving 34.5mg (58% DV) per cup (50 grams) 0.7mg (1% DV) per sprig (1 gram) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Garden Cress
Kohlrabi 62.0mg (103% DV) per 100 gram serving 83.7mg (140% DV) per cup (135 grams) 9.9mg (17% DV) per slice (16 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Kohlrabi
Watercress 43.0mg (72% DV) per 100 gram serving 14.6mg (24% DV) per cup (34 grams) 10.8mg (18% DV) per 10 sprigs (25 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Watercress
Wasabi Root 41.9mg (70% DV) per 100 gram serving 54.5mg (91% DV) per cup, sliced (130 grams) 70.8mg (118% DV) per root (169 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Wasabi Root
Star Fruit (Carambola) 34.4mg (57% DV) per 100 gram serving 37.2mg (62% DV) per cup, sliced (108 grams) 31.3mg (52% DV) per fruit (91 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Star Fruit
Drumstick Pods 141.0mg (235% DV) per 100 gram serving 15.5mg (26% DV) per pod (11 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Drumstick Pods
Mustard Greens 70.0mg (117% DV) per 100 gram serving 39.2mg (65% DV) per cup, chopped (56 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Mustard Greens
Persimmons (Sharon Fruit) 66.0mg (110% DV) per 100 gram serving 16.5mg (28% DV) per fruit (25 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Persimmons
Kumquats 43.9mg (73% DV) per 100 gram serving 8.3mg (14% DV) per fruit (19 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Kumquats
Bean Sprouts (Kidney) 38.7mg (65% DV) per 100 gram serving 71.2mg (119% DV) per cup (184 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Bean Sprouts
Elderberries 36.0mg (60% DV) per 100 gram serving 52.2mg (87% DV) per cup (145 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Elderberries
Sun-Dried Tomatoes102mg (170% DV) per 100 gram serving112mg (187% DV) per cup (110 grams)3mg (5% DV) per piece (3 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Oil Packed Sun-Dried Tomatoes
Banana Peppers83mg (138% DV) per 100 gram serving103mg (171% DV) per cup (124 grams)38mg (63% DV) per pepper (46 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Raw Banana Peppers
Chives58mg (97% DV) per 100 gram serving2mg (3% DV) per tablespoon (3 grams)0.5mg (1% DV) per teaspoon (1 gram)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fresh Chives
Chicory 24.0mg (40% DV) per 100 gram serving 7.0mg (12% DV) per cup, chopped (29 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Chicory
Coriander (Dry)567mg (945% DV) per 100 gram serving11mg (19% DV) per tablespoon (2 grams)6mg (9% DV) per teaspoon (1 gram)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Coriander
Cloves (Ground)81mg (135% DV) per 100 gram serving6mg (9% DV) per tablespoon (7 grams)2mg (3% DV) per teaspoon (2 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Ground Cloves
Saffron81mg (135% DV) per 100 gram serving2mg (3% DV) per tablespoon (2 grams)1mg (1% DV) per teaspoon (1 gram)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Saffron
Red Pepper (Cayenne)76mg (127% DV) per 100 gram serving4mg (6% DV) per tablespoon (5 grams)2mg (3% DV) per teaspoon (2 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Red Pepper (Cayenne)
Chili Powder64mg (107% DV) per 100 gram serving5mg (9% DV) per tablespoon (8 grams)2mg (3% DV) per teaspoon (3 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Chili Powder
Basil (Dried)61mg (102% DV) per 100 gram serving1.2mg (2% DV) per tablespoon (2 grams)0.6mg (1% DV) per teaspoon (1 gram)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Basil
Rosemary(Dried)61mg (102% DV) per 100 gram serving2mg (3% DV) per tablespoon (3 grams)0.6mg (1% DV) per teaspoon (1 gram)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dried Rosemary
For more foods high in Vitamin C use the nutrient ranking tool.
*Amount of vitamin C may vary greatly between products. Be sure to check nutrition labels for the exact amount of vitamin C from each individual product.


Health Benefits of Vitamin C

  • Alleviation of Cardiovascular Disease and High Blood Pressure - Several studies support that consuming at least 500mg a day of vitamin C can increase the amount blood vessels relax, or dilate, in a process known as vasodilation. This process is thought to help lower blood pressure, reducing risk of heart attack and other cardiovascular diseases.3
  • Increased Immune Function (*Controversial) - Vitamin C has a reputation for boosting immune function and possibly preventing incidence of the common cold. Repeated studies have show this is not true for the general population,4,5 and the effect of vitamin C reducing the incidence of cold is mostly seen in those with a vitamin C deficiency, and in athletes under intense physical strain.4
  • Increased Iron Absorption - Vitamin C increases iron absorption, however, this should be noted with care, as too much vitamin C can lead to iron toxicity in certain individuals.6

People at Risk of a Vitamin C Deficiency

  • Smokers and Passive Smokers - Studies show that smokers have lower levels of vitamin C in their blood than non-smokers, and this is thought to be due to increased oxidative stress. Similarly, those regularly exposed to passive smoke have lower levels of vitamin C in their blood. People in these groups are advised to consume more vitamin C, up to 35mg (50%) more than non-smokers.7
  • Infants given boiled or evaporated milk - Boiling or evaporating milk destroys any vitamin C it provides leaving infants deficient.8 However, most infant formulas come already fortified with vitamin C, check nutrition facts of a specific product to be sure.
  • People without varied diets - Vitamin C is found mainly in fresh fruits and vegetables. People who do not eat these foods or who do not vary their diet greatly are at risk of vitamin C deficiency.
  • People with malabsorption or chronic diseases - People with malabsorption diseases, like cachexia, are at increased risk of vitamin C deficiency. Other high risk groups include those with cancer, end-stage renal disease (kidney failure), or chronic hemodialysis.9,10




Comments.
Name:Sarah E. Giles
Location:Olympia, WA
Subject:Sweet Bell Peppers
I was looking up the different vitamin C levels between the different colors of sweet bell peppers, when I discovered that apparently you don't have the nutritional info for the sweet orange bell pepper variety. Would it be possible to add this to your database, because I often use orange bell peppers and would like to know more about them.
Posted on 2012-01-05 19:40:31
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Sweet Bell Peppers
Hi Sarah, thanks for your comment. You are right that there can be a lot of variation between the colors of peppers. The complete nutrition comparison of all three is here. Thanks for your suggestion to add orange peppers, the database is always being expanded. As another note, these nutrition facts are also averages and approximations. There can even be a lot of variation across yellow peppers and it is likley, but not certain, that orange peppers would resemble the similarly colored red and yellow peppers.
Posted on 2012-01-05 19:50:57
Name:Nyeesha
Location:East Orange, NJ
Subject:Sweet Bell Peppers
They are great. I use them in a lot of my cooking and my children always want me to coook with them. What a healthy family I have! What else can sweet bell pepppers do for your health?
Posted on 2012-02-16 09:42:01
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Sweet Bell Peppers
Hi Nyeesha, thanks for your question. In addition to vitamin C, the capsaicin in peppers is known to help increase blood flow, aid in alcohol metabolism, and is an expectorant that alleviates bronchitis and emphysema. You can find more health benefits on the sweet bell peppers information page.
Posted on 2012-02-16 20:29:45
Name:Eric J. Drummond
Location:Kansas
Subject:Chili Peppers and Vitamin C
Hi, I was wondering if you could clarify something for me. Your website states that Hot Green Chili's are highest in Vitamin C. But exactly which variety are you speaking of? Cause when I compare the Nutrition data of peppers the green ones such as Poblano's, and jalapeno's aren't anywhere near the level of VC mentioned. Actually the Yellow Bell Pepper has the highest that I could find. Also does the VC increase with heat? And I've read on other sites that the red mature ones actually have more VC. Very confusing to figure out which to grow for VC. Please Help.
Posted on 2012-02-17 17:31:53
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Chili Peppers and Vitamin C
Hi Eric, thanks for your question. It brings up an important issue that there are a wide array of chilies all with varying levels of vitamin C. The chilies referred to in this article are chilies which are typically small thin chilies, often sold in East Asian specialty stores under the name of "chilies", or "Thai chilies". Even within these chilies, however, you will find varying degrees of vitamin C. For more information, see the page about chilies. Finally, there is no known correlation between how hot(spicey) a chili is and its level of vitamin C.
Posted on 2012-02-17 17:40:56
Name:Jase
Location:Singapore
Subject:Oranges
Hi :) I drink sunkist orange juice 3 glases per day. Every friday I eat it in fruit form. Is juice form better or fruit form better to enjoy a good level of vitamin c? Thank you.
Posted on 2012-02-26 05:33:29
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Oranges vs Orange Juice
Hi Jase, thanks for your question. Most orange juice drinks, and even 100% orange juices will have less natural vitamin C. This is because they have to be pasturized or heat treated. Heat denatures vitamin C and thus synthetic vitamin C is often added back into orange juice. Further, orange juice tends to have less fiber and bulk than actual oranges, so eating the fruit is likely better for your health. However, if juice is more convenient, then try to drink 100% orange juice, or fresh squeezed orange juice. You can see a nutrition comparison of fresh juice vs oranges here. Basically the level of vitamin C is very close, you just get more fiber with oranges.
Posted on 2012-02-26 18:50:44
Name:Kayce
Location:Chicago
Subject:Pineapple
I was very surprised not to see pineapple on here! I was sure it would be on the top 10! I buy pineapple in the can and the ingredients are: pineapple, pineapple juice, and clarified pineapple juice from concentrate (water, clarified pineapple juice concentrate). My question is: Is this as healthy as I think it is?? I use it in my shakes to add vitamin C to my diet. Thanks so much this site is absolutely wonderful! I was hoping there was a book I could buy with all this great info on just food and the nutritional facts! Not much out there like this! Great job!!!
Posted on 2012-04-20 19:39:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Pineapple
Hi Kayce, thanks for your kind comments and question, you are right that pineapple is a high vitamin C food and it has been added to the list. As for using canned or concentrated pineapple juice it is important to note that heat can reduce the amount of vitamin C in food. You are better off adding 1 cup of fresh pineapple to your shake than the juice you are using. Here is the nutrition facts comparison between fresh and canned pineapple.

Sometimes ascorbic acid is added to juice or foods to preserve them. Ascorbic acid is vitamin C, so if the juice you use has it listed as an ingredient, you are getting more vitamin C. Here is the nutrtion comparison of pineapple juice/concentrate with and without ascorbic acid. Hope that helps and thanks again for your question.

Posted on 2012-04-21 22:03:35
Name:Peter Irving
Location:Jersey (UK)
Subject:Indian Cherry
I am a little confused by the claim that the green chillie has the most vitamin C? However the table below the top ten states that the west Indian cherry has six times the amount of vitamin C per 100mg than the green chillie yet is not number one on the list? Could you please explain this, Thank you.
Posted on 2012-04-27 18:44:10
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Indian Cherry
Hi Peter, thanks for your question. The top ten list is under some editorial discretion and is meant to list foods which people can include in their diets that are readily available in most parts of the world. The West Indian Cherry is an obscure food and so is listed in the extended table for informational purposes, but is left out of the top ten list for practical considerations. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-04-28 02:01:34
Name:Chris
Location:Ireland
Subject:Vitamin C
I am surprised you do not mention Camu Camu in your listing.
Posted on 2012-05-02 11:42:41
Name:N.K. Garg
Location:Chandigarh, India
Subject:Indian Gooseberry
Amla, Indian Gooseberry (embillica officinallis) contains a lot of high quality vitamin C. It is listed in all Ayurvedic Texts & Indian health books. It should be listed here also!
Posted on 2012-05-27 01:26:08
Name:Vanita
Location:Ontario, Canada
Subject:Mangoes
I'm surprised that mango is not on this list, I've read that mangoes are very high in vitamin c...Can you give any suggestion where mangoes rate on the vitamin c list? Thanks!
Posted on 2012-06-08 11:48:01
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Mangoes
Hi Vanita, thanks for your suggestion, mangoes have now been added to the extended list of vitamin C rich foods, and rank somewhere between cantaloupes and tomatoes with 28mg (46% DV) per 100 grams, but 57mg (96% DV) in an average size mango of 207grams. See the complete nutrition facts for mangoes. In regards to further rankings, you can use the nutrient ranking tool to see where a food ranks by food group. This top 10 list is curated to simplify scanning the list, but using the ranking tool can still be useful.
Posted on 2012-06-08 11:49:45
Name:Heather Clark
Location:Laurinburg, NC
Subject:Plums
Where do plums fit into this?
Posted on 2012-09-20 10:59:40
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Plums
Hi Heather, thanks for your question. Plums are rather low in vitamin C, providing 9.5mg (16% DV) per 100 grams, 6mg (10% DV) in an average sized plum, and 16mg (26% DV) in a cup of sliced plums.

Here is a list of 1000 fruits high in vitamin C.

Nutrition Facts for Plums.

Posted on 2012-09-20 15:12:36
Name:Aileen
Location:Australia
Subject:Vitamin C - dangers
Thanks for this list of foods high in Vitamin C - now I know which foods to avoid! You provide a list of "People at Risk of a Vitamin C Deficiency", but no list of "People who should avoid or restrict Vitamin C" - which would include people with Haemochromatosis, or those who have iron overload. We too have a right to information about what is healthy for us.
Posted on 2012-10-27 00:28:07
Name:Khalil
Location:Peshawar, Pakistan
Subject:Effect of drying on Vit C content of chilies
Is there any impact of drying (temperature) over the vit-c content of green chilies? I want to resarch the impact of different drying temperatures on the vit-c content of green chilies.
Posted on 2012-11-14 04:02:02
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Effect of drying on Vit C content of chilies
Hi Khalil, thanks for your question. Cooking or drying foods does cause them to lose vitamin C. This is because vitamin C is sensitive to heat. Experiments show that the higher the temperature the more vitamin C will be lost.
Posted on 2012-11-14 23:42:28
Name:Tony
Subject:Kakadu plum
Kakadu plum is the absolute highest vitamin c source in the world, it can have 12,000mg of vitamin c per 100g.

2nd highest is camu camu.
Posted on 2012-11-20 08:51:09
Name:Kelly
Subject:Tea and Vitamin C
Certain teas are pretty high in vitamin C too, mostly the green, white, and chamomile teas. They're the main antioxidants in the beverage, I believe.
Posted on 2013-02-04 20:09:53
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Tea and Vitamin C
Hi Kelly, thanks for your question. The amount of vitamin C in tea depends on if it has been dried and how it has been stored. Heat and cooking causes vitamin C to decompose. As such, dried tea is unlikely to contain much vitamin C, adding it to hot water further hurts the vitamin C content. Looking at the nutrition facts for brewed chamomile tea, there is no vitamin C content.

Despite these facts, vitamin C is water soluble, and can be obtained in teas made from fresh herbs or leaves. For example, a tea made from fresh rose hips is likely to be a good source of vitamin C. The bottom line is that vitamin C can only really be obtained using fresh ingredients.

Posted on 2013-02-04 23:11:49
Name:Anonymous
Subject:Sea buckthorn berries
Sea buckthorn berries contain around 600-800 mg of Vitamin C /100 gram.
Posted on 2013-08-24 06:31:09
Name:Mika
Location:Azerbaijan
Subject:Lemon?
Why lemon is not mentioned here?
Posted on 2013-09-27 05:26:15
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Lemon
Hi Mika, thanks for your question. Lemon provides 53mg (88% DV) of vitamin C per 100 grams, 31mg (51% DV), and 3.7mg (6% DV) in a lemon wedge. While most people only consume a lemon wedge or less a day, lemon is still a pretty good source, and will be added to the extended list. Thanks for the suggestion, Here are the complete nutrition facts for lemon.
Posted on 2013-09-28 00:06:30
Name:Vicky
Location:Nova Scotia, Canada
Subject:Oranges So Low?
Hey. I was expecting the oranges to be much higher in the ranking here. But I was very happy to see the strawberries sneaking in the top 10. I have thyroid problems and have been told to up my vitamin C intake. This list is awesome and a huge help. Thanks a bunch :)
Posted on 2013-10-16 08:25:58
Name:Not2cool
Location:Goldcoast Australia
Subject:Too much vitamin C
Apparently only a certain amount of vc can be absorbed per day. Can too much vc ever be a disadvantage for a person with no health issues? Btw, I find your answers and links very professional. Thanks for all your info.
Posted on 2013-10-26 08:12:33
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Too much vitamin C
Hi Not2cool, thanks for your kind comment and question. It is true that excess vitamin C is filtered out by the kidneys and excreted in urine, so the body does a good job of regulating absorption. There are no health risks of taking excess vitamin C that have been confirmed in rigorous scientific study. The Office of Dietary Supplements lists some possible problems such as gastrointestinal disturbances, kidney stones, and even heart disease. The Linus Pauling Institute lists even more with cancer included in addition to atherosclerosis, and kidney stones. They note however, that none of these health risks have been proven. Linus Pauling, who won the Nobel prize in chemistry, famously advocated taking a lot of vitamin C, believing in its health benefits.
Posted on 2013-10-27 05:28:38
Name:Ghaji Badawi
Location:Nigeria
Subject:Tomatoes and getting enough vitamin C
Here in northern Nigeria, we have different fruits and vegetables in seasons. For example, between October and January, we have tomatoes, chilli, peppers, lemon, lime, pawpaw, pineapples and several other fruits and vegetables. In March- June you hardly get any if those items, but we will have mangoes, coconuts, pomegranates, and different variety of fruits and vegetables. We eat whatever is in season and they are very affordable too. One thing I want to know is how we can eat chillies and peppers in enough quantity to give us our daily requirements of vc. Remember they can be extremely hot even for an African palate.
Posted on 2013-12-09 17:21:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Tomatoes and getting enough vitamin C
Hi Ghaji, thanks for your question. You don't have to get all your vitamin C from chillies and peppers, they are simply listed as the food most dense in vitamin C by weight. If you eat plenty of fruits and vegetables each day, you will get your daily requirement of vitamin C. Hope that helps and answers your question.
Posted on 2013-12-09 21:51:34
Name:Annitta Hearle
Location:Qld Australia
Subject:Vegetables, vitamin C, and Interstitial Cystitis
What vegetables (and fruit) would be suitable for sufferers of interstitial cystitis. Many fruits containing high levels of Vit C are not suitable. I wish to know which vegetables are suitable.
Posted on 2014-01-31 19:27:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vegetables, vitamin C, and Interstitial Cystitis
Hi Annitta, thanks for your question. Not sure what will exactly work for interstitial cystitis, but here is a list of 700 vegetables ranked lowest in vitamin C, and 250 fruits low in vitamin C. Please also note that cooking destroys vitamin C, and generally lowers the vitamin C content in food. So cooked vegetables will have less vitamin C than fresh. With canned products and juices, check the label, as vitamin C in the form of "ascorbic acid" is often added in to preserve freshness of the product.
Posted on 2014-01-31 21:01:51

Post a comment.
Name:          
Location:       
Email:(Optional)
Subject:         

Spam Prevention *(REQUIRED):
Enter the last three letters of this sentence.
Comments.
Name:Sarah E. Giles
Location:Olympia, WA
Subject:Sweet Bell Peppers
I was looking up the different vitamin C levels between the different colors of sweet bell peppers, when I discovered that apparently you don't have the nutritional info for the sweet orange bell pepper variety. Would it be possible to add this to your database, because I often use orange bell peppers and would like to know more about them.
Posted on 2012-01-05 19:40:31
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Sweet Bell Peppers
Hi Sarah, thanks for your comment. You are right that there can be a lot of variation between the colors of peppers. The complete nutrition comparison of all three is here. Thanks for your suggestion to add orange peppers, the database is always being expanded. As another note, these nutrition facts are also averages and approximations. There can even be a lot of variation across yellow peppers and it is likley, but not certain, that orange peppers would resemble the similarly colored red and yellow peppers.
Posted on 2012-01-05 19:50:57
Name:Nyeesha
Location:East Orange, NJ
Subject:Sweet Bell Peppers
They are great. I use them in a lot of my cooking and my children always want me to coook with them. What a healthy family I have! What else can sweet bell pepppers do for your health?
Posted on 2012-02-16 09:42:01
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Sweet Bell Peppers
Hi Nyeesha, thanks for your question. In addition to vitamin C, the capsaicin in peppers is known to help increase blood flow, aid in alcohol metabolism, and is an expectorant that alleviates bronchitis and emphysema. You can find more health benefits on the sweet bell peppers information page.
Posted on 2012-02-16 20:29:45
Name:Eric J. Drummond
Location:Kansas
Subject:Chili Peppers and Vitamin C
Hi, I was wondering if you could clarify something for me. Your website states that Hot Green Chili's are highest in Vitamin C. But exactly which variety are you speaking of? Cause when I compare the Nutrition data of peppers the green ones such as Poblano's, and jalapeno's aren't anywhere near the level of VC mentioned. Actually the Yellow Bell Pepper has the highest that I could find. Also does the VC increase with heat? And I've read on other sites that the red mature ones actually have more VC. Very confusing to figure out which to grow for VC. Please Help.
Posted on 2012-02-17 17:31:53
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Chili Peppers and Vitamin C
Hi Eric, thanks for your question. It brings up an important issue that there are a wide array of chilies all with varying levels of vitamin C. The chilies referred to in this article are chilies which are typically small thin chilies, often sold in East Asian specialty stores under the name of "chilies", or "Thai chilies". Even within these chilies, however, you will find varying degrees of vitamin C. For more information, see the page about chilies. Finally, there is no known correlation between how hot(spicey) a chili is and its level of vitamin C.
Posted on 2012-02-17 17:40:56
Name:Jase
Location:Singapore
Subject:Oranges
Hi :) I drink sunkist orange juice 3 glases per day. Every friday I eat it in fruit form. Is juice form better or fruit form better to enjoy a good level of vitamin c? Thank you.
Posted on 2012-02-26 05:33:29
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Oranges vs Orange Juice
Hi Jase, thanks for your question. Most orange juice drinks, and even 100% orange juices will have less natural vitamin C. This is because they have to be pasturized or heat treated. Heat denatures vitamin C and thus synthetic vitamin C is often added back into orange juice. Further, orange juice tends to have less fiber and bulk than actual oranges, so eating the fruit is likely better for your health. However, if juice is more convenient, then try to drink 100% orange juice, or fresh squeezed orange juice. You can see a nutrition comparison of fresh juice vs oranges here. Basically the level of vitamin C is very close, you just get more fiber with oranges.
Posted on 2012-02-26 18:50:44
Name:Kayce
Location:Chicago
Subject:Pineapple
I was very surprised not to see pineapple on here! I was sure it would be on the top 10! I buy pineapple in the can and the ingredients are: pineapple, pineapple juice, and clarified pineapple juice from concentrate (water, clarified pineapple juice concentrate). My question is: Is this as healthy as I think it is?? I use it in my shakes to add vitamin C to my diet. Thanks so much this site is absolutely wonderful! I was hoping there was a book I could buy with all this great info on just food and the nutritional facts! Not much out there like this! Great job!!!
Posted on 2012-04-20 19:39:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Pineapple
Hi Kayce, thanks for your kind comments and question, you are right that pineapple is a high vitamin C food and it has been added to the list. As for using canned or concentrated pineapple juice it is important to note that heat can reduce the amount of vitamin C in food. You are better off adding 1 cup of fresh pineapple to your shake than the juice you are using. Here is the nutrition facts comparison between fresh and canned pineapple.

Sometimes ascorbic acid is added to juice or foods to preserve them. Ascorbic acid is vitamin C, so if the juice you use has it listed as an ingredient, you are getting more vitamin C. Here is the nutrtion comparison of pineapple juice/concentrate with and without ascorbic acid. Hope that helps and thanks again for your question.

Posted on 2012-04-21 22:03:35
Name:Peter Irving
Location:Jersey (UK)
Subject:Indian Cherry
I am a little confused by the claim that the green chillie has the most vitamin C? However the table below the top ten states that the west Indian cherry has six times the amount of vitamin C per 100mg than the green chillie yet is not number one on the list? Could you please explain this, Thank you.
Posted on 2012-04-27 18:44:10
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Indian Cherry
Hi Peter, thanks for your question. The top ten list is under some editorial discretion and is meant to list foods which people can include in their diets that are readily available in most parts of the world. The West Indian Cherry is an obscure food and so is listed in the extended table for informational purposes, but is left out of the top ten list for practical considerations. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2012-04-28 02:01:34
Name:Chris
Location:Ireland
Subject:Vitamin C
I am surprised you do not mention Camu Camu in your listing.
Posted on 2012-05-02 11:42:41
Name:N.K. Garg
Location:Chandigarh, India
Subject:Indian Gooseberry
Amla, Indian Gooseberry (embillica officinallis) contains a lot of high quality vitamin C. It is listed in all Ayurvedic Texts & Indian health books. It should be listed here also!
Posted on 2012-05-27 01:26:08
Name:Vanita
Location:Ontario, Canada
Subject:Mangoes
I'm surprised that mango is not on this list, I've read that mangoes are very high in vitamin c...Can you give any suggestion where mangoes rate on the vitamin c list? Thanks!
Posted on 2012-06-08 11:48:01
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Mangoes
Hi Vanita, thanks for your suggestion, mangoes have now been added to the extended list of vitamin C rich foods, and rank somewhere between cantaloupes and tomatoes with 28mg (46% DV) per 100 grams, but 57mg (96% DV) in an average size mango of 207grams. See the complete nutrition facts for mangoes. In regards to further rankings, you can use the nutrient ranking tool to see where a food ranks by food group. This top 10 list is curated to simplify scanning the list, but using the ranking tool can still be useful.
Posted on 2012-06-08 11:49:45
Name:Heather Clark
Location:Laurinburg, NC
Subject:Plums
Where do plums fit into this?
Posted on 2012-09-20 10:59:40
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Plums
Hi Heather, thanks for your question. Plums are rather low in vitamin C, providing 9.5mg (16% DV) per 100 grams, 6mg (10% DV) in an average sized plum, and 16mg (26% DV) in a cup of sliced plums.

Here is a list of 1000 fruits high in vitamin C.

Nutrition Facts for Plums.

Posted on 2012-09-20 15:12:36
Name:Aileen
Location:Australia
Subject:Vitamin C - dangers
Thanks for this list of foods high in Vitamin C - now I know which foods to avoid! You provide a list of "People at Risk of a Vitamin C Deficiency", but no list of "People who should avoid or restrict Vitamin C" - which would include people with Haemochromatosis, or those who have iron overload. We too have a right to information about what is healthy for us.
Posted on 2012-10-27 00:28:07
Name:Khalil
Location:Peshawar, Pakistan
Subject:Effect of drying on Vit C content of chilies
Is there any impact of drying (temperature) over the vit-c content of green chilies? I want to resarch the impact of different drying temperatures on the vit-c content of green chilies.
Posted on 2012-11-14 04:02:02
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Effect of drying on Vit C content of chilies
Hi Khalil, thanks for your question. Cooking or drying foods does cause them to lose vitamin C. This is because vitamin C is sensitive to heat. Experiments show that the higher the temperature the more vitamin C will be lost.
Posted on 2012-11-14 23:42:28
Name:Tony
Subject:Kakadu plum
Kakadu plum is the absolute highest vitamin c source in the world, it can have 12,000mg of vitamin c per 100g.

2nd highest is camu camu.
Posted on 2012-11-20 08:51:09
Name:Kelly
Subject:Tea and Vitamin C
Certain teas are pretty high in vitamin C too, mostly the green, white, and chamomile teas. They're the main antioxidants in the beverage, I believe.
Posted on 2013-02-04 20:09:53
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Tea and Vitamin C
Hi Kelly, thanks for your question. The amount of vitamin C in tea depends on if it has been dried and how it has been stored. Heat and cooking causes vitamin C to decompose. As such, dried tea is unlikely to contain much vitamin C, adding it to hot water further hurts the vitamin C content. Looking at the nutrition facts for brewed chamomile tea, there is no vitamin C content.

Despite these facts, vitamin C is water soluble, and can be obtained in teas made from fresh herbs or leaves. For example, a tea made from fresh rose hips is likely to be a good source of vitamin C. The bottom line is that vitamin C can only really be obtained using fresh ingredients.

Posted on 2013-02-04 23:11:49
Name:Anonymous
Subject:Sea buckthorn berries
Sea buckthorn berries contain around 600-800 mg of Vitamin C /100 gram.
Posted on 2013-08-24 06:31:09
Name:Mika
Location:Azerbaijan
Subject:Lemon?
Why lemon is not mentioned here?
Posted on 2013-09-27 05:26:15
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Lemon
Hi Mika, thanks for your question. Lemon provides 53mg (88% DV) of vitamin C per 100 grams, 31mg (51% DV), and 3.7mg (6% DV) in a lemon wedge. While most people only consume a lemon wedge or less a day, lemon is still a pretty good source, and will be added to the extended list. Thanks for the suggestion, Here are the complete nutrition facts for lemon.
Posted on 2013-09-28 00:06:30
Name:Vicky
Location:Nova Scotia, Canada
Subject:Oranges So Low?
Hey. I was expecting the oranges to be much higher in the ranking here. But I was very happy to see the strawberries sneaking in the top 10. I have thyroid problems and have been told to up my vitamin C intake. This list is awesome and a huge help. Thanks a bunch :)
Posted on 2013-10-16 08:25:58
Name:Not2cool
Location:Goldcoast Australia
Subject:Too much vitamin C
Apparently only a certain amount of vc can be absorbed per day. Can too much vc ever be a disadvantage for a person with no health issues? Btw, I find your answers and links very professional. Thanks for all your info.
Posted on 2013-10-26 08:12:33
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Too much vitamin C
Hi Not2cool, thanks for your kind comment and question. It is true that excess vitamin C is filtered out by the kidneys and excreted in urine, so the body does a good job of regulating absorption. There are no health risks of taking excess vitamin C that have been confirmed in rigorous scientific study. The Office of Dietary Supplements lists some possible problems such as gastrointestinal disturbances, kidney stones, and even heart disease. The Linus Pauling Institute lists even more with cancer included in addition to atherosclerosis, and kidney stones. They note however, that none of these health risks have been proven. Linus Pauling, who won the Nobel prize in chemistry, famously advocated taking a lot of vitamin C, believing in its health benefits.
Posted on 2013-10-27 05:28:38
Name:Ghaji Badawi
Location:Nigeria
Subject:Tomatoes and getting enough vitamin C
Here in northern Nigeria, we have different fruits and vegetables in seasons. For example, between October and January, we have tomatoes, chilli, peppers, lemon, lime, pawpaw, pineapples and several other fruits and vegetables. In March- June you hardly get any if those items, but we will have mangoes, coconuts, pomegranates, and different variety of fruits and vegetables. We eat whatever is in season and they are very affordable too. One thing I want to know is how we can eat chillies and peppers in enough quantity to give us our daily requirements of vc. Remember they can be extremely hot even for an African palate.
Posted on 2013-12-09 17:21:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Tomatoes and getting enough vitamin C
Hi Ghaji, thanks for your question. You don't have to get all your vitamin C from chillies and peppers, they are simply listed as the food most dense in vitamin C by weight. If you eat plenty of fruits and vegetables each day, you will get your daily requirement of vitamin C. Hope that helps and answers your question.
Posted on 2013-12-09 21:51:34
Name:Annitta Hearle
Location:Qld Australia
Subject:Vegetables, vitamin C, and Interstitial Cystitis
What vegetables (and fruit) would be suitable for sufferers of interstitial cystitis. Many fruits containing high levels of Vit C are not suitable. I wish to know which vegetables are suitable.
Posted on 2014-01-31 19:27:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vegetables, vitamin C, and Interstitial Cystitis
Hi Annitta, thanks for your question. Not sure what will exactly work for interstitial cystitis, but here is a list of 700 vegetables ranked lowest in vitamin C, and 250 fruits low in vitamin C. Please also note that cooking destroys vitamin C, and generally lowers the vitamin C content in food. So cooked vegetables will have less vitamin C than fresh. With canned products and juices, check the label, as vitamin C in the form of "ascorbic acid" is often added in to preserve freshness of the product.
Posted on 2014-01-31 21:01:51

Post a comment.
Name:          
Location:       
Email:(Optional)
Subject:         

Spam Prevention *(REQUIRED):
Enter the last three letters of this sentence.

References

  1. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.
  2. Office of Dietary Suppliments Face Sheet: Vitamin C
  3. Gokce N, Keaney JF, Jr., Frei B, et al. Long-term ascorbic acid administration reverses endothelial vasomotor dysfunction in patients with coronary artery disease. Circulation. 1999;99(25):3234-3240.
  4. Audera, C (2001). "Mega-dose vitamin C in treatment of the common cold: a randomised controlled trial". Medical Journal of Australia 389: 175.
  5. Hemilä, Harri; Chalker, Elizabeth; Douglas, Bob; Hemilä, Harri (2007). "Vitamin C for preventing and treating the common cold". Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) (3): CD000980
  6. Fleming DJ, Tucker KL, Jacques PF, Dallal GE, Wilson PW, Wood RJ (December 2002). "Dietary factors associated with the risk of high iron stores in the elderly Framingham Heart Study cohort". The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 76 (6): 1375?84.
  7. Institute of Medicine. Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 2000.
  8. Weinstein M, Babyn P, Zlotkin S. An orange a day keeps the doctor away: scurvy in the year 2000. Pediatrics 2001;108:E55.
  9. Hoffman FA. Micronutrient requirements of cancer patients. Cancer. 1985;55 (1 Suppl):295-300.
  10. Deicher R, Hörl WH. Vitamin C in chronic kidney disease and hemodialysis patients. Kidney Blood Press Res 2003;26:100-6.