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Top 10 Foods Highest in Sodium


Sodium is an essential nutrient required by the body for maintaining levels of fluids and for providing channels of nerve signaling. Deficiency of sodium is rare, however, can occur in people after excessive vomiting or diarrhea, in athletes who intake excessive amounts of water, or in people who regularly fast on juice and water. Over-consumption of sodium is far more common and can lead to high blood pressure which in turn leads to an increased risk of heart attack and stroke. The current percent daily value for sodium is 2400mg, however, the American Heart Association recommends that people with high blood pressure eat less that 1500mg per day, or less than 3/4 of a table spoon of salt. Since sodium is required by all life to exist, it is naturally found in all foods and rarely does salt ever need to be added. Steps you can take to ensure low sodium eating include: avoiding canned foods, avoiding pickled food, choosing low sodium cheeses, and substituting herbs and other spices in place of salt. Below is a list of high sodium foods, almost all these foods should be avoided.

#1: Table salt, baking soda, and baking powder
Table salt is 40% sodium by weight, and easily the number one source of sodium for almost everyone. 100 grams of table salt (1/3 cup) provides 38,000 mg of sodium or 1615% of the DV. One teaspoon of salt provides 2325mg of sodium or 98% of the DV. One teaspoon of baking soda provides 1368mg of sodium (57% DV), and one teaspoon of baking powder contains 530mg (22% DV).
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#2: Bouillon cubes, Powdered Broths, Soups, and Gravies
Salt is widely used as an agent to dry and preserve foods and soup broths are no exception. A typical 5 gram bouillon cube contains 1200mg of sodium or 50% of the DV.
Click to see complete nutrition facts

#3: Soy Sauce, Other Sauces, and Salad Dressings
Soy sauce is commonly added to East Asian cooking, and now comes in low sodium varieties which are recommended, check nutrition facts of specific products for sodium content. One teaspoon of Tamari (Soy only) soy sauce contains 335mg (14% DV) and one teaspoon of Shoyu (Wheat and Soy) Soy Sauce contains 282mg of sodium (12% DV). In addition to soy sauces, be sure to check labels of most sauces and salad dressings in general, as these foods can be surprising high in sodium.
Click to see complete nutrition facts

#4: Yeast Extract Spread (Marmite)
Yeast extract spread is common in British cultures and is a good vegan source of vitamin B12 and protein. However, the spread also contains a lot of sodium providing 216mg (9% DV) per teaspoon.
Click to see complete nutrition facts

#5: Salami, Bacon, and Cured Meats
Salt has long been used as a preservative for various meats, and so it is not surprising to find a high amount of sodium in them. One slice of bacon (8 grams) contains 194mg of sodium (8% DV), while one slice of salami (10g) contains 226mg (9% DV), and 1 large piece of beef jerky (20g) contains 443mg of sodium or 18% DV.
Click to see complete nutrition facts

#6: Caviar
Caviar, like most foods packaged in a tin can, can be very high in sodium. On average 1oo grams provides 1500mg (63% DV) of sodium. That is 18% DV per ounce and 10% DV in a single tablespoon. Check the label of each product as sodium quantities may vary.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#7: Cheese
Most cheeses are packed with sodium, and combined with high cholesterol levels, can be a disaster for your heart and cardiovascular health. The cheeses with the most sodium per 100 gram serving (about 5 one inch cubes) are Roquefort (75% DV), Cheez Whiz (71% DV), Parmesan (71% DV), Cheddar (66% DV), Swiss (65% DV), Blue (58% DV), Romano (50% DV), Feta (47% DV), Edam (40% DV), Provolone (37% DV), Camembert (35% DV), Gouda (34% DV), Fontina (33% DV), Limburger (33% DV), Mexican blend (32% DV), Tilsit (31% DV), and Mozzarella (31% DV).
Click to see complete nutrition facts

#8: Snack Foods (Pretzels, Cheese Puffs, and Popcorn)
It should not be news that most processed snack foods are bad for you, and their high sodium content is just another reason not to eat them. 100 grams of pretzels (15 medium twists) contain 1715mg (71% DV) of sodium. Cheese puffs (~15% DV per oz) and regular popcorn (~12% DV per oz) are just as bad. As with all snack foods, be sure to check the labels for specific information.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#9: Pickled Foods
Pickled foods are typically pickled with salt and thus have very high sodium contents. 100 grams of olives, for example, will provide 1556mg (65% DV) of sodium. That is 3% of the DV per large olive, or 1/5 of your total percent daily value in 7 olives! As for dill pickles, a single large pickle will pack half of the DV for sodium!
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#10: Saltwater Crab
While crab is an excellent source of b12 and omega 3 fats, it should be eaten in moderation due to its sodium content. 100 grams provides 1072 mg of sodium (45% DV), which is 1436mg (60% DV) in a single leg of Alaska King crab.
Click to see complete nutrition facts



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Comments.
Name:C
Subject:Sodium Deficiency?
You said sodium deficiency is rare but I find it quite easy for me to feel very tired and faint, not to mention major headaches, when i don't eat enough salt. I'm in a few sports (soccer, track, skiing, and bike riding) but nothing too major. I'm in the habit of eating a large pickle after soccer and track practice, because otherwise I feel very fatigued and really crappy in general. Did you mean life threatening deficiency? Because it seems to me like too-low salt intake can be quite common.
Posted on 2011-09-01 07:23:24
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Sodium Deficiency?
Hi C, thanks for your comment. It is true that you can lose a lot of sodium when you exercise, especially if you sweat a lot. However, it is unlikely that you lose so much you experience the kind of symptoms you describe. Are you sure the symptoms are caused by lack of sodium and not another mineral like potassium or magnesium? Maybe try some bananas or orange juice after you exercise and see if you don't feel even better than eating the pickle.
Posted on 2011-09-01 07:33:31
Name:Jeff
Location:US
Subject:Hyponatremia
I had two different doctors tell me to eat MORE salt and take salt pills .... I have low blood sodium with blood work to prove it, but I never thought I would hear a Dr. say that. And I never even really used salt before .... it would be comical if it wasn't so annoying!
Posted on 2011-09-19 14:53:22
Name:Diana
Location:USA
Subject:Low Blood Sodium
I'm researching sites such as this to figure out which foods would be the best to supplement my husband's sodium intake. Even with daily cups of bouillon and salty snacks his level drops dangerously. I'm just trying to keep him out of the ER and at a safe level.
Posted on 2011-12-05 21:07:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low Blood Sodium
Hi Diana, thanks for your comment, it sounds like your husband may be suffering from a problem that requires therapy beyond salt supplementation. Perhaps he is having kidney problems or some other problem that is preventing him from properly regulating sodium. Have you consulted his doctor or health care provider? If not, do so as soon as possible. Good luck!
Posted on 2011-12-05 21:07:07
Name:Victor
Location:Arizona
Subject:RE: Low Blood Sodium
Diana, allow your husband to know that sodium levels will not maintain themselves if his potassium levels aren't maintained as well. There are intra and extra cellular fluids in the blood, consisting primarily of sodium and potassium, and without a balance of the two, one or the other will drop to the level of the other to maintain equilibrium.
Posted on 2011-12-20 14:09:51
Name:Wendy
Location:USA
Subject:Crohn's
I have dealt with Crohn's disease for thirty years and have had an ostomy for the last twenty. I lose way too much sodium and potassium and found this site very informative in choosing the right foods to keep my sodium at a healthy level. Thank you so much for providing it.
Posted on 2011-12-21 11:36:40
Name:Dawn
Location:Iowa
Subject:Low Sodium
Thanks for all the foods high in sodium. Although more rare to have low sodium, I just found out I have this. 50 yrs old, never on any meds or medical problems, was having heart palpitations to point of passing out, and throbbing headaches(on left side only) when laying down. My blood pressure drops to 83/59, but I am not an athlete, and have never over-exercised. The severe problem with low pressure is passing out/hitting head-and/or unconsciousness at worst. I am having a hard time finding healthy/low fat foods with high sodium. Lean cuisine sandwiches are the best so far and low fat Progresso soups. I have always hated salty foods and would never buy anything that had high sodium, and I also do not eat processed foods. Part of my problem I guess. All other tests came back normal. I find it weird, yet I am glad to have low rather than high blood pressure. But I have to say, it is hard to make it to 2400 mg of sodium a day. Something a person watching their sodium intake would scuff at me for, lol anymore suggestions on healthy foods with high sodium would be helpful.
Posted on 2012-01-15 21:56:44
Name:Burto394
Location:CT
Subject:Salt
Dawn, have you ever been tested for POTS syndrome? My 18 year old was just diagnosed and needs a high sodium diet and a lot of fluid. Your symptoms are similar. She also is fatigued, has muscle pain, headaches, restless nights, rapid heart rate within 3 minutes of exercise but otherwise a low heart rate. You might want to see a cardiologist.
Posted on 2012-01-24 22:37:14
Name:Emy
Location:AZ
Subject:RE: Salt and POTS
Hi Burto394, I have just been treated for low thyroid, adrenal fatigue, and hormonal imbalance. I had all the symptoms your describing but a lot more than that. After I've been treated for this, my headaches went away, the muscle pains went away, and I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia, but those symptoms are gone. I went with months of sleepless nights, racing thoughts, muscle pain like you wont believe. I couldn't exercise, my heart would beat too fast and I couldn't breath. I mean my stamina was so bad. Anyway, I've been a lot better since I'm on treatment. But it wasn't just the hormone that is low, my D3 was also very low. I suggest you consider finding a hormone doctor that will help you...
Posted on 2012-01-25 23:06:44
Name:Salty Chip
Location:Florida
Subject:5,000 mg sodium per day
I've been advised by 3 physicians to eat 5,000 to 15,000 mg of sodium per day for a medical condition called dysautonomia. I went from a low sodium diet (taste preference, not medically needed) to this super high sodium diet. I have to say that it is virtually impossible for me to achieve that goal, but I try. I definitely feel worse when I don't.
Posted on 2012-03-07 01:48:32
Name:P
Location:Los Angeles
Subject:Hyponatremia

Hi C, et el., I JUST got out of the hospital for severe hyponatremia (low blood sodium -- and mine was from studying, not sports) and yes it is life-threatening. Everything is low sodium now that it is difficult to add enough salt to your diet -unless you eat highly processed foods- to keep your levels high enough (trust me : ).

If you will drink poweraide/gatoraide, drink that for each bottle of water. Or you can add salt (and molasses is you have ever gotten low blood potassium) to your water. Licking salt from my fingers will spike mine back up almost immediately.

You must eliminate dozens of other conditions first, of course, before you can turn to just salt.But I do not think anyone needs to be concerned about dying. If your vision gets weird/spotty (I can't explain it) and you cannot concentrate, that means it is starting and just stop drinking water.

I would suggest a routine blood test when you feel those symptoms (just ask your doctor to order an electrolyte panel) and to check your kidneys. That is usually a good place to start. Good luck! And get it taken care of : )

Posted on 2012-03-13 20:33:06
Name:Ryan Elias
Location:Montreal
Subject:Table Salts vc Sea Salt
Great site and priceless; I would just like to point out that although table salt is a beneficial source of sodium, it is very acidic because it has been processed and devoid of nutrients other than sodium, instead it's preferable to consume Sea Salt or Celtic salt, which you may find in Health Shops.
Posted on 2012-03-25 00:56:46
Name:Shirley
Location:Brisbane
Subject:Foods for Dysautonomia
I too have just been hospitalized with this, I was very ill. I am taking Florinef to help retain sodium and maintain a reasonable BP. I hate the side effects of the drug. Any suggestions for increasing sodium without taking too much potassium which is already high normal?
Posted on 2012-04-24 00:44:40
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Foods for Dysautonomia
Hi Shirley, thanks for your question. This list of sodium foods will be extended to give more ideas of foods to eat to boost sodium levels. Till then you can use the nutrient ranking tool to find foods with a high sodium to potassium ratio.
Posted on 2012-05-07 03:30:32
Name:Melissa
Location:New Zealand
Subject:Muscle Cramps while Running
Hi, I have a terrible problem with getting cramps at all the wrong times such as 9ks into my 21k run, so hard to carry on as it was in my quads. I am getting it more and more often and its nearly crippling me but frustrating at the same time. I need help as I'm still wanting to run long distances, is there something I should eat the night before and the morning of a run? Please help.
Posted on 2012-05-22 02:15:39
Name:Low Blood Pressure
Location:Virginia
Subject:Low Blood Pressure
Dr. just told me to eat at least 3000 mg of sodium/day. Hypotension requires salt. Thanks for your post.
Posted on 2012-05-23 17:56:41
Name:Earl
Location:Columbia, MD
Subject:Low Blood Sodium
Well, I have suffered from low blood sodium, and believe me it is NO fun. My low sodium sent me to the hospital for two or three days. Remember: People have DIED from low blood sodium!
Posted on 2012-07-24 12:41:53
Name:Charlotte
Location:Oklahoma
Subject:Low Sodium Levels
Does anyone have any suggestions for a mid-stage Alzheimer's patient with low sodium levels? He doesn't have an appetite (side effect of low sodium) and wants to drink constantly, although we'e been told to limit his fluid intake. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
Posted on 2012-07-31 06:20:56
Name:Gastricbypasslady
Location:Oklahoma
Subject:Sodium deficiency
I had a gastric bypass in 1999. For 13 years I haven't eaten the typical American diet. I am 59 years old now. My stomach size is that of a shot glass. I can't typically eat enough to keep a healthy sodium level and my bloodpressure is constantly so low I can't get out of a chair. Please HURRY and add foods to increase sodium levels and please include foods that pack high sodium in a small serving.
Posted on 2012-09-04 17:13:36
Name:Susun
Location:Netherlands
Subject:Raw salt cf heat treated table salt
Please everyone looking to increase salt intake, I would highly encourage you to look to raw unheated untreated sources. NOT table salt. As Ryan also mentions. Table salt is a toxin and is causing many problems. Maybe some of the problems mentioned above are exacerbated by the wrong kind of salt.
Posted on 2012-10-15 09:16:58
Name:Beth
Location:Canada
Subject:Low Sodium
I would suggest anyone with trouble regulating sodium should be tested for Addison's Disease....this is a common side effect of adrenal insufficiency.
Posted on 2013-01-09 16:42:12
Name:Kate
Location:Pennsylvania
Subject:Syncope
I have a problem where I have a sudden drop in blood pressure to the point where I become unconscious and I have an increased heart rate. I don't exercise though, and I probably should. A cardiologist told me to eat more salty foods, not too difficult for someone my age, and to always have water. This article was helpful even if I do eat most of it already. But now I know what to eat if I know I'll be in a situation that may trigger my type of syncope.
Posted on 2013-01-22 11:01:31
Name:Lena
Location:NJ
Subject:Sodium deficiency
There is a difference between salt and sodium foods, which doctors do not recognize. Salt is not the right kind of sodium combination for the human body. We absorb minerals best from plants, which absorb minerals from soil and animals. The most important thing is without sodium your digestive system does not work properly, and your calcium and potassium supply can be exhausted very quickly. Here are the best sodium foods: veal joint broth, goat milk(not pasteurized), goat whey, and black mission figs. Enjoy!
Posted on 2013-01-24 18:56:06
Name:Joe
Location:KS
Subject:Type of Salt
Please note, there is misinformation in several prior posts: Salt is not toxic at reasonable intake levels. Much like water, it is required for life. Over intake of water can also be 'toxic.' It is also not acidic. A pure saltwater solution has a pH of 7. As it is refined, it is simply being washed of impurities and crystallized into a certain size particle. You may want to avoid the flowing agents in most table salt. Easiest to do this via using Kosher Salt or Sea Salt (which contains very small amounts of other salts (KCl, CaCl, etc..). Enjoy.
Posted on 2013-02-11 20:42:13
Name:Tracey
Location:New Jersey
Subject:POTS Syndrome and Sodium
C, This sounds like the issues that my daughter has from her chronic illness. PLEASE look up POTS Syndrome. My daughter needs a sodium packed item every 2-3 hours or she'll pass out. Also, gatorade (drink through a straw to save your teeth from sugar) actually helps retain the sodium.
Posted on 2013-02-19 17:22:03
Name:CW
Location:Richmond
Subject:Syncope and POTS
Kate, It sounds to me like your issue is POTS, as Syncope is 1 of the biggest symptoms.
Posted on 2013-02-28 22:04:42
Name:Dianne
Location:Southern California
Subject:Syncope
I just got back from seeing the cardiologist and having a Tilt Table Test, and too, have been told to add salt to my diet and double my water intake. Your article helped me to find foods that will help. I love pickles! I've been fainting since 16 years old and am now 56.
Posted on 2013-03-20 23:00:14
Name:Philly-o
Location:Rodeotown
Subject:Best sources of Natural Sodium
As the article states the best source is table salt, and the less processed sea salt.

Others include (per 100g): Alaskan King Crab: 45%
Seaweed, dried 45%
Dungeness Crab: 15%
Tuna /misc: 15%
Oysters/Clams: 5%
Most ocean fish: 5%

As for Lena's post: Veal joint, Goat products, and Figs, are absolutely not dependable sources of sodium, each giving about 1% of the daily value per 100g.

Posted on 2013-03-28 16:59:32
Name:Dan
Location:London
Subject:My tips for getting more salt
I have to cut down on salt, which makes me sad to see things I like eating on this list. But I might be able to offer helpful tips to those who need very high amounts. I discovered the other day that a friend's KFC meal had over 9g of salt - each piece of fried chicken has over a gram! Also I've found that Domino's do a pizza with over 10g of sodium (yes, >25g of salt), which I have unwittingly eaten a few of in the past.

I suppose the main problem for those with extreme salt requirements is finding the right ratio of salt to calories. I find it hard to eat enough protein and starch to get my energy without hitting my sodium limit, whereas I doubt one of those Domino's pizzas would fit into most people's fat allowances. If you need something high in salt but without the calories, have a look into salt crust baking - take your fish or meat or vegetable and bake it in a crust of salt.

Also please acknowledge that I'm not a doctor so check with yours first and foremost.

Posted on 2013-04-10 02:50:52
Name:Deb
Location:Ontario
Subject:Healthy Sodium from Celery
One of the very best way to get sodium into the body is through CELERY JUICE. We should all start looking to juicing to improve our health.
Posted on 2013-05-13 10:39:08
Name:Micah
Location:WA
Subject:Natural Sodium and Sodium Deficiency
Lena gave an interesting list, because at least some of her sources have higher efficacy rather than higher quantity. It is unfortunate that the few scientists who have studied sodium intake needs, using vegetable sodium, like phosphates, have ever been published in sodium online medical journals. Summarily, their findings suggest that special care to maintain a minimum amount of sodium is necessary, but no salt need be added nor included when an adequate level of greens, sodium rich vegetables, and goat whey are consumed. Apparently high amounts of sodium chloride displace other forms of sodium and likely affect the body's systems that depend on those other forms. For example, synovial fluid aids transport of calcium from bones to other tissues when enough sodium phosphate is present. Without the sodium phosphate the calcium transport pathway collects extra calcium deposits. This may be a cause for joint deterioration or arthritis.
Posted on 2013-05-14 03:37:52
Name:Mary
Location:CA
Subject:Low sodium and hyponatremia
I have hyponatremia and at my wits on what to do. I have been in and out of the hospital so many times that I am so tired of all this. My doctor took blood tests and found nothing wrong. Does anyone else have this condition? I would like any information on this if anyone knows about this condition. I know that I will be talking more about this to my doctor, but if anyone had this condition and has had good results I would appreciate input on this.
Posted on 2013-05-15 14:52:33
Name:Martin
Location:UK
Subject:Sodium helps blood pressure and is good for you
Saturated Fats are fully saturated with hydrogens therefore cannot be oxidized making them a safe and protective fat. Polyunsaturated fats are the most damaging kind of fat as they have lots of double bonds that can be oxidized = Free radical damage. Sodium/Salt is required to maintain blood volume, for calcium metabolism and various other important functions. Several studies have recently shown (Something that has been know since the 1930's) that higher salt intake REDUCES chances of heart attack and stroke and REDUCES water retention. The Medical industry is wholly responsible for the untrue paradigms regarding Salt. To know why you need to understand a bit of history. When the first diuretics were created by the medical industry they saw that people would urinate lots of sodium when they took them. The industry went with 2+2=5 and said "That must mean reducing salt intake reduces water retention (Edema)". That is where the ridiculous belief about salt being bad comes from. In regards to water retention I find it odd that most people know that if you get stranded at sea you shouldn't drink sea water as it can be a diuretic which is true, but when a woman goes to her doctor with high water retention he tells her to avoid salt as it will cause her to retain more water.

In Summary: Salt is good for you - It increases metabolism and protects against high blood pressure, stroke, and heart disease. Saturated fat is good for you as it protects you against the damaging effects of polyunsaturated fats (Read Vegetable oil and fish oil EPA DHA). Sugar from fruit is good for you as it lowers stress hormones and helps you create cholesterol (Something else which is protective) which is needed for conversion into our protective hormones (Pregnenolone, progesterone, DHEA, Testosterone etc).

If you disagree with any of the above you need to go further down the rabbit hole until you can see past the political and financial influences in western medical and food industry culture. Most won't bother.

Each and every one of us is responsible for our own health. If someone tells you something go and do your own research and make you own mind up.

You can start by reading some well referenced articles by a guy called Dr Dr Ray Peat (Physiologist and endocrinologist) and very well versed in science history - Just as important as the research itself in getting to the real truth behind the "Government recommendation".

Posted on 2013-05-26 04:37:51
Name:P Proffit
Location:Utah
Subject:Young athletes & conscientious students, be aware of low sodium
B/c we have more young competitive athletes I am saying: be aware of this low sodium problem and get the blood work done! My daughter just finished her senior year, very tired. Normal? She is very athletic, tried to eat right, drink lots of water, studied, tried to avoid Gatorade due to so much sugar and fake coloring-we asked doctors at 2 physicals to check her blood for iron levels, mono, diabetes etc. We had never thought to check for sodium or electrolytes in the blood. She took vitamins, tried to sleep--they said it was just "normal" for teenagers to be tired with all they do. BUT, now we know the piece of the puzzle--sodium, real sodium from natural sources. With her hard work we knew she was "running on adrenaline", our family has a history of low blood pressure (we were always patted on the back for it, but isn't that funny? Just b/c it doesn't fit the normal health problems doesn't mean it is something "healthy") Anyway, other young competitive athlete students, consider adding REAL" salt to your water :/ Wished we'd known sooner! At least she knows for college!
Posted on 2013-06-06 05:26:03
Name:Emily Rose
Location:Ohio
Subject:Salt IS NOT bad!!!
Salt and fat are required for survival!!! Fat is good for you! Fat in foods is NOT the same fat as body fat. They only share the same name! There are a lot of people who need more salt than normal. Not JUST people with salt deficiency. I myself need extra salt as I have a nervous system disorder called Postural Orthostatic Tachychardia Syndrome also called P.O.T.S.
Posted on 2013-07-05 01:46:47
Name:Denise
Location:New Jersey
Subject:High blood pressure
Thank you very much for your list of foods. I'm in my mid 40s and have high blood pressure. It runs in my family-genetics I guess, since I don't add table salt to anything, not overweight, and try to exercise every week. Most of the foods on your list I already avoided but it's a good list to keep on my refrigerator to remind my husband who does most of the cooking, which foods to avoid.
Posted on 2013-07-09 08:42:06
Name:Andrew Jordaan
Location:UK
Subject:Parts of table salt are toxic
Parts of table salt are toxic and should be avoided at all costs. No one needs a daily intake anti caking agents in their system! If you have a disease that requires higher sodium intake find a proper non industrialized product.
Posted on 2013-07-17 06:57:52
Name:Andrew Jordaan
Location:UK
Subject:Sodium or Sodium Chloride
Martin in UK, If you disagree with any of the above you need to go further down the rabbit hole until you can see past the political and financial influences in western medical and food industry culture. Most won't bother.

Martin I did bother to read Ray Peat's article on Sodium, annoyingly he, like you, interchanges salt and sodium as if they are the same thing. Despite his article being extremely scholarly, the moment someone interchanges between sodium and sodium chloride, without qualifying what they mean, the article becomes just another article confusing the reader. It is absolutely essential to differentiate between sodium, naturally occurring, and salt which can easily mean an industrialized toxin laced with anti caking agents, which are not food.

Posted on 2013-07-17 13:47:53
Name:Trudy S
Location:MA, USA
Subject:Low blood sodium
Dear Reader, I have taken trilepal for two years and have low sodium and chloride in my blood. This is a side effect for some people. Tedgretal can cause this also. A blood test will confirm this. My dose is only 600mg a day, so even a smaller dose can affect the blood. Happy for this list, thank you.
Posted on 2013-07-20 14:36:41
Name:Wendy
Location:Terrace, BC
Subject:High blood pressure
My husband is dealing with high blood pressure for about a month now. It was at normal a week ago but today we checked and it gone up a bit. He had a mild stroke last month. We change his diet a bit. He hasn't drank alcohol or smoked. I'm sort of lost on this sodium in foods and the salt intake??
Posted on 2013-07-23 08:11:24
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: High blood pressure
Hi Wendy, thanks for your question. Basically, the more sodium you eat the higher your blood pressure. Eating a diet low in sodium (less than 1500mg/day) can help keep your blood pressure low. Your husband should avoid the foods on this list, and other high sodium foods. Further, the body tries to keep a balance between potassium and sodium. So eating more potassium foods, fruits, and vegetables, can help lower blood pressure also. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-07-23 11:54:32
Name:Salvador
Location:Riverside Ca.
Subject:About low blood sodium
Hello,can someone please tell me what low blood sodium is, how can you get it, and how can you prevent from getting it or what can you do to get it normal?
Posted on 2013-07-31 00:06:16
Name:Lisa
Location:BC
Subject:Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome and Low BP
I'm on a high salt diet and take salt pills. My BP is low so I pass out and get sick if I don't eat a ton of salt. I also have a condition called POTS (Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome). One of the treatments for the type of POTS I have is to eat a ton of salt and drink tons to increase my blood volume. This list is helpful in finding foods with high salt content.
Posted on 2013-08-09 12:04:25
Name:Mrs. Deshmukh
Location:India
Subject:Vegitarian foods to increase sodium in blood
My mother is 77 yrs old & has been admitted in the hospital due to low level of sodium. She is vegetarian, please suggest natural vegetarian foods to increase her sodium level. Thank you.
Posted on 2013-08-31 05:20:17
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vegitarian foods to increase sodium in blood
Hi Mrs. Deshmukh, thanks for your question. The best way to get more sodium in her diet is by adding salt to foods. Further, you can eat more pickled food, which is usually high in sodium. If you are looking for natural foods, both cooked celery, and cooked artichokes are fairly high in sodium. 1 cup of cooked celery provides 6% of the DV for sodium. It may not be enough to raise her level though, so consider pickles, or salt, which can really contribute a lot. Here is a ranking of 816 vegetables high in sodium.
Posted on 2013-09-01 07:48:32
Name:Jocelyn
Location:Australia
Subject:Cramping
Hello, I get cramping every time I run long distances and especially hills. If it is more then 4miles (7km) I start to cramp always half way through. Do you believe it is due to a lack of sodium? And what would you recommend?
Posted on 2013-09-18 05:50:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cramping
Hi Jocelyn, thanks for your question. Your cramping could be due to a lack of electrolytes, including sodium, potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus. Try drinking a sports electrolyte drink, like Gatorade, before, during, and after your run. Mixing some fruit juice in water could also work.
Posted on 2013-09-18 23:57:08
Name:Neil
Location:Canada
Subject:Sodium shortage
I've been advised that I'm slightly under the required level of sodium in my blood. The required level 135 and my reading shows 130. Is there a need of bringing up the level to 135? Or will it get normal through my daily intake of food. I'm 58. What are the symptoms that show Sodium deficiency?
Posted on 2013-09-19 00:24:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Sodium shortage
Hi Neil, thanks for your question. You should be fine eating a bit more sodium to bring up your level. Your level is not so low as to show signs of sodium deficiency which can include cramps or muscle weakness.
Posted on 2013-09-19 00:24:48
Name:Ed
Location:Ohio
Subject:Low serum sodium, but high blood pressure
I have low serum sodium, going from 125 gradually up to 131, but now back to 126...getting very frustrated. It's hard to eat all the time, plus my blood pressure it high. What foods can I eat or drink to help increase my serum sodium, but won't increase my blood pressure too much?
Posted on 2013-09-21 20:37:32
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low serum sodium, but high blood pressure
Hi Ed, thanks for your question. Normal blood sodium ranges between 135 to 145 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L). Low blood sodium has many causes, including dehydration, and taking certain medications such as such as diuretics (water pills), morphine, and SSRI antidepressants. It is likely your low blood sodium has a cause other than diet, and so you should not try to consume more sodium to compensate. Check what medications you are taking to see if any lower your blood sodium, or consult your doctor/pharmacist. Medline plus also has a great article on blood sodium levels.
Posted on 2013-09-23 03:51:48
Name:Raju
Location:India
Subject:Veg foods for sodium supplement
Thank you very much for providing most helpful information on sodium to Mrs. Deshmukh of India which has solved my question. My father is 88, has undergone three operations, including hip replacement, within two months. He was hospitalized for deficiency of sodium. It was as low as 114 before a month. Now, it is 132.80. I was desperately searching for sodium supplement from veg. food. My search has ended to your site. Thanks a lot once again.
Posted on 2013-09-27 10:12:06
Name:Raju
Location:India
Subject:Veg foods for sodium supplement
Further to my comment posted above, I would be obliged if you guide on the following: My father has been advised to take two to three tablespoons of salt (measuring 3 grms.) and he has been taking that since the last 25 days. Should he continue that? Will his sodium level deplete if he stops taking extra salt? Please advise.
Posted on 2013-10-01 10:31:38
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Veg foods for sodium supplement
Hi Raju, thanks for your question. How long has your father been eating 3 teaspoons of salt a day? Is this what brought his level up from 114 to 132.80? If so, 132.80 is pretty close to the normal of 135 to 145(mEq/L). The best thing you can do is get your father's sodium level checked again, and talk with your doctor about reducing the amount of sodium your father eats to 1-2 teaspoons a day. The other factor here is what is causing your father's sodium to be low? Was it just the past surgery or something else? Finding out the cause of the sodium deficiency and your father's current sodium level will best guide you what to do regarding his sodium intake. For now, 3 teaspoons a day should be ok for someone who was previously deficient in sodium.
Posted on 2013-10-02 01:30:00
Name:Logan
Location:Huron
Subject:Heart attack
Just last year my dad went to the hospital due to high sodium. When he had high sodium his body built up fluid. When this happened he suffered from CHF (congestive heart failure), and had a heart attack. He is doing a lot better now. He is still doing the things he loves to do.
Posted on 2014-03-14 10:53:18
Name:Andrew Jordaan
Location:UK
Subject:Sodium
One of the most pro active and healthy choices for those with low blood sodium, would be to juice organic celery, it is packed full of minerals and has real life sodium. A lifetime on table salt, bleached and full of toxic anti caking agents is linked to stomach cancer. Avoid all processed foods and juice celery.
Posted on 2014-04-13 12:18:51

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Name:C
Subject:Sodium Deficiency?
You said sodium deficiency is rare but I find it quite easy for me to feel very tired and faint, not to mention major headaches, when i don't eat enough salt. I'm in a few sports (soccer, track, skiing, and bike riding) but nothing too major. I'm in the habit of eating a large pickle after soccer and track practice, because otherwise I feel very fatigued and really crappy in general. Did you mean life threatening deficiency? Because it seems to me like too-low salt intake can be quite common.
Posted on 2011-09-01 07:23:24
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Sodium Deficiency?
Hi C, thanks for your comment. It is true that you can lose a lot of sodium when you exercise, especially if you sweat a lot. However, it is unlikely that you lose so much you experience the kind of symptoms you describe. Are you sure the symptoms are caused by lack of sodium and not another mineral like potassium or magnesium? Maybe try some bananas or orange juice after you exercise and see if you don't feel even better than eating the pickle.
Posted on 2011-09-01 07:33:31
Name:Jeff
Location:US
Subject:Hyponatremia
I had two different doctors tell me to eat MORE salt and take salt pills .... I have low blood sodium with blood work to prove it, but I never thought I would hear a Dr. say that. And I never even really used salt before .... it would be comical if it wasn't so annoying!
Posted on 2011-09-19 14:53:22
Name:Diana
Location:USA
Subject:Low Blood Sodium
I'm researching sites such as this to figure out which foods would be the best to supplement my husband's sodium intake. Even with daily cups of bouillon and salty snacks his level drops dangerously. I'm just trying to keep him out of the ER and at a safe level.
Posted on 2011-12-05 21:07:07
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low Blood Sodium
Hi Diana, thanks for your comment, it sounds like your husband may be suffering from a problem that requires therapy beyond salt supplementation. Perhaps he is having kidney problems or some other problem that is preventing him from properly regulating sodium. Have you consulted his doctor or health care provider? If not, do so as soon as possible. Good luck!
Posted on 2011-12-05 21:07:07
Name:Victor
Location:Arizona
Subject:RE: Low Blood Sodium
Diana, allow your husband to know that sodium levels will not maintain themselves if his potassium levels aren't maintained as well. There are intra and extra cellular fluids in the blood, consisting primarily of sodium and potassium, and without a balance of the two, one or the other will drop to the level of the other to maintain equilibrium.
Posted on 2011-12-20 14:09:51
Name:Wendy
Location:USA
Subject:Crohn's
I have dealt with Crohn's disease for thirty years and have had an ostomy for the last twenty. I lose way too much sodium and potassium and found this site very informative in choosing the right foods to keep my sodium at a healthy level. Thank you so much for providing it.
Posted on 2011-12-21 11:36:40
Name:Dawn
Location:Iowa
Subject:Low Sodium
Thanks for all the foods high in sodium. Although more rare to have low sodium, I just found out I have this. 50 yrs old, never on any meds or medical problems, was having heart palpitations to point of passing out, and throbbing headaches(on left side only) when laying down. My blood pressure drops to 83/59, but I am not an athlete, and have never over-exercised. The severe problem with low pressure is passing out/hitting head-and/or unconsciousness at worst. I am having a hard time finding healthy/low fat foods with high sodium. Lean cuisine sandwiches are the best so far and low fat Progresso soups. I have always hated salty foods and would never buy anything that had high sodium, and I also do not eat processed foods. Part of my problem I guess. All other tests came back normal. I find it weird, yet I am glad to have low rather than high blood pressure. But I have to say, it is hard to make it to 2400 mg of sodium a day. Something a person watching their sodium intake would scuff at me for, lol anymore suggestions on healthy foods with high sodium would be helpful.
Posted on 2012-01-15 21:56:44
Name:Burto394
Location:CT
Subject:Salt
Dawn, have you ever been tested for POTS syndrome? My 18 year old was just diagnosed and needs a high sodium diet and a lot of fluid. Your symptoms are similar. She also is fatigued, has muscle pain, headaches, restless nights, rapid heart rate within 3 minutes of exercise but otherwise a low heart rate. You might want to see a cardiologist.
Posted on 2012-01-24 22:37:14
Name:Emy
Location:AZ
Subject:RE: Salt and POTS
Hi Burto394, I have just been treated for low thyroid, adrenal fatigue, and hormonal imbalance. I had all the symptoms your describing but a lot more than that. After I've been treated for this, my headaches went away, the muscle pains went away, and I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia, but those symptoms are gone. I went with months of sleepless nights, racing thoughts, muscle pain like you wont believe. I couldn't exercise, my heart would beat too fast and I couldn't breath. I mean my stamina was so bad. Anyway, I've been a lot better since I'm on treatment. But it wasn't just the hormone that is low, my D3 was also very low. I suggest you consider finding a hormone doctor that will help you...
Posted on 2012-01-25 23:06:44
Name:Salty Chip
Location:Florida
Subject:5,000 mg sodium per day
I've been advised by 3 physicians to eat 5,000 to 15,000 mg of sodium per day for a medical condition called dysautonomia. I went from a low sodium diet (taste preference, not medically needed) to this super high sodium diet. I have to say that it is virtually impossible for me to achieve that goal, but I try. I definitely feel worse when I don't.
Posted on 2012-03-07 01:48:32
Name:P
Location:Los Angeles
Subject:Hyponatremia

Hi C, et el., I JUST got out of the hospital for severe hyponatremia (low blood sodium -- and mine was from studying, not sports) and yes it is life-threatening. Everything is low sodium now that it is difficult to add enough salt to your diet -unless you eat highly processed foods- to keep your levels high enough (trust me : ).

If you will drink poweraide/gatoraide, drink that for each bottle of water. Or you can add salt (and molasses is you have ever gotten low blood potassium) to your water. Licking salt from my fingers will spike mine back up almost immediately.

You must eliminate dozens of other conditions first, of course, before you can turn to just salt.But I do not think anyone needs to be concerned about dying. If your vision gets weird/spotty (I can't explain it) and you cannot concentrate, that means it is starting and just stop drinking water.

I would suggest a routine blood test when you feel those symptoms (just ask your doctor to order an electrolyte panel) and to check your kidneys. That is usually a good place to start. Good luck! And get it taken care of : )

Posted on 2012-03-13 20:33:06
Name:Ryan Elias
Location:Montreal
Subject:Table Salts vc Sea Salt
Great site and priceless; I would just like to point out that although table salt is a beneficial source of sodium, it is very acidic because it has been processed and devoid of nutrients other than sodium, instead it's preferable to consume Sea Salt or Celtic salt, which you may find in Health Shops.
Posted on 2012-03-25 00:56:46
Name:Shirley
Location:Brisbane
Subject:Foods for Dysautonomia
I too have just been hospitalized with this, I was very ill. I am taking Florinef to help retain sodium and maintain a reasonable BP. I hate the side effects of the drug. Any suggestions for increasing sodium without taking too much potassium which is already high normal?
Posted on 2012-04-24 00:44:40
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Foods for Dysautonomia
Hi Shirley, thanks for your question. This list of sodium foods will be extended to give more ideas of foods to eat to boost sodium levels. Till then you can use the nutrient ranking tool to find foods with a high sodium to potassium ratio.
Posted on 2012-05-07 03:30:32
Name:Melissa
Location:New Zealand
Subject:Muscle Cramps while Running
Hi, I have a terrible problem with getting cramps at all the wrong times such as 9ks into my 21k run, so hard to carry on as it was in my quads. I am getting it more and more often and its nearly crippling me but frustrating at the same time. I need help as I'm still wanting to run long distances, is there something I should eat the night before and the morning of a run? Please help.
Posted on 2012-05-22 02:15:39
Name:Low Blood Pressure
Location:Virginia
Subject:Low Blood Pressure
Dr. just told me to eat at least 3000 mg of sodium/day. Hypotension requires salt. Thanks for your post.
Posted on 2012-05-23 17:56:41
Name:Earl
Location:Columbia, MD
Subject:Low Blood Sodium
Well, I have suffered from low blood sodium, and believe me it is NO fun. My low sodium sent me to the hospital for two or three days. Remember: People have DIED from low blood sodium!
Posted on 2012-07-24 12:41:53
Name:Charlotte
Location:Oklahoma
Subject:Low Sodium Levels
Does anyone have any suggestions for a mid-stage Alzheimer's patient with low sodium levels? He doesn't have an appetite (side effect of low sodium) and wants to drink constantly, although we'e been told to limit his fluid intake. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
Posted on 2012-07-31 06:20:56
Name:Gastricbypasslady
Location:Oklahoma
Subject:Sodium deficiency
I had a gastric bypass in 1999. For 13 years I haven't eaten the typical American diet. I am 59 years old now. My stomach size is that of a shot glass. I can't typically eat enough to keep a healthy sodium level and my bloodpressure is constantly so low I can't get out of a chair. Please HURRY and add foods to increase sodium levels and please include foods that pack high sodium in a small serving.
Posted on 2012-09-04 17:13:36
Name:Susun
Location:Netherlands
Subject:Raw salt cf heat treated table salt
Please everyone looking to increase salt intake, I would highly encourage you to look to raw unheated untreated sources. NOT table salt. As Ryan also mentions. Table salt is a toxin and is causing many problems. Maybe some of the problems mentioned above are exacerbated by the wrong kind of salt.
Posted on 2012-10-15 09:16:58
Name:Beth
Location:Canada
Subject:Low Sodium
I would suggest anyone with trouble regulating sodium should be tested for Addison's Disease....this is a common side effect of adrenal insufficiency.
Posted on 2013-01-09 16:42:12
Name:Kate
Location:Pennsylvania
Subject:Syncope
I have a problem where I have a sudden drop in blood pressure to the point where I become unconscious and I have an increased heart rate. I don't exercise though, and I probably should. A cardiologist told me to eat more salty foods, not too difficult for someone my age, and to always have water. This article was helpful even if I do eat most of it already. But now I know what to eat if I know I'll be in a situation that may trigger my type of syncope.
Posted on 2013-01-22 11:01:31
Name:Lena
Location:NJ
Subject:Sodium deficiency
There is a difference between salt and sodium foods, which doctors do not recognize. Salt is not the right kind of sodium combination for the human body. We absorb minerals best from plants, which absorb minerals from soil and animals. The most important thing is without sodium your digestive system does not work properly, and your calcium and potassium supply can be exhausted very quickly. Here are the best sodium foods: veal joint broth, goat milk(not pasteurized), goat whey, and black mission figs. Enjoy!
Posted on 2013-01-24 18:56:06
Name:Joe
Location:KS
Subject:Type of Salt
Please note, there is misinformation in several prior posts: Salt is not toxic at reasonable intake levels. Much like water, it is required for life. Over intake of water can also be 'toxic.' It is also not acidic. A pure saltwater solution has a pH of 7. As it is refined, it is simply being washed of impurities and crystallized into a certain size particle. You may want to avoid the flowing agents in most table salt. Easiest to do this via using Kosher Salt or Sea Salt (which contains very small amounts of other salts (KCl, CaCl, etc..). Enjoy.
Posted on 2013-02-11 20:42:13
Name:Tracey
Location:New Jersey
Subject:POTS Syndrome and Sodium
C, This sounds like the issues that my daughter has from her chronic illness. PLEASE look up POTS Syndrome. My daughter needs a sodium packed item every 2-3 hours or she'll pass out. Also, gatorade (drink through a straw to save your teeth from sugar) actually helps retain the sodium.
Posted on 2013-02-19 17:22:03
Name:CW
Location:Richmond
Subject:Syncope and POTS
Kate, It sounds to me like your issue is POTS, as Syncope is 1 of the biggest symptoms.
Posted on 2013-02-28 22:04:42
Name:Dianne
Location:Southern California
Subject:Syncope
I just got back from seeing the cardiologist and having a Tilt Table Test, and too, have been told to add salt to my diet and double my water intake. Your article helped me to find foods that will help. I love pickles! I've been fainting since 16 years old and am now 56.
Posted on 2013-03-20 23:00:14
Name:Philly-o
Location:Rodeotown
Subject:Best sources of Natural Sodium
As the article states the best source is table salt, and the less processed sea salt.

Others include (per 100g): Alaskan King Crab: 45%
Seaweed, dried 45%
Dungeness Crab: 15%
Tuna /misc: 15%
Oysters/Clams: 5%
Most ocean fish: 5%

As for Lena's post: Veal joint, Goat products, and Figs, are absolutely not dependable sources of sodium, each giving about 1% of the daily value per 100g.

Posted on 2013-03-28 16:59:32
Name:Dan
Location:London
Subject:My tips for getting more salt
I have to cut down on salt, which makes me sad to see things I like eating on this list. But I might be able to offer helpful tips to those who need very high amounts. I discovered the other day that a friend's KFC meal had over 9g of salt - each piece of fried chicken has over a gram! Also I've found that Domino's do a pizza with over 10g of sodium (yes, >25g of salt), which I have unwittingly eaten a few of in the past.

I suppose the main problem for those with extreme salt requirements is finding the right ratio of salt to calories. I find it hard to eat enough protein and starch to get my energy without hitting my sodium limit, whereas I doubt one of those Domino's pizzas would fit into most people's fat allowances. If you need something high in salt but without the calories, have a look into salt crust baking - take your fish or meat or vegetable and bake it in a crust of salt.

Also please acknowledge that I'm not a doctor so check with yours first and foremost.

Posted on 2013-04-10 02:50:52
Name:Deb
Location:Ontario
Subject:Healthy Sodium from Celery
One of the very best way to get sodium into the body is through CELERY JUICE. We should all start looking to juicing to improve our health.
Posted on 2013-05-13 10:39:08
Name:Micah
Location:WA
Subject:Natural Sodium and Sodium Deficiency
Lena gave an interesting list, because at least some of her sources have higher efficacy rather than higher quantity. It is unfortunate that the few scientists who have studied sodium intake needs, using vegetable sodium, like phosphates, have ever been published in sodium online medical journals. Summarily, their findings suggest that special care to maintain a minimum amount of sodium is necessary, but no salt need be added nor included when an adequate level of greens, sodium rich vegetables, and goat whey are consumed. Apparently high amounts of sodium chloride displace other forms of sodium and likely affect the body's systems that depend on those other forms. For example, synovial fluid aids transport of calcium from bones to other tissues when enough sodium phosphate is present. Without the sodium phosphate the calcium transport pathway collects extra calcium deposits. This may be a cause for joint deterioration or arthritis.
Posted on 2013-05-14 03:37:52
Name:Mary
Location:CA
Subject:Low sodium and hyponatremia
I have hyponatremia and at my wits on what to do. I have been in and out of the hospital so many times that I am so tired of all this. My doctor took blood tests and found nothing wrong. Does anyone else have this condition? I would like any information on this if anyone knows about this condition. I know that I will be talking more about this to my doctor, but if anyone had this condition and has had good results I would appreciate input on this.
Posted on 2013-05-15 14:52:33
Name:Martin
Location:UK
Subject:Sodium helps blood pressure and is good for you
Saturated Fats are fully saturated with hydrogens therefore cannot be oxidized making them a safe and protective fat. Polyunsaturated fats are the most damaging kind of fat as they have lots of double bonds that can be oxidized = Free radical damage. Sodium/Salt is required to maintain blood volume, for calcium metabolism and various other important functions. Several studies have recently shown (Something that has been know since the 1930's) that higher salt intake REDUCES chances of heart attack and stroke and REDUCES water retention. The Medical industry is wholly responsible for the untrue paradigms regarding Salt. To know why you need to understand a bit of history. When the first diuretics were created by the medical industry they saw that people would urinate lots of sodium when they took them. The industry went with 2+2=5 and said "That must mean reducing salt intake reduces water retention (Edema)". That is where the ridiculous belief about salt being bad comes from. In regards to water retention I find it odd that most people know that if you get stranded at sea you shouldn't drink sea water as it can be a diuretic which is true, but when a woman goes to her doctor with high water retention he tells her to avoid salt as it will cause her to retain more water.

In Summary: Salt is good for you - It increases metabolism and protects against high blood pressure, stroke, and heart disease. Saturated fat is good for you as it protects you against the damaging effects of polyunsaturated fats (Read Vegetable oil and fish oil EPA DHA). Sugar from fruit is good for you as it lowers stress hormones and helps you create cholesterol (Something else which is protective) which is needed for conversion into our protective hormones (Pregnenolone, progesterone, DHEA, Testosterone etc).

If you disagree with any of the above you need to go further down the rabbit hole until you can see past the political and financial influences in western medical and food industry culture. Most won't bother.

Each and every one of us is responsible for our own health. If someone tells you something go and do your own research and make you own mind up.

You can start by reading some well referenced articles by a guy called Dr Dr Ray Peat (Physiologist and endocrinologist) and very well versed in science history - Just as important as the research itself in getting to the real truth behind the "Government recommendation".

Posted on 2013-05-26 04:37:51
Name:P Proffit
Location:Utah
Subject:Young athletes & conscientious students, be aware of low sodium
B/c we have more young competitive athletes I am saying: be aware of this low sodium problem and get the blood work done! My daughter just finished her senior year, very tired. Normal? She is very athletic, tried to eat right, drink lots of water, studied, tried to avoid Gatorade due to so much sugar and fake coloring-we asked doctors at 2 physicals to check her blood for iron levels, mono, diabetes etc. We had never thought to check for sodium or electrolytes in the blood. She took vitamins, tried to sleep--they said it was just "normal" for teenagers to be tired with all they do. BUT, now we know the piece of the puzzle--sodium, real sodium from natural sources. With her hard work we knew she was "running on adrenaline", our family has a history of low blood pressure (we were always patted on the back for it, but isn't that funny? Just b/c it doesn't fit the normal health problems doesn't mean it is something "healthy") Anyway, other young competitive athlete students, consider adding REAL" salt to your water :/ Wished we'd known sooner! At least she knows for college!
Posted on 2013-06-06 05:26:03
Name:Emily Rose
Location:Ohio
Subject:Salt IS NOT bad!!!
Salt and fat are required for survival!!! Fat is good for you! Fat in foods is NOT the same fat as body fat. They only share the same name! There are a lot of people who need more salt than normal. Not JUST people with salt deficiency. I myself need extra salt as I have a nervous system disorder called Postural Orthostatic Tachychardia Syndrome also called P.O.T.S.
Posted on 2013-07-05 01:46:47
Name:Denise
Location:New Jersey
Subject:High blood pressure
Thank you very much for your list of foods. I'm in my mid 40s and have high blood pressure. It runs in my family-genetics I guess, since I don't add table salt to anything, not overweight, and try to exercise every week. Most of the foods on your list I already avoided but it's a good list to keep on my refrigerator to remind my husband who does most of the cooking, which foods to avoid.
Posted on 2013-07-09 08:42:06
Name:Andrew Jordaan
Location:UK
Subject:Parts of table salt are toxic
Parts of table salt are toxic and should be avoided at all costs. No one needs a daily intake anti caking agents in their system! If you have a disease that requires higher sodium intake find a proper non industrialized product.
Posted on 2013-07-17 06:57:52
Name:Andrew Jordaan
Location:UK
Subject:Sodium or Sodium Chloride
Martin in UK, If you disagree with any of the above you need to go further down the rabbit hole until you can see past the political and financial influences in western medical and food industry culture. Most won't bother.

Martin I did bother to read Ray Peat's article on Sodium, annoyingly he, like you, interchanges salt and sodium as if they are the same thing. Despite his article being extremely scholarly, the moment someone interchanges between sodium and sodium chloride, without qualifying what they mean, the article becomes just another article confusing the reader. It is absolutely essential to differentiate between sodium, naturally occurring, and salt which can easily mean an industrialized toxin laced with anti caking agents, which are not food.

Posted on 2013-07-17 13:47:53
Name:Trudy S
Location:MA, USA
Subject:Low blood sodium
Dear Reader, I have taken trilepal for two years and have low sodium and chloride in my blood. This is a side effect for some people. Tedgretal can cause this also. A blood test will confirm this. My dose is only 600mg a day, so even a smaller dose can affect the blood. Happy for this list, thank you.
Posted on 2013-07-20 14:36:41
Name:Wendy
Location:Terrace, BC
Subject:High blood pressure
My husband is dealing with high blood pressure for about a month now. It was at normal a week ago but today we checked and it gone up a bit. He had a mild stroke last month. We change his diet a bit. He hasn't drank alcohol or smoked. I'm sort of lost on this sodium in foods and the salt intake??
Posted on 2013-07-23 08:11:24
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: High blood pressure
Hi Wendy, thanks for your question. Basically, the more sodium you eat the higher your blood pressure. Eating a diet low in sodium (less than 1500mg/day) can help keep your blood pressure low. Your husband should avoid the foods on this list, and other high sodium foods. Further, the body tries to keep a balance between potassium and sodium. So eating more potassium foods, fruits, and vegetables, can help lower blood pressure also. Hope that helps.
Posted on 2013-07-23 11:54:32
Name:Salvador
Location:Riverside Ca.
Subject:About low blood sodium
Hello,can someone please tell me what low blood sodium is, how can you get it, and how can you prevent from getting it or what can you do to get it normal?
Posted on 2013-07-31 00:06:16
Name:Lisa
Location:BC
Subject:Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome and Low BP
I'm on a high salt diet and take salt pills. My BP is low so I pass out and get sick if I don't eat a ton of salt. I also have a condition called POTS (Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome). One of the treatments for the type of POTS I have is to eat a ton of salt and drink tons to increase my blood volume. This list is helpful in finding foods with high salt content.
Posted on 2013-08-09 12:04:25
Name:Mrs. Deshmukh
Location:India
Subject:Vegitarian foods to increase sodium in blood
My mother is 77 yrs old & has been admitted in the hospital due to low level of sodium. She is vegetarian, please suggest natural vegetarian foods to increase her sodium level. Thank you.
Posted on 2013-08-31 05:20:17
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Vegitarian foods to increase sodium in blood
Hi Mrs. Deshmukh, thanks for your question. The best way to get more sodium in her diet is by adding salt to foods. Further, you can eat more pickled food, which is usually high in sodium. If you are looking for natural foods, both cooked celery, and cooked artichokes are fairly high in sodium. 1 cup of cooked celery provides 6% of the DV for sodium. It may not be enough to raise her level though, so consider pickles, or salt, which can really contribute a lot. Here is a ranking of 816 vegetables high in sodium.
Posted on 2013-09-01 07:48:32
Name:Jocelyn
Location:Australia
Subject:Cramping
Hello, I get cramping every time I run long distances and especially hills. If it is more then 4miles (7km) I start to cramp always half way through. Do you believe it is due to a lack of sodium? And what would you recommend?
Posted on 2013-09-18 05:50:08
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Cramping
Hi Jocelyn, thanks for your question. Your cramping could be due to a lack of electrolytes, including sodium, potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus. Try drinking a sports electrolyte drink, like Gatorade, before, during, and after your run. Mixing some fruit juice in water could also work.
Posted on 2013-09-18 23:57:08
Name:Neil
Location:Canada
Subject:Sodium shortage
I've been advised that I'm slightly under the required level of sodium in my blood. The required level 135 and my reading shows 130. Is there a need of bringing up the level to 135? Or will it get normal through my daily intake of food. I'm 58. What are the symptoms that show Sodium deficiency?
Posted on 2013-09-19 00:24:48
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Sodium shortage
Hi Neil, thanks for your question. You should be fine eating a bit more sodium to bring up your level. Your level is not so low as to show signs of sodium deficiency which can include cramps or muscle weakness.
Posted on 2013-09-19 00:24:48
Name:Ed
Location:Ohio
Subject:Low serum sodium, but high blood pressure
I have low serum sodium, going from 125 gradually up to 131, but now back to 126...getting very frustrated. It's hard to eat all the time, plus my blood pressure it high. What foods can I eat or drink to help increase my serum sodium, but won't increase my blood pressure too much?
Posted on 2013-09-21 20:37:32
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Low serum sodium, but high blood pressure
Hi Ed, thanks for your question. Normal blood sodium ranges between 135 to 145 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L). Low blood sodium has many causes, including dehydration, and taking certain medications such as such as diuretics (water pills), morphine, and SSRI antidepressants. It is likely your low blood sodium has a cause other than diet, and so you should not try to consume more sodium to compensate. Check what medications you are taking to see if any lower your blood sodium, or consult your doctor/pharmacist. Medline plus also has a great article on blood sodium levels.
Posted on 2013-09-23 03:51:48
Name:Raju
Location:India
Subject:Veg foods for sodium supplement
Thank you very much for providing most helpful information on sodium to Mrs. Deshmukh of India which has solved my question. My father is 88, has undergone three operations, including hip replacement, within two months. He was hospitalized for deficiency of sodium. It was as low as 114 before a month. Now, it is 132.80. I was desperately searching for sodium supplement from veg. food. My search has ended to your site. Thanks a lot once again.
Posted on 2013-09-27 10:12:06
Name:Raju
Location:India
Subject:Veg foods for sodium supplement
Further to my comment posted above, I would be obliged if you guide on the following: My father has been advised to take two to three tablespoons of salt (measuring 3 grms.) and he has been taking that since the last 25 days. Should he continue that? Will his sodium level deplete if he stops taking extra salt? Please advise.
Posted on 2013-10-01 10:31:38
Name:HealthAliciousNess
Subject:RE: Veg foods for sodium supplement
Hi Raju, thanks for your question. How long has your father been eating 3 teaspoons of salt a day? Is this what brought his level up from 114 to 132.80? If so, 132.80 is pretty close to the normal of 135 to 145(mEq/L). The best thing you can do is get your father's sodium level checked again, and talk with your doctor about reducing the amount of sodium your father eats to 1-2 teaspoons a day. The other factor here is what is causing your father's sodium to be low? Was it just the past surgery or something else? Finding out the cause of the sodium deficiency and your father's current sodium level will best guide you what to do regarding his sodium intake. For now, 3 teaspoons a day should be ok for someone who was previously deficient in sodium.
Posted on 2013-10-02 01:30:00
Name:Logan
Location:Huron
Subject:Heart attack
Just last year my dad went to the hospital due to high sodium. When he had high sodium his body built up fluid. When this happened he suffered from CHF (congestive heart failure), and had a heart attack. He is doing a lot better now. He is still doing the things he loves to do.
Posted on 2014-03-14 10:53:18
Name:Andrew Jordaan
Location:UK
Subject:Sodium
One of the most pro active and healthy choices for those with low blood sodium, would be to juice organic celery, it is packed full of minerals and has real life sodium. A lifetime on table salt, bleached and full of toxic anti caking agents is linked to stomach cancer. Avoid all processed foods and juice celery.
Posted on 2014-04-13 12:18:51

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References

    • USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.