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Top 10 Foods Highest in Vitamin B3 (Niacin)


Vitamin B3, or Niacin, is an essential vitamin required for processing fat in the body, lowering cholesterol levels, and regulating blood sugar levels. A deficiency of niacin leads to pellagra, a condition characterized by diarrhea, dermatitis, dementia, inflammation of the mouth, amnesia, delirium, and if left untreated, death. Even a slight deficiency of niacin can lead to irritability, poor concentration, anxiety, fatigue, restlessness, apathy, and depression. Niacin, Vitamin B3, is a water soluble vitamin that is well regulated by the body, thus overdose is rare, and only occurs when niacin is taken in the form of supplements. An overdose of niacin is seen in the form of skin rashes (flush), dry skin, various digestive maladies. A long term overdose can lead to liver damage, elevated blood sugar levels and type II diabetes, as well as increased risk of birth defects. The current DV for Niacin (Vitamin B3) is 20mg. Below are the top 10 foods highest in vitamin B3 (Niacin) by common serving sizes, click here for high vitamin B3 (Niacin) foods by nutrient density, here for an extended list of vitamin B3 (Niacin) rich foods, and here for other foods high in vitamin B.

#1: Fish (Cooked Yellowfin Tuna)
Niacin in 100gPer 3oz (85g)Per ounce (28g)
22.1mg (110% DV)18.8mg (94% DV)6.3mg (31% DV)
Other Fish High in Niacin (%DV per 3oz cooked): Skipjack Tuna (80%), Mackerel and Bluefin Tuna (45%), Wild Salmon (43%), Swordfish (39%), Farmed Salmon and Halibut (34%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#2: Chicken & Turkey (Cooked Chicken Breast)
Niacin in 100gPer 3oz (85g)Per 1/2 Breast (86g)
14.8mg (74% DV)12.6mg (63% DV)12.7mg (64% DV)
Turkey is also High in Niacin: Roasted light meat contains (50% DV) per 3oz cooked. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#3: Pork (Cooked Lean Chop)
Niacin in 100gPer 3oz (85g)Per chop (142g)
10.9mg (54% DV)9.2mg (46% DV)15.4mg (77% DV)
Other Pork Cuts High in Niacin (%DV per 3oz cooked): Lean mince (44%), and Sirloin (35%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#4: Liver (Cooked Lamb Liver)
Niacin in 100gPer 3oz (85g)Per Liver (332g)
16.7mg (83% DV)14.2mg (71% DV)53.7mg (269% DV)
Other Livers High in Niacin (%DV per 3oz cooked): Beef (75%), Veal (61%), Chicken (57%), and Pork (36%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#5: Peanuts (Oil Roasted)
Niacin in 100g Per cup chopped (144g)Per ounce (28g)
13.8mg (69% DV)19.9mg (100% DV)3.9mg (19% DV)
Peanuts (botanically legumes) contain 168 calories per ounce. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#6: Beef (Cooked Lean Rib)
Niacin in 100gPer 3oz (85g)Per pound (454g)
9.0mg (45% DV)7.6mg (39% DV)41.0mg (205% DV)
Other Beef Cuts High in Niacin (%DV per 3oz cooked): Lean Sirloin Steak (38%), Beef Fillet (37%), and Tenderloin (36%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#7: Mushrooms (Grilled Portobello)
Niacin in 100gPer cup (121g)Per cup raw (86g)
6.3mg (31% DV)7.6mg (38% DV)3.9mg (19% DV)
Other Mushrooms High in Niacin (%DV per cup, sliced): Cooked White (35%), Oyster (Raw) (21%), Brown (Raw) (14%), and Chanterelle (Raw) (11%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#8: Green Peas (Fresh)
Niacin in 100gPer cup (145g)Per cup (160g)
2.1mg (10% DV)3.0mg (15% DV)3.2mg (16% DV)
A cup of cooked frozen peas contains (12% DV) and a cup of cooked canned peas contains (8% DV):. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#9: Sunflower Seeds
Niacin in 100g Per cup (140g)Per ounce (28g)
8.3mg (42% DV)11.7mg (58% DV)2.3mg (12% DV)
Other Seeds High in Niacin (%DV per ounce): Chia Seeds (12%), Sesame (8%), Pumpkin & Squash (7%), and Sunflower (6%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#10: Avocado
Niacin in 100gPer cup cubed (150g)Per fruit (201g)
1.7mg (9% DV)2.6mg (13% DV)3.5mg (17% DV)
Half an average avocado provides 160 calories. Click to see complete nutrition facts.



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Top 10 High Vitamin B3 (Niacin) Foods by Nutrient Density (Vitamin B3 per Gram)

#1: Yeast Extract 127.5mg (638% DV) per 100 grams7.7mg (38% DV) per teaspoon (6 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Yeast Extract
#2: Bran (Rice) 34.0mg (170% DV) per 100 grams40.1mg (201% DV) per cup (118 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Bran
#3: Liver (Lambís) 16.7mg (83% DV) per 100 grams14.2mg (71% DV) per 3oz (85 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Liver
#4: Fish (Tuna) 22.1mg (110% DV) per 100 grams18.8mg (94% DV) per 3oz (85 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fish
#5: Chicken (Breast, cooked) 14.8mg (74% DV) per 100 grams12.7mg (64% DV) per 1/2 breast (86 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Chicken
#6: Veal (Cooked) 12.6mg (63% DV) per 100 grams10.7mg (54% DV) per 3oz (85 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Veal
#7: Peanuts (Roasted) 13.8mg (69% DV) per 100 grams3.9mg (19% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Peanuts
#8: Spices (Chili Powder) 11.6mg (58% DV) per 100 grams0.4mg (2% DV) per teaspoon (3 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Chili Powder
#9: Bacon (Cooked) 11.1mg (55% DV) per 100 grams0.9mg (4% DV) per rasher (8 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Bacon
#10: Sun Dried Tomatoes 9.1mg (45% DV) per 100 grams4.9mg (24% DV) per cup (54 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sun Dried Tomatoes

Other Vitamin B3 (Niacin) Rich Foods

Bakerís Yeast 40.2mg (201% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.8mg (14% DV) per packet (7 grams) 1.6mg (8% DV) per teaspoon (4 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Bakerís Yeast
Paprika 10mg (50% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.7mg (4% DV) per packet (7 grams) 0.2mg (1% DV) per teaspoon (2 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Bakerís Yeast
Instant Coffee 28.2mg (141% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.6mg (3% DV) per packet (2 grams) 0.3mg (1% DV) per teaspoon (1 gram) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Instant Coffee
Coffee (Espresso) 5.2mg (26% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.6mg (8% DV) per fluid ounce (30 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Espresso Coffee
Canned Anchovies 19.9mg (100% DV) per 100 gram serving 9.0mg (45% DV) per can (45 grams) 4.0mg (20% DV) per 5 anchovies (20 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Canned Anchovies
Canned Tuna 13.3mg (66% DV) per 100 gram serving 21.9mg (110% DV) per can (165 grams) 11.3mg (56% DV) per 3oz (85 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Canned Tuna
Spirulina Seaweed 12.8mg (64% DV) per 100 gram serving 14.4mg (72% DV) per cup (112 grams) 0.9mg (4% DV) per tablespoon (7 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Spirulina Seaweed
Venison (Cooked) 10.8mg (54% DV) per 100 gram serving 5.8mg (29% DV) per steak (54 grams) 9.1mg (46% DV) per 3oz (85 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Venison
Duck (Cooked) 10.4mg (52% DV) per 100 gram serving 9.8mg (49% DV) per 1/2 Breast (95 grams) 8.8mg (44% DV) per 3oz (85 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Duck
Shiitake Mushrooms (Dried) 14.1mg (71% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.1mg (11% DV) per 4 mushrooms (15 grams) 0.6mg (3% DV) per mushroom (4 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Shiitake Mushrooms
Soy Sauce 4.0mg (20% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.7mg (4% DV) per tablespoon (18 grams) 0.2mg (1% DV) per teaspoon (6 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Soy Sauce
Fortified Cereals (Bran Flakes) 90.6mg (453% DV) per 100 gram serving 38.0mg (190% DV) per cup (42 grams) 26.3mg (131% DV) per NLEA serving (29 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fortified Cereals
Chia Seeds 8.8mg (44% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.5mg (12% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Chia Seeds
Sprouted Beans (Kidney) 2.9mg (15% DV) per 100 gram serving 5.4mg (27% DV) per cup (184 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sprouted Kidney Beans
Peanut Butter 24.6mg (73% DV) per 100 gram serving 5.3mg (26% DV) per 2 tablespoons (36 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Peanut Butter
To find even more high vitamin B3 (Niacin) foods use the nutrient ranking tool.


Health Benefits of Niacin (Vitamin B3)

  • Protect Against Heart Disease - Niacin is prescribed pharmacologically to lower LDL fats and triglycerides by preventing the breakdown of fats into these individual components. Niacin consumed at such high levels can cause rashes, headaches, nausea, and diarrhea. Consult your doctor before taking niacin supplements in high doses.2,3
  • Regulation of Blood Sugar and Insulin Dependence (*Controversial) - Studies suggest that vitamin B3 (niacin) can help decrease insulin sensitivity,4 however, other studies find no difference.5 Niacin has also been shown to help alleviate some of the destructive autoimmune reactions of type I diabetes, and further studies are being conducted to asses its effectiveness.5
  • Reduced Cancer Risk - Studies show that niacin reduces cancer risk via ensuring DNA integrity and maintenance, and through proper regulation of the tumor suppressor gene: p53.6-8
  • Slow the progression of AIDS - An observational study has reported slowing the progression of AIDS and increasing survival with high doses of niacin.9

People at Risk of a Niacin (Vitamin B3) Deficiency

  • People with HIV/AIDS - The bodies immune system creates a specific cytokine, interferon gamma, which breaks down tryptophan, a precursor of niacin. Studies show that HIV patients who take increased levels of niacin slow the progression of AIDS.9-11
  • People who eat high amounts of refined foods - Bran is a high food in vitamin B3 which is typically lost during the refining process. Anyone who eats high amounts of white bread, white rice, corn syrup, or other refined products will not receive adequate amounts of niacin. Even though most of these foods are now fortified, it is still best to eat unrefined food products.

Warnings

  • Liver and bacon are high cholesterol foods which should be eaten in moderate amounts and avoided by people at risk of heart disease or stroke.
  • Marmite is made from brewer's yeast, which is high in purines, and should be avoided by people with gout, kidney disease, or arthritis.

Other Vitamin B Foods




Comments.
Name:Sam Chapman
Location:Reading
Subject:Marmite Consumption
I have been 'addicted' to Marmite for decades, and have found that spread thickly, it elevates my concentration. I'm assuming this is because of the Niacin content, but I do wonder if I'm as a consequence, taking in too much salt!
Posted on 2012-02-05 22:03:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Marmite Consumption
Hi Sam, thanks for your question. Marmite is a very potent source of niacin. One teaspoon will provide 29% of the DV (Percent Daily Value) for niacin, but only 9% of the DV for sodium (salt). This means that you can probably eat 3-5 teaspoons of Marmite, depending on how much sodium you get from other parts of your diet. Maybe try to measure how many teaspoons of Marmite you eat? Also, monitor your blood pressure, as long as it stays in a normal range, your sodium levels should be ok. If your blood pressure is high, then cut back on Marmite. Here are the complete nutrition facts for yeast extract spread (marmite), but check the nutrition label of your marmite to verify the sodium level.
Posted on 2012-02-05 22:15:51
Name:Alex
Subject:Niacin Overdose
Tell me sir, do you have any crucial evidence on the side effect of niacin overdose? Or it is just a conjecture? Please inform me. Thank you, Alex.
Posted on 2012-05-21 18:39:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Niacin Overdose
Hi Alex, as this study states, having skin reactions is a common side effect of too much niacin. Liver damage and digestive disorders (diarrhea) can also occur. For more sources, see the "References" section at the bottom of this article.
Posted on 2012-05-22 06:52:32
Name:Mark
Location:India
Subject:Niacin required
Hi, my age is 46, and I consume 40mg of Naicin each day to control my blood pressure. My lipoprotein (a) level is 62, can anyone suggest how I can reduce it without any side effects?
Posted on 2012-07-13 19:04:22
Name:Anonymous
Subject:Niacin Levels
I'm taking about 500mg of nicotinic acid per day with only small side-effects. Just some mild flushing which lasts only a few minutes. This has definitely reduced my heart failure symptoms.
Posted on 2012-09-08 18:15:10
Name:Sarah
Location:Cheltenham
Subject:Marmite
I just want to say that I love the stuff :D
Posted on 2012-09-12 17:30:44
Name:Anonymous
Subject:Niacin Complications
Hello, I've just been prescribed niacin to try and elevate my good cholesterol levels, which are low. I have high cholesterol but can not tolerate the usual medicines such as lipitor etc. I also have type II diabetes will the niacin not elevate my already high blood sugar levels? I'm also confused about the contradictions between what niacin helps and what too much niacin causes. Thank you, Candice.
Posted on 2012-09-17 21:54:57
Name:Jim
Subject:Marmite and Glutamic Acid
Niacin is a critical micronutrient but marmite as a health recommendation is shameful! Marmite is chemically denatured protein. Just like MSG, Marmite delivers a neurotoxic dose of the free amino acid "glutamic acid", which, at unnaturally high blood concentrations, triggers neurons to fire, and keep firing until cell death. Heart, brain, and pancreas are organs where homeostasis is easily disrupted by this amino acid neurotransmitter. In nature aminos are chemically bound to each other, and our body's digestive organs decide when they are made available. "MSG" so to speak, has many aliases, Yeast extract is but one....please cross-reference marmite, or yeast extract with MSG.
Posted on 2012-10-09 18:28:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Marmite and Glutamic Acid
Hi Jim, thanks for making this point and bringing this issue to light. Just going to counter by saying that many cultures, such as Japan, consume MSG and glutamic acid with no wide spread health affects, and that people should pay attention to the qualifier in your comment of "unnaturally high blood concentrations", since most nutrients at unaturally high levels are unhealthy. Given this perspective, yeast extract, such as Marmite, is probably still a good food for most people.
Posted on 2012-10-09 18:43:15
Name:MJ
Location:Ohio
Subject:Schizophrenia and Hoffer
As you may or may not know, Dr Hoffer discovered that some brain-damaged people did have an extreme need for niacin that in some cases required daily doses of 3000mg. Yes that's not a typo, and it cured 80% of the schizophrenia patients. Even the idea that niacin raised brain functions to clarity was confirmation of the potential need for some. Even the doses for depression were ignored though it's a frequent symptom of violent brain problems. Imagine what we could do with our out-of-control crime and prison situation, with modest amounts of inexpensive niacin, in one form or another. Look for Hoffer's published work. TTYL.
Posted on 2012-10-22 19:52:09
Name:Jan
Location:Michigan
Subject:Too much niacin
I have noticed that niacin is in many food products...health drinks, snacks, cereals, etc. My problem is I get too much niacin. I have had a strong twitching of muscles in my calves and also had charley horses prior to cutting down niacin. I deleted multivitamins and also a B complex supplement I was taking. Months later, it is greatly reduced, but I am no longer getting the multivitamins I wanted to supplement my diet. Are mfgers not sensitive to this problem?? I am trying to avoid niacin, but it is difficult to find a variety diet that is not loaded with doses of niacin.
Posted on 2012-12-21 07:50:08
Name:SG
Location:California
Subject:RE: Too much niacin
To Jan from Michigan, your muscle twitches are not caused by niacin, but lack of magnesium. Take some. Low magnesium is caused by too much calcium, prescription drugs, soft water, processed foods and sodas. Also, why are you buying processed vitamin enriched foods? Just purchase real food and you will not have to worry. Anyway, niacin is not the culprit in your case.
Posted on 2013-01-18 22:10:08
Name:Sophie Barcant
Location:Trinidad,WI
Subject:Niacin and depression
I heard of the 3000mg Niacin treating schizophrenia and other mental conditions...so started on 2500mg flush free Niacin for my moderate depression. I have been on it for 4 months but now take between 1000-1500mg most days. I was able to reduce my anti depressants to 2 tablets a week..Lexapro 10mg.. I marvel at the effectiveness of Niacin but am concerned now about liver damage or diabetes. Who can guide me?..Doctors in my region would scoff at this treatment for depression!!
Posted on 2013-03-13 22:59:19
Name:Sam M
Location:London
Subject:My Experience Taking 500mg Niacin
I have now been taking 500mg Niacin everyday for over seven years, and it has been good to my skin and well being so far. I love the skin flushing and itching...I think this may be why my skin feels better. 10min after taking it with a little solid food I go to bed, fall sleep quickly, do not notice the skin itches, and the next thing I know is when I wake up in the morning.
Posted on 2013-04-27 02:24:43
Name:L. Naomi
Location:USA
Subject:Niacin....Shingle-skin pain
My twin was diag w/shingles; I eat 95%vegan so was never diag w/shingles but started havng skin (nerve endings)pain a decade agao. A nutritionist said Flax seed so I started on the gel caps-helped alot; when only sleep was helping. Then this past spring 2013 a friend was telling me about the flush u get w/niacin;I started taking the one with the flush;I really like the flush. After over 5yrs of of skin pain - IT JUST ALL STOPPED! I THINK IT WAS THE NIACIN.Plus my lymphaatic system collected waste and my nodes under my left arm clogged up-Yeah! Lymph system doin its job Yeah!!! I think that was the niacin cleaning the blood and sending the waste into the lymph system for the body to slow get rid of it! Yeah Niacin. I will lower my mg but keep it as a supplement.
Posted on 2013-06-21 12:16:12
Name:Lahope
Location:CA
Subject:Re: Too Much Niacin
To Jan from Michigan: Your charley horse is likely caused by lack of potassium. Try eating a banana before bed. I've been taking 1000 mg niacin for APO B issues (small dense LDL particles instead of the large buoyant ones--it's genetic)with no side effects other than the transient flushing and tingling of the skin.
Posted on 2013-08-06 11:28:48
Name:Jeyser Forks
Location:Seattle, WA
Subject:Niacin causes my face to blush...
I just noticed that my frequent intake of niacin-rich food caused me a lot of blushing (on the face especially). Why is that so? What does niacin trigger in my sympathetic nervous system?
Posted on 2013-09-08 04:38:22
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Niacin causes my face to blush...
Hi Jeyser, thanks for your question. Skin flushing is a result of taking too much niacin, though it typically occurs only from supplements. Skin flushing is thought to be due to niacin's effect as a vasodilator, increasing blood flow in your body, but can also be due to niacin restricting the effect of certain enzymes in the body. Wikipedia's section on niacin toxicity has more info.
Posted on 2013-09-09 00:17:10
Name:K Hatton
Location:United Kingdom
Subject:Is Non Flush Niacin Effective?
Is none flush niacin different from other types of niacin that does cause flushing? Is anything missing in non flush niacin?
Posted on 2013-10-06 09:31:27
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Is Non Flush Niacin Effective
Hello and thanks for your question. Products marketed as "non-flush" niacin typically contain a chemical meant to be converted by your body into niacin. It appears that, so far, these types of supplements are not effective in increasing the level of niacin in your body. You might benefit more from a slow release form of niacin. This study shows that a slow release form of niacin was able to lower cholesterol levels, while the non-flush version had no effect. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-07 01:43:10
Name:K Hatton
Location:United Kingdom
Subject:Niacin Prescriptions
I get all of my niacin from food and question the need for supplements. I've read articles on the web that suggest asking your doctor to prescribe niacin but, in the uk, doctors don't generally prescribe supplements. I assume that those patients being prescribed it are from America?
Posted on 2013-10-07 02:26:23
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Niacin Prescriptions
Hi and thanks for your question. Niacin is typically prescribed to reduce cholesterol and for people with heart disease. Wikipedia has a good section about prescription niacin. In truth, the prescribed form does not differ too much from over the counter supplements, except that they have been tested as effective. You are right to think that natural sources of niacin are best, so stick to natural foods as much as possible. This article is about to be updated and expanded, so please check back next week for more foods!
Posted on 2013-10-07 05:30:27
Name:J. Miller
Location:Wisconsin
Subject:Skin burning all the time
For the last few years my skin feels like it's burning almost all the time. Some days worse than others, like a sun burn, but no pigment change and slightly painful. Sometimes it's just a shoulder or an arm, or thigh, or combination. I recently added a supplement for my fibromyalgia and had a reaction, which I know now is called a niacin flush.(Contained 25mg of Niacin). It was unbearable. The redness/rash would disappear in about 30 minutes, but the burning would continue. I've since stopped taking the supplement and have not had another "flush", but my old burning skin problem still exists and seems worse some days. Since I've had burning skin issues for a while, I started to think that they might be related to too much Niacin or B vitamins?? Is that possible? Should I cut down on foods high in niacin? could I be highly sensitive to niacin or b vitamins?
Posted on 2013-10-12 20:13:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Skin burning all the time
Hi J. Miller and thanks for your question. A flush of the skin is pretty well limited to niacin and not the other B vitamins. It is also unlikely that you have some long term overdose of niacin. From what you have described it sounds like you may have an allergy, niacin can make allergies worse by increasing histamine. Consult with your health care provider about getting tested for allergies. Further, you could check with your family if they are allergic to anything, or have had any similar reaction. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-13 15:49:53
Name:T Hart
Location:CA
Subject:Niacin Flush
People are more concerned with the niacin flush than they need to be. But if you just can't tolerate the niacin flush, take inositol hexaniacinate, and that will work just fine. The cure for the niacin flush is more niacin, the flush releases built up histamine. It can cure mental disorders and may be the answer to the super bugs ravaging our hospitals.
Posted on 2013-11-18 06:38:25
Name:S. Miller
Location:MD
Subject:Low Dose Aspirin alleviates Niacin Flush
Took niacin for high cholesterol levels. I took a low dose aspirin and it helped with the flush.
Posted on 2014-01-09 17:43:38
Name:Ralph
Location:IA
Subject:Niacin and tinitis
I read that too much niacin can be a cause of tinitis. Any truth to that? Would cutting back on it reverse some of the noise?
Posted on 2014-01-13 00:18:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Niacin and tinitis
Hi Ralph, thanks for your question. Researching the issue yielded an article by the American Tinnitus Association for using niacin to alleviate tinnitus. This would suggest the opposite of what you are asking, that niacin actually helps instead of hurts in regards to tinnitus. Likely, however, there is no effect. Sorry not to be of more help.
Posted on 2014-01-15 20:54:06
Name:Mark
Location:HK
Subject:Niacin and Stroke Medication
I had a mild stroke with full recovery, however now on blood thinners, blood pressure lowering and Lipitor (statin for lowering cholesterol) tablets.

Would like to know if Niacin is OK to take after a stroke and if any conflict with the above medications. I am told that after 3-6 months I will be off the drugs except the blood thinners which I will need to take daily for the test of my life.

Posted on 2014-02-05 09:54:37
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Niacin and Stroke Medication
Hi Mark, thanks for your question. As long as you are getting niacin from foods, you should be ok with niacin and the medications you are taking. This site mainly specializes in nutrition advice, so if you are going to taking a high dose niacin supplement you are best to consult with your doctor or pharmacist. If you are taking a blood thinner which works by antagonizing vitamin K then you might find the article on low vitamin K foods for a warfarin (coumadin) diet useful.
Posted on 2014-02-05 12:07:01

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Comments.
Name:Sam Chapman
Location:Reading
Subject:Marmite Consumption
I have been 'addicted' to Marmite for decades, and have found that spread thickly, it elevates my concentration. I'm assuming this is because of the Niacin content, but I do wonder if I'm as a consequence, taking in too much salt!
Posted on 2012-02-05 22:03:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Marmite Consumption
Hi Sam, thanks for your question. Marmite is a very potent source of niacin. One teaspoon will provide 29% of the DV (Percent Daily Value) for niacin, but only 9% of the DV for sodium (salt). This means that you can probably eat 3-5 teaspoons of Marmite, depending on how much sodium you get from other parts of your diet. Maybe try to measure how many teaspoons of Marmite you eat? Also, monitor your blood pressure, as long as it stays in a normal range, your sodium levels should be ok. If your blood pressure is high, then cut back on Marmite. Here are the complete nutrition facts for yeast extract spread (marmite), but check the nutrition label of your marmite to verify the sodium level.
Posted on 2012-02-05 22:15:51
Name:Alex
Subject:Niacin Overdose
Tell me sir, do you have any crucial evidence on the side effect of niacin overdose? Or it is just a conjecture? Please inform me. Thank you, Alex.
Posted on 2012-05-21 18:39:21
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Niacin Overdose
Hi Alex, as this study states, having skin reactions is a common side effect of too much niacin. Liver damage and digestive disorders (diarrhea) can also occur. For more sources, see the "References" section at the bottom of this article.
Posted on 2012-05-22 06:52:32
Name:Mark
Location:India
Subject:Niacin required
Hi, my age is 46, and I consume 40mg of Naicin each day to control my blood pressure. My lipoprotein (a) level is 62, can anyone suggest how I can reduce it without any side effects?
Posted on 2012-07-13 19:04:22
Name:Anonymous
Subject:Niacin Levels
I'm taking about 500mg of nicotinic acid per day with only small side-effects. Just some mild flushing which lasts only a few minutes. This has definitely reduced my heart failure symptoms.
Posted on 2012-09-08 18:15:10
Name:Sarah
Location:Cheltenham
Subject:Marmite
I just want to say that I love the stuff :D
Posted on 2012-09-12 17:30:44
Name:Anonymous
Subject:Niacin Complications
Hello, I've just been prescribed niacin to try and elevate my good cholesterol levels, which are low. I have high cholesterol but can not tolerate the usual medicines such as lipitor etc. I also have type II diabetes will the niacin not elevate my already high blood sugar levels? I'm also confused about the contradictions between what niacin helps and what too much niacin causes. Thank you, Candice.
Posted on 2012-09-17 21:54:57
Name:Jim
Subject:Marmite and Glutamic Acid
Niacin is a critical micronutrient but marmite as a health recommendation is shameful! Marmite is chemically denatured protein. Just like MSG, Marmite delivers a neurotoxic dose of the free amino acid "glutamic acid", which, at unnaturally high blood concentrations, triggers neurons to fire, and keep firing until cell death. Heart, brain, and pancreas are organs where homeostasis is easily disrupted by this amino acid neurotransmitter. In nature aminos are chemically bound to each other, and our body's digestive organs decide when they are made available. "MSG" so to speak, has many aliases, Yeast extract is but one....please cross-reference marmite, or yeast extract with MSG.
Posted on 2012-10-09 18:28:18
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Marmite and Glutamic Acid
Hi Jim, thanks for making this point and bringing this issue to light. Just going to counter by saying that many cultures, such as Japan, consume MSG and glutamic acid with no wide spread health affects, and that people should pay attention to the qualifier in your comment of "unnaturally high blood concentrations", since most nutrients at unaturally high levels are unhealthy. Given this perspective, yeast extract, such as Marmite, is probably still a good food for most people.
Posted on 2012-10-09 18:43:15
Name:MJ
Location:Ohio
Subject:Schizophrenia and Hoffer
As you may or may not know, Dr Hoffer discovered that some brain-damaged people did have an extreme need for niacin that in some cases required daily doses of 3000mg. Yes that's not a typo, and it cured 80% of the schizophrenia patients. Even the idea that niacin raised brain functions to clarity was confirmation of the potential need for some. Even the doses for depression were ignored though it's a frequent symptom of violent brain problems. Imagine what we could do with our out-of-control crime and prison situation, with modest amounts of inexpensive niacin, in one form or another. Look for Hoffer's published work. TTYL.
Posted on 2012-10-22 19:52:09
Name:Jan
Location:Michigan
Subject:Too much niacin
I have noticed that niacin is in many food products...health drinks, snacks, cereals, etc. My problem is I get too much niacin. I have had a strong twitching of muscles in my calves and also had charley horses prior to cutting down niacin. I deleted multivitamins and also a B complex supplement I was taking. Months later, it is greatly reduced, but I am no longer getting the multivitamins I wanted to supplement my diet. Are mfgers not sensitive to this problem?? I am trying to avoid niacin, but it is difficult to find a variety diet that is not loaded with doses of niacin.
Posted on 2012-12-21 07:50:08
Name:SG
Location:California
Subject:RE: Too much niacin
To Jan from Michigan, your muscle twitches are not caused by niacin, but lack of magnesium. Take some. Low magnesium is caused by too much calcium, prescription drugs, soft water, processed foods and sodas. Also, why are you buying processed vitamin enriched foods? Just purchase real food and you will not have to worry. Anyway, niacin is not the culprit in your case.
Posted on 2013-01-18 22:10:08
Name:Sophie Barcant
Location:Trinidad,WI
Subject:Niacin and depression
I heard of the 3000mg Niacin treating schizophrenia and other mental conditions...so started on 2500mg flush free Niacin for my moderate depression. I have been on it for 4 months but now take between 1000-1500mg most days. I was able to reduce my anti depressants to 2 tablets a week..Lexapro 10mg.. I marvel at the effectiveness of Niacin but am concerned now about liver damage or diabetes. Who can guide me?..Doctors in my region would scoff at this treatment for depression!!
Posted on 2013-03-13 22:59:19
Name:Sam M
Location:London
Subject:My Experience Taking 500mg Niacin
I have now been taking 500mg Niacin everyday for over seven years, and it has been good to my skin and well being so far. I love the skin flushing and itching...I think this may be why my skin feels better. 10min after taking it with a little solid food I go to bed, fall sleep quickly, do not notice the skin itches, and the next thing I know is when I wake up in the morning.
Posted on 2013-04-27 02:24:43
Name:L. Naomi
Location:USA
Subject:Niacin....Shingle-skin pain
My twin was diag w/shingles; I eat 95%vegan so was never diag w/shingles but started havng skin (nerve endings)pain a decade agao. A nutritionist said Flax seed so I started on the gel caps-helped alot; when only sleep was helping. Then this past spring 2013 a friend was telling me about the flush u get w/niacin;I started taking the one with the flush;I really like the flush. After over 5yrs of of skin pain - IT JUST ALL STOPPED! I THINK IT WAS THE NIACIN.Plus my lymphaatic system collected waste and my nodes under my left arm clogged up-Yeah! Lymph system doin its job Yeah!!! I think that was the niacin cleaning the blood and sending the waste into the lymph system for the body to slow get rid of it! Yeah Niacin. I will lower my mg but keep it as a supplement.
Posted on 2013-06-21 12:16:12
Name:Lahope
Location:CA
Subject:Re: Too Much Niacin
To Jan from Michigan: Your charley horse is likely caused by lack of potassium. Try eating a banana before bed. I've been taking 1000 mg niacin for APO B issues (small dense LDL particles instead of the large buoyant ones--it's genetic)with no side effects other than the transient flushing and tingling of the skin.
Posted on 2013-08-06 11:28:48
Name:Jeyser Forks
Location:Seattle, WA
Subject:Niacin causes my face to blush...
I just noticed that my frequent intake of niacin-rich food caused me a lot of blushing (on the face especially). Why is that so? What does niacin trigger in my sympathetic nervous system?
Posted on 2013-09-08 04:38:22
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Niacin causes my face to blush...
Hi Jeyser, thanks for your question. Skin flushing is a result of taking too much niacin, though it typically occurs only from supplements. Skin flushing is thought to be due to niacin's effect as a vasodilator, increasing blood flow in your body, but can also be due to niacin restricting the effect of certain enzymes in the body. Wikipedia's section on niacin toxicity has more info.
Posted on 2013-09-09 00:17:10
Name:K Hatton
Location:United Kingdom
Subject:Is Non Flush Niacin Effective?
Is none flush niacin different from other types of niacin that does cause flushing? Is anything missing in non flush niacin?
Posted on 2013-10-06 09:31:27
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Is Non Flush Niacin Effective
Hello and thanks for your question. Products marketed as "non-flush" niacin typically contain a chemical meant to be converted by your body into niacin. It appears that, so far, these types of supplements are not effective in increasing the level of niacin in your body. You might benefit more from a slow release form of niacin. This study shows that a slow release form of niacin was able to lower cholesterol levels, while the non-flush version had no effect. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-07 01:43:10
Name:K Hatton
Location:United Kingdom
Subject:Niacin Prescriptions
I get all of my niacin from food and question the need for supplements. I've read articles on the web that suggest asking your doctor to prescribe niacin but, in the uk, doctors don't generally prescribe supplements. I assume that those patients being prescribed it are from America?
Posted on 2013-10-07 02:26:23
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Niacin Prescriptions
Hi and thanks for your question. Niacin is typically prescribed to reduce cholesterol and for people with heart disease. Wikipedia has a good section about prescription niacin. In truth, the prescribed form does not differ too much from over the counter supplements, except that they have been tested as effective. You are right to think that natural sources of niacin are best, so stick to natural foods as much as possible. This article is about to be updated and expanded, so please check back next week for more foods!
Posted on 2013-10-07 05:30:27
Name:J. Miller
Location:Wisconsin
Subject:Skin burning all the time
For the last few years my skin feels like it's burning almost all the time. Some days worse than others, like a sun burn, but no pigment change and slightly painful. Sometimes it's just a shoulder or an arm, or thigh, or combination. I recently added a supplement for my fibromyalgia and had a reaction, which I know now is called a niacin flush.(Contained 25mg of Niacin). It was unbearable. The redness/rash would disappear in about 30 minutes, but the burning would continue. I've since stopped taking the supplement and have not had another "flush", but my old burning skin problem still exists and seems worse some days. Since I've had burning skin issues for a while, I started to think that they might be related to too much Niacin or B vitamins?? Is that possible? Should I cut down on foods high in niacin? could I be highly sensitive to niacin or b vitamins?
Posted on 2013-10-12 20:13:41
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Skin burning all the time
Hi J. Miller and thanks for your question. A flush of the skin is pretty well limited to niacin and not the other B vitamins. It is also unlikely that you have some long term overdose of niacin. From what you have described it sounds like you may have an allergy, niacin can make allergies worse by increasing histamine. Consult with your health care provider about getting tested for allergies. Further, you could check with your family if they are allergic to anything, or have had any similar reaction. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-10-13 15:49:53
Name:T Hart
Location:CA
Subject:Niacin Flush
People are more concerned with the niacin flush than they need to be. But if you just can't tolerate the niacin flush, take inositol hexaniacinate, and that will work just fine. The cure for the niacin flush is more niacin, the flush releases built up histamine. It can cure mental disorders and may be the answer to the super bugs ravaging our hospitals.
Posted on 2013-11-18 06:38:25
Name:S. Miller
Location:MD
Subject:Low Dose Aspirin alleviates Niacin Flush
Took niacin for high cholesterol levels. I took a low dose aspirin and it helped with the flush.
Posted on 2014-01-09 17:43:38
Name:Ralph
Location:IA
Subject:Niacin and tinitis
I read that too much niacin can be a cause of tinitis. Any truth to that? Would cutting back on it reverse some of the noise?
Posted on 2014-01-13 00:18:09
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Niacin and tinitis
Hi Ralph, thanks for your question. Researching the issue yielded an article by the American Tinnitus Association for using niacin to alleviate tinnitus. This would suggest the opposite of what you are asking, that niacin actually helps instead of hurts in regards to tinnitus. Likely, however, there is no effect. Sorry not to be of more help.
Posted on 2014-01-15 20:54:06
Name:Mark
Location:HK
Subject:Niacin and Stroke Medication
I had a mild stroke with full recovery, however now on blood thinners, blood pressure lowering and Lipitor (statin for lowering cholesterol) tablets.

Would like to know if Niacin is OK to take after a stroke and if any conflict with the above medications. I am told that after 3-6 months I will be off the drugs except the blood thinners which I will need to take daily for the test of my life.

Posted on 2014-02-05 09:54:37
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Niacin and Stroke Medication
Hi Mark, thanks for your question. As long as you are getting niacin from foods, you should be ok with niacin and the medications you are taking. This site mainly specializes in nutrition advice, so if you are going to taking a high dose niacin supplement you are best to consult with your doctor or pharmacist. If you are taking a blood thinner which works by antagonizing vitamin K then you might find the article on low vitamin K foods for a warfarin (coumadin) diet useful.
Posted on 2014-02-05 12:07:01

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References

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