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Top 10 Foods Highest in Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid)


Vitamin B5, or Pantothenic Acid, is an essential vitamin required by the body for cellular processes and optimal maintenance of fat. A deficiency of vitamin B5 is rare, however, when it does occur is usually seen in the form of irritability, fatigue, apathy, numbness, paresthesia, and muscle cramps. It can also lead to increased sensitivity to insulin, or hypoglycemia. Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B5, is a water soluble vitamin that is well regulated by the body, thus overdose is rare, and may only be noticed in the form of slight digestive complaints or diarrhea. The current DV for Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5) is 10mg. Below is a list high vitamin B5 foods, click here for high vitamin B5 foods by nutrient density, here for an extended list of vitamin B5 rich foods, and here for other foods high in vitamin B.

#1: Mushrooms (Shiitake, Cooked)
Pantothenic Acid in 100gPer cup (145g)In 4 mushrooms (72g)
3.59mg (36% DV)5.21mg (52% DV)2.59mg (26% DV)
Other Mushrooms High in Pantothenic Acid (%DV per cup slices): White Mushrooms, cooked (34%), Portabella, grilled (15%), Brown Mushrooms, raw & Oyster Mushrooms, raw (11%), and Chanterelle, raw (6%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#2: Cheese (Gjetost)
Pantothenic Acid in 100gPer package (227g)Per ounce (28g)
3.35mg (34% DV)7.61mg (76% DV)0.94mg (9% DV)
Other Cheeses High in Pantothenic Acid (%DV per ounce): Roquefort & Blue Cheese (5%), Camembert (4%), and Feta (3%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#3: Oily Fish (Trout, Cooked)
Pantothenic Acid in 100gPer fillet (62g)Per 3oz (85g)
2.24mg (22% DV)1.39mg (14% DV)1.90mg (19% DV)
Other Oily Fish High in Pantothenic Acid (%DV per 3oz cooked): Rainbow Trout (17%), Wild Salmon (16%), Farmed Salmon (13%), and Tuna (12%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#4: Avocados
Pantothenic Acid in 100gPer cup puréed (230g)Per fruit (136g)
1.46mg (15% DV)3.37mg (34% DV)1.99mg (20% DV)
A half avocado provides 113 calories and only 1.4g saturated fat. Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#5: Eggs
Pantothenic Acid in 100gPer egg (50g)Per cooked egg (50g)
1.53mg (15% DV)0.77mg (8% DV)0.70mg (7% DV)
Other Eggs High in Pantothenic Acid (%DV per egg, raw): Goose (25%), Turkey (15%), Duck (13%), and Quail (2%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#6: Lean Pork (Sirloin, Cooked)
Pantothenic Acid in 100gPer roast (638g)Per 3oz (85g)
1.65mg (17% DV)10.55mg (106% DV)1.41mg (14% DV)
Cuts of Pork High in Pantothenic Acid (%DV per 3oz cooked): Lean Ribs & Lean Loin of Pork (14%), Lean Shoulder of Pork (12%), and Lean Ground Pork (7%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#7: Beef & Veal (Veal Shoulder, Cooked)
Pantothenic Acid in 100gPer piece (182g)Per 3oz (85g)
1.61mg (16% DV)2.93mg (29% DV)1.37mg (14% DV)
Other Cuts of Beef & Veal High in Pantothenic Acid (%DV per 3oz cooked): Rib of Veal (12%), Veal Sirloin (11%), and Lean Beef Steak (12%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#8: Chicken & Turkey (Chicken Drumstick, Cooked)
Pantothenic Acid in 100gPer drumstick (42g)Per 3oz (85g)
1.32mg (13% DV)0.55mg (6% DV)1.12mg (11% DV)
Other Poultry High in Pantothenic Acid (%DV per 3oz cooked): Chicken Leg & Chicken Thigh (11%), Turkey Leg (10%), Chicken Breast (9%), and Turkey Light Meat (8%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#9: Sunflower Seeds
Pantothenic Acid in 100gPer cup (134g)Per ounce (28g)
7.06mg (71% DV)9.46mg (95% DV)1.98mg (20% DV)
Other Seeds High in Pantothenic Acid (%DV per ounce): Flaxseeds (9%), and Pumpkin & Squash Seeds (2%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#10: Sweet Potato (Baked)
Pantothenic Acid in 100gPer cup (200g)Per potato (114g)
0.88mg (9% DV)1.77mg (18% DV)1.01mg (10% DV)
A medium sweet potato provides 103 calories and less than 0.2g fat. Click to see complete nutrition facts.




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Top 10 High Vitamin B5 Foods by Nutrient Density (Vitamin B5 per Gram)

#1: Baker’s Yeast 13.5mg (135% DV) per 100 grams0.54mg (5% DV) per teaspoon (4 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Baker’s Yeast
#2: Liver (Chicken, cooked) 8.32mg (83% DV) per 100 grams3.66mg (37% DV) per liver (44 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Liver
#3: Bran (Rice) 7.39mg (74% DV) per 100 grams8.72mg (87% DV) per cup (118 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Bran
#4: Sunflower Seeds 7.06mg (71% DV) per 100 grams1.98mg (20% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sunflower Seeds
#5: Whey (Dried) 5.62mg (56% DV) per 100 grams8.15mg (81% DV) per cup (145 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Whey
#6: Yeast Extract (Marmite) 4.60mg (46% DV) per 100 grams0.28mg (3% DV) per teaspoon (6 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Yeast Extract
#7: Mushrooms (Shiitake, Cooked) 3.59mg (36% DV) per 100 grams5.21mg (52% DV) per cup, pieces (145 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Mushrooms
#8: Spices (Paprika) 2.51mg (25% DV) per 100 grams0.05mg (1% DV) per teaspoon (2 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Spices
#9: Wheat Germ 2.26mg (23% DV) per 100 grams2.60mg (26% DV) per cup (115 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Wheat Germ
#10: Sun Dried Tomatoes 2.09mg (21% DV) per 100 grams1.13mg (11% DV) per cup (54 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sun Dried Tomatoes


Other Vitamin B5 Rich Foods

Peas (Frozen, Cooked) 0.86mg (9% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.37mg (14% DV) per cup (160 grams) 2.17mg (22% DV) per package (253 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Peas
Caviar 3.50mg (35% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.56mg (6% DV) per tablespoon (16 grams) 0.98mg (10% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Caviar
Potato Chips 4.35mg (43% DV) per 100 gram serving 9.87mg (99% DV) per bag (227 grams) 1.22mg (12% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Potato Chips
Liver Cheese 3.54mg (35% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.99mg (10% DV) per ounce (28 grams) 1.34mg (13% DV) per slice (38 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Liver Cheese
Spirulina 3.48mg (35% DV) per 100 gram serving 3.90mg (39% DV) per cup (112 grams) 0.24mg (2% DV) per tablespoon (7 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Spirulina
Goose (Cooked) 1.83mg (18% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.62mg (26% DV) per unit (143 grams) 10.84mg (108% DV) per 1/2 Goose (591 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Goose
Lobster (Cooked) 1.67mg (17% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.42mg (24% DV) per cup (145 grams) 1.42mg (14% DV) per 3oz (85 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Lobster
Duck (Cooked) 1.50mg (15% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.10mg (21% DV) per cup (140 grams) 3.32mg (33% DV) per 1/2 Duck (221 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Duck
Granola (Homemade) 1.56mg (16% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.91mg (19% DV) per cup (122 grams) 0.44mg (4% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Granola
Yogurt (Plain, Nonfat) 0.64mg (6% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.57mg (16% DV) per cup (245 grams) 1.46mg (15% DV) per container (227 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Nonfat Yogurt
Sweet Corn (Cooked) 0.79mg (8% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.82mg (8% DV) per ear (103 grams) 1.18mg (12% DV) per cup (149 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sweet Corn
Peanuts 1.40mg (14% DV) per 100 gram serving 0.39mg (4% DV) per ounce (28 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Peanuts
Buckwheat (Roasted) 1.23mg (12% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.02mg (20% DV) per cup (164 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Buckwheat
Ostrich (Cooked) 1.36mg (14% DV) per 100 gram serving 1.16mg (12% DV) per 3oz (85 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Ostrich
Triticale 1.32mg (13% DV) per 100 gram serving 2.54mg (25% DV) per cup (192 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Triticale
Fortified Cereals (All-Bran) 34.5mg (345% DV) per 100 gram serving 10.01mg (100% DV) per 3/4 cup (29 grams) Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fortified Cereals
For more foods high in vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid) use the nutrient ranking tool.






Comments.
Name:Leo
Location:US
Subject:Shiitake
The entry for dried shiitake lists 219% for 100 grams. That's far more than the 83% listed for chicken liver as the #1 source. Why is dried shiitake not at the top of the B5 list or even on the list for that matter and why is there no raw shiitake entry?
Posted on 2012-12-23 13:38:17
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Shiitake
Hi Leo, thanks for your question. Dried shiitake is indeed high in vitamin B5. Looking at the top 500 foods highest in B5 it ranks at #12, below raw whale beluga flipper and fortified commercial cereals. This top 10 list is curated to include more common foods and portion sizes. Dried shiitake would typically be hydrated before cooking and consumption. This hydration would make their B5 content equivalent, gram per gram, to the hydrated cooked shiitake listed.

Thanks for your comment, all the lists on this website are currently being refined to include more common portion sizes with an extended section for the top 10 by nutrient density. At that time, dried shiitake can be listed.

Posted on 2012-12-23 18:17:20
Name:Pieter
Location:Belgium, Leuven
Subject:B5 in Dried Sunflower Seeds
Hi there, it seems that dried sunflower seeds have much less B5 than roasted or toasted seeds, is that right?
Posted on 2013-01-11 11:15:51
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: B5 in Dried Sunflower Seeds
Hi Pieter, thanks for your question. Looking at the nutrition facts comparison, it does appear that dried sunflower seeds have about 1/7th the amount of B5 as toasted seeds.
Posted on 2013-01-11 14:37:23
Name:Josh
Location:USA
Subject:DV vs RDI
It appears your percentages are given for a RDI of 10mg, when it should be 5mg for an adult. Why was this done?
Posted on 2013-02-12 14:29:14
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: DV vs RDI
Hi Josh, thanks for your question. The Percent Daily Value (%DV) is set by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a way to compare foods and to quickly judge what portion size will be adequate in relation to a specific nutrient. The %DV often matches or exceeds the recommended daily intake (RDI). This is a good thing as you probably never absorb 100% of the nutrient value from any food. The RDI was established by Food and Nutrition Board at the National Institute of Medicine. It is meant to be a calculated value of how much each nutrient a person needs in a day. In short, the %DV helps you to judge the value of different foods and portion sizes, and the RDI looks at your body's needs. This website uses the %DV since that is what is quoted on the nutrition labels of food products. For more information, see question 7 on the FAQ page.
Posted on 2013-02-13 19:33:54
Name:David
Location:South Africa
Subject:Roasting Sunflower Seeds
How are sunflower seeds roasted? Can you roast raw sunflower seeds by grilling them yourself? I ask this because it is quite hard to find roasted sunflower seeds on their own.
Posted on 2013-03-19 15:42:59
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Roasting Sunflower Seeds
Hi David, thanks for your question. Sunflower seeds can be roasted in a pan on low to medium heat. Simply place the sunflower seeds in their shells in the pan on the stove. How long you need to roast them depends on quantity, but 10 minutes for 1 cup of sunflower seeds should suffice.
Posted on 2013-03-20 20:53:14
Name:Anonymous
Subject:More B5 Foods?
I need to know at least 5 more foods that are high in B5 that are not on this page as I have tried looking on the internet and can only find the ones that are listed above, please could anyone be kind enough to help.
Posted on 2013-05-31 08:44:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:More B5 Foods?
Hi and thanks for your question. Eventually this article will be expanded to list more B5 foods. Till then, you can search through this list of 1000 foods high in vitamin B5 for more foods. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-06-05 03:02:53

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Comments.
Name:Leo
Location:US
Subject:Shiitake
The entry for dried shiitake lists 219% for 100 grams. That's far more than the 83% listed for chicken liver as the #1 source. Why is dried shiitake not at the top of the B5 list or even on the list for that matter and why is there no raw shiitake entry?
Posted on 2012-12-23 13:38:17
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Shiitake
Hi Leo, thanks for your question. Dried shiitake is indeed high in vitamin B5. Looking at the top 500 foods highest in B5 it ranks at #12, below raw whale beluga flipper and fortified commercial cereals. This top 10 list is curated to include more common foods and portion sizes. Dried shiitake would typically be hydrated before cooking and consumption. This hydration would make their B5 content equivalent, gram per gram, to the hydrated cooked shiitake listed.

Thanks for your comment, all the lists on this website are currently being refined to include more common portion sizes with an extended section for the top 10 by nutrient density. At that time, dried shiitake can be listed.

Posted on 2012-12-23 18:17:20
Name:Pieter
Location:Belgium, Leuven
Subject:B5 in Dried Sunflower Seeds
Hi there, it seems that dried sunflower seeds have much less B5 than roasted or toasted seeds, is that right?
Posted on 2013-01-11 11:15:51
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: B5 in Dried Sunflower Seeds
Hi Pieter, thanks for your question. Looking at the nutrition facts comparison, it does appear that dried sunflower seeds have about 1/7th the amount of B5 as toasted seeds.
Posted on 2013-01-11 14:37:23
Name:Josh
Location:USA
Subject:DV vs RDI
It appears your percentages are given for a RDI of 10mg, when it should be 5mg for an adult. Why was this done?
Posted on 2013-02-12 14:29:14
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: DV vs RDI
Hi Josh, thanks for your question. The Percent Daily Value (%DV) is set by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a way to compare foods and to quickly judge what portion size will be adequate in relation to a specific nutrient. The %DV often matches or exceeds the recommended daily intake (RDI). This is a good thing as you probably never absorb 100% of the nutrient value from any food. The RDI was established by Food and Nutrition Board at the National Institute of Medicine. It is meant to be a calculated value of how much each nutrient a person needs in a day. In short, the %DV helps you to judge the value of different foods and portion sizes, and the RDI looks at your body's needs. This website uses the %DV since that is what is quoted on the nutrition labels of food products. For more information, see question 7 on the FAQ page.
Posted on 2013-02-13 19:33:54
Name:David
Location:South Africa
Subject:Roasting Sunflower Seeds
How are sunflower seeds roasted? Can you roast raw sunflower seeds by grilling them yourself? I ask this because it is quite hard to find roasted sunflower seeds on their own.
Posted on 2013-03-19 15:42:59
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Roasting Sunflower Seeds
Hi David, thanks for your question. Sunflower seeds can be roasted in a pan on low to medium heat. Simply place the sunflower seeds in their shells in the pan on the stove. How long you need to roast them depends on quantity, but 10 minutes for 1 cup of sunflower seeds should suffice.
Posted on 2013-03-20 20:53:14
Name:Anonymous
Subject:More B5 Foods?
I need to know at least 5 more foods that are high in B5 that are not on this page as I have tried looking on the internet and can only find the ones that are listed above, please could anyone be kind enough to help.
Posted on 2013-05-31 08:44:35
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:More B5 Foods?
Hi and thanks for your question. Eventually this article will be expanded to list more B5 foods. Till then, you can search through this list of 1000 foods high in vitamin B5 for more foods. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-06-05 03:02:53

Post a comment.
Name:          
Location:       
Email:(Optional)
Subject:         

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References

  1. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 25.